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Encyclopedia > J. M. W. Turner
J. M. W. Turner

Self portrait, oil on canvas, circa 1799
Born April 23, 1775(1775-04-23)
Covent Garden, London, England
Died December 19, 1851 (aged 76)
Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, London, England —
Unspecified (burial location: St. Paul's Cathedral, London)
Other names Joseph Turner and William Turner

Joseph Mallord William Turner (23 April 1775[1]19 December 1851) was an English Romantic landscape painter, watercolourist and printmaker, whose style can be said to have laid the foundation for Impressionism. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2024x2038, 254 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): J. M. W. Turner ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Covent Garden is a district in London, located on the easternmost parts of the City of Westminster and the southwest corner of the London Borough of Camden. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Cheyne Walk (pronounced Chaynee) is the most historic street in Chelsea, a bit of picturesque old London. Most of the houses were built in the early eighteenth century. ... Chelsea is a district of London, loosely defined by the area around the Kings Road, beginning at Sloane Square at one end, and the Worlds End public house at the other, the River Thames and the Victorian artists district to the south, and some parts between the King... This is an index of lists of people who died, by cause of death, in alphabetical order of cause. ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Romantics redirects here. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... Printmaking is a process for producing a work of art in ink; the work (called a print) is created indirectly, through the transfer of ink from the surface upon which the work was originally drawn or otherwise composed. ... This article is about the art movement. ...

Contents

Life and career

Turner was born in Maiden Lane Covent Garden, London, England. His father, William Gay Turner (27 January 17387 August 1829), was a barber and wig maker.[2] His mother, Mary Marshall, became increasingly mentally unstable, perhaps, in part, due to the early death of Turner's younger sister, Helen Turner in 1786. She died in 1804, after having been committed in 1799 to a mental asylum. Covent Garden is a district in London, located on the easternmost parts of the City of Westminster and the southwest corner of the London Borough of Camden. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... A psychiatric hospital (also called a mental hospital or asylum) is a hospital specializing in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ...


Possibly due to the load placed on the family by these problems, the young Turner was sent in 1785 to stay with his uncle on his mother's side in Brentford, which was then a small town west of London on the banks of the River Thames. It was here that he first expressed an interest in painting. A year later he went to school in Margate on the north-east Kent coast. By this time he had created many drawings, which his father exhibited in his shop window. 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... , Brentford is a suburb in the London Borough of Hounslow at the confluence of the River Thames and the River Brent in West London, situated approximately 8 miles (12. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... Margate is a town in Thanet, Kent, England (population about 60,000). ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ...

The fighting Temeraire tugged to her last berth to be broken up, painted 1839.
The fighting Temeraire tugged to her last berth to be broken up, painted 1839.

He entered the Royal Academy of Art schools in 1789, when he was only 14 years old,[3] and was accepted into the academy a year later. Sir Joshua Reynolds, president of the Royal Academy at the time, chaired the panel that admitted him. At first Turner showed a keen interest in architecture but was advised to keep to painting by the architect Thomas Hardwick (junior). A watercolour of Turner's was accepted for the Summer Exhibition of 1790 after only one year's study. He exhibited his first oil painting in 1796, Fishermen at Sea, and thereafter exhibited at the academy nearly every year for the rest of his life. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x742, 509 KB) The Fighting Téméraire tugged to her last Berth to be broken by J. M. W. Turner, 1838, Watercolour, 91 x 122 cm. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x742, 509 KB) The Fighting Téméraire tugged to her last Berth to be broken by J. M. W. Turner, 1838, Watercolour, 91 x 122 cm. ... The fighting Téméraire, tugged to her last berth to be broken up by J. M. W. Turner, 1838. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London, England. ... Sir Joshua Reynolds Sir Joshua Reynolds (July 16, 1723–February 23, 1792) was the most important and influential of eighteenth-century English painters, specialising in portraits and promoting the Grand Style in painting which depended on idealization of the imperfect. ... For the American politican, read the article Thomas W. Hardwick. ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... Royal Academy during the 2004 summer exhibition The Summer Exhibition is an art exhibition held annually by the Royal Academy in Burlington House, Piccadilly in central London. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Mona Lisa, Oil on wood panel painting by Leonardo da Vinci. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Although renowned for his oils, Turner is also one of the greatest masters of British watercolour landscape painting. He is commonly known as "the painter of light".[4] Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ...


One of his most famous oil paintings is The fighting Temeraire tugged to her last berth to be broken up, painted in 1838, which hangs in the National Gallery, London. See also The Golden Bough. J.M.W. Turner. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ... The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion is a wide-ranging comparative study of mythology and religion, written by Scottish anthropologist Sir James George Frazer (1854–1941). ...


Turner travelled widely in Europe, starting with France and Switzerland in 1802 and studying in the Louvre in Paris in the same year. He also made many visits to Venice during his lifetime. On a visit to Lyme Regis, in Dorset, England, he painted a stormy scene (now in the Cincinnati Art Museum). --69. ... This article is about the museum. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Lyme Regis (IPA: ) is a coastal town in West Dorset, England, situated 25 miles west of Dorchester and 25 miles east of Exeter. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dɔ.sət], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... History The Cincinnati Art Museum was founded in 1881 and opened in 1886. ...


Important support for his works also came from Walter Ramsden Fawkes, of Farnley Hall, near Otley in Yorkshire, who became a close friend of the artist. Turner first visited Otley in 1797, aged 22, when commissioned to paint watercolours of the area. He was so attracted to Otley and the surrounding area that he returned time and time again. The stormy backdrop of Hannibal Crossing The Alps is reputed to have been inspired by a storm over Otley's Chevin while Turner was staying at Farnley Hall. J. M. W. Turners 1816 painting Grouse Shooting on Beamsley Beacon - Fawkes is one of the subjects[1]. Walter Ramsden Hawkesworth Fawkes (2 March 1769 – 24 October 1825) was a Yorkshire landowner, writer and Member of Parliament (MP) for Yorkshire from 1806 to 1807. ... This article discusses the stately home Farnley Hall, Farnley, in North Yorkshire, near Otley, which is in West Yorkshire. ... Otley on a market day, looking up Kirkgate with The Chevin in the background Otley is a town in northern England by the River Wharfe. ... Disambiguation. ...


Turner was also a frequent guest of Lord Lamont at Petworth House in West Sussex and painted scenes from the grounds of the house and of the Sussex countryside, including a view of the Chichester Canal that Egremont funded. Petworth House still displays a number of paintings. Norman Stewart Hughson Lamont, Baron Lamont of Lerwick, PC (born 8 May 1942) is a former Conservative Party MP for Kingston-upon-Thames, England. ... A distant view of Petworth House across the lake in Petworth Park by JMW Turner. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... For the larger local government district, see Chichester (district). ...

The shipwreck of the Minotaur, oil on canvas.

As he grew older, Turner became more eccentric. He had few close friends except for his father, who lived with him for thirty years, eventually working as his studio assistant. His father's death in 1829 had a profound effect on him, and thereafter he was subject to bouts of depression. He never married, although he had two daughters by Sarah Danby, one born in 1801, the other in 1811. Image File history File links Shipwreck_turner. ... Image File history File links Shipwreck_turner. ... HMS Minotaur fought at the Battle of the Nile and the Battle of Trafalgar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ...


He died in the house of his mistress Mrs Sophia Caroline Booth in Cheyne Walk, Chelsea on 19 December 1851. At his request he was buried in St Paul's Cathedral, where he lies next to Sir Joshua Reynolds. His last exhibition at the Royal Academy was in 1850. Mistress is the feminine form of the word master. ... Cheyne Walk (pronounced Chaynee) is the most historic street in Chelsea, a bit of picturesque old London. Most of the houses were built in the early eighteenth century. ... Chelsea is a district of London, loosely defined by the area around the Kings Road, beginning at Sloane Square at one end, and the Worlds End public house at the other, the River Thames and the Victorian artists district to the south, and some parts between the King... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... Sir Joshua Reynolds Sir Joshua Reynolds (July 16, 1723–February 23, 1792) was the most important and influential of eighteenth-century English painters, specialising in portraits and promoting the Grand Style in painting which depended on idealization of the imperfect. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The architect Philip Hardwick (1792–1870) who was a friend of Turner's and also the son of the artist's tutor, Thomas Hardwick, was one in charge of his funeral arrangements and wrote to those who knew Turner to tell them at the time of his death that "I must inform you, we have lost him". Philip Hardwick (1792-1870) was an eminent English architect (son of architect Thomas Hardwick (junior) (1752-1829), and grandson of Thomas Hardwick Senior (1725-1798)). He is particularly associated with transport-related buildings (eg: railway stations, warehouses) in London and elsewhere. ... For the American politican, read the article Thomas W. Hardwick. ...


Style

Turner's talent was recognized early in his life. He became a full art academician at the age of 29.[citation needed] Financial independence allowed Turner to innovate freely; his mature work is characterized by a chromatic palette and broadly applied atmospheric washes of paint. According to David Piper's The Illustrated History of Art, his later pictures were called "fantastic puzzles." However, Turner was still recognized as an artistic genius: the influential English art critic John Ruskin described Turner as the artist who could most "stirringly and truthfully measure the moods of Nature." (Piper 321) The title Academician denotes a Full Member of an art, literary, or scientific academy. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ...


Suitable vehicles for Turner's imagination were to be found in the subjects of shipwrecks, fires (such as the burning of Parliament in 1834, an event which Turner rushed to witness first-hand, and which he transcribed in a series of watercolor sketches), natural catastrophes, and natural phenomena such as sunlight, storm, rain, and fog. He was fascinated by the violent power of the sea, as seen in Dawn after the Wreck (1840) and The Slave Ship (1840). The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons (1835) by J. M. W. Turner. ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... The Slave Ship The Slave Ship or Slavers throwing overboard the Dead and Dying - Typhoon coming on is a painting by J.M.W. Turner, first exhibited in 1840. ...


Turner placed human beings in many of his paintings to indicate his affection for humanity on the one hand (note the frequent scenes of people drinking and merry-making or working in the foreground), but its vulnerability and vulgarity amidst the 'sublime' nature of the world on the other hand. 'Sublime' here means awe-inspiring, savage grandeur, a natural world unmastered by man, evidence of the power of God - a theme that artists and poets were exploring in the late 18c. and early 19c. The significance of light was to Turner the emanation of God's spirit and this was why he refined the subject matter of his later paintings by leaving out solid objects and detail, concentrating on the play of light on water, the radiance of skies and fires. Although these late paintings appear to be 'impressionistic' and therefore a forerunner of the French school, Turner was striving for expression of spirituality in the world, rather than responding primarily to optical phenomena. ("The Sun is God," he stated shortly before his death.)

Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway painted (1844).
Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway painted (1844).

His first works, such as Tintern Abbey (1795) and Venice: S. Giorgio Maggiore (1819), stayed true to the traditions of English landscape. However, in Hannibal Crossing the Alps (1812), an emphasis on the destructive power of nature had already come into play. His distinctive style of painting, in which he used watercolor technique with oil paints, created lightness, fluency, and ephemeral atmospheric effects. (Piper 321) Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3567x2648, 1679 KB) J. M. W. Turner - Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway (1844), oil on canvas, National Gallery, London The painting depicts an early locomotive of the Great Western Railway crossing the River Thames on Brunels recently... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3567x2648, 1679 KB) J. M. W. Turner - Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway (1844), oil on canvas, National Gallery, London The painting depicts an early locomotive of the Great Western Railway crossing the River Thames on Brunels recently...


One popular story about Turner, though it likely has little basis in reality, states that he even had himself "tied to the mast of a ship in order to experience the drama" of the elements during a storm at sea[5].


In his later years he used oils ever more transparently, and turned to an evocation of almost pure light by use of shimmering colour. A prime example of his mature style can be seen in Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway, where the objects are barely recognizable. The intensity of hue and interest in evanescent light not only placed Turner's work in the vanguard of English painting, but later exerted an influence upon art in France, as well; the Impressionists, particularly Claude Monet, carefully studied his techniques. In the modern art era, advocates of abstract art were also inspired by Turner.[citation needed] Rain, Steam, and Speed – The Great Western Railway is an oil painting by the 19th century British painter J.M.W. Turner. ... See also Impressionist (entertainment): A girl with a watering can by Renoir, 1876 Impressionism was a 19th century art movement, which began as a private association of Paris-based artists who exhibited publicly in 1874. ... Claude Monet also known as Oscar-Claude Monet or Claude Oscar Monet (November 14, 1840 – December 5, 1926)[1] was a founder of French impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movements philosophy of expressing ones perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... Kazimir Malevich, Black square 1915 Abstract art is now generally understood to mean art that does not depict objects in the natural world, but instead uses color and form in a non-representational way. ...


It has been suggested that the high levels of ash in the atmosphere during the 1816 "Year Without a Summer," which led to unusually spectacular sunsets during this period, were an inspiration for some of Turner's work. Development of global average temperatures during the last 1000 years. ...


John Ruskin says in his "Notes" on Turner in March 1878, that an early patron, Dr Thomas Monro, the Principal Physician of Bedlam, was a significant influence on Turner's style: Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ... Descended from the Munro family of Fowlis, the Monros were a notable dynasty of doctors to London in the 18th and 19th century where they were involved in early work on curing insanity. Four generations occupied successively the position of (Principle) Physician of the notorious Bethlem Hospital (Bedlam). ... Look up Bedlam in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

His true master was Dr Monro; to the practical teaching of that first patron and the wise simplicity of method of watercolour study, in which he was disciplined by him and companioned by Giston, the healthy and constant development of the greater power is primarily to be attributed; the greatness of the power itself, it is impossible to over-estimate.

The first American to buy a Turner painting was James Lenox of New York City, a private collector. Lenox wished to own a Turner and in 1845 bought one sight unseen through an intermediary, his friend C. R. Leslie. From among the paintings Turner had on hand and was willing to sell for GBP £500, Leslie selected and shipped the 1832 atmospheric seascape Staffa, Fingal's Cave.[6] Worried about the painting's reception by Lenox, who knew Turner's work only through his etchings, Leslie wrote Lenox that the quality of Staffa, "a most poetic picture of a steam boat" would become apparent in time. Upon receiving the painting Lenox was baffled, and "greatly disappointed" by what he called the painting's "indistinctness". When Leslie was forced to relay this opinion to Turner, Turner said "You should tell Mr. Lenox that indistinctness is my fault."[7] Staffa, Fingal's Cave is currently owned by the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Connecticut. James Lenox (19 August 1800 - 17 February 1880) was an American bibliophile and philanthropist, born in New York City. ... GBP may be: short for Game Boy Player the ISO currency code for the British Pound Sterling. ... The Yale Center for British Art is an art museum associated with Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ... “New Haven” redirects here. ...


Legacy

J.M.W. Turner, Calais Pier
J.M.W. Turner, Calais Pier

Turner left a small fortune which he hoped would be used to support what he called "decayed artists". Part of the money went to the Royal Academy of Arts, which now does not use it for this purpose though occasionally it awards students the Turner Medal. His collection of finished paintings was bequeathed to the British nation, and he intended that a special gallery would be built to house them. This did not come to pass owing to a failure to agree on a site, and then to the parsimony of British governments. Twenty-two years after his death, the British Parliament passed an Act allowing his paintings to be lent to museums outside London, and so began the process of scattering the pictures which Turner had wanted to be kept together. In 1910 the main part of the Turner Bequest, which includes unfinished paintings and drawings, was rehoused in the Duveen Turner Wing at the Tate Gallery. In 1987 a new wing of the Tate, the Clore Gallery, was opened specifically to house the Turner bequest, though some of the most important paintings in it remain in the National Gallery in contravention of Turner's condition that the finished pictures be kept and shown together. Download high resolution version (3200x2250, 432 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (3200x2250, 432 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article refers to an art institution in London. ... Tate Britain is a part of the Tate Gallery in Britain, along with Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives. ... Tate Britain is a part of the Tate Gallery in Britain, along with Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives. ...

Turner's 1813 watercolour, Ivy Bridge
Turner's 1813 watercolour, Ivy Bridge

In 1974, the Turner Museum was founded in the USA by Douglass Montrose-Graem to house his collection of Turner prints[8]. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ivybridge is a town in the South Hams area of Devon, England. ...


A prestigious annual art award, the Turner Prize, created in 1984, was named in Turner's honour, but has become increasingly controversial, having promoted art which has no apparent connection with Turner's. Twenty years later the more modest Winsor & Newton Turner Watercolour Award was founded. The Turner Prize is an annual prize given to a British visual artist under 50, named after the painter J.M.W. Turner. ... This article is about the year. ...


A major exhibition, "Turner's Britain", with material, (including The Fighting Temeraire) on loan from around the globe, was held at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery from 7 November 2003 to 8 February 2004. Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery Opened in 1885, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery (BM&AG), in Birmingham, England, has a collection of international importance covering fine art, ceramics, metalwork, jewellery, archaeology, ethnography, local and industrial history. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2005, Turner's The Fighting Temeraire was voted Britain's "greatest painting" in a public poll organized by the BBC[9]. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


In October 2005 Professor Harold Livermore, its owner for 60 years, gave Sandycombe Lodge, the villa at Twickenham which Turner designed and built for himself, to the Sandycombe Lodge Trust to be preserved as a monument to the artist. In 2006 he additionally gave some land to the Trust which had been part of Turner's domaine. The Friends of Turner's House were formed in 2004 to support it.


In April 2006, Christie's New York auctioned Giudecca, La Donna Della Salute and San Giorgio, a view of Venice exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1841, for US$35.8 million, setting a new record for a Turner. The New York Times stated that according to two sources who had requested anonymity the buyer was casino magnate Stephen Wynn. The Christies auction house in South Kensington, London Christies American branch in Rockefeller Center, New York Christies is a fine art auction house, the largest and by some accounts the oldest in the world. ... This article is about the state. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Stephen Alan Wynn (born January 27, 1942 in New Haven, Connecticut) is a casino resort developer. ...


In 2006, Turner's Glaucus and Scylla (1840) was returned by Kimbell Art Museum to the heirs of John and Anna Jaffe after a Holocaust Claim was made.[10] The painting was repurchased by the Kimbell for $5.7 million at a sale by Christie's in April of 2007[11]. [12]. The Kimbell Art Museum is situated in the Cultural District of Fort Worth, Texas. ... “Shoah” redirects here. ... The Christies auction house in South Kensington, London Christies American branch in Rockefeller Center, New York Christies is a fine art auction house, the largest and by some accounts the oldest in the world. ...


Selected works

The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... The Battle of Trafalgar, as seen from the mizzen starboard shrouds of the Victory by J. M. W. Turner (oil on canvas, 1806–1808) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000), with a complementary website Tate Online (1998). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1229, 161 KB) Description: Title: de: Schneesturm: Hannibal und sein Herr überqueren die Alpen Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 144,7 × 236 cm Country of origin: de: Großbritanien Current location (city): de: London Current location (gallery): de: Tate... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000), with a complementary website Tate Online (1998). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (985x713, 1102 KB) File links No pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file. ... The Yale Center for British Art is an art museum associated with Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ... The Battle of Trafalgar The Battle of Trafalgar was painted by J. M. W. Turner in 1824. ... The National Maritime Museum, Greenwich The National Maritime Museum (NMM) is the leading maritime museum of the United Kingdom, and one of the most important in the world. ... This article is about Greenwich in England. ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ... Download high resolution version (863x644, 101 KB)J. M. W. Turner - The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons (1835) Oil on canvas, Philadelphia Museum of Art Turner witnessed the fire that burnt down most of the Palace of Westminster on 16 October 1834. ... The Philadelphia Museum of Art, located at the west end of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphias Fairmount Park, was established in 1876 in conjunction with the Centennial Exposition of the same year and is now among the largest and most important art museums in the United States. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x742, 509 KB) The Fighting Téméraire tugged to her last Berth to be broken by J. M. W. Turner, 1838, Watercolour, 91 x 122 cm. ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ... The Slave Ship The Slave Ship or Slavers throwing overboard the Dead and Dying - Typhoon coming on is a painting by J.M.W. Turner, first exhibited in 1840. ... Paul Gauguin, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (Doù venons-nous? Que faisons-nous? Où allons-nous?) (1897). ... The Kimbell Art Museum is situated in the Cultural District of Fort Worth, Texas. ... Download high resolution version (807x605, 65 KB)J. M. W. Turner - Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway (1844), oil on canvas, National Gallery, London The painting depicts an early locomotive of the Great Western Railway crossing the River Thames on Brunels recently completed Maidenhead Railway Bridge. ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ... Nunnington Hall — South Elevation Nunnington Hall is a country house situated in the English county of Yorkshire. ...

See also

British Art is the art of the island of Britain. ... A cloudscape by Jacob Isaakszoon van Ruysdael. ... The English school of painting is an expression for English (or British) painters who produced characteristically English paintings. ... // The history of painting reaches back in time to artifacts from pre-historic humans, and spans all cultures. ... The following is a partial list of British painters (in chronological order): George Gower (1540-1596) Nicolas Hilliard (1547-1619) Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599-1641) (born Flemish) William Dobson (1610-1646) John Michael Wright (1617-1694) Sir James Thornhill (1675-1734) John Wootton (1682-1764) John Vanderbank (1694-1739... Romantics redirects here. ... A sketchbook is most often an unlined notebook of quality paper, used by practitioners across the arts. ... Theory of Colours (original German title, Zur Farbenlehre) is a book published by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in 1810. ... See also Western art, History of painting, History of art, Art history, Painting, Outline of painting history Jan Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring, known as the Mona Lisa of the North 1665-1667 Édouard Manet, The Balcony 1868 The history of Western painting represents a continuous, though disrupted, tradition...

Notes

  1. ^ Exact date disputed
  2. ^ Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  3. ^ Finberg, A. J.: "The Life of J.M.A. Turner, R.A", page 17. Oxford At The Clarendon Press, 1961
  4. ^ TURNER, Joseph Mallord William National Gallery, London
  5. ^ Tate Gallery
  6. ^ The Art Archive, J.M.W. Turner, Staffa, Fingal's cave
  7. ^ JSTOR, 'Indistinctness Is My Fault': A Letter about Turner from C. R. Leslie to James Lenox
  8. ^ Turner Museum
  9. ^ BBC news story
  10. ^ Art Daily news story
  11. ^ News-Antique.com story
  12. ^ Fort Worth Star-Telegram story

Further reading

Non-fiction

Fiction

  • Wilson, James. The Dark Clue. London, Faber and Faber Limited. (2001) ISBN 0-571-20276-4

For other persons named James Wilson, see James Wilson (disambiguation). ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Persondata
NAME Turner, Joseph Mallord William
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Turner, J. M. W.
SHORT DESCRIPTION English Romantic landscape painter, watercolourist and printmaker
DATE OF BIRTH 23 April 1775
PLACE OF BIRTH Maiden Lane Covent Garden, London, England
DATE OF DEATH December 19, 1851
PLACE OF DEATH Cheyne Walk, Chelsea

 
 

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