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Encyclopedia > Jack Johnson (boxer)
Jack Johnson

Statistics
Real name John Arthur Johnson
Nickname Galveston Giant
Rated at Heavyweight
Nationality American
Birth date March 31, 1878
Birth place Galveston, Texas
Death date June 10, 1946
Death place Raleigh, North Carolina
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights 113 (14 No Decisions)
Wins 79
Wins by KO 44
Losses 8
Draws 12
No contests 14

John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878June 10, 1946), better known as Jack Johnson and nicknamed the "Galveston Giant", was an American boxer and arguably the best heavyweight of his generation. He was the first black Heavyweight Champion of the World, 1908-1915. In a documentary about his life, Ken Burns said: "For more than thirteen years, Jack Johnson was the most famous, and the most notorious, African-American on Earth".[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (575x894, 134 KB) Jack Johnson, c. ... Heavyweight is a division, or weight class, in boxing. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas County Galveston Government  - Mayor Lyda Ann Thomas Area  - City 539. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Nickname: Motto: You Can See the Whole State from Here Map of Wake County, North Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State North Carolina County Wake County i Founded 1792 Government  - Mayor Charles Meeker (D) Area  - City  134. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Domínguez (left, throwing a left uppercut) versus Rafael Ortiz Boxing, also referred to as prizefighting, the noble art, the sweet science, and pugilism is a combat sport in which two participants of similar weight fight each other with their fists in a series of... A Masai man in Kenya Black people or blacks is a political, social or cultural classification of people. ... This is a chronological list of world heavyweight boxing champions, as recognized by the following organizations: The World Boxing Association (WBA), founded in 1921 as the National Boxing Association (NBA), The World Boxing Council (WBC), founded in 1963, The International Boxing Federation (IBF), founded in 1983, The World Boxing Organization... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Contents

Early life

Jack Johnson was born in Galveston, Texas as the second child and first son of Henry and Tina "Tiny" Johnson, former slaves and faithful Methodists, who both worked blue-collar jobs to earn enough to raise six children (the Johnsons had nine children, five of whom lived to adulthood, and an adopted son) and taught them how to read and write. Jack Johnson had five years of formal education.[1] He was later kicked out of church when he stated that God did not exist and that the church was a domination over people's lives.[citation needed] Nickname: Location in the state of Texas County Galveston Government  - Mayor Lyda Ann Thomas Area  - City 539. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... A blue-collar worker is a working class employee who performs manual or technical labor, such as in a factory or in technical maintenance trades, in contrast to a white-collar worker, who does non-manual work generally at a desk. ... See Adult. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


Johnson fought his first bout, a 16-round victory, at age 15. He turned professional around 1897, fighting in private clubs and making more money then he had ever seen. In 1901, Joe Choynski, the small Jewish heavyweight, came to Galveston to train Jack Johnson. Choynski, an experienced boxer, knocked Johnson out in round three, and the two were arrested for "engaging in an illegal contest" and put in jail for 23 days. (Although boxing was one of the three most popular sports in America at the time, along with baseball and horse-racing, the practice was officially illegal in most states, including Texas.) Choynski began training Johnson in jail but did not get arrested.[1] Joe Choynski (b. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


Professional boxing career

Johnson's fighting style was very distinctive. He developed a more patient approach than was customary in that day: playing defensively, waiting for a mistake, and then capitalizing on it. Johnson always began a bout cautiously, slowly building up over the rounds into a more aggressive fighter. He often fought to punish his opponents rather than knock them out, endlessly avoiding their blows and striking with swift counters. He always gave the impression of having much more to offer and, if pushed, he could punch quite powerfully.


Johnson's style was very effective, but it was criticized in the white press as being cowardly and devious. In contrast, World Heavyweight Champion "Gentleman" Jim Corbett, who was white, had used many of the same techniques a decade earlier, and was praised by the white press as "the cleverest man in boxing."[1] James John Corbett, born September 1, 1866 in San Francisco, California, United States – died February 18, 1933 in Bayside, New York, was a heavyweight boxing champion. ...


By 1902, Johnson had won at least 50 fights against both white and black opponents. Johnson won his first title on February 3, 1903, beating "Denver" Ed Martin over 20 rounds for the "Colored Heavyweight Championship". His efforts to win the full title were thwarted as World Heavyweight Champion James J. Jeffries refused to face him. Blacks could box whites in other arenas, but the heavyweight championship was such a respected and coveted position in America that blacks were not deemed worthy to compete for it. Johnson was, however, able to fight former champion Bob Fitzsimmons in July 1907, and knocked him out in two rounds.[1] February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... James Jackson Jeffries (The Boilermaker) (born April 15, 1875 in Carroll, Ohio, United States – died March 3, 1953 in Burbank, California) was a world heavyweight boxing champion. ... Robert James Bob Fitzsimmons (May 26, 1863 - October 22, 1917) was a Cornish native and moved to New Zealand in his childhood. ...


He eventually won the World Heavyweight Title on December 26, 1908, when he fought the Canadian world champion Tommy Burns in Sydney, Australia, after following him all over the world, taunting him in the press for a match. The fight lasted fourteen rounds before being stopped by the police. The title was awarded to Johnson on a referee's decision as a T.K.O, but he had severely beaten the champion. During the fight, Johnson had mocked both Burns and his ringside crew. Every time Burns was about to go down, Johnson would hold him up again, punishing him more. The camera was stopped just as Johnson was finishing off Burns, so as not to show Burns' defeat.[1] This is a chronological list of world heavyweight boxing champions, as recognized by the following organizations: The World Boxing Association (WBA), founded in 1921 as the National Boxing Association (NBA), The World Boxing Council (WBC), founded in 1963, The International Boxing Federation (IBF), founded in 1983, The World Boxing Organization... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 361st in leap years. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Tommy Burns, ca. ... This is about the city of Sydney in Australia. ... A boxer is knocked down and receives the 10-count. ...


After Johnson's victory over Burns, racial animosity among whites ran so deep that even a socialist like Jack London called out for a "Great White Hope" to take the title away from Johnson — who was crudely caricatured as a subhuman "ape" — and return it to where it supposedly belonged, with the "superior" white race. As title holder, Johnson thus had to face a series of fighters billed by boxing promoters as "great white hopes", often in exhibition matches. In 1909 he beat Victor McLaglen, Frank Moran, Tony Ross, Al Kaufman, and the middleweight champion Stanley Ketchel. The match with Ketchel was keenly fought by both men until the 12th and last round, when Ketchel threw a right to Johnson's head, knocking him down. Slowly regaining his feet, Johnson threw a straight to Ketchel's jaw, knocking him out, along with several of his teeth. His fight with "Philadelphia" Jack O'Brien was a disappointing one for Johnson: though scaling 205 pounds to O'Brien's 161, he could only achieve a six-round draw with the great middleweight. Jack London (January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916),[1][2][3] was an American author who wrote The Call of the Wild and other books. ... Great White Hope, sometimes plain great white hope, may refer to several things: It originally referred to James J. Jeffries (1875-1953), a white boxer who came out of retirement in 1910 in an attempt to dislodge the first black world boxing heavyweight champion, Jack Johnson. ... An exhibition game is the North American term for a sporting event in which there is no gain or loss from whether the competitors are victorious or not in the competition. ... Victor Andrew de Bier McLaglen (December 10, 1886[1] - November 7, 1959) was a British-born boxer and Academy Award winning actor, who later became a naturalized American. ... Stanislaus Kiecal, (September 14, 1886–October 15, 1910), better known in the boxing world as Stanley Ketchel was an American boxer who became world middleweight champion. ...


The "Fight of the Century"

Johnson's fight against Jeffries, 1910.
Johnson's fight against Jeffries, 1910.

In 1910 former heavyweight champion James J. Jeffries came out of retirement and said, "I am going into this fight for the sole purpose of proving that a white man is better than a Negro."[2] Jeffries had not fought in 6 years and had to lose around 100 pounds to try to get back to his championship fighting weight. Image File history File links Johnson_jeff. ... Image File history File links Johnson_jeff. ... James Jackson Jeffries (The Boilermaker) (born April 15, 1875 in Carroll, Ohio, United States – died March 3, 1953 in Burbank, California) was a world heavyweight boxing champion. ...


At the fight, which took place on July 4, 1910 in front of 22,000 people, at a ring built just for the occasion in downtown Reno, Nevada, the ringside band played, "All coons look alike to me". The fight had become a hotbed of racial tension, and the promoters incited the all-white crowd to chant "kill the nigger".[3] Johnson, however, proved stronger and more nimble than Jeffries. In the 15th round, after he had been knocked down twice for the first time in his career, Jeffries' people called it quits to prevent Johnson from knocking him out. July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... City nickname: The Biggest Little City in the World Founded May 9, 1868 County Washoe County Mayor Bob Cashell Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 179. ...


The "Fight of the Century" earned Johnson $225,000 and silenced the critics, who had belittled Johnson's previous victory over Tommy Burns as "empty", claiming that Burns was a false champion since Jeffries had retired undefeated.


Riots and Aftermath

The outcome of the fight triggered race riots that evening — the Fourth of July — all across the United States, from Texas and Colorado to New York and Washington, D.C. Johnson's victory over Jeffries had dashed white dreams of a finding a "great white hope" to defeat him. Many whites felt humiliated by the defeat of Jeffries and were incensed by Johnson's comments.[1] Mass racial violence in the United States, often described using the term race riots, includes such disparate events as: attacks on Irish Catholics and other early immigrants in the 19th century massacres of black people in the period after Reconstruction uprisings in African-American communities such as the 1968 riots... In the United States, Independence Day (commonly known as the Fourth of July or July Fourth) is a federal holiday celebrating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, declaring independence from Great Britain. ...


Blacks, on the other hand, were jubilant, and celebrated Johnson's great victory as a victory for their entire long-suffering race. Black poet William Waring Cuney later highlighted the African American reaction to the fight in his poem, "My Lord, What a Morning".


Around the country, blacks organized spontaneous parades, gathered in prayer meetings, and purchased goods with their newly-won gambling earnings. These celebrations often drew a violent response from white people. Some "riots" were simply African Americans celebrating in the streets. In certain cities, like Chicago, the police allowed them to continue their festivities. But in other cities the police and angry white citizens tried to subdue the celebrations. Innocent black people were often attacked on the streets, and in some cases, gangs of whites entered black neighborhoods and tried to burn down apartment buildings. Police interrupted several attempted lynchings. In all, riots occurred in more than twenty-five states and fifty cities. At least 23 blacks and 2 whites died in the riots, and hundreds more were injured. A few white people were injured when they tried to intervene in a crowd's beating of a black man.[1] Lynching is a form of violence, usually murder, conceived of by its perpetrators as extrajudicial punishment for offenders or as a terrorist method of enforcing social domination. ...


Certain states responded by banning the filming of Johnson's victories over white fighters. African American newspapers stated that white people were afraid to circulate images of black superiority, and argued that the white press was hypocritical by condemning fight films while allowing lynchings to occur without criticism.[1] The Washington Bee wrote, "The white man cannot expect always to be in the front rank without competition, and we all should look at things this way."


On April 5, 1915 Johnson lost his title to Jess Willard, a working cowboy who did not start boxing until he was almost thirty years old. With a crowd of 25,000 at the Vedado Racetrack in Havana, Cuba, Johnson was K.O.'d in the 26th round of the scheduled 45-round fight, which was co-promoted by Roderick James "Jess" McMahon and a partner. Johnson found that he could not knock out the giant Willard, who fought as a counterpuncher, making Johnson do all the leading. Johnson began to tire after the 20th round, and was visibly hurt by heavy body punches from Willard in rounds preceding the 26th round knockout. Johnson is said to have spread rumors that he took a dive,[citation needed] but Willard is widely regarded as winning fairly. Willard said, "If he was going to throw the fight, I wish he'd done it sooner. It was 105 degrees out." April 5 is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Jess Willard - 1915 Library of Congress collection Jess Willard, born December 29, 1881 in St. ... This article is about the Cuban city. ... Roderick James Jess McMahon (b. ...


Personal life

Jack Johnson, March 1915
(Library of Congress)

Johnson was an early example of the celebrity athlete, appearing regularly in the press and later on radio and in motion pictures. He earned considerable sums endorsing various products, including patent medicines, and indulged several expensive hobbies such as automobile racing and tailored clothing, as well as purchasing jewelry and furs for his wives.[citation needed] Once, when he was pulled over for a $50 speeding ticket (a large sum at the time), he gave the officer a $100 bill, telling him to keep the change as he was going to make his return trip at the same speed.[1] Johnson was also interested in opera (his favorite being Il Trovatore) and in history — he was an admirer of Napoleon Bonaparte, believing him to have risen from a similar origin as himself. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (508x700, 79 KB) This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (508x700, 79 KB) This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... In promotion and advertising, a testimonial or endorsement consists of a written or spoken statement, sometimes from a public figure, sometimes from a private citizen, extolling the virtue of some product. ... E.W. Kembles Deaths Laboratory in Colliers Magazine in 1906 Patent medicine is the somewhat misleading term given to various medical compounds sold under a variety of names and labels, though they were, for the most part, actually medicines with trademarks, not patented medicines. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Il trovatore (The Troubadour) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Leone Emanuele Bardare and Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play El Trobador by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... Title page to Historians History Of The World. ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des...


Johnson flouted conventions regarding the social and economic "place" of African Americans in American society. As a black man, he broke a powerful taboo in consorting with white women, and would verbally taunt men (both white and black) inside and outside the ring. Johnson was not shy about his affection for white women, nor modest about his physical prowess, both in and out of the ring. Asked the secret of his staying power by a reporter who had watched a succession of women parade into, and out of, the champion's hotel room, Johnson supposedly said, "Eat jellied eels and think distant thoughts."[4] This article is about cultural prohibitions in general, for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ... Jellied eels are an east end of London delicacy often sold with pie and mash. ...


Johnson married Etta Duryea in late 1910 or early 1911. She committed suicide in September of 1911, and Johnson quickly remarried, to Lucille Cameron. Both women were white, a fact that caused considerable controversy at the time. After Johnson married Cameron, two ministers in the South recommended that Johnson be lynched. The couple fled via Canada to France soon after their marriage to escape criminal charges in the U.S.[1]


Prison sentence

In 1920, Johnson opened a night club in Harlem; he sold it three years later to a white gangster, Owney Madden, who renamed it the Cotton Club. This article is about the Harlem neighborhood in New York City. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Cotton Club was a famous night club in New York City that operated during and after Prohibition. ...


After fighting a number of bouts in Mexico, Johnson returned to the U.S. on 20 July 1920 and surrendered to Federal agents for allegedly violating the Mann Act against "transporting women across state lines for immoral purposes" by sending his white girlfriend, Belle Schreiber, a railroad ticket to travel from Pittsburgh to Chicago. This prosecution is generally considered an intentional misuse of the Act, which was intended to stop interstate traffic in prostitutes. He was sent to the United States Penitentiary, Leavenworth to serve his sentence of one year, and was released on 9 July 1921.[1] There have been recurring proposals to grant Johnson a posthumous Presidential pardon. July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The United States White-Slave Traffic Act of 1910 prohibited so-called white slavery. ... Nickname: Motto: Benigno Numine (With the Benevolent Deity) Location in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States Commonwealth Pennsylvania County Allegheny Founded November 25, 1758 Incorporated April 22, 1794 (borough)   March 18, 1816 (city) Government  - Mayor Luke Ravenstahl (D) Area  - City 151. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... The United States Penitentiary (USP), Leavenworth is located in Leavenworth, Kansas on 1,583 acres (6. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


While incarcerated, Johnson found need for a tool that would help tighten loosened fastening devices, and modified a wrench for the task. He patented his improvements on April 18, 1922, as US Patent 1,413,121. For the record label, see Wrench Records. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ...


Cameron divorced him in 1924 on the grounds of infidelity. Johnson then married an old friend, Irene Pineau, in 1925; she outlived him. Johnson had no children.


Later life

Johnson continued fighting, but age was catching up with him. After two losses in 1928 he participated only in exhibition bouts.


Johnson died in a car crash near Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1946, aged 68, just one year before Jackie Robinson broke the "color line" in Major League Baseball. He was buried next to Etta Duryea at Graceland Cemetery in Chicago. His grave is unmarked, but a stone that bears only the name "Johnson" stands above the plots of he and two of his wives. Nickname: Motto: You Can See the Whole State from Here Map of Wake County, North Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State North Carolina County Wake County i Founded 1792 Government  - Mayor Charles Meeker (D) Area  - City  134. ... Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American Major League Baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... Racial segregation in the United States is the history of racial segregation, of facilities, services, and opportunities such as housing, education, employment, and transportation—along racial lines. ... Graceland Cemetery is a large Victorian-era cemetery located in the north side community area of Uptown, in the city of Chicago, Illinois, USA. Established in 1860, its main entrance is at Clark and Irving Park. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ...


Legacy

Johnson was inducted into the Boxing Hall of Fame in 1954, and is on the roster of both the International Boxing Hall of Fame and the World Boxing Hall of Fame. In 2005, the United States National Film Preservation Board deemed the film of the 1910 Johnson-Jeffries fight "historically significant" and put it in the National Film Registry. The modern International Boxing Hall of Fame is located in Canastota, New York, United States, within driving distance from the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown and the National Soccer Hall of Fame in Oneonta. ... The modern World Boxing Hall of Fame (WBHF) is located in Riverside, California, United States, in Southern California. ... The United States National Film Preservation Board is the board selecting films for preservation in the Library of Congress National Film Registry. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Johnson's story is the basis of the play and subsequent 1970 movie, The Great White Hope, starring James Earl Jones as Johnson (known as Jack Jefferson in the movie), and Jane Alexander as his love interest. In 2005, filmmaker Ken Burns produced a 2-part documentary about Johnson's life, Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson, based on the 2004 nonfiction book of the same name by Geoffrey C. Ward. theatrical poster for The Great White Hope The Great White Hope, a Pulitzer Prize-winning and Tony Award-winning play written by Howard Sackler and first produced by Arena Stage in Washington, DC in 1967, that was the basis for the 1970 film of the same name. ... James Earl Jones (b. ... Jane Alexander (born October 28, 1939), is an award-winning American actress, a former director of the National Endowment for the Arts, and an author. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Johnson's skill as a fighter and the money that it brought made it impossible for him to be ignored by the white establishment. In a time in which African-Americans enjoyed few civil rights and in which lynching was an accepted extra-legal means of social coercion in many parts of the United States, his success and defiant behavior were a serious threat to the racist status quo. In the short term, the boxing world reacted against Johnson's legacy. Joe Louis, later, was not able to box for the heavyweight title until he proved he could "act white," and was warned against gloating over fallen opponents or having his picture taken with a white woman.[1] But Johnson foreshadowed, in many ways, perhaps the most famous boxer of all time, Muhammad Ali. In fact, Ali often spoke of how he was influenced by Jack Johnson. He identified with him because he felt white America ostracized him in the same manner because of his opposition to the war in Vietnam. In his autobiography, Ali relates how he and Joe Frazier agreed that Johnson and Joe Louis were the greatest boxers of old. Joseph Louis Barrow (May 13, 1914 – April 13, 1981), better known in the boxing world as Joe Louis and nicknamed The Brown Bomber, was a native of LaFayette, Alabama and is regarded as one of the greatest heavyweight boxing champions. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For the Major League Baseball player and manager, see Joe Frazier (baseball) Joseph William Smokin Joe Frazier (born January 12, 1944 in Beaufort, South Carolina) is a former world heavyweight boxing champion, active mostly in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Joseph Louis Barrow (May 13, 1914 – April 13, 1981), better known in the boxing world as Joe Louis and nicknamed The Brown Bomber, was a native of LaFayette, Alabama and is regarded as one of the greatest heavyweight boxing champions. ...


41st street in Galveston, Texas is named "Jack Johnson Blvd." after the Galveston Giant himself! Galveston redirects here. ...


Popular culture

Southern punk rock band This Bike Is A Pipe Bomb has a song about Jack Johnson. It appears on both their Three Way Tie for a Fifth CD and split seven inch with Carrie Nations. Several hip-hop artists have also reflected on Johnson's legacy, most notably in the album New Danger, by Mos Def, in which songs like "Zimzallabim" and "Blue Black Jack" are devoted to the artist's pugilistic hero. Miles Davis and Wynton Marsalis both have done soundtracks for documentaries about Jack Johnson. There are also several references to Jack Johnson, made by the main character Ron Burgundy, in the movie Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... This Bike Is A Pipe Bomb is a folk-punk band from Pensacola, Florida, USA. Their first recording was released in 1997 on Ghostmeat Records. ... Mos Def (born Dante Terrell Smith on December 11, 1973 in Brooklyn, New York City, USA), is an American rapper and actor. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (26 May 1926 – 28 September 1991) was one of the most influential musicians of the latter half of the 20th century. ... Wynton Learson Marsalis (b. ... Categories: Stub | 2004 films | Comedy films ...


Miles Davis's 1970 (see 1970 in music) album "A Tribute to Jack Johnson" was inspired by Johnson. The end of the record features the actor Brock Peters (as Johnson) saying: Miles Dewey Davis III (26 May 1926 – 28 September 1991) was one of the most influential musicians of the latter half of the 20th century. ... See also: other events of 1970 list of years in music 1970s in music // Charles Wuorinen, aged 32, becomes the youngest composer ever to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music. ... A Tribute to Jack Johnson is an album recorded in April 1970 by Miles Davis. ... Brock Peters delivering the eulogy at Gregory Pecks funeral Brock Peters (July 2, 1927 – August 23, 2005), born George Fisher in New York City, was an African American actor probably best known for the role in the 1962 film To Kill a Mockingbird of Tom Robinson, the black man...

I'm Jack Johnson. Heavyweight champion of the world. I'm black. They never let me forget it. I'm black all right! I'll never let them forget it!

Folksinger and blues musician Lead Belly references Jack Johnson in a song about the Titanic. "Jack Johnson wanna get on board, Captain said I ain't hauling no coal. Fare thee, Titanic, fare thee well. When Jack Johnson heard that mighty shock, mighta seen the man do the Eagle rock. Fare thee, Titanic, fare thee well." The Eagle Rock was a popular dance at the time. For the film, see Leadbelly (film). ... For other uses, see Titanic. ...


Alt-country performer Tom Russell wrote a song entitled Jack Johnson and it was recorded in 1993, with Barrence Whitfield singing lead vocals, on the album Hillbilly Voodoo. It is both a tribute to Johnson and a biting indictment of the racism he faced : "here comes Jack Johnson, like he owns the town, there's a lot of white Americans like to see a man go down...like to see a black man drown."


Wal-Mart created a controversy in 2006 when DVD shoppers were directed from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Planet of the Apes to the "similar item," Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson.[5] Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... For other uses, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (disambiguation) Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (1964) is a childrens book by British author Roald Dahl. ... This article is about the book. ...


Ray Emery of the Ottawa Senators of the NHL sported a mask with a picture of Jack Johnson on it as a tribute to his love for boxing.


41st street in Galveston, Texas is named "Jack Johnson Blvd." after the Galveston Giant himself Galveston redirects here. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Ken Burns, Unforgivable Blackness
  2. ^ Remnick, David "Struggle for his soul", The Observer, 2003-11-02. Retrieved on November 02, 2003
  3. ^ Zinn, Dave "The Hidden History of Muhammad Ali", Edge of Sports
  4. ^ Stump, Al. 'The rowdy reign of the Black avenger'. True: The Men's Magazine January 1963.
  5. ^ Horowitz, Adam, et al. "101 Dumbest Moments in Business", CNN.com, 2007-01-23. Retrieved on January 23, 2007

Washington Bee, New York Times, Chicago Tribune, all July 5, 1910 This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


External links

Preceded by
Tommy Burns
WBA World Heavyweight boxing champion
1908–1915
Succeeded by
Jess Willard
Persondata
NAME Johnson, Jack
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Johnson, John Arthur (full name)
SHORT DESCRIPTION American boxer
DATE OF BIRTH March 31, 1878
PLACE OF BIRTH Galveston, Texas
DATE OF DEATH June 10, 1946
PLACE OF DEATH Raleigh, North Carolina

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JACK JOHNSON Lyrics (198 words)
Average rating for Jack Johnson is 8.67, total rating is 52 and received 6 votes.
Latest album's name from Jack Johnson is "Sing-A-Longs & Lullabies for the Film Curious George (Jack Johnson)" which is released 658 days ago on 07 February 2006.
Jack Johnson (born April 7, 1987) in Los Angeles, California is an American actor whose main claim to fame is his performance as Will Robinson in the 1998 movie, Lost in Space.
Esteemed Committee Spearheads Boxer Jack Johnson Presidential Pardon Effort; Praises Senate Resolution (725 words)
The Johnson pardon movement was initiated this summer by Burns, who pursued the cause on Capitol Hill after extensively researching the life of Jack Johnson for his film, “ Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson,” which airs on PBS in January.
Johnson’s conviction in 1913 of violating a vice law was widely regarded, even by the prosecuting attorney, as a punishment for Johnson’s romantic relationships with white women.
Johnson further enraged whites by traveling with, dating and marrying white women, many of whom were prostitutes.
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