FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Jack Dempsey
For other uses, including another boxing champion, see Jack Dempsey (disambiguation).
Jack Dempsey

Statistics
Real name William Harrison Dempsey
Nickname(s) Manassa Mauler
Rated at Heavyweight
Nationality Flag of the United States American
Birth date June 24, 1895(1895-06-24)
Birth place Manassa, Colorado
Death date May 31, 1983 (aged 87)
Death place New York City, NY
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights 84
Wins 66
Wins by KO 51
Losses 6
Draws 11
No contests 6 [1]

Jack "Manassa Mauler" Dempsey (June 24, 1895May 31, 1983) was an American boxer who held the world heavyweight title from 1919 to 1926. Dempsey's aggressive style and punching power made him one of the most popular boxers in history. Many of his fights set financial and attendance records. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... John Edward Kelly (December 15, 1862 – November 1, 1895), County Kildare, Ireland. ... Manassa is a town located in Conejos County, Colorado. ... For the mixed martial arts division of the same name, see Heavyweight (MMA). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Manassa is a town located in Conejos County, Colorado. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... An Orthodox stance in boxing refers to someone who boxes right-handed as opposed to a left handed fighter who is referred to as a Southpaw. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... This is a chronological list of world heavyweight boxing champions, as recognized by the following organizations: The World Boxing Association (WBA), founded in 1921 as the National Boxing Association (NBA), The World Boxing Council (WBC), founded in 1963, The International Boxing Federation (IBF), founded in 1983, and The World Boxing...

Contents

Early career

Born in Manassa, Colorado, with the name of William Harrison Dempsey, he grew up in a poor family of mixed Irish origin. Because his father had difficulty finding work, the family traveled often. He himself dropped out of grade school to work. Dempsey left home at the age of 16, eager to start a better life for himself. Due to his poverty, he frequently had to travel underneath trains and slept in hobo camps. However, Dempsey was a strong, powerful youth who quickly discovered he had a talent for fighting. With the help of his older brother Bernie, he began training to be a professional boxer. Manassa is a town located in Conejos County, Colorado. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Desperate for money, Dempsey would occasionally go into saloons and challenge for fights saying "I can't sing and I can't dance, but I can lick any SOB in the house." If anyone accepted his challenge, bets would be wagered. According to Dempsey's autobiography, he rarely lost these barroom brawls.


Dempsey's exact fight record is not known because sometimes he boxed under the pseudonym, "Kid Blackie." This practice continued until 1916. In between, he first appeared as "Jack Dempsey" in 1914, after an earlier middleweight boxer Jack (Nonpareil) Dempsey, drawing with Young Herman in six rounds. After that fight, he won six bouts in a row by knockout (as Jack Dempsey), before losing for the first time, on a disqualification in four rounds to Jack Downey. During this early part of his career, Dempsey campaigned in Utah frequently entering fights in towns up and down the Wasatch mountain range and keeping in shape with such sparring partners as Frank VanSickle day after day. Middleweight is a division, or weight class, in boxing. ... John Edward Kelly (December 15, 1862 – November 1, 1895), County Kildare, Ireland. ... A boxer is knocked down and receives the 10-count. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


He followed his loss against Downey with a knockout win and two draws versus Johnny Sudenberg in Nevada. Three more wins and a draw followed and then he met Downey again, this time resulting in a four round draw. Johnny Sudenberg was an American boxer. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ...


Ten wins in a row followed, a streak during which he beat Sudenberg and was finally able to avenge his defeat at the hands of Downey, knocking him out in two. Then, three more non-decisions came (early in boxing, there were no judges to score a fight, so if a fight lasted the full distance, it was called a draw or non-decision, depending on the state or country the fight was being held in).


When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Dempsey worked in a shipyard while continuing to box. After the war, he was accused by some boxing fans of being a draft dodger. It was not until 1920 that he was able to clear his name on that account, when evidence was produced showing he had attempted to enlist in the U.S. Army but had been turned down. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


Taking the title

Among his opponents were Fireman Jim Flynn, the only boxer ever to beat Dempsey by a knockout when Dempsey lost to him in the first round (although many boxing historians, including Monte Cox, believe the fight was a "fix"), and Gunboat Smith, formerly a highly ranked contender who had beaten both World Champion Jess Willard and Hall of Famer Sam Langford. Dempsey beat Smith for the third time on a second round KO. Edward (Gunboat) Smith was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on February 17, 1887. ... Jess Willard - 1915 Library of Congress collection Jess Willard, born December 29, 1881 in St. ... For the baseball player, see Sam Langford (baseball). ...


Around this time Dempsey hooked up with Jack "Doc" Kearns, an experienced, clever fight manager who carefully and skillfully guided Dempsey to the top.


In 1918, Dempsey boxed 17 times, going 15–1 with one no decision. He avenged his defeat against Flynn by returning the favor, knocking him out in the first round. Among others he beat were light heavyweight champion Battling Levinsky, who had never been knocked out before Dempsey did so. Among others he beat were Bill Brennan, Fred Fulton, Carl Morris, Billy Miske ("newspaper decision") and Homer Smith. In boxing, the light heavyweight division is the weight division between cruiserweight over 175 pounds (79. ... Barney Williams or better known as Battling Levinsky (born as Barney Lebrowitz on June 10, 1891 – died February 12, 1949 in Philadelphia, PA) was a former light heavyweight boxing champion of the world. ...


He began 1919 winning five bouts in a row by knockout in the first round. Then on July 4, he and world heavyweight champion Jess Willard met at Toledo, Ohio, for the world title. Few gave Dempsey a chance against the larger champion and many called this fight a modern David and Goliath. Minutes before the fight started, Kearns informed Dempsey that he had wagered Dempsey's share of the purse on Dempsey winning with a first round knockout. As a result, the first round of the fight was one of the most brutal in boxing history. Dempsey dealt Willard a terrible beating and knocked him down seven times in the first round. Willard had a broken cheekbone, broken jaw, several teeth knocked out, partial hearing loss in one ear, and broken ribs. Kearns' own recollection of the event was the source of the loaded gloves' theory. In March, 1964, Sports Illustrated published an article interviewing Dempsey and Willard, on their recollections of the fight and of "Doc" Kearns. Kearns claimed he had applied plaster of paris to the customary wrappings under Dempsey's gloves, and that Dempsey did not seem to notice even when these reinforcements were removed after the fight. Dempsey never granted any credence to Kearns' story. is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jess Willard - 1915 Library of Congress collection Jess Willard, born December 29, 1881 in St. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ... David and Goliath. ...


Under the rules at the time, a fighter was allowed to stand almost over a knocked-down opponent, and hit him again as soon as both knees had left the canvas. Several times Willard was knocked back down as he was trying to rise. Also, modern referees would step in to stop a fight if one of them was clearly defenseless, but the referee of this fight had the attitude that the only ending for a fight is an actual knockout. At the end of the third round the champion's handlers would not let him answer the bell for the fourth round. Dempsey did win the Heavyweight Title, but he never received any money for doing so.


Title defenses

Dempsey and Carpentier in the arena before the fight
Dempsey and Carpentier in the arena before the fight

After winning the title, Dempsey traveled around the country, making publicity appearances with circuses, staging exhibitions, and even starring in a low-budget Hollywood movie. Dempsey did not defend his title until September 1920. This was against Billy Miske in Benton Harbor, Michigan. Miske was a good fighter but past his prime when he challenged Jack for the title, and was knocked out in 3 rounds. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Benton Harbor is a city in Berrien County in the U.S. State of Michigan. ...


Dempsey's second title defense was much tougher, against Bill Brennan in December 1920 at Madison Square Garden, New York City. Brennan had given Dempsey a tough match two years earlier. After 10 rounds, Brennan was actually ahead on points, and Dempsey's left ear was bleeding profusely. Dempsey rebounded to stop Brennan in the 12th round. Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, and known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


The next fight for "The Manassa Mauler" was against Frenchman Georges Carpentier, who had been a war hero during WWI and was extremely popular on both sides of the Atlantic. The bout was shrewdly promoted by Tex Rickard, emphasizing the differences between the two men, and George Bernard Shaw, who claimed that Carpentier was "the greatest boxer in the world" and stacked the odds 50 to 1 against Dempsey.[2] The anticipation for this bout was tremendous. Georges Carpentier Georges Carpentier (January 12, 1894 – October 28, 1975) was a French boxer. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was a world-renowned Irish author. ...


Dempsey-Carpentier took place on July 2, 1921 at Boyles Thirty Acres, New Jersey, generating the first million dollar gate in boxing history. A crowd of 91,000 watched the fight. Though it was deemed "the Fight of the Century," and Carpentier was favored 50 to 1, the match was not nearly as close as many assumed it would be. RCA arranged for live coverage of the match making the event the first national radio broadcast reaching mostly homemade radio sets after first being telegraphed to KDKA for broadcast.[3] This article is about the U.S. state. ... RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... KDKA is the callsign of two broadcast stations in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA: KDKA AM 1020, the first commercial station in the U.S. KDKA-TV, channel 2 (DTV 25) KDKA-FM 92. ...


Carpentier got off to a fast start and reportedly even wobbled Dempsey with a hard right in the 2nd round. A reporter at ringside, however, counted twenty-five punches from Dempsey in a single thirty-one second exchange soon after he was supposedly injured by the right.[2] Carpentier also broke his thumb in that round, which crippled his chances. In the 3rd, the bigger, stronger Dempsey began to take charge and administered a brutal beating to Georges. The Frenchman was eventually stopped in the 4th round.


Dempsey did not defend his title again until July 1923 against Tommy Gibbons in Shelby, Montana. Gibbons was a skilled, clever boxer, but was not powerful enough against the bigger, stronger Dempsey, who won a 15 round decision. Shelby is a city in and county seat of Toole County, Montana, United States. ...


The last successful title defense for Dempsey was in September 1923 at New York's Polo Grounds. The opponent was the huge, powerful, yet limited contender Luis Angel Firpo, from Argentina. Attendance was 85,000, with another 20,000 trying to get inside the arena. Dempsey won via a 2nd round KO, but it was an exciting battle. Firpo was knocked down repeatedly yet continued to battle back, even knocking Dempsey down twice. The second time Dempsey was floored he went sailing head first through the ring ropes, landing on a reporter's typewriter, and taking several more seconds than the ten stipulated by the rules. This scene is one of the most memorable in sports history. (This fight was so important that it was transmitted live to Buenos Aires by radio, and people gathered in the streets to listen to it through primitive amplifiers.) Luis Firpo and his handlers Luis Ángel Firpo, (October 11, 1894? - August 7, 1960), was an Argentine boxer of enormous transcendence. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ...


These fights, plus his many exhibitions, movies and endorsements, had made Dempsey one of the richest athletes in the world.


Time off from boxing

Jack Dempsey holding his wife, Estelle Taylor, on his shoulder
Jack Dempsey holding his wife, Estelle Taylor, on his shoulder

After the Firpo brawl, Dempsey did not defend his title for another 3 years. There was pressure from the public and the media for Dempsey to defend his title against black contender Harry Wills. Politics and racial fears prevented the Dempsey-Wills bout. There is disagreement among boxing historians as to whether Dempsey avoided Wills. Dempsey always claimed he was willing. Instead of defending his title, Dempsey continued to earn money by boxing exhibitions, making movies and endorsing products. Dempsey also did a lot of traveling, spending and partying. During this time away from competitive fighting, Dempsey married actress Estelle Taylor, and broke up with his long-time trainer/manager Jack "Doc" Kearns. This break-up did not go smoothly, and Kearns repeatedly sued Dempsey for huge sums of money. Download high resolution version (817x1024, 100 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (817x1024, 100 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Harry The Black Panther Wills (b. ...


Loss of title and the "Long Count"

In September 1926, Dempsey fought Irish-American former U.S. Marine Gene Tunney in Philadelphia. Tunney was an excellent boxer who had lost only once in his career. Nevertheless, Tunney was still considered the underdog. The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... James Joseph Gene Tunney (May 25, 1897 – November 7, 1978) was the heavyweight boxing champion from 1926-28 who defeated Jack Dempsey in 1926 and 1927 in what became known as The Long Count Fight and retired undefeated after winning against Tom Heeney in 1928. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ...


In a big upset, Dempsey lost his title on points in ten rounds. No longer displaying his legendary punching power or hand speed, Dempsey was easily outboxed by the slick Tunney who would dodge, and then let loose with a salvo of punches of his own. The attendance for this fight was a record 120,557, the second largest attendance ever for a sporting event (the 1950 soccer world cup finals between Brazil and Uruguay had 150,000+ spectators). When the battered Dempsey returned to his dressing room, he explained the defeat to wife Estelle Taylor by saying, "Honey, I just forgot to duck." This phrase was later used by President Ronald Reagan to his wife after Reagan was shot during a failed attempt on his life in 1981. Soccer redirects here. ... Estelle Taylor (May 20, 1894—April 15, 1958) was an American Hollywood actress whose career was most prominent during the silent film era of the 1920s. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of the former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ... The major events of the assassination attempt The Reagan assassination attempt occurred on March 30, 1981, just 69 days into the presidency of Ronald Reagan. ...


Dempsey contemplated retiring, but after a few months of rest decided to try a comeback. In July 1927, at Yankee Stadium, he knocked out future heavyweight champion Jack Sharkey in the seventh round of an elimination bout for a title shot against Tunney. Sharkey was beating Dempsey until the end, when the fight ended controversially. Dempsey had been hitting Sharkey below the belt, and Sharkey turned to the referee to complain, leaving himself unprotected. Dempsey took advantage and crashed a left hook onto Sharkey's chin, knocking him out cold. The referee then counted out Sharkey. This page is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Jack Sharkey, born October 6, 1902 in Binghamton, New York, United States – died August 17, 1994 in Beverly, Massachusetts, was a heavyweight boxing champion. ...


The Tunney rematch took place in Chicago, Illinois, on September 22, 364 days after losing his title to Tunney in their first bout. This fight generated even more interest than the Carpentier and Firpo bouts, generating an amazing 2 million dollar gate, a record that stood for many years.It is said that Al Capone offered Dempsey that he could fix the rematch, but he would not hear of it. Millions of people around the country listened to the bout on the radio, and hundreds of reporters covered the event. Tunney was paid a record one million dollars for the Dempsey rematch. Dempsey earned about half that. Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Capone” redirects here. ...


Dempsey was losing the fight on points when he knocked Tunney down with a left hook to the chin in the seventh round, and landed several more punches. A new rule for boxing at the time mandated that when a fighter knocks down an opponent, he must immediately go to a neutral corner. But Dempsey seemed to have forgotten that rule (compare his fight with Willard where he almost stood over his downed opponent ready to strike again) and refused to immediately move to the neutral corner when instructed by the referee. The referee had to escort Dempsey to the neutral corner, which bought Tunney at least an extra five seconds to recover.


The official timekeeper for the fight counted the time Tunney stayed down as 14 seconds. But, after Dempsey finally went to a neutral corner, the referee started his count, and Tunney got up at the referee's count of nine. Dempsey tried to finish Tunney off before the round ended, but he failed to do so. A fully recovered Tunney dropped Dempsey for a count of one in round eight, easily won the final two rounds of the fight, and retained the title on a unanimous decision. Ironically, the new rule (which was not yet universal) was requested during negotiations by members of the Dempsey camp. Another discrepancy was the fact that when Tunney knocked Dempsey down, the referee started the count immediately, not waiting for Tunney to move to a neutral corner.[1] Because of the controversial nature of the fight, it remains known in history as the fight of "The Long Count." Punch Lunch battle was the boxing rematch between world Heavyweight champion Gene Tunney and former champion Jack Dempsey, held on September 22, 1927, at Soldier Field in Chicago. ...


Retirement

He retired after this bout and made countless exhibition bouts. In 1935, he opened Jack Dempsey's Broadway Restaurant in New York City's Times Square, which he kept open until 1974. He divorced Taylor and in July 1933 married Broadway singer Hannah Williams (who had just divorced Roger Wolfe Kahn) and had two children with her. Shortly after he divorced Hannah Williams in 1943, the boxer married Deanna Rudin Piatelli, and was married to her at the time of his death. Jack Dempseys Broadway Restaurant was a restaurant on Broadway Avenue in Manhattan, New York at the site of the old car barn across from Madison Square Garden. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Hannah Williams (born c. ... 1927 Time cover featuring Kahn Roger Wolfe Kahn (October 19, 1907–July 12, 1962) was a Jewish-American jazz and popular musician, composer, and band leader (Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra). Born in Morristown, New Jersey into a very rich family—his father, Otto Hermann Kahn, was a banker...


When the United States entered World War II, Dempsey had an opportunity to refute any remaining criticism of his war record of two decades earlier. He volunteered for national service and was commissioned as a commander in the U.S. Coast Guard, charged with developing a physical fitness program for U.S. soldiers. Later, he served as a morale officer in the Pacific and in 1945 became a hero to many when, at age 49, he insisted on going into battle on Okinawa with a group of men he had trained. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... This article is about the prefecture. ...


Dempsey wrote a book on boxing, Championship Fighting: Explosive Punching and Aggressive Defense, which was published in 1950. Dempsey was also something of a cross-trainer, he wrestled in training camp and later took judo lessons. He later wrote a book on this, How to Fight Tough, which dealt with close-quarters combat incorporating boxing, wrestling, and jiu-jitsu.


He made friends with Wills and Tunney after retirement, and had many books written about his life. Dempsey even campaigned for Tunney's son John when he ran for the U.S. Senate, from California. One of Dempsey's best friends was Judge John Sirica who presided over the Watergate trials. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Judge John Joseph Sirica (March 19, 1904 – August 14, 1992) was the Chief Judge for the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. ... Watergate redirects here. ...


In 1977, in collaboration with his stepdaughter Barbara, Jack published his autobiography, titled Dempsey. In May 1983, Dempsey died of natural causes at age 87. His wife Deanna at his side, he told her..."Don't worry honey, I'm too mean to die." He is buried in the Southampton Cemetery, Southampton, New York. Southampton, New York is the name of three entities on Long Island in Suffolk County, New York in the United States. ...


Dempsey is a member of the International Boxing Hall Of Fame. The street where Madison Square Garden is located is called Jack Dempsey Corner. The modern International Boxing Hall of Fame (IBHOF) is located in Canastota, New York, United States, within driving distance from the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown and the National Soccer Hall of Fame in Oneonta. ...


Record

Professional boxing: 82 Fights 66 Wins 51 KOs 6 Losses 9 Draws 6 No contests[4]


Quotes

  • "You're in there for three-minute rounds with gloves on and a referee. That's not real fighting."
  • "Honey, I forgot to duck."
  • "I can't sing and I can't dance, but I can lick any SOB in the house."
  • "A champion is someone who gets up when he can't."

Notes

  1. ^ Six Dempsey fight results were 'newspaper decisions.' Four were wins and two were draws.
  2. ^ a b The Lawless Decade By Paul Sann
  3. ^ Fisher, Marc. Something in the Air. Random House, xiv. ISBN 978-0-375-50907-0. 
  4. ^ Six Dempsey fight results were 'newspaper decisions.' Four were wins and two were draws.

Subfamilies Astronotinae Cichlasomatinae Cichlinae Etroplinae Geophaginae Heterochromidinae Paratilapiinae Pseudocrenilabrinae Ptychochrominae Retroculinae For genera, see below. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Cichlasoma octofasciatum (Regan, 1903) The Jack Dempsey (Nandopsis octofasciatum) is a cichlid fish named for the 1920s boxer Jack Dempsey. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Jack Dempsey
Preceded by
Jess Willard
9th Heavyweight Champion
July 4, 1919September 23, 1926
Succeeded by
Gene Tunney
Preceded by
Inaugural champion
1st NBA Heavyweight Champion
July 2, 1921September 23, 1926
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Boxrec. ... Jess Willard - 1915 Library of Congress collection Jess Willard, born December 29, 1881 in St. ... This is a chronological list of world heavyweight boxing champions, as recognized by the following organizations: The World Boxing Association (WBA), founded in 1921 as the National Boxing Association (NBA), The World Boxing Council (WBC), founded in 1963, The International Boxing Federation (IBF), founded in 1983, and The World Boxing... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Joseph Gene Tunney (May 25, 1897 – November 7, 1978) was the heavyweight boxing champion from 1926-28 who defeated Jack Dempsey in 1926 and 1927 in what became known as The Long Count Fight and retired undefeated after winning against Tom Heeney in 1928. ... World Boxing Association (WBA) is a boxing organization that sanctions official matches, and awards the WBA world championship title, at the professional level. ... This is a chronological list of world heavyweight boxing champions, as recognized by the following organizations: The World Boxing Association (WBA), founded in 1921 as the National Boxing Association (NBA), The World Boxing Council (WBC), founded in 1963, The International Boxing Federation (IBF), founded in 1983, and The World Boxing... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jack Dempsey - Encyclopedia.com (1082 words)
Dempsey held the crown until losing to Gene Tunney in 1926.
In a rematch Dempsey knocked Tunney down in the seventh round, but failed to immediately return to his corner, thus allowing Tunney the benefit of a legendary 14-second "long count." After retirement, he worked occasionally as a referee and spent nearly four decades as proprietor of a popular New York City restaurant.
Search for Dempsey film yields truth of fight; Maggie Simpson of St. Paul wanted to learn details of how her great-uncle in 1923 became the first to go the distance against heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey.
IBHOF / Jack Dempsey (542 words)
Born William Harrison Dempsey in Manassa Colorado, Dempsey was one of 11 children.
Dempsey was inactive in 1924 and '25 and put his title on the line against Gene Tunney in 1926.
By the time Dempsey was ushered across the ring and the referee began his count, it is estimated that Tunney had 14 seconds to recover.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m