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Encyclopedia > Jack Layton
Hon. John Gilbert Layton

Leader of the New Democratic Party
Incumbent
Riding Toronto—Danforth
In office since 2004 Federal Election
Preceded by Dennis Mills
Born July 18 1950 ( 1950-07-18) (age 56)
Montreal, Quebec
Residence Toronto, Ontario
Political party

New Democratic Party Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (470x683, 211 KB)[edit] Summary Jack Layton at Quebec party conference in 2006 [edit] Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... Toronto—Danforth in relation to the other Toronto ridings Toronto—Danforth (formerly Broadview—Greenwood) is a federal and provincial electoral district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1979, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1999. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Dennis Joseph Mills (b. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (in unity, prosperity) Coordinates: Country Canada Province Québec Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² - Water... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area Ranked 4th... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ...

Profession(s) Politician
Religion United Church of Canada
Spouse Olivia Chow

John Gilbert "Jack" Layton, PC, MP, PhD (born July 18, 1950) is a social democratic Canadian politician and current leader of Canada's New Democratic Party (since 2003). He is a former city councillor and deputy mayor of Toronto, Ontario. On June 28, 2004, he was elected Member of Parliament for the constituency of Toronto—Danforth. He is married to fellow MP Olivia Chow. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The United Church of Canada (French: lÉglise Unie du Canada) is Canadas second largest church (after the Roman Catholic Church), and its largest Protestant denomination. ... Olivia Chow (鄒至蕙, pinyin: Zōu Zhìhuì) (born March 24, 1957) is a social democratic Canadian Member of Parliament and former city councillor (1991-2005) in Toronto. ... The Privy Council Office as it appeared in the 1880s The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is the council of advisers to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by the Governor General of Canada for life on the... 38th Parliament Members of the House of Commons in the 38th Parliament of Canada, as of May 17, 2005. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... The Toronto City Council is the governing body of the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area Ranked 4th... Toronto—Danforth in relation to the other Toronto ridings Toronto—Danforth (formerly Broadview—Greenwood) is a federal and provincial electoral district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1979, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1999. ... Olivia Chow (鄒至蕙, pinyin: Zōu Zhìhuì) (born March 24, 1957) is a social democratic Canadian Member of Parliament and former city councillor (1991-2005) in Toronto. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Layton comes from a long line of politicians. His great-great-uncle, William Steeves, was a Father of Confederation. His great-grandfather Philip Layton was a blind activist who led a campaign for disability pensions in the 1930s. His grandfather, Gilbert Layton, was a cabinet minister in the Union Nationale government of Maurice Duplessis in Quebec, and resigned due to the provincial government's lack of support for Canadian participation in World War II. His father, Robert Layton, was a Liberal Party activist in the 1960s and 1970s, and served as a Progressive Conservative Member of Parliament (MP) and Cabinet minister in the 1980s. William Henry Steeves (May 20, 1814 - December 9, 1873) was a merchant, lumberman, politician and Father of Canadian Confederation. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... Blindness is the condition of lacking visual perception due to physiological or psychological factors. ... Disability pension is a form of pension given to those people who are permanently or temporarily unable to work due to a disability. ... Gilbert Layton (November 5, 1899 - May 29, 1961) was a businessman and politician in Quebec, Canada. ... The Union Nationale was a political party in Quebec, Canada, that identified with conservative French-Canadian nationalism. ... Duplessis campaigning in the 1952 election. ... A recruiting poster in Canada. ... Robert (Bob) E. J. Layton (December 25, 1925 - May 9, 2002) was a Canadian politician. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Cabinet of Canada plays an important role in the Canadian government in accordance with the Westminster System. ...


Layton was born in Montreal and reared in nearby Hudson, Quebec, a comfortable and largely anglophone community. He was elected student council president of his high school, and his yearbook predicted that he would become a politician. He studied political science at McGill University, and in 1969, at age 19, he married his high school sweetheart Sally Halford, with whom he had two children, Sarah and Mike. (Layton and Halford's marriage ultimately ended in 1983 after 14 years.) At McGill, he was a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity. Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (in unity, prosperity) Coordinates: Country Canada Province Québec Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Hudson, Quebec, Canada, is a town with a population of 4796 (2001 Census), and an area of approx. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² - Water... Look up Anglophone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... McGill University is a publicly funded, co-educational research university located in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest international all-male college social fraternities, with chapters at universities predominantly in the United States and several in Canada. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


In 1970, the family moved to Toronto where Layton went to York University to obtain his Ph.D. in political science. Layton then became a professor at Ryerson University. He also became a prominent activist for a variety of causes. He has written several books, including Homelessness: The Making and Unmaking of a Crisis and, more recently, a book on general public policy, Speaking Out. York University (French: Université York), located in Toronto, Ontario, is Canadas third-largest university and has produced several of the countrys top leaders in the fields of law, politics, business, space sciences, and fine arts. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Ryerson University is located in downtown Toronto and has 23,000 full-time students and is the largest of the 21 Universities in Canada in the primarily undergraduate category. ...


Toronto City Council

At York and Ryerson, Layton developed close links with a number of Toronto figures including John Sewell and David Crombie. He was first elected to Toronto City Council in 1982, in a surprise upset against incumbent Gordon Chong. He quickly became one of the most outspoken members of council, and a leader of the left wing. He was one of the most vocal opponents of the massive SkyDome project, and an early advocate for rights for AIDS patients. In 1984, he was fined for trespassing when he handed out leaflets at the Eaton Centre during a strike by Eaton's staff, but the charge was later thrown out on freedom of speech grounds. Layton was also one of the few opponents to Toronto's bid for the 1996 Summer Olympics. In 1985, he moved to the Metro Toronto council, in the first direct elections for members of that body. For other people and things named Sewell, see Sewell (disambiguation). ... David Edward Crombie (born 1936) is a Canadian politician and professor and consultant. ... The Toronto City Council is the governing body of the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Gordon Joseph Chong has served as a City of Toronto Councillor and was Vice-Chairman of the Toronto Transit Commission. ... Rogers Centre, formerly known as SkyDome,[1] is a multi-purpose stadium in Toronto, Ontario, situated next to the CN Tower near the shores of Lake Ontario. ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... Interior of the Toronto Eaton Centre, looking south. ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, United States. ... The Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto was the name of the highest level of municipal government in the Toronto, Ontario area from 1954 to 1997. ...

Jack Layton with wife, Olivia Chow

In July 1988, he married Hong Kong-born Toronto school board trustee Olivia Chow in a ceremony on Algonquin Island. Their whitewater rafting honeymoon plans had to be abandoned, however, when days after the wedding Layton collided with a newspaper box while bicycling.[1] Chow later joined Layton on Toronto City Council, and she has also been a candidate for the federal New Democrats three times, winning her seat the third time in a close race against Tony Ianno in the 2006 election. Image File history File links Jackandolivia. ... Image File history File links Jackandolivia. ... Olivia Chow (鄒至蕙, pinyin: Zōu Zhìhuì) (born March 24, 1957) is a social democratic Canadian Member of Parliament and former city councillor (1991-2005) in Toronto. ... Hon. ...


In the 1988 municipal elections, Layton traded places with City Council ally Dale Martin, with Martin going to Metro and Layton returning to Toronto City Council. Layton was easily elected in a contest with former high school teacher Lois MacMillan-Walker. The election was a major victory for Layton as the reformist coalition of which he was the de facto head gained control of City Council, the first time in city history a coalition of New Democrats and independents controlled council.


Layton and Chow were also the subject of some dispute when a June 14, 1990 Toronto Star article by Tom Kerr accused them of unfairly living in a housing cooperative subsidized by the federal government, despite their high income.[2] Layton and Chow had both lived in the Hazelburn Co-op since 1985, and lived together in an $800 per month three-bedroom apartment after their marriage in 1988. By 1990, their combined annual income was $120,000, and in March of that year they began voluntarily paying an additional $325 per month to offset their share of the co-op's Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation subsidy, the only members of the co-op to do so. Average Toronto market rent in 1989 was $782 per month, although the Vancouver Province newspaper claimed a comparable dwelling would have been worth $1,500. The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) is a Canadian government agency. ... The Province is a daily tabloid newspaper published in British Columbia by the Pacific Newspaper Group Inc, a CanWest Global Communications Company. ...


In response to the article, the co-op's board argued that having mixed-income tenants was crucial to the success of co-ops, and that the laws deliberately set aside apartments for those willing to pay market rates, such as Layton and Chow.[3] During the late 1980s and early 1990s they maintained approximately 30% of their units as low income units and provided the rest at what they considered market rent. In June 1990, the city's solicitor cleared the couple of any wrong-doing, and later that month, Layton and Chow left the co-op and bought a house in Toronto's Chinatown together with Chow's mother, a move they said had been planned for some time. Former Toronto mayor John Sewell later wrote in NOW Magazine that rival Toronto city councillor Tom Jakobek had given the story to Tom Kerr. For other people and things named Sewell, see Sewell (disambiguation). ... Tom Jakobek is a former member of the Toronto City Council. ...


Originally known for coming to council meetings in blue jeans with unkempt hair, Layton worked to change his image to run for mayor in the 1991 civic election. He also started wearing contact lenses, abandoning his glasses, and traded in his blue jeans for suits. In February 1991, Layton became the first official NDP candidate for the mayoralty, pitting him against centrist incumbent Art Eggleton. In a move that surprised many, Eggleton elected not to run again. Layton was opposed by three right-of-centre candidates: Susan Fish, June Rowlands, and Betty Disero. Right wing support soon coalesced around former city councillor Rowlands, preventing the internal divisions Layton needed to win office. Layton was also hurt by the growing unpopularity of the provincial NDP government of Bob Rae, and by his earlier opposition to Toronto's Olympic bid. Bid organizer Paul Henderson accused Layton and his allies of costing Toronto the event. Despite this, October polls showed Layton only four points behind Rowlands, with 36% support. However on October 17, Fish, a former provincial Tory cabinet minister who had only 19% support, pulled out of the race, and many of her supporters moved to Rowlands. Layton lost the November 12 election by a considerable margin. However, in the same election Olivia Chow easily won a seat on City Council. The 1991 Toronto municipal election was held on November 12, 1991 to elect councillors in Metropolitan Toronto, and mayors, councillors and school trustees in Toronto, York, East York, North York, Scarborough and Etobicoke. ... Arthur (Art) C. Eggleton, PC (born September 29, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario) is a former Canadian Cabinet minister and Mayor of Toronto, and is currently a Senator representing Ontario. ... Susan Fish (March 21, 1945—) is a former Canadian politician. ... June Rowlands was the 67th mayor of Toronto, Ontario, and the first woman to hold that office (beginning in 1991). ... Betty Disero is a former city councillor in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Bob Rae Robert Keith (Bob) Rae, PC, OC, O.Ont, QC, B.A., LL.B, B.Phi. ... Signature of Canadian hockey player Paul Henderson Paul Henderson (born January 28, 1943 in Lucknow, Ontario, Canada) is a retired Canadian hockey left winger who played 13 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Detroit Red Wings, Toronto Maple Leafs and Atlanta Flames. ... October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Layton returned to academia and founded the Green Catalyst Group Inc., an environmental consulting business. In 1993, he ran for the Canadian House of Commons in the riding of Rosedale for the NDP, but finished fourth in the generally Liberal riding. In 1994, he returned to Metro Council, and he resumed his high profile role in local politics. He also came to national attention as the leader of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. He ran again in the 1997 federal election, but lost to incumbent Dennis Mills by a wide margin. The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... Toronto Centre is an electoral district that has long covered the heart of downtown Toronto. ... The Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto was the name of the highest level of municipal government in the Toronto, Ontario, Canada, area from 1954 to 1997. ... The Federation of Canadian Municipalities is a civic advocacy group composed of every municipality in Canada. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Dennis Joseph Mills (b. ...


Leader of the NDP

Layton was elected leader of the NDP at the party's leadership convention in Toronto, on January 25, 2003. Layton won on the first ballot with 53.5% of the vote, defeating Bill Blaikie and Lorne Nystrom. He was the first candidate for federal NDP leadership to win on the first ballot since Tommy Douglas. NDP leadership conventions are the process by which the Canadian New Democratic Party elects its leader. ... The Honourable Rev. ... The Honourable Lorne Edmund Nystrom, PC (born April 26, 1946) a Canadian politician, was a member of the Canadian House of Commons from 1968 to 2004, except for an interval from 1993, when he lost re-election, to 1997. ... Thomas Clement Douglas, PC, CC, SOM, MA, LL.D (hc) (October 20, 1904 – February 24, 1986) was a Scottish-born Baptist minister who became a prominent Canadian social democratic politician. ...


As Layton held no seat in the House of Commons, he appointed the runner-up, longtime Winnipeg-area MP Bill Blaikie, as deputy leader and delegated him to act as parliamentary leader. Layton did not seek election to the House of Commons by running in a by-election, as is the tradition among new party leaders without a seat. Instead, he waited until the 2004 federal election to contest the riding of Toronto-Danforth against Liberal Dennis Mills. Mills had defeated Layton by a wide margin in the 1997 election. The Honourable Rev. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the British Isles since Anglo-Saxon times, a riding is traditionally a sub-division (especially in three) of a county, in Australia analogous. ... Toronto—Danforth is a Canadian federal and provincial electoral district, or riding. ... Dennis Joseph Mills (b. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...

Jack Layton addresses the 2003 NDP convention in Toronto, where he was elected leader

Although he had no parliamentary seat, Layton was noted for trying to draw considerable attention from the Canadian mass media. Much of his rhetoric has involved attacking the policies of Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin as conservative, and arguing the ideology of the Liberal Party of Canada has shifted in a more right wing direction. Jack Layton addresses the 2003 NDP convention in Toronto, where he was elected. ... Jack Layton addresses the 2003 NDP convention in Toronto, where he was elected. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Paul Edgar Philippe Martin (born August 28, 1938) was the 21st Prime Minister of Canada and a former leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ...


Another contribution has been to increase the party's profile in Quebec, one of the party's weaker provinces. A native of the province, he visited Quebec more times in the first year of his tenure than the previous leader, Alexa McDonough, did in her entire leadership, and has forged ties with various Quebec activist groups such as Montreal's Front d'action populaire en réaménagement urbain (FRAPRU). One of his opponents in the leadership race, Pierre Ducasse, was the first Québécois to run for leader of the NDP. After the race, Layton appointed Ducasse as his Quebec lieutenant and party spokesperson. Alexa McDonough (born August 11, 1944) is a Canadian politician, and former leader of the New Democratic Party. ... Pierre Ducasse (born August 18, 1972), a Canadian politician, is a prominent New Democratic Party activist. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² - Water...


2004 election

During the 2004 federal election, controversy erupted over Layton's accusation that Liberal Prime Minister Paul Martin was responsible for the deaths of homeless people because he failed to provide funding for affordable housing. While rates of homelessness and homeless deaths skyrocketed during the eleven years of Liberal government, the Liberals argued that funding for affordable housing was cut under the government of Brian Mulroney. Regardless of who was to blame, even Ed Broadbent privately chastened Layton for that comment since that forced the NDP to stay away from issues of poverty and homelessness, which Broadbent personally wanted to champion. Layton's gaffe was seen as negative campaigning and the National Post had the front-page headline "Jack Splat". See also: Homelessness in Canada Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... John Edward Ed Broadbent, PC, CC, Ph. ... Negative campaigning is trying to win an advantage by referring to negative aspects of an opponent or of a policy rather than emphasizing ones own positive attributes or preferred policies. ... Homelessness in Canada is viewed as a serious social problem. ...


Further controversy followed as Layton suggested the removal of the Clarity Act, considered by some to be vital to keeping Quebec in Canada and by others as undemocratic, and promised to recognize any declaration of independence by Quebec after a referendum. This position was not part of the NDP's official party policy, leading some high-profile party members, such as NDP House Leader Bill Blaikie and former NDP leader Alexa McDonough, to publicly indicate that they did not share Layton's views. His position on the clairty act was reversed in the 2006 election to one of support.[1] The Clarity Act (known as Bill C-20 before it became law) is legislation of Canadas federal parliament that established the conditions under which the Government of Canada would enter into negotiations that might lead to secession following such a vote by one of the provinces. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² - Water... The Honourable Rev. ... Alexa McDonough (born August 11, 1944) is a Canadian politician, and former leader of the New Democratic Party. ...


Layton advocated replacing the first-past-the-post system with proportional representation. He even threatened to use the NDP's clout in the event of a minority government. However, it was dismissed out of hand by the Liberal and Bloc Québécois leaders, as they tend to be favored by the first-past-the-post system, normally being allocated a greater proportion of seats than the proportion of votes cast for them. Historically, the NDP's popular vote does not translate into a proportional number of seats because of scattered support. This was most opposed by the Bloc Québécois, who usually had the lowest popular vote but nonetheless won many seats because their support was concentrated in Quebec. The plurality electoral system (or first past the post electoral system), is a voting system for single-member districts. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ...


Despite these problems, Layton led the NDP to a 15% popular vote, its highest in 16 years. However, it only won 19 seats in the House of Commons, two less than the 21 won under Alexa McDonough in 1997, and far short of the 40 that Layton predicted on the eve of the election. However, some potential NDP voters may have voted Liberal to prevent a possible Conservative win. Layton's wife, Olivia Chow, and several other prominent Toronto NDP candidates lost tight races and Layton won his own seat against incumbent Liberal Dennis Mills by a much narrower margin than early polls indicated. Olivia Chow (鄒至蕙, pinyin: Zōu Zhìhuì) (born March 24, 1957) is a social democratic Canadian Member of Parliament and former city councillor (1991-2005) in Toronto. ... Dennis Joseph Mills (b. ...


Liberal minority government

On March 21, 2005, Layton was sworn into the Queen's Privy Council for Canada, allowing him to use the prefix The Honourable. The Privy Council Office as it appeared in the 1880s The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is the council of advisers to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by the Governor General of Canada for life on the...


With the ruling Liberal Party being reduced to a minority government, revelations of the sponsorship scandal damaging its popularity to the point where both the Conservative Party and the Bloc Québécois were pressing their advantage for a snap election, the Prime Minister approached the NDP for its support. Layton demanded the cancellation of proposed corporate tax cuts and called for an increase in social spending. The ensuing compromise in the NDP's favour was protested by the other opposition parties who used it as a pretext to force a non-confidence vote. On May 19, two such votes were defeated and Layton's amendments went on to be passed on its final reading vote on June 23. As a result of this political coup and his apparent civil behavior in a spitefully raucous parliament, many political analysts have noted that Layton has gained increased credibility as an effective leader of an important party, becoming the major second choice leader in many political polls - for example, polling second in Quebec after Gilles Duceppe, despite the low polls for his party as a whole in the province. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The sponsorship scandal, AdScam, or Sponsorgate, is an ongoing scandal that came as a result of a Canadian federal government sponsorship program in the province of Quebec and involving the Liberal Party of Canada (mostly its Quebec branch), which was in power since 1993 up to 2005. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Bloc Québécois is a centre-left federal political party in Canada that is devoted to the promotion of sovereignty for Quebec. ... A snap election is an election called earlier than scheduled. ... ... Gilles Duceppe, MP (born July 22, 1947 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Quebec nationalist and social democratic politician in Canada. ...


In mid-November 2005, when Liberal support dropped after the Gomery Inquiry delivered its first report, Layton offered the Prime Minister several conditions in return for the NDP's continued support, most notably a ban on private health care in Canada. When the Liberals turned him down, Layton announced he would introduce a motion requesting a February election. However, the Martin government refused to allow the election date to be decided by the opposition. A motion of non-confidence followed, moved by Stephen Harper and seconded by Layton, triggering the Canadian federal election, 2006. The Gomery Commission, formally the Commission of Inquiry into the Sponsorship Program and Advertising Activities, is a federal Canadian commission headed by the retired Justice John Gomery for the purpose of investigating the sponsorship scandal, which involves allegations of corruption within the Canadian government. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...


2006 campaign

In a media scrum during the 2006 winter election campaign.
In a media scrum during the 2006 winter election campaign.

With a vote scheduled for January 23, 2006 many New Democrats expected Layton to deliver substantially more seats than he did in 2004. They hoped the NDP would hold the balance of power in a new minority parliament, so that they could carry additional leverage in negotiating with the governing party. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1146, 1125 KB) Jack Layton, leader of the federal New Democratic Party of Canada, on January 2, 2006 in a media scrum outside a campaign rally at the Kent Street legion in Ottawa, Canada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1146, 1125 KB) Jack Layton, leader of the federal New Democratic Party of Canada, on January 2, 2006 in a media scrum outside a campaign rally at the Kent Street legion in Ottawa, Canada. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


During the election, Mike Klander (the executive vice-president of the federal Liberals' Ontario wing) resigned after making posts on his blog comparing Chow to a Chow Chow dog and calling her husband an "asshole". [2] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Chow-chow is a combination of different vegetables: cabbage, carrots, beans, asparagus, cauliflower, and peas which are pickled in a jar and served cold. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Through the course of the campaign, Layton attempted to cast himself as the sole remaining champion of universal health-care. Some opinion polls showed that Canadians found Layton the most appealing and charismatic of the leaders. Layton repeatedly insisted that "Canadians have a third choice", and urged Liberals to "lend us your vote". Some commentators and pundits mocked Mr. Layton for over-using these catchphrases instead of explaining the NDP platform.


The NDP's strategy had changed from in that they were focusing their attacks on the Liberals[3], rather than in 2004 where they criticized both the Liberals and Conservatives in equal measure, prompting some criticism from Paul Martin[4]. Andrew Coyne suggested that the NDP not only wanted to disassociate themselves from the scandal-ridden Liberals, but also because the Liberals were likely to receive credit for legislation achieved under the Liberal-NDP partnership. The NDP had also lost close races in the 2004 election due to the Liberals' strategic voting. Early in the campaign, NDP MP Judy Wasylycia-Leis had asked the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to launch a criminal investigation into the leaking of the income trust announcement[5]. The criminal probe seriously damaged the Liberal campaign and preventing them from making their key policy announcements, as well as bringing alleged Liberal corruption back into the spotlight. Judy Wasylycia-Leis (born August 10, 1951) is a Canadian politician. ... RCMP redirects here. ...


Layton's campaign direction also caused a break between him and Canadian Auto Workers union head Buzz Hargrove over the issue of strategic voting. Hargrove preferred a Liberal minority government supported by the NDP and he had earlier criticized Layton for participating in the motion of non-confidence that brought down the Liberal government. Hargrove allied with the Liberals and publicly stated that he "did not like the campaign that Jack Layton was running", criticizing Layton for "spending too much time attacking the Liberals". During the final week of the campaign, Hargrove and Martin urged all progressive voters to unite behind the Liberal banner to stop a Conservative government. Knowing that last-minute strategic voting had cost the NDP seats in several close ridings during the 2004 election[6], Layton intensified his attacks on the Liberal scandals, pledging to use his minority clout to keep the Conservatives in check. Shortly after the election, the Ontario provincial branch of the NDP revoked Mr. Hargrove's party membership, due to the fact that he had violated the party's constitution by campaigning for other parties during an election campaign. Mr. Layton disagreed with this action, though Hargrove retaliated by severing ties with the NDP at the annual CAW convention. The Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) (properly the National Automobile, Aerospace, Transportation and General Workers Union of Canada) is one of Canadas largest and highest profile trade unions. ... Basil Buzz Eldon Hargrove (born March 8, 1944, Bath, New Brunswick, Canada) is the current National President of the Canadian Auto Workers trade union. ... In voting systems, tactical voting (or strategic voting) occurs when a voter misrepresents his or her sincere preferences in order to gain a more favorable outcome. ...


The election brought the NDP significantly increased presence in the House of Commons, increasing their total seats to 29 seats, from 18 MP before dissolution. Among the new NDP candidates elected was Layton's wife, Olivia Chow, thereby making the two only the second husband and wife team in Canadian Parliament history. (Gurmant Grewal and Nina Grewal were the first husband and wife team in Canadian Parliament after the 2004 federal election). Gurmant Singh Grewal, BSc, MBA (born December 21, 1957 in Barundi, India) is a Canadian politician and former Conservative Party of Canada Member of Parliament. ... Nina Grewal, MP (born October 20, 1958 in Osaka, Japan) is a Canadian politician of the Conservative Party. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...


In the end, the NDP succeeded in increasing their seats to 29, though they had far fewer seats than the Bloc Quebecois (51) or the Opposition Liberals (103).


Conservative minority government

The NDP has the balance of power in the 39th Parliament. The Speaker only votes in a tie so that reduces the Liberal caucus by one, enabling the Conservatives to pass legislature with the cooperation of the NDP (125+29=154 versus 100+51+2=153). The Conservatives can also pass legislation with either Liberal or Bloc Quebecois support.


At the NDP's 22nd Convention, held on September 10, 2006 in Quebec City, Layton received a 92-per-cent approval rating in a leadership vote, tying former Reform Party leader Preston Manning's record for this kind of voting.[7]. At the same convention, the NDP passed a motion calling for the return of Canadian troops from Afghanistan. On September 24, 2006, he met with Afghan president Hamid Karzai to discuss the NDP position. After the meeting Layton stated that Canada's role should be focused on traditional peacekeeping and reconstruction rather than in a front line combat role currently taking place.[8] September 10 is the 253rd day of the Gregorian calendar (254th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Motto : « Don de Dieu feray valoir Â» (I shall put Gods gift to good use) Site in the province of Quebec Official logo Country  Canada Province Québec Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Constitution date 1833 Geographical code 24 23027 Founder Foundation... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987, originally as a Western Canada-based protest party, but attempted to expand eastward in the 1990s. ... Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a right-wing populist Canadian politician. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Hamid Karzai (Pashto: حامد کرزي, Persian: حامد کرزی) (b. ...


Jack Layton and the NDP caucus voted to support the new proposed rules for income trusts introduced by the Conservatives October 31, 2006 [4]. The short-term result of the tax policy announcement was a loss to Canadian investors of $20 Billion, the largest ever loss attributed to a change in government policy [5]. According to the Canadian Association of Income Trust Investors some 2.5 million Canadian investors were affected by the change in Income Trust policy [6]. An income trust is an investment trust that holds income-producing assets. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 61 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... An income trust is an investment trust that holds income-producing assets. ...


Jack Layton threatened to move a motion of non-confidence against the government over the "Clean Air Act" unless action was taken to improve the bill and its approach to environmental policy. [7] Prime Minister Harper agreed to put an end to the Parliamentary logjam by sending the bill to a special legislative committee before second reading. Jack Layton released his proposed changes to the "Clean Air Act" on November 19, 2006 [9] November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Bibliography

  • Homelessness: The Making and Unmaking of a Crisis ISBN 0-14-028888-0
  • Speaking Out: Ideas that Work For Canadians ISBN 1-55263-577-5
  • Speaking Out Louder: Ideas that Work For Canadians ISBN 1-55263-688-7 (revised and expanded edition of Speaking Out)

Notes

  1. ^ "Layton Sues for Bike Mishap that 'Ruined' his Honeymoon." Toronto Star. Jul 5, 1988. pg. A.7
  2. ^ "Well-to-do Layton lives in 'affordable co-op'." Tom Kerr, Toronto Star. Jun 14, 1990. pg. A.1
  3. ^ "Co-op residents answer critics." Tom Kerr, Toronto Star. Jul 19, 1990. pg. A.21
  4. ^ Coalition of Canadian Energy Trusts. "Vote Breakdown – November 7, 2006", Coalition of Canadian Energy Trusts, November 07, 2006. 
  5. ^ Global National TV. "Exclusive: Flaherty received death threats", Global National TV, February 01, 2007. 
  6. ^ Brent Fullard. "Income Trusts: Just Another Special Interest Group?", Canadian Association of Income Trust Investors, January 05, 2007. 
  7. ^ NDP threaten confidence vote over environmental measures

The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ...

External links

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Jack Layton reaffirmed as Canadian New Democratic leader with 92% support


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Preceded by
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Toronto City Councillor
19821985
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Metro Toronto Councillor
1985-1991
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
Alexa McDonough
Leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada
2003–present
Succeeded by
incumbent
Preceded by
Dennis Mills
Member of Parliament for Toronto—Danforth
2004–present
Succeeded by
incumbent


1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto was the name of the highest level of municipal government in the Toronto, Ontario area from 1954 to 1997. ... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alexa McDonough (born August 11, 1944) is a Canadian politician, and former leader of the New Democratic Party. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... Dennis Joseph Mills (b. ... Toronto—Danforth in relation to the other Toronto ridings Toronto—Danforth (formerly Broadview—Greenwood) is a federal and provincial electoral district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1979, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1999. ...

Leaders of the CCF/NDP
Woodsworth | Coldwell | Argue | Douglas | Lewis | Broadbent | McLaughlin | McDonough | Layton
Persondata
NAME Layton, John Gilbert
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Layton, Jack
SHORT DESCRIPTION Leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada
DATE OF BIRTH July 18, 1950
PLACE OF BIRTH Hudson, Quebec
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
NDP | Jack Layton, leader (418 words)
Through two decades of public service, and as Leader of Canada's NDP since 2003, Jack Layton is delivering the kinds of results that strengthen people and communities.
Layton’s leadership was endorsed by 92% of delegates at the Party’s September 2006 Convention – a stronger approval than Paul Martin and Jean Chrétien received as sitting Prime Ministers and better than Stephen Harper at the past Conservative convention.
Jack Layton honed his trademark pragmatism as a stand-out municipal leader.
Jack Layton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3196 words)
Layton was also hurt by the growing unpopularity of the provincial NDP government of Bob Rae, and by his earlier opposition to Toronto's Olympic bid.
Layton was elected leader of the NDP at the party's leadership convention in Toronto, on January 25, 2003.
Layton did not seek election to the House of Commons by running in a by-election, as is the tradition among new party leaders without a seat.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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