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Encyclopedia > Jack Pierce

Jack Pierce (May 5, 1889 in GreeceJuly 19, 1968), born Janus Piccoulas, was a Hollywood make-up artist most famous for creating the iconic make-up worn by Boris Karloff in Universal Studios' 1931 adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... ... Cosmetics or makeup are substances to enhance the beauty of the human body, apart from simple cleaning. ... Boris Karloff Boris Karloff (November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969), born William Henry Pratt, was a famous actor in horror films. ... The current Universal Studios logo Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal, has production studios and offices located at 100 Universal City Plaza Drive in Universal City, California, an unincorporated area of Los Angeles County between Los Angeles and Burbank. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Mary Shelley Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley née Godwin (August 30, 1797 – February 1, 1851) was an English novelist who is perhaps equally famous as the wife of Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and as the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. ...


After immigrating to the United States from Greece as a teenager, Pierce tried his hand at several careers, including a stint as an amateur baseball player. In his twenties, he embarked on a series of jobs in cinema - cinema manager, stuntman, actor - which would eventually lead, in 1930, to him being offered the opportunity to design make-up for the Bela Lugosi version of Dracula. A gap in the market was created by the death of Lon Chaney, who throughout the 1920s had made a name for himself by creating grotesque and often painful horror make-ups. After his death, the studios, and Universal in particular, rose to the challenge of providing audiences with the deformed gargoyles they so clearly enjoyed, and experienced make-up artists became valuable commodities. Baseball is a team sport in which a player on one team (the pitcher) attempts to throw a hard, fist-sized ball past a player on the other team (the batter), who attempts to hit the baseball with a tapered, smooth cylinder called a bat. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Bela Lugosi as Dracula United States stamp Béla Lugosi was the stage name of actor Béla Ferenc Dezső Blaskó (October 20, 1882–August 16, 1956). ... This DVD cover for the film shows Lugosi in the role which would type-cast him for the rest of his career. ... Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera Lon Chaney, Sr. ... Sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or primarily in North America and in Australia as the Roaring Twenties . In Europe it is sometimes refered to as the Golden Twenties. ...


Although Pierce didn't make-up Lugosi himself, his work on the rest of the cast of "Dracula" was sufficient to earn him a series of assignments with Universal, the most significant of which was to be Frankenstein. For this, Pierce rejected several prototype designs, including one designed by Lugosi in the period when he was expected to play the part of the monster, and based on the central character from Paul Wegener 1920 German film of The Golem. Instead, he went back to the script, and tried to come up with a design which, as well as being horrific, would also make sense in the context of the story. So, where Henry Frankenstein has accessed the brain cavity, there is a scar and a seal, and the now famous bolts on the neck make sense as a carrier for the electricity used to vivify the monster. How much input director James Whale had into the initial concept remains controversial. Frankenstein is a 1931 horror film from Universal Pictures directed by James Whale and loosely based on the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. ... Paul Wegener (born December 11, 1874 in Arnoldsdorf (Westpreußen; now Jarantowice, Poland); died September 13, 1948 in Berlin) was a German actor and film director. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... This is a page about the film director James Whale. ...


Pierce's reputation is as someone who was frequently bad-tempered, but his relationship with Karloff was a good one. They co-operated somewhat on the design of the make-up, with Karloff removing a dental plate to create an indentation on one side of the Monster's face. He also endured four hours of make-up under Pierce's hand each day, during which time his head was built up with cotton collodion and gum, and toxic green paint (designed to look pale on black and white film) was applied to his face and hands. The finished product was universally acclaimed, and has since become by far the most commonly accepted visual representation of Mary Shelley's creation.


The Mummy (1932 movie), produced the following year, combines the plot of "Dracula" with the make-up tricks of Frankenstein, to turn Karloff into an incredibly aged and wrinkled Egyptian prince. Again, Pierce and Karloff's collaboration was critically acclaimed, as well as impressing audiences. The Mummy is a 1932 horror film starring Boris Karloff as an Ancient Egyptian prince, Im-Ho-Tep, whose mummy is inadvertently revived by a member of an archaeological expedition and who, using the name Ardath Bey, prowls Cairo seeking the reincarnation of the soul of his ancient lover, Princess...


Pierce went on to create make-up for several "Frankenstein" sequels (The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Son of Frankenstein (1939), Henry Hull's subtly terrifying visage in Werewolf of London (1935), and Lon Chaney Jr. in The Wolf Man (1941). This last make-up was extremely elaborate, and pioneered a technique whereby pieces of moulded rubber (now known as "applications") covered in yak fur were glued to the actor's face. As new methods emerged during this period, however, Pierce's slow painstaking approach drew criticism from the studio and actors. Newer techniques could create equivalent effects in less time, and without causing as much pain to actors. Bride of Frankenstein 1999 release DVD cover Bride of Frankenstein is a horror film released April 22, 1935, which is a sequel to the 1931 film Frankenstein. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Son of Frankenstein is a horror film made by Universal Studios in 1939 and directed by Rowland V. Lee. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Werewolf of London was the first Hollywood werewolf movie, filmed in 1935 by Universal Pictures and featuring Henry Hull as a scientist bitten by a werewolf (played by Warner Oland) in Tibet. ... Lon Chaney, Jr. ... The Wolf Man is a 1941 horror film written by Curt Siodmak and produced and directed by George Waggner, starring Lon Chaney Jr, Claude Rains, Evelyn Ankers, Ralph Bellamy, Patrick Knowles, Bela Lugosi, and Maria Ouspenskaya. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Pierce's last original make-up was for Claude Rains 1943 version of The Phantom of the Opera. Thereafter, other artists took over at Universal, often recreating Pierce's original designs for sequels made cheaply and with less care. Claude Rains in Casablanca (1942) Claude Rains (November 10, 1889 - May 30, 1967) was an English actor. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ... The title character as depicted by Lon Chaney, Sr. ...


He worked in television for some of the 1950s and 60s, but died in obscurity in 1968. Since then, his reputation has grown, with a generation of make-up artists like Rick Baker and Tom Savini citing him as a pioneer, and magazines such as Famous Monsters of Filmland publishing articles on his work. Recent DVD releases of the classic Universal horror movies have also included footage of Pierce at work, and discussion of his techniques and importance. // Events and trends This map shows two essential global spheres during the Cold War in 1959. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... Richard A. Rick Baker (born December 8, 1950 in Binghamton, New York, USA) is a Hollywood special makeup effects artist known for his realistic creature effects. ... Tom Savini (born November 3, 1946, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an award-winning actor, stunt man, director and special effects and make-up artist, and probably the only person in Hollywood who can claim all four titles. ... Famous Monsters of Filmland #14, October 1961 issue. ... DVD-R writing/reading side DVD-R with purple dye, 4. ...


In 2003, he was recognised with a lifetime achievement award from the Hollywood Makeup Artist and Hair Stylist Guild. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There are also other people named Jack Pierce for example Jack Pierce (born 1948) Lavern Jack Pierce (Born June 2, 1948 in Laurel, Mississippi) is an American olympic medalist. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jack P. Pierce - Films as makeup artist (selected list):, Other films: (982 words)
The greatest achievement in Pierce's design was that it left Karloff's gaunt features free enough to express a range of emotions that gave the monster its pathos and humanity.
Pierce, like Chaney before him, possessed the innate knowledge that it is in the face where the cruelty and pain which dwell in a soul become manifest.
Pierce found himself unceremoniously dumped from the studio payroll and freelancing for other studios and for television.
Jack Pierce - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (767 words)
Jack Pierce (May 5, 1889 in Greece – July 19, 1968), born Janus Piccoulas, was a Hollywood make-up artist most famous for creating the iconic make-up worn by Boris Karloff in Universal Studios' 1931 adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.
Although Pierce didn't make-up Lugosi himself, his work on the rest of the cast of "Dracula" was sufficient to earn him a series of assignments with Universal, the most significant of which was to be Frankenstein.
For this, Pierce rejected several prototype designs, including one designed by Lugosi in the period when he was expected to play the part of the monster, and based on the central character from Paul Wegener 1920 German film of The Golem.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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