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Encyclopedia > Jabba the Hutt
Star Wars character
Jabba the Hutt

Portrayed by A New Hope:
Declan Mulholland (stand-in)
Return of the Jedi:
Larry Ward (voice)
Mike Edmonds (puppeteer)
Toby Philpott (puppeteer)
David Alan Barclay (puppeteer)

Position Crime lord
Homeworld Nal Hutta; resident of Tatooine
Species Hutt
Gender Hermaphroditic (male personality)[1]
Affiliation Criminal
Star Wars Portal

Jabba the Hutt is a fictional character in George Lucas' science fiction saga Star Wars. He first appeared on film in Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983) as an obese, slug-like alien. Jabba was originally portrayed by an immense latex puppet, but in other films he is a computer-generated image (CGI). Besides the films, Jabba the Hutt is featured in Star Wars literature and is sometimes referenced by his full name, Jabba Desilijic Tiure.[2] This article is about the series. ... Image File history File links JabbatheHuttROTJ.jpg‎ Summary Jabba the Hutt from the science fiction film Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983). ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Declan Mulholland (right) alongside Harrison Ford in a deleted scene from Star Wars. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... Larry Ward provided the voice for Star Wars villian Jabba the Hutt in Return of the Jedi. ... Mike Edmonds is an actor, most famous for his role as Little Ron in the childrens television show Maid Marian and Her Merry Men. ... // M4-78 is the name given to a planet colonised by droids. ... In George Lucass Star Wars saga, Tatooine is the home planet of the Skywalker family and Ben Kenobi, the setting for much of the action in the sagas films (as well as several of the novels and other pieces of written fiction) and one of the most iconic... Jabba the Hutt as seen in the film Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999). ... For other uses, see Hermaphrodite (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Star_Wars_Logo. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity that is created from ones imagination or from an adaption of an existing entity. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about the series. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... Obesity is a condition in which the natural energy reserve, stored in the fatty tissue of humans and other mammals, is increased to a point where it is associated with certain health conditions or increased mortality. ... This article is about land slugs. ... Green people redirects here. ... This article is about the typesetting system. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ... Splinter of the Minds Eye, 1978 The Star Wars Expanded Universe (also known as the EU) encompasses all of the officially licensed, fictional background of the Star Wars universe, outside of the six feature films produced by George Lucas. ...


The character's role in Star Wars is primarily antagonistic. He is a 600-year-old Hutt crime lord and gangster who employs a retinue of criminals, bounty hunters, smugglers, assassins, and bodyguards to operate his criminal empire. Jabba the Hutt's palace on the desert planet Tatooine is a former monastery for a group of mystics known as the B'omarr monks. There, he keeps a host of entertainers at his disposal: slaves, droids, and alien creatures. Jabba has a grim sense of humor, a bellicose laugh, an insatiable appetite, and an affinity for gambling, slave girls, and torture.[2] Jabba the Hutt as seen in the film Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999). ... For other uses, see Bounty hunter (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... Jabbas palace is a geographical location from the Star Wars fictional universe. ... In George Lucass Star Wars saga, Tatooine is the home planet of the Skywalker family and Ben Kenobi, the setting for much of the action in the sagas films (as well as several of the novels and other pieces of written fiction) and one of the most iconic... // The Abyssin inhabit the planet Byss. ... Slave redirects here. ... Luke Skywalker in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope along side astromech droid R2-D2, and protocol droid C-3PO. This is the concept of the droid in science fiction. ... Gamble redirects here. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ...


The character was incorporated into the Star Wars merchandising campaign that corresponded with the theatrical release of Return of the Jedi. Jabba the Hutt's image has since played an influential role in popular culture, particularly in the United States. His name is used as a satirical literary device and a political caricature to underscore negative qualities such as morbid obesity and corruption.[3][4] Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... Obesity is an excess storage of fat and can affect any mammal, such as the mouse on the left. ...

Contents

Appearances

Although a relatively minor character in Star Wars fiction, Jabba the Hutt has appeared in three of the six Star Wars films. The character has a recurring role in Expanded Universe literature and is the protagonist of the comic book anthology Jabba the Hutt: The Art of the Deal (1998), a collection of comics published in 1995 and 1996. A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ...


Star Wars films

Jabba the Hutt is mentioned in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977) and Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (1980), but his first appearance on film came in 1983 with the third installment of the original Star Wars trilogy, Return of the Jedi. Directed by Richard Marquand and written by Lawrence Kasdan and George Lucas, the first act of Return of the Jedi features the attempts of Princess Leia Organa (Carrie Fisher), the Wookiee Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew), and Jedi knight Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) to rescue their friend, Han Solo (Harrison Ford), who had been imprisoned in carbonite in the events of the previous film, The Empire Strikes Back.[5] This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Movie poster Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back is the sequel to the first released Star Wars movie, and the second film released in the original trilogy. ... This article is about the series. ... Richard Marquand Richard Marquand (April 17, 1938 - September 4, 1987) was a Welsh film director. ... Lawrence Kasdan (born 14 January 1949, Miami, Florida) is an American movie producer, director and screenwriter. ... Princess Leia Organa Solo of Alderaan (born Leia Amidala Skywalker) is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Carrie Frances Fisher (born October 21, 1956) is an American actress, screenwriter and novelist. ... Wookiees are a race of hirsute bipeds in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... Chewbacca (or Chewie) is a character in the Star Wars universe. ... Peter Mayhew (born May 19, 1944 in Barnes, London, England) is an English actor best known for playing the Wookiee Chewbacca in the Star Wars movies. ... Jedi Knights and Jedi Knight redirect here. ... Luke Skywalker is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe portrayed by Mark Hamill in the films Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, and Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor. ... Han Solo is a character in the Star Wars universe. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... For Rarbonite, see Rarbonite. ...


The captured Han is delivered to Jabba by the bounty hunter Boba Fett (Jeremy Bulloch) and placed on display in the crime lord's throne room. Friends of Han, namely, Lando Calrissian (Billy Dee Williams), droids C-3PO (Anthony Daniels) and R2-D2 (Kenny Baker), Leia, and Chewbacca infiltrate Jabba's palace as part of a plot to save Han. Leia herself is soon captured and enslaved by the Hutt. Luke arrives to "bargain for Solo's life". Luke, however, is dropped into the pit of the monstrous rancor, just below Jabba's throne room. After Luke slays the beast, Jabba condemns Luke, Han, and Chewbacca to a slow death in the belly of the Sarlacc, a large alien creature in Tatooine's Dune Sea. The execution turns into a skirmish at the Great Pit of Carkoon where Luke escapes execution with the help of R2-D2 and defeats Jabba's guards. During the subsequent confusion, Leia repays the Hutt for her humiliation by strangling the Hutt to death with her slave chains. Luke, Leia, C-3PO, and R2-D2 escape just before Jabba's sail barge explodes, killing all inside.[5] Boba Fett is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe. ... Bulloch as Boba Fett (right) in The Empire Strikes Back. ... Lando Calrissian is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Billy Dee Williams (born April 6, 1937) is an American actor who for a period in the 1970s rivaled Sidney Poitier as the most popular black actor in American film. ... C-3PO (pronounced IPA: []., often shortened to Threepio) is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, who appears in both the original Star Wars films and the prequel trilogy. ... Anthony Daniels with C-3POs head. ... R2-D2 (called R2, or Artoo for short), is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Kenny Baker at a science fiction convention Kenny Baker (born August 24, 1934) is a British actor best known as the man inside of R2-D2 in the popular Star Wars film series. ... For a definition of the word rancor, see the Wiktionary entry rancor. ... The Great Pit of Carkoon with the original Sarlacc from Return of the Jedi (1983). ... In George Lucass Star Wars saga, Tatooine is the home planet of the Skywalker family and Ben Kenobi, the setting for much of the action in the sagas films (as well as several of the novels and other pieces of written fiction) and one of the most iconic... The Great Pit of Carkoon with the original Sarlacc from Return of the Jedi (1983). ...


The second film appearance of Jabba the Hutt is in the Special Edition of A New Hope which was released in 1997 to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the original Star Wars. Han Solo has a confrontation in a Mos Eisley cantina with an alien bounty hunter named Greedo (Paul Blake and Maria De Aragon) that ends with Greedo's death. According to Greedo, Jabba "has no use for smugglers who drop their shipments at the first sign of an Imperial cruiser." Jabba had hired Han to smuggle the illicit drug spice from the planet Kessel. Han, however, was forced to dump his cargo when an Imperial search team boarded the Millennium Falcon, Han's ship. Greedo tells Han, "Jabba's put a price on your head so large, every bounty hunter in the galaxy will be looking for you." In a scene that had been cut from the 1977 original, Jabba and an entourage of bounty hunters are seen in a hangar bay outside the Millennium Falcon, trying to find the smuggler. Jabba confirms Greedo's last words and demands that Han pay the value of the shipment. Han promises to compensate Jabba as soon as he receives payment for delivering "goods"—Obi-Wan Kenobi (Alec Guinness), Luke Skywalker, R2-D2, and C-3PO—to the planet Alderaan. Jabba warns Han that if he is not paid back soon, he will post a bounty "so big, you won't be able to go near a civilized system." Due to circumstances beyond Han's control, however, he never completes his deal with the Hutt.[6] This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Mos Eisley is a spaceport town on the planet Tatooine in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... The Mos Eisley Cantina is a fictional bar (cantina) of the Star Wars universe located in the pirate city of Mos Eisley on the planet Tatooine. ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe who are bounty hunters. ... The following is a list of fictional starships, cruisers, battleships, and other spacecraft in the Star Wars saga. ... The following is a list of substances, including food and drugs, found in the fictional series Star Wars. ... // Kalakar VI was a volcanic moon of Dromund Kalakar in the Outer Rim. ... The Galactic Empire is one of the main factions in the Star Wars universe. ... The Millennium Falcon is a fictional spacecraft in the Star Wars universe commanded by smuggler Han Solo (Harrison Ford) and his Wookiee first mate, Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew). ... A bounty is often offered by a group as an incentive for the accomplishment of a task by someone usually not associated with the group. ... For other uses, see Star Wars Galaxy. ... Obi-Wan Kenobi is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Sir Alec Guinness CH, CBE (2 April 1914 – 5 August 2000) was an Academy Award and Tony Award-winning English actor. ... In the fictional Star Wars universe, Alderaan is the home of Princess Leia, Bail Organa and also, in 4000 BBY, Ulic Qel Droma who fought in the Great Sith War. ...


Jabba the Hutt's final film appearance is in the 1999 prequel, Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. The character's scene is minor and has little to do with the plot of the film. During the Boonta Eve Classic podrace at Mos Espa on Tatooine, in which nine-year-old Anakin Skywalker (Jake Lloyd) wins his freedom by outracing his competitors, Jabba the Hutt is featured in his grandstand accompanied by Gardulla the Hutt (a Hutt female) and his Twi'lek majordomo Bib Fortuna (Matthew Wood). Although he is the host of the race, Jabba is totally uninterested and even dozes off, missing the race's conclusion.[7][8] A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 film by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and Jake Lloyd. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... PodracingbonerisbonerthebonernamebonerforbonerabonerfictionalbonerracingbonerPre-ImperialbonersportbonerknownbonerinbonerthebonerStarbonerWarsboneruniverse. ... Anakin Skywalker is the central character in the Star Wars franchise. ... Jacob Christopher Jake Lloyd (born March 5, 1989) is an American actor who gained worldwide fame when he was chosen by George Lucas to play the young Anakin Skywalker in Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, the first film in the Star Wars prequel trilogy. ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe, who do not fit into any other category. ... Various Twilek females In the fictional Star Wars universe, Twileks (pronounced /twiː.lɛk/) are a prominent alien species. ... A majordomo is the head (major) person of a domestic staff (domo), one who acts on behalf of a usually absent owner of a typically large residence. ... Bib Fortuna was a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... For the English cricketers named Matthew Wood, see Matthew Wood (Yorkshire cricketer) and Matthew Wood (Somerset cricketer). ...


Jabba is set to play a crucial role in the upcoming film Star Wars: The Clone Wars, where his son is kidnapped, presumably by the Sepratists, who are trying to lure the Jedi into a war with the Hutts. He is seen in the teaser trailer. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Trailer (film). ...


Star Wars literature

Expanded Universe comics like Jabba the Hutt: The Gaar Suppoon Hit (1995) detail how Jabba built his criminal empire.

The first appearances of Jabba the Hutt in Star Wars Expanded Universe literature was in Marvel Comics's non-canonical adaptations of A New Hope. Six Against the Galaxy (1977) by Roy Thomas and What Ever Happened to Jabba the Hut? (1979) and In Mortal Combat (1980), both by Archie Goodwin, depict Jabba the Hutt (originally spelled Hut) as a tall humanoid with a walrus-like face, a topknot, and a bright uniform. The Marvel artists based Jabba on a character later named Mosep Binneed, an alien visible only briefly in the Mos Eisley cantina scene of A New Hope.[9][10][11][12] The 1977 mass market paperback novelization of Lucas' Star Wars script describes Jabba as a "great mobile tub of muscle and suet topped by a shaggy scarred skull", but gives no further detail as to the character's physical appearance or species.[13] Image File history File links JabbaComic1. ... Image File history File links JabbaComic1. ... Splinter of the Minds Eye, 1978 The Star Wars Expanded Universe (also known as the EU) encompasses all of the officially licensed, fictional background of the Star Wars universe, outside of the six feature films produced by George Lucas. ... Splinter of the Minds Eye, 1978 The Star Wars Expanded Universe (also known as the EU) encompasses all of the officially licensed, fictional background of the Star Wars universe, outside of the six feature films produced by George Lucas. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The Star Wars canon consists of the six Star Wars feature films, along with all officially licensed, non-contradicting spin-off works to the six films. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Archie Goodwin (September 8, 1937 – March 1, 1998) was an American comic book writer, editor, and artist. ... For other uses, see Walrus (disambiguation). ... The chonmage (丁髷, ちょんまげ) is a form of Japanese traditional haircut worn by men. ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe, who do not fit into any other category. ... The Mos Eisley Cantina is a fictional bar (cantina) of the Star Wars universe located in the pirate city of Mos Eisley on the planet Tatooine. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Suet is raw beef or mutton fat, especially that found around the loins and kidneys. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ...


Later Expanded Universe novels and comics adopt the character's image as seen in the film. They also elaborate on his background prior to the events of the Star Wars films. For example, Zorba the Hutt's Revenge (1992), a young adult novel by Paul and Hollace Davids, reveals that Jabba's father is a powerful crime lord named Zorba the Hutt and that Jabba was born 596 years before the events of A New Hope, making him around 600 years old at the time of his death in Return of the Jedi.[14] Ann C. Crispin's novel The Hutt Gambit (1997) explains how Jabba the Hutt and Han Solo become business associates and portrays the events that lead to a bounty being placed on Han's head.[15] Other Expanded Universe stories—especially the anthology of Dark Horse comics by Jim Woodring titled Jabba the Hutt: The Art of the Deal (1998)—likewise detail Jabba the Hutt's rise to the head of the Desilijic clan, his role in the criminal underworld of the Star Wars universe, and the establishment of his crime syndicate on Tatooine in the Star Wars galaxy's Outer Rim Territories.[16] Zorba the Hutts Revenge is the third book of the Jedi Prince series by Paul and Hollace Davids. ... Young adult fiction (often abbreviated at YA fiction) is fiction written for, published for, or marketed to adolescents, roughly ages 12 to 18. ... Paul Davids is a writer of films and novels, especially about science fiction. ... This article is about minor villains in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... Ann C. Crispin is a science fiction writer and the author of over sixteen published novels. ... Publishers Description Once one of the Academys brightest stars, Han Solo is now a fugitive from the Imperial Navy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jim Woodring (born October 11, 1952) is a comic book author and artist. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... For other uses, see Star Wars Galaxy. ... For other uses, see Star Wars Galaxy. ...


Tales From Jabba's Palace (1996), a collection of short stories edited by science fiction author Kevin J. Anderson, pieces together the lives of Jabba the Hutt's various minions in his palace and their relationship to him during the last days of his life. The stories reveal that few of the Hutt's servants are loyal to him and most are in fact plotting to have him assassinated. When Jabba the Hutt is killed in Return of the Jedi, his surviving former courtiers join forces with his rivals on Tatooine and his family on the Hutt homeworld Nal Hutta make claims to his palace, fortune, and criminal empire.[17] Timothy Zahn's novel Heir to the Empire (1991) reveals that a smuggler named Talon Karrde eventually replaces Jabba as the "big fish in the pond", and moves the headquarters of the Hutt's criminal empire off Tatooine.[18] Tales From Jabbas Palace (1995) is an anthology of short stories set in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... |200px| ]] Pseudonym: Gabriel Mesta Born: March 27, 1962 ) Oregon, Wisconsin, U.S. Occupation: Author Genres: Science fiction Debut works: Resurrection, Inc Influences: The War of the Worlds Kevin J. Anderson (born March 27, 1962) is a prolific American science fiction author. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... // M4-78 is the name given to a planet colonised by droids. ... Timothy Zahn (born September 1, 1951) is a science fiction novelist. ... Heir to the Empire is the first book in a trilogy of novels known as The Thrawn Trilogy, all written by Timothy Zahn. ... Talon Karrde is a character in the Star Wars Expanded Universe. ...


Characterization

According to film historian Murray Pomerance, Jabba the Hutt's many flaws include vice, lust, greed, and gluttony.[19] The character is known throughout the Stars Wars universe as a "vile gangster"[20] who amuses himself by torturing and humiliating his subjects and enemies. He surrounds himself with scantily-clad slave girls of all species, chaining many of them to his dais. The Star Wars Databank — an official online database of Star Wars information — remarks that residents of his palace are not safe from his desire to dominate and torture. Jabba would send even his most loyal servants and prized possessions to their deaths.[21] For example, in Return of the Jedi, the Twi'lek slave dancer Oola is fed to the rancor monster because she refuses to satisfy his lust.[22] A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Dais (French dais, estrade, Italian predella), originally a part of the floor at the end of a medieval hall, raised a step above the rest of the building. ... Screenshot of the online Star Wars Databank in July 2006 The Star Wars Databank is the official Star Wars sites repository of information on characters, locations, and technology, sorted by category. ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe, who do not fit into any other category. ...

In this scene from A New Hope, Han Solo sarcastically tells Jabba the Hutt, "You're a wonderful human being."
In this scene from A New Hope, Han Solo sarcastically tells Jabba the Hutt, "You're a wonderful human being."

Jabba the Hutt's physical appearance is as grotesque as his character and reinforces his personality as a criminal deviant. As Han Solo puts it in Return of the Jedi, Jabba is a "slimy piece of worm-ridden filth." Film critic Roger Ebert describes him as "a cross between a toad and the Cheshire Cat",[23] and astrophysicist and science fiction writer Jeanne Cavelos gives Jabba the "award for most disgusting alien."[24] Science fiction authors Tom and Martha Veitch write that Jabba's body is a "miasmic mass" of flesh that shakes as he laughs. He emits an unmistakable smell: "The Hutt's lardaceous body seemed to periodically release a greasy discharge, sending fresh waves of rotten stench" into the air. His swollen tongue drips with saliva as he feeds on creatures that resemble frogs and maggots.[25] Jabba's appetite is insatiable and he is not discriminatory about his diet. For example, his jester, the Kowakian monkey-lizard Salacious B. Crumb, must make the Hutt crime lord laugh once a day, every day, or Jabba will eat him.[26][27] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (864x436, 37 KB) Summary http://gwiezdne-wojny. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (864x436, 37 KB) Summary http://gwiezdne-wojny. ... Han Solo is a character in the Star Wars universe. ... Sarcasm is the sneering, sly, jesting, or mocking of a person, situation or thing. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Spiral Galaxy ESO 269-57 Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe, including the physical properties (luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition) of celestial objects such as stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, as well as their interactions. ... Tom Veitch is an American writer, best known for his contributions to the Dark Horse line of Star Wars comicbook titles, notably Dark Empire and Tales of the Jedi. ... For other uses of Jester, see Jester (disambiguation). ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe, who do not fit into any other category. ...


Jabba the Hutt does show rare moments of charity, however. For instance, in one Expanded Universe story, he prevents a Chevin named Ephant Mon from freezing to death on an ice planet by covering him with his bloated layers of fat; the two are eventually rescued, and Ephant Mon becomes totally loyal to the crime lord, making him the only resident of Jabba's palace that the crime lord trusts.[28] For the ethical doctrine, see Altruism (ethics). ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe, who do not fit into any other category. ...


Concept and creation

Jabba the Hutt's appearance underwent several changes between different versions of the films. The shift in the concept of Jabba the Hutt from a furry creature to a slug and from a puppet to CGI represent two of the more glaring changes to the character in the concept and creation process. Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ...


Episode I: The Phantom Menace

Jabba appears briefly during the pod race. He is in a box along with Bib Fortuna, and watches the race. Bib Fortuna was a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ...


Episode IV: A New Hope

The original script to A New Hope describes Jabba as a "fat, slug-like creature with eyes on extended feelers and a huge ugly mouth",[12] but Lucas stated in an interview that the initial character he had in mind was much furrier and resembled a Wookiee. When filming the scene between Han Solo and Jabba in 1976, Lucas employed Northern Irish actor Declan Mulholland to play the stand-in and read Jabba the Hutt's lines wearing a shaggy brown suit. Lucas planned to replace Mulholland in post-production with a stop-motion creature. The scene was meant to connect A New Hope to Return of the Jedi and explain why Han Solo was imprisoned at the end of The Empire Strikes Back.[29] Nevertheless, Lucas decided to leave the scene out of the final film on account of budget and time constraints and because he felt that it did not enhance the film's plot.[30] The scene remained in the novelization, comic book, and radio adaptations of the film. This article is about the constituent country. ... Declan Mulholland (right) alongside Harrison Ford in a deleted scene from Star Wars. ... Stand-ins in film are often misunderstood to be doubles for the actors, that is, people who double for the actor during filming, e. ... Stop motion is an animation technique which makes things that are static appear to be moving. ...

Harrison Ford (left) and Declan Mulholland, Jabba the Hutt's stand-in, in an uncompleted scene from A New Hope in 1976.
Harrison Ford (left) and Declan Mulholland, Jabba the Hutt's stand-in, in an uncompleted scene from A New Hope in 1976.

Lucas revisited the scene in the 1997 Special Edition release of A New Hope, restoring the sequence and replacing Mulholland with a CGI version of Jabba the Hutt and the English dialogue with Huttese, a fictional language created by sound designer Ben Burtt. Joseph Letteri, the visual effects supervisor for the Special Edition, explained that the ultimate goal of the revised scene was to make it look as if Jabba the Hutt was actually on the set talking to and acting with Harrison Ford and that the crew had merely photographed it. Letteri stated that the new scene consisted of five shots that took over a year to complete.[31][32] The scene was polished further for the 2004 release on DVD, improving Jabba's appearance with advancements in CGI techniques, although neither release looks exactly like the original Jabba the Hutt puppet.[33] Image File history File links FordandMulholland. ... Image File history File links FordandMulholland. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Declan Mulholland (right) alongside Harrison Ford in a deleted scene from Star Wars. ... Jabba the Hutt as seen in the film Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999). ... Quenya, written in Tengwar and Latin-based alphabets Fictional languages are by far the largest group of artistic languages. ... Ben Burtt (born July 12, 1948 in Syracuse, New York) is the archetypal sound designer (a term he invented) and sound editor for many famous and noteworthy films, as well as directing an Oscar-nominated documentary. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


At one point of the original scene, Ford walks behind Mulholland. This became a problem when adding the CGI Jabba, since he had a tail that happened to be in the way. Eventually, this problem was solved by having Han stepping on Jabba's tail, causing the Hutt to react with a yelp of pain.


Lucas confesses that some people were upset about the CGI Jabba's appearance, most complaining that the character (and others like it) "looked fake". Lucas dismisses this, stating that whether a character is portrayed as a puppet or as CGI, it will always be "fake" since the character is not real. He says he sees no difference between a puppet made of latex and one generated by a computer.[34] The CGI character performed actions that the puppet could not, such as walking. Jabba's film appearance in The Phantom Menace was as a CGI based on the character from A New Hope.


Episode VI: Return of the Jedi

Concept artwork of Jabba the Hutt for Return of the Jedi designed by Industrial Light & Magic.
Concept artwork of Jabba the Hutt for Return of the Jedi designed by Industrial Light & Magic.

Lucas based the CGI on the character as he originally appeared in Return of the Jedi. In this film, Jabba the Hutt is an immense, sedentary, slug-like creature designed by Lucas' Industrial Light & Magic Creature Shop. Design consultant Ralph McQuarrie claimed, "In my sketches Jabba was huge, agile, sort of an apelike figure. But then the design went into another direction, and Jabba became more like a worm kind of creature."[35] According to the 1985 documentary From Star Wars to Jedi, Lucas rejected initial designs of the character. One made Jabba appear too human — almost like a Fu Manchu character — while a second made him look too snail-like. Lucas finally settled on a design that was a hybrid of the two.[36] Return of the Jedi costume designer Nilo Rodis-Jamero commented, Image File history File links Jabbaconceptart. ... Image File history File links Jabbaconceptart. ... Industrial Light & Magic original logo, designed by Drew Struzan Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) is a motion picture visual effects company, founded in May 1975 by George Lucas and owned by Lucasfilm Ltd. ... Industrial Light & Magic original logo, designed by Drew Struzan Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) is a motion picture visual effects company, founded in May 1975 by George Lucas and owned by Lucasfilm Ltd. ... Mr. ... This article is about the fictional literature character. ...

My vision of Jabba was literally Orson Welles when he was older. I saw him as a very refined man. Most of the villains we like are very smart people. But Phil Tippett kept imagining him as some kind of slug, almost like in Alice in Wonderland. At one time he sculpted a creature that looked like a slug that's smoking. I kept thinking I must be really off, but eventually that's where it led up to."[37] George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... Phil Tippett (born 1951) is a movie director and an award-winning Visual effects Supervisor and Producer, who specializes in creature design and character animation. ... Alice in Wonderland redirects here. ...

Designed by visual effects artist Phil Tippett,[38] Jabba the Hutt was inspired by the anatomy of several animal species. His body structure and reproductive processes were based on annelid worms, hairless animals that have no skeleton and are hermaphroditic. Jabba's head was modeled after that of a snake, complete with bulbous, slit-pupilled eyes and a mouth that opens wide enough to swallow large prey. His skin was given moist, amphibian qualities. Jabba's design would come to represent almost all members of the Hutt species in subsequent Star Wars fiction.[1] For the characters from System Shock 2, see The Many. ... For other uses, see Skeleton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermaphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Amphibian (disambiguation). ...


In Return of the Jedi, Jabba is portrayed by a one-ton puppet that took three months and half a million dollars to construct. While filming the movie, the puppet had its own makeup artist. The puppet required three puppeteers to operate, making it one of the largest ever used in a motion picture.[36] Stuart Freeborn designed the puppet, while John Coppinger sculpted its latex, clay, and foam pieces. Puppeteers included David Alan Barclay, Toby Philpott, and Mike Edmonds, who were members of Jim Henson's Muppet group. Barclay operated the right arm and mouth and read the character's English dialogue, while Philpott controlled the left arm, head, and tongue. Edmonds, the shortest of the three men (he also played the Ewok Logray in later scenes) was responsible for the movement of Jabba's tail. The eyes and facial expressions were operated by radio control.[36][34][12] Stuart Freeborn (born September 5, 1914, in London, England) is a British motion picture make-up artist, perhaps best known for his work on the original Star Wars trilogy. ... Mike Edmonds is an actor, most famous for his role as Little Ron in the childrens television show Maid Marian and Her Merry Men. ... James Maury Jim Henson (September 24, 1936 – May 16, 1990), was the most widely known puppeteer in American television history. ... For the slang term, see Muppet (slang). ... Ewoks are a species of bearlike hunter-gatherers that inhabit the forest moon of Endor. ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe, who do not fit into any other category. ... This radio control airplane is carrying a scale model of X-33 and is taking part in NASA research. ...

Design of the Jabba the Hutt puppet for Return of the Jedi.
Design of the Jabba the Hutt puppet for Return of the Jedi.

Lucas voiced displeasure in the puppet's appearance and immobility, complaining that the puppet had to be moved around the set to film different scenes. In the DVD commentary to the Special Edition of Return of the Jedi, Lucas notes that if the technology had been available in 1983, Jabba the Hutt would have been a CGI character similar to the one that appears in the Special Edition scene of A New Hope.[34] Image File history File links In_jabba. ... Image File history File links In_jabba. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Jabba the Hutt only speaks Huttese on film, but his lines are subtitled in English. His voice and Huttese-language dialogue were performed by voice actor Larry Ward, whose work is listed in the end credits.[36][39] A heavy, booming quality was given to Ward's voice by pitching it an octave lower than normal and processing it through a subharmonic generator.[40] A soundtrack was recorded to accompany the movement of the puppet's limbs and mouth. The sound effects were created by a hand running through a bowl of cheese casserole and a muddy towel scraping along the inside of a garbage can.[41] For other uses, see Subtitle. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Larry Ward provided the voice for Star Wars villian Jabba the Hutt in Return of the Jedi. ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ... For other uses, see Octave (disambiguation). ... Sub-harmonic frequencies are frequencies below the fundamental frequency of an oscillator. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... In cooking, a casserole (from the French for stew pan) is a large, deep, covered pot or dish used both in the oven and as a serving dish. ...


Jabba the Hutt's musical theme throughout the film, composed by John Williams, is played on a tuba. One reviewer of Return of the Jedi's soundtrack comments, "Among the new thematic ideas [of the score is] Jabba the Hutt's cute tuba piece (playing along the politically incorrect lines of tubas representing fatness) ...."[42] The theme is very similar to one Williams wrote for a heavyset character in Fitzwilly (1967), though the theme does not appear on that film's soundtrack album. Williams later turned the theme into a symphonic piece performed by the Boston Pops Orchestra featuring a tuba solo by Chester Schmitz. The role of the piece in film and popular culture has become a focus of study by musicologists such as Gerald Sloan, who says Williams' piece "blends the monstrous and the lyrical."[43] For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tuba (disambiguation). ... Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ... Fitzwilly is a 1967 film by Delbert Mann, based on Poyntz Tylers novel, A Garden of Cucumbers, adapted for the screen by Isobel Lennart. ... A soundtrack album is any album that incorporates music from a particular feature film. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Boston Pops Orchestra was founded in 1885 as a subsection of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... For album by Prince, see Musicology (album). ...


According to film historian Laurent Bouzereau, Jabba the Hutt's death in Return of the Jedi was suggested by script writer Lawrence Kasdan. Lucas decided Leia should strangle him with her slave chain. He was inspired by a scene from The Godfather (1972) where an obese character named Luca Brasi (Lenny Montana) is garroted by an assassin.[44] This article is about the 1972 film. ... Luca Brasi is a character in Mario Puzos novel The Godfather, as well as its 1972 film adaptation (portrayed by Lenny Montana). ... Lenny Montana (born Leonardo Passofaro) (March 13, 1926 – May 12, 1992) was an American actor. ... A garrote or garrote vil (a Spanish word; alternative spellings include garotte and garrotte) is a handheld weapon, most often referring to a ligature of chain, rope, scarf, wire or fishing line used to strangle someone to death. ...


Jabba the Hutt in popular culture

With the premiere of Return of Jedi in 1983 and the accompanying merchandising campaign, Jabba the Hutt became an icon in American popular culture. The character was produced and marketed as a series of action figure playsets by Kenner/Hasbro from 1983 to 2004.[45] In the 1990s, Jabba the Hutt became the protagonist in his own comic book series collectively titled Jabba the Hutt: The Art of the Deal.[46] Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... Kenner Products was a toy company founded in 1947 by three brothers, Albert, Phillip, and Joseph L. Steiner, in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, and was named after the street where the original corporate offices were located. ... Hasbro (NYSE: HAS) is an American toy and game company. ...

Packaging for the Jabba the Hutt action figure playset distributed by Kenner in 1983 as part of the merchandising campaign for Return of the Jedi.
Packaging for the Jabba the Hutt action figure playset distributed by Kenner in 1983 as part of the merchandising campaign for Return of the Jedi.

Jabba's role in popular culture extends beyond the Star Wars universe and its fans. In Mel Brooks' Star Wars spoof Spaceballs (1987), Jabba the Hutt is parodied as the character Pizza the Hutt, a cheesy blob shaped like a slice of pizza whose name is a double pun on Jabba the Hutt and the restaurant franchise Pizza Hut. Like Jabba, Pizza the Hutt is a loan shark and mobster. The character meets his demise at the end of Spaceballs when he "[becomes] locked in his car and [eats] himself to death".[47] The Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., included a display on Jabba the Hutt in the temporary exhibition Star Wars: The Myth of Magic, which closed in 1999. Jabba's display was called "The Hero's Return," referencing Luke Skywalker's journey toward becoming a Jedi.[48] Image File history File links JabbatheHuttPlayset. ... Image File history File links JabbatheHuttPlayset. ... Kenner Products was a toy company founded in 1947 by three brothers, Albert, Phillip, and Joseph L. Steiner, in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, and was named after the street where the original corporate offices were located. ... Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, comedian, actor and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Bold text Spaceballs is a 1987 science fiction parody film co-written, directed by, and starring Mel Brooks. ... A parody (pronounced ), in contemporary usage, is a work created to mock, comment on, or poke fun at an original work, its subject, or author, by means of humorous or satiric imitation. ... Bold text Spaceballs is a 1987 science fiction parody film co-written, directed by, and starring Mel Brooks. ... Pizza Hut Inc. ... A loan shark is a person or body that offers illegal unsecured loans at high interest rates to individuals, often backed by blackmail or threats of violence. ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... National Air and Space Museum exterior The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the Smithsonian Institution is a museum in Washington, D.C., United States, and is the most popular of the Smithsonian museums. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Art exhibitions are traditionally the space in which art objects (in the most general sense) meet an audience. ...


Jabba the Hutt in mass media

Since the release of Return of the Jedi, the name Jabba the Hutt has become synonymous in American mass media with repulsive obesity and corruption. The name is frequently utilized as a literary device—either as a simile or metaphor—to illustrate character flaws. For example, in Under the Duvet (2001), Marian Keyes references a problem with gluttony when she writes, "wheel out the birthday cake, I feel a Jabba the Hutt moment coming on."[49] Likewise, in the novel Steps and Exes: A Novel of Family (2000), Laura Kalpakian uses Jabba the Hutt to emphasize the weight of a character's father: "The girls used to call Janice's parents Jabba the Hutt and the Wookie [sic]. But then Jabba (Janice's father) died, and it didn't seem right to speak of the dead on those terms."[50] Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... Look up simile in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... A character flaw is a limitation,imperfection, problem, phobia, or deficiency present in a character who may be otherwise very functional. ... Witty Irish novelist and columnist Marian Keyes. ... Portion depicting Gluttony in Hieronymus Boschs The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Last Things Derived from the Latin gluttire, meaning to gulp down or swallow, gluttony is the over-indulgence and over-consumption of food, drink, or intoxicants to the point of waste. ...


In his book of humor and popular culture, The Dharma of Star Wars (2005), writer Matthew Bortolin attempts to show similarities between Buddhist teachings and aspects of Star Wars fiction. Bartolin insists that if a person makes decisions that Jabba the Hutt would make, then that person is not practicing the proper spiritual concept of dharma. Bortolin's book reinforces the idea that Jabba's name is synonymous with negativity: The Dharma of Star Wars is a book by Matthew Bortolin. ... Matthew Bortolin is the author of The Dharma of Star Wars, a book that serves as an introduction to Buddhist philosophy using the fictional characters and events of the Star Wars saga. ... Buddhism, a Dharmic faith, is usually considered one of the worlds major religions, with between 230 to 500 million followers. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ...

One way to see if we are practicing right livelihood is to compare our trade with that of Jabba the Hutt. Jabba has his fat, stubby fingers in many of the pots that led to the dark side. He dealt largely in illegal "spice" trade—an illicit drug in the Star Wars galaxy. He also transacts business in the slave trade. He has many slaves himself, and some he fed to the Rancor, a creature he kept caged and tormented in his dungeon. Jabba uses deception and violence to maintain his position.[51] Eightfold Path redirects here. ... May The Force Be With You redirects here. ...

Outside literature, the character's name has become an insulting term of disparagement. To say that someone "looks like Jabba the Hutt" is commonly understood as a slur to impugn that person's weight and/or appearance.[3] The term is often employed by the media as an attack on prominent figures. For instance, actress and comedian Roseanne endured what W. C. Goodman called "vitriolic attacks based on her weight" at the hands of The New York Observer columnist Michael Thomas who often compared her with "Star Wars blob monster" Jabba the Hutt.[52] In an episode of the animated television series South Park titled "Starvin' Marvin in Space" that aired in 1999, Christian Children's Fund spokeswoman Sally Struthers is portrayed as the Hutt and accused of gorging herself on food relief meant for starving Ethiopians.[53] Another reference appears in the Family Guy episode He's Too Sexy for His Fat when Peter mentions his husky ancestor Jabba the Griffin. [54] Terms of disparagement are pejorative words and phrases which are either intended to be or are often regarded as insulting, impolite or unkind. ... This article is about the actress. ... The New York Observer is a weekly newspaper first published in New York City on September 22, 1987 by Arthur L. Carter, a very successful former investment banker with publishing interests. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Starvin Marvin in Space is episode 311 of Comedy Centrals animated series South Park. ... The logo of Christian Childrens Fund Christian Childrens Fund (CCF) is an international child-sponsorship group based in Richmond, Virginia that provides assistance to communities in 33 countries. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... “He’s Too Sexy for His Fat” is an episode from the second season of the FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... This article is about the Family Guy character. ...

Actress and spokeswoman Sally Struthers is parodied as Jabba the Hutt in a 1999 episode of South Park.
Actress and spokeswoman Sally Struthers is parodied as Jabba the Hutt in a 1999 episode of South Park.

In another sense of the term, Jabba the Hutt has come to represent greed and anarchy, especially in the business world.[4] For instance, Michael Jordan biographer Mitchell Krugel uses the term to disparage Chicago Bulls's general manager Jerry Krause after Krause made a comment about Jordan and other players' multi-million dollar contracts: "Krause added to his Jabba the Hutt image during the media gathering that preceded the opening of camp when he answered a question about the prospect of rebuilding the Bulls without Phil or Michael in the imminent future by saying, 'Organizations win championships. Players and coaches are parts of organizations'."[55] Sally Struthers as Jabba Hut. ... Sally Struthers as Jabba Hut. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Anarchist redirects here. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the professional basketball team. ... Jerry Krause was a longtime professional basketball scout and general manager for, among other franchises, the Baltimore Bullets and, most notably, the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association. ... This article is about the basketball coach. ...


Jabba the Hutt has likewise become a popular means of caricature in American politics. For example, opponents of California Democratic legislator Jackie Goldberg commonly depict the politician as the Star Wars character. The Los Angeles Daily News has caricatured her in cartoons as a grotesquely overweight Jabba the Hutt-like figure and the New Times LA referred to Goldberg as "a human Jabba the Hutt who consumes the good while producing the bad."[56] William G. Ouchi uses the term to describe what he sees as the inefficient bureaucracy of the public school system: "With all of these unnecessary layers of organizational fat, school districts have come to resemble Jabba the Hutt—the pirate leader in Star Wars."[57] This article is about the U.S. state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Jackie Goldberg is an American teacher and politician, and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Los Angeles Daily News is the second largest circulating daily newspaper of Los Angeles, California. ... New Times LA is a now-defunct alternative weekly newspaper, published in Los Angeles , until 2002, by the New Times Media corporation. ... William G. Ouchi (born 1943) is an American professor and author in the field of business management. ... This article is about the sociological concept. ...


The German thrash metal band Sodom made a song about Jabba the Hutt, to be found on their album Get What You Deserve. Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music, one of the extreme metal subgenres that is characterised by high speed riffing and aggression. ... Sodom is a German thrash metal band formed in 1982. ... Get what you Deserve is an album by the German thrash metal band Sodom. ...


References

  1. ^ a b "Hutt", in Stephen J. Sansweet, Star Wars Encyclopedia (New York: Del Rey, 1998), p. 134, ISBN 0-345-40227-8.
  2. ^ a b "Jabba Desilijic Tiure (Jabba the Hutt)", in Sansweet, Star Wars Encyclopedia, pp. 146–147.
  3. ^ a b For example, see "Fat Wars: The Obesity Empire Strikes Back" at Center for Consumer Freedom.
  4. ^ a b Koenraad Kuiper, "Star Wars: An Imperial Myth," Journal of Popular Culture 21.4 (Spring 1988): p. 78.
  5. ^ a b Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, dir. Richard Marquand (DVD, 20th Century Fox, 2005), disc 1.
  6. ^ Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Special Edition, dir. George Lucas (DVD, 20th Century Fox, 2005), disc 1.
  7. ^ "Mos Espa Grand Arena" at the Star Wars Databank.
  8. ^ Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, dir. George Lucas (DVD, 20th Century Fox, 1999), disc 1.
  9. ^ Roy Thomas, Marvel Star Wars #2: Six Against the Galaxy (Marvel, August 1977).
  10. ^ Archie Goodwin, Marvel Star Wars #28: What Ever Happened to Jabba the Hut? (Marvel, October 1979).
  11. ^ Archie Goodwin, Marvel Star Wars #37: In Mortal Combat (Marvel, July 1980).
  12. ^ a b c Jabba the Hutt, Behind the Scenes, Star Wars Databank; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  13. ^ George Lucas, Star Wars: From the Adventures of Luke Skywalker (paperback; New York: Del Rey, 1977), p. 107, ISBN 0-345-26079-1.
  14. ^ Paul Davids and Hollace Davids, Zorba the Hutt's Revenge (New York: Bantam Spectra, 1992), ISBN 0-553-15889-9.
  15. ^ A. C. Crispin, The Hutt Gambit (New York: Bantam Spectra, 1997), ISBN 0-553-57416-7.
  16. ^ Jim Woodring, Jabba the Hutt: The Art of the Deal (Dark Horse Comics, 1998), ISBN 1-56971-310-3.
  17. ^ Kevin J. Anderson, ed., Tales from Jabba's Palace (paperback; New York: Bantam Spectra, 1996), ISBN 0-553-56815-9.
  18. ^ Timothy Zahn, Heir to the Empire (paperback; New York: Bantam Spectra, 1991), p. 27, ISBN 0-553-29612-4.
  19. ^ Murray Pomerance, "Hitchcock and the Dramaturgy of Screen Violence", in Steven Jay Schneider, ed., New Hollywood Violence (Manchester, Eng.: Manchester University Press, 2004), p. 47, ISBN 0-7190-6723-5.
  20. ^ From the title crawl of Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi; also a description from the Return of the Jedi novelization at Del Rey; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  21. ^ Jabba the Hutt, The Movies, Star Wars Databank; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  22. ^ Kathy Tyers, "A Time to Mourn, A Time to Dance: Oola's Tale", in Anderson, ed., Tales from Jabba's Palace, p. 80.
  23. ^ Roger Ebert, review of Return of the Jedi, Chicago Sun-Times, 25 May 1983, at RogerEbert.com; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  24. ^ Jeanne Cavelos, "Just Because It Goes 'Ho Ho Ho' Doesn't Mean It's Santa", The Science of Star Wars: An Astrophysicist's Independent Examination of Space Travel, Aliens, Planets, and Robots as Portrayed in the Star Wars Films and Books (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999), p. 57, ISBN 0-312-20958-4.
  25. ^ Tom Veitch and Martha Veitch, "A Hunter's Fate: Greedo's Tale", in Kevin J. Anderson, ed., Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina (paperback; New York: Bantam Spectra, 1995), pp. 49–53, ISBN 0-553-56468-4.
  26. ^ Ryder Windham, This Crumb for Hire, in A Decade of Dark Horse #2 (Dark Horse Comics, 1996).
  27. ^ Esther M. Friesner, "That's Entertainment: The Tale of Salacious Crumb", in Anderson, ed., Tales from Jabba's Palace, pp. 60–79.
  28. ^ Ephant Mon, Expanded Universe Star Wars Databank; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  29. ^ George Lucas interview, Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Special Edition (VHS, 20th Century Fox, 1997).
  30. ^ George Lucas commentary, Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Special Edition, dir. George Lucas, (DVD, 20th Century Fox, 2004).
  31. ^ Joseph Letteri interview, Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Special Edition (VHS, 20th Century Fox, 1997).
  32. ^ "A New Hope: Special Edition — What has changed?: Jabba the Hutt", 15 January 1997, at StarWars.com; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  33. ^ "Star Wars: The Changes — Part One" at DVDActic.com; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  34. ^ a b c George Lucas commentary, Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, Special Edition, dir. Richard Marquand (DVD, 20th Century Fox, 2004).
  35. ^ Ralph McQuarrie, quoted in Laurent Bouzereau, Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays (New York: Del Rey, 1997), p. 239, ISBN 0-345-40981-7.
  36. ^ a b c d From Star Wars to Jedi: The Making of a Saga, narrated by Mark Hamill (1985; VHS, CBS Fox Video, 1992).
  37. ^ Nilo Rodis-Jamero, quoted in Bouzereau, Annotated Screenplays, p. 239.
  38. ^ Biography of Phil Tippett at StarWars.com; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  39. ^ Larry Ward at the Internet Movie Database; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  40. ^ Tomlinson Holman, Sound for Film and Television (Burlington, Mass.: Focal Press, 2002), p. 11, ISBN 0-240-80453-8.
  41. ^ Ben Burtt commentary, Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, Special Edition, dir. Richard Marquand (DVD, 20th Century Fox, 2004).
  42. ^ Review of Return of the Jedi soundtrack by Filmtracks.com; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  43. ^ Gerald Sloan, "Yuba Meets Jabba: The Expanding Role of Tuba in Film Music", TUBA Journal, quoted in "Evening The Score: UA Professor Explores Tuba Music In Film", 27 June 2000, at University of Arkansas Daily Digest; last accessed July 3, 2006.
  44. ^ Bourezeau, Annoted Screenplays, p. 259.
  45. ^ A complete Jabba the Hutt playset sold by Kenner in 1983 was valued at $70 in 2003 by collectors if in mint condition and with original packaging. See Geoffrey T Carlton, Star Wars Super Collector's Wish Book: Identification & Values (Paducah, Ky.: Collector Books, 2003), p. 13, ISBN 1574323342.
  46. ^ Richard von Busack, "Jabba the Hutt slimes his way through a new graphic novel," review of Jabba the Hutt: The Art of the Deal at Metroactive Books.
  47. ^ Spaceballs, dir. Mel Brooks (MGM, 1987).
  48. ^ "The Hero's Return", Star Wars: The Myth of Magic exhibition at National Air and Space Museum.
  49. ^ Marian Keyes, Under the Duvet: Shoes, Reviews, Having the Blues, Builders, Babies, Families and Other Calamities (New York: HarperCollins, 2001), p. 199, ISBN 0060562080.
  50. ^ Laura Kalpakian, Steps and Exes: A Novel of Family (New York: HarperCollins, 2000), p. 58, ISBN 0380806592.
  51. ^ Matthew Bortolin, The Dharma of Star Wars (Somerville, Mass.: Wisdom Publications, 2005), p. 139, ISBN 0861714970.
  52. ^ W. C. Goodman, The Invisible Woman: Confronting Weight Prejudice in America (Carlsbad Calif.: Gürze Books, 1995), p. 57, ISBN 0936077107.
  53. ^ "Starvin' Marvin in Space", Episode 311, South Park, 17 November 1999 (DVD, Paramount, 2003).
  54. ^ Movie Connections at the Internet Movie Database
  55. ^ Mitchell Krugel, One Last Shot: The Story of Michael Jordan's Comeback (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2003), p. 55, ISBN 0312992238.
  56. ^ Patrick Mallon, California Dictatorship (Philadelphia: Xlibris, 2004), p. 235, ISBN 1413467970.
  57. ^ William G. Ouchi, Making Schools Work: A Revolutionary Plan to Get Your Children the Education They Need (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2003), p. 96, ISBN 0743246306.

is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Mangels, Andy. The Essential Guide to Characters. New York: Del Rey, 1995. ISBN 0-345-39535-2.
  • Reynolds, David West. Star Wars Episode I: The Visual Dictionary. New York: DK Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-7894-4701-0.
  • Wallace, Daniel. The New Essential Guide to Characters. New York: Del Rey, 2002. ISBN 0-345-44900-2.
  • Wallace, Daniel, and Kevin J. Anderson. The New Essential Chronology. New York: Del Rey, 2005. ISBN 0-345-49053-3.
  • Wixted, Martin. Star Wars Galaxy Guide 7: Mos Eisley. Honesdale, Penn.: West End Games, 1993. ISBN 0-87431-187-X.

External links

Screenshot of the online Star Wars Databank in July 2006 The Star Wars Databank is the official Star Wars sites repository of information on characters, locations, and technology, sorted by category. ... Wikia (no official pronunciation[2]; originally Wikicities) is a selective wiki hosting service (or wiki farm) operated by Wikia, Inc. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 film by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and Jake Lloyd. ... Padmé Amidala is a fictional character in George Lucas science fiction saga Star Wars. ... Security Battle Droids shooting at Obi-Wan Kenobi and Qui-Gon Jinn. ... Jar Jar Binks (born c. ... C-3PO (pronounced IPA: []., often shortened to Threepio) is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, who appears in both the original Star Wars films and the prequel trilogy. ... Bib Fortuna was a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Nute Gunray is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, played by Silas Carson. ... Center: Rabé dressed as a handmaiden in The Phantom Menace. ... Qui-Gon Jinn is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe, portrayed by Liam Neeson in Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ... Obi-Wan Kenobi is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Darth Maul is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Boss Nass is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... The following is a list of characters from the Old Republic era of the Star Wars fictional universe, dating from 5,000 BBY to the end of the events depicted in Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, approximately 19 BBY. Jedi are not included in this list. ... Palpatine is a fictional character in George Lucas science fiction saga Star Wars. ... The following is a list of characters from the Old Republic era of the Star Wars fictional universe, dating from 5,000 BBY to the end of the events depicted in Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, approximately 19 BBY. Jedi are not included in this list. ... R2-D2 (called R2, or Artoo for short), is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Sebulba is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe. ... Anakin Skywalker is the central character in the Star Wars franchise. ... Shmi Skywalker is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe, portayed by Pernilla August. ... The following is a list of characters from the Old Republic era of the Star Wars fictional universe, dating from 5,000 BBY to the end of the events depicted in Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, approximately 19 BBY. Jedi are not included in this list. ... Finis Valorum (92 BBY - 22 BBY) is a fictional character from Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ... Watto is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe, featured in the films The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones. ... Windu redirects here. ... Yoda is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, who appears in all of the franchises films except for Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The Boonta Eve Classic is a fictional racing tournament in the Star Wars universe. ... The Battle or Invasion of Naboo refers to a pre-Clone Wars conflict in the fictional Star Wars universe that occurred on the peaceful planet Naboo shortly after the Invasion of Theed (Naboos capital city) in which the organisation called the Trade Federation sent an army of battle droids... Coruscant (pronounced //)[1] is a fictional planet in the Star Wars universe. ... -1... In George Lucass Star Wars saga, Tatooine is the home planet of the Skywalker family and Ben Kenobi, the setting for much of the action in the sagas films (as well as several of the novels and other pieces of written fiction) and one of the most iconic... Coruscant (pronounced //)[1] is a fictional planet in the Star Wars universe. ... This is a list of cities and towns in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... This is a list of cities and towns in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... This is a list of cities and towns in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars starfighters. ... The Naboo Royal N-1 Starfighter is a fictional spaceship in the Star Wars universe. ... The following is a list of fictional starships, cruisers, battleships, and other capital ships seen in the Star Wars saga. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars assault gunboats, dropships, shuttles, space transports, and other support spaceships. ... The following is a list of fictional starships, cruisers, battleships, and other capital ships seen in the Star Wars saga. ... In the fictional Star Wars universe, the Sith Infiltrator is a small craft used by the Sith apprentice Darth Maul in Star Wars Episode I. He dubbed his vessel the Scimitar. ... The following is a list of fictional starships, cruisers, battleships, and other capital ships seen in the Star Wars saga. ... The Droid Control Ship is fictional spaceship in the movies Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, and Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars assault gunboats, dropships, shuttles, space transports, and other support spaceships. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars air vehicles, including floaters, skyhoppers, and airspeeders. ... The Swoop bike is a fictional Star Wars vehicle. ... This article is about minor vehicles in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars ground vehicles, including tanks, landspeeders, and assault units. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars ground vehicles, including tanks, landspeeders, and assault units. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars aquatic vehicles. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars ground vehicles, including tanks, landspeeders, and assault units. ... Sandcrawler The sandcrawler is a fictional transport vehicle in the Star Wars universe that is found on the desert planet Tatooine. ... The term speeder bike describes any of a variety of small personal transport vehicles in the fictional Star Wars universe that use repulsorlift engines to hover above the ground and move very rapidly. ... The Single Trooper Aerial Platform (STAP) is an agile flying machine designed for use by the Trade Federations battle droids. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars ground vehicles, including tanks, landspeeders, and assault units. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars ground vehicles, including tanks, landspeeders, and assault units. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars ground vehicles, including tanks, landspeeders, and assault units. ... Star Wars Episode I is a 1999 pinball game released by Williams. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Wedge Antilles is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... C-3PO (pronounced IPA: []., often shortened to Threepio) is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, who appears in both the original Star Wars films and the prequel trilogy. ... Chewbacca (or Chewie) is a character in the Star Wars universe. ... This is a list of minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe who are part of the Rebel Alliance. ... Boba Fett is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe. ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe who are bounty hunters. ... // The Falleen are a scaled, cold-blooded, reptilian humanoid species with pigmentation that varies with mood, known to be as long lived as the Hutts (the Falleen have an average lifespan of 250 Standard Years) who inhabit and originate from the planet Falleen. ... Obi-Wan Kenobi is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Otherworldly wildlife -- Terryl Whitlatchs creature study of Tatooine inhabitants This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe who reside, or at least appear primarily, on the planet Tatooine. ... Otherworldly wildlife -- Terryl Whitlatchs creature study of Tatooine inhabitants This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe who reside, or at least appear primarily, on the planet Tatooine. ... Princess Leia Organa Solo of Alderaan (born Leia Amidala Skywalker) is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... R2-D2 (called R2, or Artoo for short), is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... A Tusken Raider Tusken Raiders (or Sand People) are fictional creatures in the Star Wars saga. ... Han Solo is a character in the Star Wars universe. ... Luke Skywalker is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe portrayed by Mark Hamill in the films Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, and Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. ... Stormtroopers have distinctive white armor and a helmet with a grimacing, skull-like visage. ... Grand Moff Governor Wilhuff Tarkin is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe and is an antagonist in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope where he was portrayed by British actor Peter Cushing. ... For information on this characters appearance in the Star Wars prequel trilogy, see Anakin Skywalker. ... In the fictional Star Wars universe, Alderaan is the home of Princess Leia, Bail Organa and also, in 4000 BBY, Ulic Qel Droma who fought in the Great Sith War. ... Combatants Galactic Empire Rebel Alliance Commanders Grand Moff Tarkin † Darth Vader Admiral Motti † General Tagge Chief Bast General Dodonna General Willard Garven Dreis (Red Leader)† John Vander (Gold Leader)† Admiral Ackbar (Supreme Commander of the Rebel Alliance Fleet) Strength TIE Fighters Darth Vaders TIE Advanced Death Star heavy, medium... In George Lucass Star Wars saga, Tatooine is the home planet of the Skywalker family and Ben Kenobi, the setting for much of the action in the sagas films (as well as several of the novels and other pieces of written fiction) and one of the most iconic... In the fictional Star Wars universe, Alderaan is the home of Princess Leia, Bail Organa and also, in 4000 BBY, Ulic Qel Droma who fought in the Great Sith War. ... Yavin 4 is one of the many moons of the gas planet Yavin in the Star Wars universe. ... Mos Eisley is a spaceport town on the planet Tatooine in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... For other uses, see Death Star (disambiguation). ... An escape pod is a capsule or craft used to escape a vessel in an emergency, usually only big enough for one person. ... The Sentinel-class Landing Craft was a transport used by the Empire to carry troops or supplies in Star Wars. ... A typical Imperial Class Star Destroyer An Imperial Star Destroyer is a type of fictional starship from the Star Wars universe. ... The Millennium Falcon is a fictional spacecraft in the Star Wars universe commanded by smuggler Han Solo (Harrison Ford) and his Wookiee first mate, Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew). ... In the Star Wars galaxy, the Outrider is the spaceship of the Corellian smuggler Dash Rendar. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars assault gunboats, dropships, shuttles, space transports, and other support spaceships. ... In the fictional Star Wars saga, the blockade runner Tantive IV, was a Corellian Corvette used by Bail Organa and later his adoptive daughter Leia Organa. ... The TIE/Advanced fighter, also known as the TIE Advanced x1 or Darth Vaders TIE Fighter, is a prototype starfighter in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... TIE Fighter, see X-wing computer game series. ... X-wing fighters on their way into battle in a still from Star Wars. ... The BTL Y-wing Starfighter/Bomber is one of the Rebel Alliance starfighters in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... The Swoop bike is a fictional Star Wars vehicle. ... Sandcrawler The sandcrawler is a fictional transport vehicle in the Star Wars universe that is found on the desert planet Tatooine. ... The T-16 Skyhopper is a fictitious vehicle from the Star Wars universe. ... Landspeeders are the Star Wars equivilent of automobiles. ... Landspeeders are the Star Wars equivilent of automobiles. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... This article is about minor droids in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... Admiral Ackbar is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Wedge Antilles is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... C-3PO (pronounced IPA: []., often shortened to Threepio) is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, who appears in both the original Star Wars films and the prequel trilogy. ... Lando Calrissian is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Chewbacca (or Chewie) is a character in the Star Wars universe. ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe, who do not fit into any other category. ... Otherworldly wildlife -- Terryl Whitlatchs creature study of Tatooine inhabitants This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe who reside, or at least appear primarily, on the planet Tatooine. ... EV-9D9 (or Eve-Ninedenine) was the masochistic and sadistic supervisor of Droid Operations for Jabba the Hutt. ... Ewoks are a species of bearlike hunter-gatherers that inhabit the forest moon of Endor. ... Fanatically loyal, the Guardsmen protect the former Supreme Chancellor turned Galactic Emperor and his personal residences unceasingly In the fictional Star Wars universe, the Emperors Royal Guard (a. ... Boba Fett is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe. ... Bib Fortuna was a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... // The Falleen are a scaled, cold-blooded, reptilian humanoid species with pigmentation that varies with mood, known to be as long lived as the Hutts (the Falleen have an average lifespan of 250 Standard Years) who inhabit and originate from the planet Falleen. ... Moff Jerjerrod was an Imperial officer from the fictional Star Wars universe. ... Obi-Wan Kenobi is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe, who do not fit into any other category. ... Crix Madine (b. ... The original Max Rebo Band, from the left: Max Rebo, Droopy McCool, and Sy Snootles The Max Rebo Band is a fictional pop music band in George Lucass science fiction saga Star Wars. ... -Mon Mothma Mon Mothma (48 BBY-24 ABY) was the Senator of Chandrila in the waning days of the Old Republic and leader of the Rebel Alliance and New Republic. ... In the Star Wars universe, Nien Nunb is co-pilot of the Millennium Falcon in Return of the Jedi. ... Otherworldly wildlife -- Terryl Whitlatchs creature study of Tatooine inhabitants This article is about minor characters in the fictional Star Wars universe who reside, or at least appear primarily, on the planet Tatooine. ... Princess Leia Organa Solo of Alderaan (born Leia Amidala Skywalker) is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Palpatine is a fictional character in George Lucas science fiction saga Star Wars. ... Fleet Admiral Firmus Piett is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, played by Kenneth Colley in The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. ... R2-D2 (called R2, or Artoo for short), is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... For a definition of the word rancor, see the Wiktionary entry rancor. ... The Great Pit of Carkoon with the original Sarlacc from Return of the Jedi (1983). ... Han Solo is a character in the Star Wars universe. ... Luke Skywalker is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe portrayed by Mark Hamill in the films Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, and Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. ... Stormtroopers have distinctive white armor and a helmet with a grimacing, skull-like visage. ... For information on this characters appearance in the Star Wars prequel trilogy, see Anakin Skywalker. ... Anakin Skywalker is the central character in the Star Wars franchise. ... Wicket Wystri Warrick is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, first introduced in Return of the Jedi and played by Warwick Davis. ... Yoda is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, who appears in all of the franchises films except for Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... The Great Pit of Carkoon with the original Sarlacc from Return of the Jedi (1983). ... Yoda is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe, who appears in all of the franchises films except for Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... This article is about the battle in the film Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Ewoks: The Battle for Endor Combatants Galactic Empire Rebel Alliance Ewoks Commanders Palpatine  â€  Moff Jerjerrod  â€  Firmus Piett  â€  Darth Vader  â€  Gilad Pellaeon Nial Declann  â€  Osvald Teshik Admiral Ackbar Mon Mothma Crix Madine Lando Calrissian... Luke Skywalker is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe portrayed by Mark Hamill in the films Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, and Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. ... The Galactic Empire is one of the main factions in the Star Wars universe. ... In George Lucass Star Wars saga, Tatooine is the home planet of the Skywalker family and Ben Kenobi, the setting for much of the action in the sagas films (as well as several of the novels and other pieces of written fiction) and one of the most iconic... Dagobah is both a planet and the system in which it resides, in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... In the fictional universe of Star Wars, the forest moon of Endor is a moon which is home to the Ewoks and above which the second Death Star was constructed in Return of the Jedi. ... Bespin is a fictional planet in the Star Wars universe. ... Coruscant (pronounced //)[1] is a fictional planet in the Star Wars universe. ... -1... For other uses, see Death Star (disambiguation). ... Ewok Village is fictional village or small city on the Forest Moon of Endor. ... Coruscant (pronounced //)[1] is a fictional planet in the Star Wars universe. ... Mos Eisley is a spaceport town on the planet Tatooine in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... This is a list of cities and towns in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... The A-wing, an interceptor starfighter in the Star Wars universe, is used by the Rebel Alliance. ... B-wing is also the title of an expansion pack to the Star Wars: X-Wing The B-wing is one of the Rebel Alliance starfighters in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... The Nebulon-B Frigate is a starship from the fictional Star Wars universe, and it has also been known as the Escort Frigate or the Rebel Cruiser. ... In the fictional Star Wars universe, the Lambda-class shuttle is a standard light utility aerospacecraft in use throughout the Imperial Navy. ... A group of Imperial Star Destroyers. ... The Millennium Falcon is a fictional spacecraft in the Star Wars universe commanded by smuggler Han Solo (Harrison Ford) and his Wookiee first mate, Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew). ... Home One- Mon Calamari Star Cruiser In the Star Wars fictional universe Mon Calamari Star Cruisers are the main cruisers in the Rebel Alliance/New Republic/Federation of Free Alliances fleet for a significant portion of the Galactic Civil War. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars assault gunboats, dropships, shuttles, space transports, and other support spaceships. ... It has been suggested that Executor (Star Wars) be merged into this article or section. ... In the fictional Star Wars saga, the blockade runner Tantive IV, was a Corellian Corvette used by Bail Organa and later his adoptive daughter Leia Organa. ... The TIE bomber, a spacecraft of the fictional Star Wars universe, is a larger, less maneuverable version of the TIE Fighter used for destroying larger Rebel ships and pinpoint planetary bombardment. ... TIE Fighter, see X-wing computer game series. ... The TIE interceptor, or T/I, a fictional starfighter in the Star Wars universe, is an improved version of the TIE fighter that is identifiable by its bent-wing and arrow-shaped side wing panels, as distinct from the hexagonal ones on its predecessor craft. ... X-wing fighters on their way into battle in a still from Star Wars. ... The BTL Y-wing Starfighter/Bomber is one of the Rebel Alliance starfighters in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... All Terrain Scout Transports are bipedal war machines used by the Galactic Empire in the fictional Star Wars universe. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars air vehicles, including floaters, skyhoppers, and airspeeders. ... The term speeder bike describes any of a variety of small personal transport vehicles in the fictional Star Wars universe that use repulsorlift engines to hover above the ground and move very rapidly. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars air vehicles, including floaters, skyhoppers, and airspeeders. ... The term skiff is applied to various river craft, but a skiff is typically a small flat-bottomed open boat with a pointed bow and square stern. ... The T-16 Skyhopper is a fictitious vehicle from the Star Wars universe. ... The following is a list of fictional Star Wars air vehicles, including floaters, skyhoppers, and airspeeders. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Star Wars: Databank | Jabba the Hutt's Palace (401 words)
Jabba's bloodlust was slaked by a secret concealed beneath his throne room.
In this bone-strewn cave lurked the rancor, a fearsome and vicious predator bred for combat and ferocity.
Jabba, aboard his stately sail barge, led an execution party into the desert.
Jabba the Hutt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4715 words)
Jabba the Hutt's palace on the desert planet Tatooine is a former monastery for a group of mystics known as the B'omarr monks.
Jabba the Hutt's physical appearance is as grotesque as his character and reinforces his personality as a criminal deviant.
Actress and spokeswoman Sally Struthers is parodied as Jabba the Hutt in an episode of South Park in 1999.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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