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Encyclopedia > Jack Straw (politician)
The Rt Hon Jack Straw


Preceded by Geoff Hoon
Succeeded by Incumbent
Constituency Blackburn
Majority 8,009 (19.2%)

Born August 3, 1946 (age 60)
Buckhurst Hill
Essex
England
Political party Labour

John Whitaker Straw (born August 3, 1946) is a British Labour Party politician. He was Home Secretary from 1997–2001, and Foreign Secretary from 2001 to May 5, 2006, when he was made Leader of the House of Commons and Lord Privy Seal. He has been the Member of Parliament for Blackburn since 1979. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (699x834, 178 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jack Straw (politician) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... Geoff Hoon (right) at Pentagon briefing Geoffrey William Geoff Hoon (born December 6, 1953) is a British politician. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... Location within the British Isles. ... August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Buckhurst Hill is a suburban town in the Epping Forest district of Essex. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (126th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... Location within the British Isles. ...

Contents

Early life and career, 1946-87

Born in Buckhurst Hill, Essex, England and brought up at Loughton by a single mother on a council estate, he was educated at Staples Road School, Loughton, and Brentwood School (where he was already expressing political ambitions and took the name "Jack," allegedly after the 14th century peasant leader Jack Straw — although "Jack" is a common diminutive of "John") and read law at the University of Leeds. During his time at Leeds he was elected president of Leeds University Union with the support of the Broad Left, a coalition including Liberal, Socialist and the Communist Societies. Having joined the Labour Society when he arrived at Leeds in 1964, Straw was elected chairman of the Society in 1966 at an annual general meeting packed with members of the Communist Society who had joined days earlier. The Society's name was immediately changed to Socialist Society to reflect the fact that it no longer supported the Labour Party. In 1966, when Straw disrupted a student trip to Chile, he was branded a "troublemaker acting with malice aforethought" by the Foreign Office.[1] Buckhurst Hill is a suburban town in the Epping Forest district of Essex. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... For other places with the same name, see Loughton (disambiguation). ... Public housing describes a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... Brentwood School Brentwood School is a public school in Brentwood in the English county of Essex. ... Jack Straw (probably the same person as Rackstraw) was one of the three leaders (together with John Ball and Wat Tyler) of the Peasants Revolt or Great Rising of 1381, a major event in the history of Britain. ... The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ... Leeds University Union (LUU) is the representative body for the students at the University of Leeds, England. ... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for promoting the interests of the United Kingdom abroad. ...


In 1969 he was elected President of the National Union of Students after gaining a reputation for effective student militancy after he appeared to lead a successful occupation of Leeds University in 1968, though he initially opposed the protest and not one of the students' demands was conceded. He was regarded as a radical on issues of social equality and race, though he opposed the legalisation of drugs. He qualified as a barrister and practised criminal law. From 1971 to 1974 Jack Straw was a member of the Inner London Education Authority and Deputy Leader from 1973 to 1974. He served as political adviser to Barbara Castle at the Department of Social Security from 1974 to 1976 and then to Peter Shore at the Department for the Environment to 1977. He then worked as a researcher for the Granada TV current affairs series, World in Action. The National Union of Students (NUS) is the main organisation claiming to represent students unions in the United Kingdom. ... University Tower, University of Leeds The University of Leeds (United Kingdom) is amongst the largest of British universities and the most popular by applicants, with 52,444 applicants in 2003 for 7,228 places (UCAS). ... The term Radical (latin radix meaning root) has been used since the late 18th century as a label in political science for those favoring or trying to produce thoroughgoing or extreme political reforms which can include changes to the social order to a greater or lesser extent. ... Social equality is a social state of affairs in which certain different people have the same status in a certain respect, minimally at least in voting rights, freedom of speech and assembly, and property rights. ... The term race serves to distinguish between populations or groups of people based on different sets of characteristics which are commonly determined through social conventions. ... A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of statutory and common law that deals with crime and the legal punishment of criminal offenses. ... The Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) was the education authority for the 12 inner London boroughs, from 1965 until its abolition in 1990. ... Barbara Castle, Baroness Castle of Blackburn (October 6, 1910 – May 3, 2002), British left-wing politician, was born Barbara Anne Betts in Bradford, Yorkshire, and adopted her familys politics, joining the Labour Party. ... The Department of Social Security (DSS) was until 2001 a department of the Government of the United Kingdom. ... Peter David Shore, Baron Shore of Stepney PC (May 20, 1924 - September 24, 2001) was a British Labour politician noted for his opposition to the European Communities. ... The Department for the Environment was a British government department. ... Granada TV logo, used from 1956 to 1968. ... Current Affairs is a genre of a broadcast journalism format where the emphasis is on detailed analysis and discussion of news stories that have been recently occurred or are ongoing at the time of broadcast. ...


During his time as political adviser, Straw was asked by Castle to examine the social security file of Norman Scott, who had claimed that the Liberal leader Jeremy Thorpe was behind an attempt to murder him. Castle had been asked by Harold Wilson to investigate Scott's file to see if it contained any evidence that he was involved in a security conspiracy against Thorpe. Straw informed Castle that when he went to examine Scott's file, he found it was missing. The journalist Barrie Penrose has alleged that Straw subsequently leaked details from the file to the media. Straw remains silent on that matter. He has denied allegations by Joe Haines, Wilson's press secretary, that Wilson asked for Scott's file to be viewed for party political purposes, in the hopes of gaining information that could be used to damage Thorpe if he attempted to form a coalition government with Edward Heath. By the time he was asked to view the file, Heath had ceased to be leader of the Conservative Party. At the time of the scandal, the general view, promoted in particular by Private Eye, was that Wilson was using his influence to help and protect Thorpe and certainly not to smear him. Thorpe was cleared of any involvement in the attempt on Scott's life. Norman Scott was a male model whom accused the then Liberal Party Leader Jeremy Thorpe, his former lover, and three others of his attempted murder. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... John Jeremy Thorpe (born April 29, 1929) is a British politician, who was leader of the Liberal Party from 1967 to 1976. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio...


Straw was selected to run for Parliament in Blackburn, Barbara Castle's seat, in 1977 after Castle decided not to run again. He won the seat in 1979 and has held it since, also becoming honorary president of Blackburn Rovers. In the 1980s, he was an opposition spokesman on economic affairs and later on the environment before promotion to the Shadow Cabinet in 1987. This article is about Blackburn in Lancashire, England. ... Blackburn Rovers Football Club are an English Premier League football club based in the town of Blackburn, Lancashire. ... The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose...


Shadow Cabinet, 1987-97

Straw's first Shadow Cabinet post was as Education spokesman from 1987. In this role, he called on Local Education Authorities to give private Muslim and Orthodox Jewish schools the right to opt out of the state system and still receive public funds. He also stated that the schools should be free to enter the state system. His comments came at a time of great controversy regarding the funding of Muslim schools. Straw argued that the controversy arose out of ignorance and stereotyping about women's role in Islam, pointing out that Muslim women acquired property rights centuries before European women. Straw played a significant role in articulating the Labour party's interest in and sensitivity to the issue. A Local Education Authority (LEA) is the part of a council in England or Wales that is responsible for education within that councils jurisdiction. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Turkish: Müslüman, Persian and Urdu: مسلمان, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of Islam. ... Orthodox Judaism is one of the three major branches of Judaism. ...


Straw briefly served as Shadow Environment Secretary under John Smith from 1992 to 1994, speaking on matters concerning local government. When Tony Blair became leader after Smith's death, he chose Straw to succeed him as Shadow Home Secretary. Like Blair, Straw believed Labour's electoral chances had been damaged in the past by the party appearing to be "soft on crime" and he developed a reputation as being even more authoritarian than the Conservative Home Secretary Michael Howard. Straw garnered particular attention for comments condemning "aggressive beggars, winos and squeegee merchants" and calling for a curfew on children. The Secretary of State for the Environment was a UK cabinet position. ... John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Rt Hon. ...


Cabinet career, 1997 to present

Home Secretary

Appointed as Home Secretary after the 1997 UK general election, he brought forward the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, increased police powers against terrorism and proposed a reduction in the right to trial by jury. These policies won praise from Margaret Thatcher who once declared 'I trust Jack Straw. He is a very fair man.' However, they were deemed excessively authoritarian by his former students' union which in 2000 banned him from the building — a policy which lapsed in 2003. However, he also incorporated the European Convention on Human Rights into British law, and pressed for action on institutionalised racism in the police revealed by the Stephen Lawrence case. The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIP or RIPA) is a United Kingdom law covering the interception of communications. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), is a former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe[1] in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · Holocaust · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Supremacism Kahanism Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism · Civil rights · Gay rights Womens/Universal suffrage · Mens rights Childrens rights · Youth... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In March 2000, Jack Straw was responsible for allowing General Augusto Pinochet to return to Chile. There were requests from several countries for Pinochet to be extradited and face trial for crimes against humanity. Pinochet was placed under house arrest in Britain while appealing the legal authority of the Spanish and British courts to try him, but Straw eventually ordered his release on medical grounds before a trial could begin, and Pinochet returned to Chile. Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (November 25, 1915–December 10, 2006) was a general and President of Chile. ...


Foreign Secretary

Straw appears at a press conference with American Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice.
Straw appears at a press conference with American Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice.

Expected by commentators to be demoted to Transport Secretary after the 2001 UK general election[citation needed], there was some surprise when he was instead appointed Foreign Secretary to succeed Robin Cook. Within months Straw was confronted by the September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks. He was initially seen as taking a back seat to Tony Blair in the UK Government's prosecution of the 'war against terrorism'. Image File history File links Jack_Straw_and_Rice. ... Image File history File links Jack_Straw_and_Rice. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Robert Finlayson Cook, known as Robin Cook, (February 28, 1946 – August 6, 2005), was a politician in the British Labour Party. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terror) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies to destroy groups deemed to be terrorist (primarily radical Islamist organizations such as al-Qaeda...


According to polls, Straw is - along with Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and John Prescott - one of the few British government ministers who is recognised by a majority of the British public. On November 26, 2003, he made an unannounced visit to Iraq. For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... John Leslie Prescott MP (born 31 May 1938) is a British Labour Party politician, Deputy Prime Minister, First Secretary of State and Member of Parliament for the North East constituency of Hull East. ... November 26 is the 330th day (331st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the run up to the 2005 UK general election Straw faced a potential backlash from his Muslim constituents over the Iraq war — the Muslim Public Affairs Committee UK (MPAC) attempted to capitalise on anti-war sentiment with 'operation Muslim vote' in Blackburn. In addition, Craig Murray, an ex-British ambassador to Uzbekistan, stood against Jack Straw on an anti-torture platform. Jack Straw's vote fell by 20% compared to the previous general election in 2001 (21,808 to 17,562). Nonetheless, he was re-elected. Speaking moments after his re-election during the BBC's election night coverage, Jack Straw called MPAC an 'egregious group' and expressed disappointment at its campaign tactics, which he saw as overly aggressive. Straw enjoys a reputation for involved local campaigning in his constituency despite his cabinet post, often spending many hours in the run up to elections literally standing on a soapbox in a high street area taking questions from the crowd and responding to criticism with a microphone[citation needed]. The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... The logo of MPACUK The Muslim Public Affairs Committee UK (MPACUK) is a not-for-profit British Muslim organization. ... Craig Murray (born October, 1958)[1] is a writer and broadcaster[1] and was the United Kingdoms Ambassador to Uzbekistan. ... Someone soapboxing in Chinatown, San Francisco. ... A microphone, sometimes referred to as a mike or mic (both IPA pronunciation: ), is an acoustic to electric transducer that converts sound into an electrical signal. ...


On October 13, 2005 Straw took questions from a public panel of (mostly anti-war)[citation needed] individuals in a BBC Newsnight television special on the subject of Iraq, addressing widespread public concerns about the exit strategy for British troops, the Iraqi insurgency and, inevitably, the moral legitimacy of the war. On several occasions Straw reiterated his position that the decision to invade was in his opinion the right thing to do, but said he did not 'know' for certain that this was the case. He said he understood why public opinion on several matters might differ from his own — a Newsnight/ICM poll showed over 70% of respondents believed the war in Iraq to have increased the likelihood of terrorist attacks in the United Kingdom, but Straw said he could not agree based on the information presented to him. October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... Newsnight is a British daily news analysis, current affairs and politics programme broadcast between 22:30 and 23:20 on weekdays on BBC Two. ... An exit strategy is a means of escaping a very difficult situation. ...


In February 2006 Straw attracted publicity after he condemned the publication of cartoons picturing Mohammed in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten.[citation needed] The controversial cartoons of Muhammad, first published in Jyllands-Posten in September 2005. ... Jyllands-Posten , full name: (help· info) (English: The Morning Newspaper / The Jutland Post), is Denmarks largest-selling daily newspaper. ...


In August 2006, it was claimed by William Rees-Mogg in The Times that there was evidence that Straw was removed from this post upon request of the Bush administration, possibly due to his expressed opposition to bombing Iran.[2]. Other commentators also speculated that Straw had effectively been 'fired' by the Bush administration [3]. William Rees-Mogg, Baron Rees-Mogg (born July 14, 1928) is a journalist and politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ...


It has also been alleged that another factor in his dismissal was the large number of Muslims amongst Straw's Blackburn constituents, supposedly considered a cause for concern by the US.[4] Dissentents in Iran have mocked Straw as "Ayatollah Straw" for his frequent visits to Tehran. [10]


Leader of the House of Commons

After the Labour Party suffered major defeats in local elections on 4 May 2006, losing 317 seats in balloting for 176 councils, Tony Blair acted the following day with a major reshuffle of his ministers during which he moved Straw from Foreign Secretary to Leader of the House of Commons and Lord Privy Seal. Straw had apparently requested a break from high ministerial office after serving in two of the four great departments of state for nearly ten years. Straw's close relationship with US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice was said to have 'infuriated' Number 10, with particular reference to her visit to Straw's Blackburn constituency which caused significant organisational difficulties. It is believed that Straw's public opposition to potential military actions in Iran during his tenure as Foreign Secretary was one of the main reasons behind his demotion[citation needed]. To lessen the apparent demotion, Blair gave Straw responsibility for House of Lords reform and party funding, issues which had been part of the portfolio of the Department for Constitutional Affairs. In addition, Straw was given the chairmanship of the Constitutional Affairs cabinet committee.[5] May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Following poor results for the Labour Party in the May 4, 2006 local elections in England, British Prime Minister Tony Blair held a Cabinet reshuffle on May 5. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Department for Constitutional Affairs (DCA) is a United Kingdom government department. ... A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ...


On 25 March 2007, Straw announced he is to run Gordon Brown's campaign for the Labour leadership - the first official confirmation the Chancellor will stand.[6] March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


It is claimed that Jack Straw may become the new Chancellor of the Exchequer under a Brown government.


2006 veil controversy

In October 2006 Straw attracted controversy by suggesting to a local newspaper (The Lancashire Evening Telegraph) that women wearing a full-veil (niqab) can inhibit inter-community relations, though he denied the issue was raised for political gain, stating that he had raised it in private circles in the past and it had never progressed beyond discussions. Although he did not support a law banning a woman's right to choose to wear the veil, he would like them to abandon it all together. Asked whether he would prefer veils to be abolished completely, Mr Straw said: "Yes. It needs to be made clear I am not talking about being prescriptive but with all the caveats, yes, I would rather."[7] He said that he had asked women visiting his constituency surgeries to consider uncovering their noses and mouths in order to allow better communication. He claimed that no women had ever chosen to wear a full-veil after this request.[8][9][10] The Daily Express launched what it called a Crusade against the veil. The United Kingdom debate over veils began in October 2006 when the MP and government minister Jack Straw wrote in a local newspaper that, while he did not want to be prescriptive, he preferred talking to women who... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


There is debate within the Muslim community whether the Quran and hadith based sharia principles allow the full face to be visible or only allows the eyes to be visible, while most Muslims respect some form of veil as it was worn by the female members of the Prophet's family. The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Rule of sharia be merged into this article or section. ...


Tony Blair and Salman Rushdie have stated that they support Straw,[11] while Ken Livingstone and Steven Berkoff have come out on the side of the Muslim minority.[12][13][14] For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Kenneth Robert Livingstone (born June 17, 1945) is an English politician who became Mayor of London on the creation of the post in 2000. ... Steven Berkoff (born August 3, 1937) is an actor, writer and director. ...


Nazreen Nawaz, a spokeswoman for the Islamist group Hizb ut-Tahrir said: "The Muslim community does not need lessons in dress from Jack Straw, any more than it needs lessons in parenting from John Reid."[15] Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... Hizb ut-Tahrirs logo Hizb ut-Tahrir (Arabic: حزب التحرير; English: Party of Liberation) is an international non-sectarian Sunni Islamist political party whose goal is to establish a caliphate to unify the Muslim world under a unitary ruling system. ... John Reid (born 8 May 1947) is a Scottish politician who is Home Secretary and Member of Parliament (MP) for the Scottish constituency of Airdrie and Shotts in the United Kingdom. ...


The Stop the War Coalition and the political party Respect both denounced Jack Straw's declarations, accusing him of pandering to anti-muslim prejudices.[citation needed]


Family issues

In 1998, Straw was said to be embarrassed by newspaper revelations that his teenage son was dealing cannabis; Will Straw had apparently sold 1.92 g of cannabis resin to an undercover reporter,[16] and was cautioned by police after his father turned him in. Look up Cannabis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Will Straw (born in Lambeth in 1980) is a trainee civil servant best known for being the son of Jack Straw, Leader of the House of Commons. ...


There was further embarrassment in 2000 when Jack Straw's brother — also named William — was fined for indecently assaulting a 16 year old girl.[17]


The Independent reported that Jack Straw's sister, Suzy, likes to encircle the world with sacred dance, and led one such celebration in a cathedral, prompting complaints about pagan practises. He complained to the PCC about intrusion but the PCC found in favour of the newspaper.


In June 2006 Private Eye magazine revealed that Straw's wife, Alice Perkins, joined the board of the country's largest airports operator BAA in March of the same year, shortly before it was taken over by the Spanish firm Ferrovial. Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... BAA plc is the owner and operator of seven major United Kingdom airports and operator of several airports worldwide, making the company one of the largest transport companies in the world. ... Ferrovial Group (Grupo Ferrovial) is a Spanish company involved in construction, infrastructure, real estate and related services. ...


Trivia

Tinnitus (IPA pronunciation: or ,[1] from the Latin word for ringing[2]) is the perception of sound in the human ear in the absence of corresponding external sound(s). ... The Front Cover of The Demon Headmaster The Demon Headmaster is a series of books by Gillian Cross which were later adapted as a television series starring Terrence Hardiman in the title role. ...

Partial bibliography

Author or co-author

  • Implementation of the Human Rights Act 1998: Minutes of Evidence, Wednesday 14 March 2001 (2001) ISBN 0-10-442701-9
  • Making Prisons Work: Prison Reform Trust Annual Lecture (1998) ISBN 0-946209-44-8
  • Future of Policing and Criminal Justice (Institute of Police & Criminological Studies Occasional Paper S.) (1996) ISBN 1-86137-087-3
  • Policy and Ideology (1993) ISBN 0-9521163-0-8

Reports

  • Reform of the Race Relations Act 1976: Proposals for Change Submitted by the Commission for Racial Equality to the Rt Hon Jack Straw MP, Secretary of State for the Home Department, on 30th April 1998 (1998) ISBN 1-85442-210-3

Footnotes

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ Times Online. "How the US fired Jack Straw", 2006-08-07. Retrieved on August 14, 2006.
  4. ^ [3]
  5. ^ The Guardian. "Clarke sacked in major cabinet reshuffle", 2006-05-05. Retrieved on May 5, 2006.
  6. ^ BBC News. "Straw to run Brown leadership bid", 2007-03-25. Retrieved on March 25, 2007.
  7. ^ In quotes: Jack Straw on the veil - BBC News. October 6, 2006
  8. ^ http://www.blackburncitizen.co.uk/news/newsheadlines/display.var.954145.0.straw_in_plea_to_muslim_women_take_off_your_veils.php
  9. ^ http://www.gm.tv/index.cfm?articleid=22773
  10. ^ BBC NewsStraw's veil comments spark anger
  11. ^ Blair, Rushdie support former British foreign secretary who ignited veil debate The San Diego Union-Tribune. October 10, 2006
  12. ^ The Evening Standard - October 10. Quote by Ken Livingstone[4].
  13. ^ Letter to the Independent by Steven Berkoff[5]"
  14. ^ Ken Livingstone in the Daily MailDaily Mail
  15. ^ http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/10/06/news/london.php
  16. ^ [6]
  17. ^ CNN: UK minister's brother fined for sex assault
  18. ^ [7]
  19. ^ [8]
  20. ^ [9]

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (126th in leap years). ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (126th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The San Diego Union-Tribune is a daily newspaper published in San Diego, California by the Copley Press. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... Kenneth Robert Livingstone (born June 17, 1945) is an English politician who became Mayor of London on the creation of the post in 2000. ... Steven Berkoff (born August 3, 1937) is an actor, writer and director. ... The Daily Mail is a British, tabloid newspaper, first published in 1896. ...

External links

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Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Jack Straw
  • Online exhibition of the May 1968 student protest in Leeds
  • 10 Downing Street - Foreign Secretary Jack John Whitaker Straw
  • Guardian Unlimited Politics - Ask Aristotle: Jack Straw MP
  • TheyWorkForYou.com - Jack Straw MP
  • Open Directory Project - Jack Straw directory category
  • BBC Newsnight: Jack Straw
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Barbara Castle
Member of Parliament for Blackburn
1979–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
?
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment
1992–1994
Succeeded by
Frank Dobson
Preceded by
Tony Blair
Shadow Home Secretary
1994–1997
Succeeded by
Brian Mawhinney
Preceded by
Michael Howard
Home Secretary
1997–2001
Succeeded by
David Blunkett
Preceded by
Robin Cook
Foreign Secretary
2001–2006
Succeeded by
Margaret Beckett
Preceded by
Geoff Hoon
Leader of the Commons
2006–present
Incumbent
Lord Privy Seal
2006–present
Order of precedence in the United Kingdom
Preceded by
The Rt. Hon Mr. Michael Martin, MP, Speaker of the House of Commons
The Rt. Hon Mr. Jack Straw, MP
United Kingdom Order of Precedence
Gentlemen
Succeeded by
The Most Hon. the Marquess of Cholmondeley

 
 

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