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Encyclopedia > Ivysaur
Ivysaur

National
Bulbasaur - Ivysaur (#002) - Venusaur

Johto
Bulbasaur - Ivysaur (#227) - Venusaur
Japanese name Fushigisou
Stage Stage 1
Evolves from Bulbasaur
Evolves to Venusaur
Generation First
Species Seed Pokémon
Type Grass / Poison
Height 3 ft 3 in (1.0 m)
Weight 28.7 lb (13.0 kg)
Ability Overgrow

Ivysaur (フシギソウ Fushigisou?) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. The purpose of Ivysaur in the games, anime, and manga, as with all other Pokémon, is to battle both wild Pokémon—untamed creatures encountered while the player passes through various environments—and tamed Pokémon owned by Pokémon trainers.[2] © This image is copyrighted. ... This is a complete list of the Pokémon which appear in the National Pokédex as of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. ... Bulbasaur ) is the first of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Japanese Pokémon media franchise. ... Venusaur (フシギバナ Fushigibana in Japanese, Bisaflor in Germany and Florizarre in France) is is one of the 395 fictional species of Pokémon from the Pokémon franchise - a series of video games, anime, manga, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... This is a list of the Pokémon found in Pokémon Gold, Silver and Crystal in the order they are listed in the Johto Regional Pokédex. ... Bulbasaur ) is the first of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Japanese Pokémon media franchise. ... Venusaur (フシギバナ Fushigibana in Japanese, Bisaflor in Germany and Florizarre in France) is is one of the 395 fictional species of Pokémon from the Pokémon franchise - a series of video games, anime, manga, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... List of Pokémon by English name The following is a list of all fictional Pokémon characters ordered alphabetically by their name in English. ... This chart shows the evolution chains of all 391 fictional Pokémon characters. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bulbasaur ) is the first of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Japanese Pokémon media franchise. ... Venusaur (フシギバナ Fushigibana in Japanese, Bisaflor in Germany and Florizarre in France) is is one of the 395 fictional species of Pokémon from the Pokémon franchise - a series of video games, anime, manga, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A foot (plural: feet) is a non-SI unit of distance or length, measuring around a third of a metre. ... Mid-19th century tool for converting between different standards of the inch An inch is an Imperial and U.S. customary unit of length. ... The metre, or meter (US), is a measure of length. ... The pound is the name of a number of units of mass, all in the range of 300 to 600 grams. ... The international prototype, made of platinum-iridium, which is kept at the BIPM under conditions specified by the 1st CGPM in 1889. ... A Pokémon ability, is an ability that a certain Pokémon can use. ... // Alien Species (science fiction) List of aliens in fiction List of fictional robots Fantasy Species (fantasy fiction) List of species in fantasy fiction List of dragons in literature Legendary and Mythical Species (folklore/mythology) List of species in folklore and mythology List of species in folklore and mythology by type... The official Pokémon logo. ... A media franchise is an intellectual property involving the characters, setting, and trademarks of an original work of media (usually a work of fiction), such as a film, a work of literature, a television program, or a video game. ... It has been suggested that Multiplayer Video Games be merged into this article or section. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) Anime ) (IPA pronunciation: in Japanese, but typically or in English) is an abbreviation of the word animation. Outside Japan, the term most popularly refers to animation... 2nd English edition of InuYasha Vol. ... A book is a collection of paper, parchment or other material with a piece of text written on them, bound together along one edge, usually within covers. ... Various trading cards A trading card (or collectible card) is a small card which is intended for trading and collecting. ... Tajiri Satoshi (born on August 28, 1965) is a Japanese electronic game designer and the creator of Pocket Monsters ), which later became shortened to Pokémon. ... Since Pokémon Crystal, trainers in the video games can be male or female. ...


The name Ivysaur may be a portmanteau of the English word ivy, and the Greek word, sauros, meaning lizard (as in “dinosaur”).[3] The Japanese name “Fushigisou”, can be construed as a combination of the Japanese words 不思議 (ふしぎ, fushigi, “mystery”) and 草 (くさ, kusa, “grass”). The kanji for “grass” can also be read そう (). (see Kanji - Readings) Additionally, そう is an expression of agreement in Japanese, making "Fushigisou" literally "yes, it's a mystery". Ivysaur are still squat, but somewhat larger, develops more prominent canine teeth, and can sometimes stand on its hind legs alone. What was once a bulb on its back in its earlier development has now grown into a large flower bud. Look up Portmanteau word in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Species See text Hedera (English name ivy, plural ivies) is a genus of about ten species of climbing or ground-creeping evergreen woody plants in the family Araliaceae, native to the Atlantic Islands, western, central and southern Europe, northwestern Africa and across central-southern Asia east to Japan. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji Kanji (Japanese:  ) are the Chinese characters that are used in the modern Japanese logographic writing system along with hiragana (平仮名), katakana (片仮名), and the Hindu-Arabic numerals. ... Shallot bulbs A bulb is an underground vertical shoot that has modified leaves (or thickened leaf bases) that are used as food storage organs by a dormant plant. ... Flower buds have not yet bloomed into a full-size flower. ...

Contents

Characteristics

The bud’s size may increase under direct sunlight, forcing Ivysaur to walk on all fours. Even though the bulb is now a premature flower, it's still unknown whether it is a plant or an animal. In a reversal of the bulb’s function, the bud appears to draw energy from the Ivysaur, as well as photosynthesizing. Carrying the additional weight strengthens its legs in preparation for the final stage of its growth. The bud produces a pleasant scent when it is ready to bloom, and Ivysaur will then evolve into a Venusaur.[4] Venusaur (フシギバナ Fushigibana in Japanese, Bisaflor in Germany and Florizarre in France) is is one of the 395 fictional species of Pokémon from the Pokémon franchise - a series of video games, anime, manga, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...


In the Pokémon video games

A screenshot from Pokémon LeafGreen, potraying a player's Ivysaur battle a Paras in Mount Moon.
A screenshot from Pokémon LeafGreen, potraying a player's Ivysaur battle a Paras in Mount Moon.

Ivysaur play a key role in the original Pokémon video games, RPG strategy games created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Nintendo Game Boy. These were originally in Japanese, but later translated into other languages. Worldwide, these games and their sequels have sold over 143 million units, making them one of Nintendo's most popular game franchises, second only to Mario.[1] The games are divided into sets of three generations by release and each is often only subtly different. Following the same basic plot in different areas of the Pokémon world, each generation builds on the game play mechanics with new features. As the main character, the player’s task is to direct his or her Pokémon to battle the opponent’s Pokémon, creating a scenario which has been likened to cockfighting. However, Pokémon emphasizes that these fights are friendly competition, not brutality.[5] Image File history File links WildParas. ... Paras (パラス Paras in Japan) is a bug/grass Pokémon from the Pokémon franchise. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A strategy is a long term plan of action designed to achieve a particular goal, as differentiated from tactics or immediate actions with resources at hand. ... Tajiri Satoshi (born on August 28, 1965) is a Japanese electronic game designer and the creator of Pocket Monsters ), which later became shortened to Pokémon. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (Japanese: 任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... The Game Boy ) line is a line of battery-powered handheld game consoles sold by Nintendo. ... Mario ) is a video game character created by Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and is the official mascot of Nintendo. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... A fictional universe is a cohesive imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction. ... The Cock Fight by Jean-Léon Gérôme (1847) Training for a cockfight in Hell-Bourg on Réunion Island A cockfight is a blood sport between two specially trained roosters held in a ring called a cockpit. ...


In the first-generation Pokémon games, the player may choose Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle as his or her first (or "Starter") Pokémon. If the player chooses a Bulbasaur, the protagonist’s rival will choose a Charmander,[6] since Charmander have a type advantage over Bulbasaur.[7] Ivysaur are not found in the wild, and can only be obtained by evolving a Bulbasaur by leveling it up to level 16.[8] The three original starters are not available in any of the other games in the series, except in the enhanced remakes, FireRed and LeafGreen. However, in Pokémon Yellow, a Bulbasaur becomes available later, as a gift from a non-player character in Cerulean City, following the Pokémon anime storyline.[9] Since Ivysaur can only be obtained by evolving a Bulbasaur,[8] the availability of a Bulbasaur dictates the availability of Ivysaur. Charmander ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Squirtle ) is one of the 416 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In the video game subculture, an enhanced remake (also called updated classics) is an updated version of a video or computer game that was originally developed for a less advanced system. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require restructuring. ... Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen are games in the world famous Pokémon video game series. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Kanto cities and towns Official Unofficial Glitch City Cerulean City is a fictional in-game city from the Pokémon video games. ...


There are seventeen different Pokémon types, a special attribute determining strengths and weaknesses of each species, offsetting each other in a complicated series of rock-paper-scissors relationships. Ivysaur are a Grass/Poison-type (though they don’t have the ability to learn any damage-dealing Poison attacks naturally), so their attacks are particularly effective against Ground-, Rock- and Water-type Pokémon, but Psychic-, Fire-, Ice- and Flying-type attacks are particularly effective against them. Attacks of the Fighting, Water, Electric, and Grass types do little damage to Ivysaur, and Ivysaur do little damage to other Grass and Poison types, as well as to Fire, Flying, Bug, Steel, or Dragon types. All other types have no particular advantage or disadvantage when facing Ivysaur.[7] Bulbasaur are therefore considered a good first choice for beginners, as the Kanto region's first two Pokémon gym leaders are Brock, who uses Rock-type Pokémon,[10] and Misty, who uses Water-type Pokémon.[11] Also, the third and fourth Gym Leaders are Lt. Surge, an Electric-type specialist, and Erika, a Grass-type specialist,[12] and they have no advantage in battle against Bulbasaur and their evolved forms.[7] Rock, Paper, Scissors chart Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-07-13, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section may be excessively or inappropriately using first or second person, contrary to the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Brock, known in Japan as Takeshi ), is a character in the fictional world of Pokémon. ... now. ... Lt. ... Erika may mean: People: Erika Berger (*1939), an Austrian television presenter Erika von Brockdorff (1911–1943), a German resistance fighter during the Second World War Erika Christensen, an American actress Erika Cremer (1900–1996), a German physicist Erika Eleniak (*1969), an American actress and Playboy Playmate Erika Fuchs (1906–2005...


In Pokémon anime

Screenshot of Pokémon anime, Episode 368, "Judgement Day," featuring Jimmy's Wartortle, Ivysaur and Charmeleon (left to right).
Screenshot of Pokémon anime, Episode 368, "Judgement Day," featuring Jimmy's Wartortle, Ivysaur and Charmeleon (left to right).

The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[13]—an in-training Pokémon Master—as he and May (as well as several other companions[13]) travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their Pokémon partners, Pikachu and Blaziken.[14] Image File history File links Judgement_day. ... Image File history File links Judgement_day. ... Wartortle , Kameil) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Charmeleon , Lizard) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... The Pokémon , Pocket Monsters) anime metaseries, based on the video game series, was created in Japan and was then adapted for the North American television market. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and be more accessible to a general audience, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ...


A group of newly evolved Ivysaur appeared in Episode 51, "Bulbasaur’s Mysterious Garden", in which the group stumbled upon a natural evolutionary ground for Bulbasaur, under the protection of a Venusaur, where they witnessed a natural cycle of many Bulbasaur evolving into Ivysaur, and defended his Bulbasaur’s right to not evolve.[15] Bulbasaur ) is the first of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Japanese Pokémon media franchise. ...


Another Ivysaur was owned by a minor character, Jimmy, an in-training Pokémon battle referee who also owned a Charmeleon and a Wartortle, in Episode 368, "Judgment Day", in which the group accidentally travel to Banaba island, where there is a camp dedicated to training referees. Jimmy's tutor, Sarina, asks Ash and Brock to have a double battle, so Jimmy could practice refereeing. Ash's Swellow attacks Brock's Pokémon hard, and Brock tells Lombre to play fainted. Jimmy doesn't rule Lombre unable to battle, at which point Sarina interrupted and told Jimmy he shouldn't have let Lombre continue to fight. Later that evening, the group ask Jimmy how he caught all of his Pokémon. Jimmy explains that he started out in Kanto with a Squirtle, which evolved into a Wartotle on his journey. He explains that one day, he and Wartortle were fighting over who would eat a rice ball, and accidentally knocked it down a hill, and rolled into a yawning Ivysaur's mouth. Ivysaur felt sorry for Jimmy and Wartortle and decided to join their team.[16] Charmeleon , Lizard) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Wartortle , Kameil) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ...


Another Ivysaur was owned by a girl, Crystal, in the Pokémon Chronicles series, a collection of sub stories seperate from the main anime series. In Episode 16, "Put the Air Back in Aerodactyl!", Professor Oak, and his assisstant Tracey, visit Oak's newphew, Gary Oak, on Saida Island, where Gary has secretly cloned Aerodactyl, an extinct Pokémon. However, when Professor Oak and Tracey arrive, Aerodactyl has escaped from the lab, and is roaming the island. Kobara, a female researcher, has a little sister, Misawo, who controlled groups of wild Pokémon to help the group find Aerodactyl. Misawo uses her Ivysaur to defeat Team Rocket agents, Butch and Cassidy, and save Aerodactyl.[17] Pokémon Chronicles is a spin-off series of the Pokémon anime, revolving around characters other than Ash. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In the fictional world of Pokémon, Tracey Sketchit (called Kenji (ケンジ) in the Japanese version) is a Pokémon watcher and artist (his first name derives from trace, his last is a combination of the phrase sketch it). Assisted by Pokémon Marill and Venonat, Tracey searches for Pokémon... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Aerodactyl , Ptera) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Butch and Cassidy (Kosaburō and Yamato in Japanese) are members of the Team Rocket Organization, a fictional evil organization in the world of the anime series Pokémon that attempts to exploit Pokemon as part of its goal of world domination. ...


In the Pokémon Trading Card Game

Ivysaur in the Pokémon Trading Card Game (Base Set).
Ivysaur in the Pokémon Trading Card Game (Base Set).

The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series; players must use cards (with individual strengths and weaknesses) in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" all of his cards.[18] The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999, until Nintendo USA started publishing the series in 2003.[19] Image File history File links Ivysaur_tcg. ... Image File history File links Ivysaur_tcg. ... Rare Candy illustration found in the trading card game The Pokémon Trading Card Game was first introduced to North America in 1999, and in Japan at an earlier date (exact date unknown). ... Collectible card games (CCGs), also called trading card games (TCGs) or customizable card games (a phrase specific to two Decipher, Inc. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Wizards of the Coast (often referred to as WotC or simply Wizards) is a publisher of games, primarily based on fantasy and science fiction themes. ... Pokémon USA, Inc is an American industry that distributes products for Pokémon gaming & anime. ...


Most Ivysaur cards are typical, Stage-1 Pokémon cards, and are primarily used to play stronger cards (such as Stage-2 Pokémon, like Charizard).[20] Ivysaur appear in the Base set (as well as the Base Set 2 and Legendary Collection), the Gym Challenge set (as Erika's Ivysaur), the Expedition set, and the EX FireRed & LeafGreen set, as well as appearing in the promotional Southern Islands set.[21] Charizard , Lizardon) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...


In Pokémon manga

Red received a Bulbasaur, which he nicknamed "Saur", in the Pokémon Adventures manga, and manga based on the original games, from Professor Oak, in Chapter 1, "VS. Mew".[22] It battled alongside Red, until Chapter 15, "Wartortle Wars", when it evolved into an Ivysaur, after battling a wild Mankey.[23] In Chapter 30, "Zap, Zap, Zapdos!", Red used his Suar to defeat Lt. Surge's Zapdos, using its Razor Leaf attack to cut the cables that joined the Team Rocket Executive and the legendary bird.[24] In Chapter 33, "The Winged Legends", Red's Ivysaur evolved into a Venusaur to team up with Blue's Charizard and Green's Blastoise, Turtley, to defeat Sabrina's Zapmolcuno (a merged form of Zapdos, Moltres and Articuno) and destroy Team Rocket's control on Saffron City, splitting the three birds in the process.[25] Red is a name used to refer to two related, but distinct, fictional characters in the Pokémon franchise, the protagonists of the series in their respective media. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue (known in Japan as Pocket Monsters: Red and Green) are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Mankey (マンキー MankÄ«) is a fictional Fighting-type Pokémon that debuted in the original generation. ... Below is a list of fictional Gym Leaders from the Kanto region in the Pokémon series of video games games, anime and manga. ... Charizard , Lizardon) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Green(ブルー) is a fictional character in the manga series Pokémon Adventures. ... Blastoise , Kamex) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Below is a list of fictional Gym Leaders from the Kanto region in the Pokémon series of video games games, anime and manga. ... Zapados , Thunder) is a fictional character in the Pokémon franchise. ... Moltres , Fire) is a fictional character in the Pokémon franchise. ... Articuno , Freezer) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...


Red's Saur re-appeared next in Chapter 40, "A Charizard... and a Champion", during the final match of the Ninth Pokémon League, against his longtime Rival, Blue. The battle began with Red's Saur and and Blue's Charizard facing each other, Charizard tried to use Fire Punch, but was hit by Saur's Poison Powder nearly being knocked out, despite the type advantage. As the battle progressed, Blue's Ninetails used Fire Blast to send Red's Pika and Poliwrath, Poli, flying towards the ceiling. The two trainers then use their first Pokémon to battle again, Saur binding the Charizard from attacking. Suddenly, thunderclouds began to form above the battlefield, formed from the attacks of Poli and Pika, and Saur submerged a vine into the cloud, shocking Charizard and knocking it out.[26] Poliwrath (ニョロボン Nyorobon in Japan, Quappo in Germany and Tartard in France) is a fictional character from the Pokémon franchise. ...


References

Notes
  1. ^ a b Pokemon Franchise Approaches 150 Million Games Sold. PR Newswire. Retrieved on 2006-02-28.
  2. ^ Pokémon Ruby and Pokémon Sapphire Review (page 1) Ign.com. URL Accessed June 1, 2006.
  3. ^ Ivsaur name etymology Pokedream.com. URL Accessed September 16, 2006.
  4. ^ The in-game of the Pokédexes of the video games (A copy of them from Psypokes.com.) URL Accessed September 16, 2006.
  5. ^PokéMania,” Time.com. URL accessed on July 20, 2006.
  6. ^ Pokémon Red and Blue walkthrough; Pallet Town Psypokes.com. URL Accessed July 20, 2006.
  7. ^ a b c Pokémon types attack and defense chart Serebii.net. URL Accessed July 20, 2006.
  8. ^ a b Ivysaur Advnace Pokédex entry Serebii.net. URL Accessed September 16, 2006.
  9. ^ Pokémon Yellow walkthrough Pokemonelite2000.com. URL Accessed July 20, 2006.
  10. ^ Hollinger, Elizabeth M.; Ratkos, James M., Pokémon Gold and Silver: Prima's Official Strategy Guide. (pg 148) Prima Publishing, 2000. ISBN 0-7615-3084-3.
  11. ^ Hollinger, Elizabeth M.; Ratkos, James M., Pokémon Gold and Silver: Prima's Official Strategy Guide. (pg 132-133) Prima Publishing, 2000. ISBN 0-7615-3084-3.
  12. ^ Gym leader guide for Pokémon Red, Blue, Green and Yellow Dogasu.bulbagarden.net. URL Accessed July 20, 2006.
  13. ^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
  14. ^ Pokémon anime; May character bio Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
  15. ^ Synopsis of Pokémon anime; Episode 51, "Bulbasaur’s Mysterious Garden" Serebii.net. URL Accessed on September 16, 2006.
  16. ^ Synopsis of Pokémon anime; Episode 368, "Judgment Day" Serebii.net. URL Accessed on September 16, 2006.
  17. ^ Synopsis of Pokémon Chronicles; Episode 16, "Putting the air back in Aerodactyl!" Serebii.net. URL Accessed September 16, 2006.
  18. ^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
  19. ^ Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
  20. ^ Pokémon Trading Card Game glossary Pokebeach.com. URL Accessed July 21, 2006.
  21. ^ List of Ivysaur appearances in the Pokémon Trading Card Game Psypokes.com. URL Accessed September 16, 2006.
  22. ^ Kusaka, Hidenori, & Mato. Pokémon Adventures, Volume 1: Desperado Pikachu, VIZ Media LLC, July 6, 2000. ISBN 1-56931-507-8.
  23. ^ Kusaka, Hidenori, & Mato. Pokémon Adventures: Legendary Pokémon, Vol. 2; Chapter 33, Chapter 15, "Wartortle Wars", (pg 7-20) VIZ Media LLC, December 6, 2001. ISBN 1-56931-508-6.
  24. ^ Kusaka, Hidenori, & Mato. Pokémon Adventures, Volume 3: Saffron City Siege; Chapter 31, "The Art of Articuno" (pg 33-46) VIZ Media LLC, August 5 2001. ISBN 1-56931-560-4
  25. ^ Kusaka, Hidenori, & Mato. Pokémon Adventures, Volume 3: Saffron City Siege; Chapter 33, "The Winged Legends" (pg 77-95) VIZ Media LLC, August 5 2001. ISBN 1-56931-560-4
  26. ^ Kusaka, Hidenori, & Mato. Pokémon Adventures, Volume 3: Saffron City Siege; Chapter 31, "A Charizard... and a Champion" (pg 118-) VIZ Media LLC, August 5 2001. ISBN 1-56931-560-4
Publications
  • Barbo, Maria. The Official Pokémon Handbook. Scholastic Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9.
  • Loe, Casey, ed. Pokémon Special Pikachu Edition Official Perfect Guide. Sunnydale, CA: Empire 21 Publishing, 1999. ISBN 1-930206-15-1.
  • Nintendo Power. Official Nintendo Pokémon FireRed Version & Pokémon LeafGreen Version Player’s Guide. Nintendo of America Inc., August 2004. ISBN 1-930206-50-X
  • Mylonas, Eric. Pokémon Pokédex Collector’s Edition: Prima’s Official Pokémon Guide. Prima Games, September 21 2004. ISBN 0-7615-4761-4
Manga volumes
  • Ono, Toshihiro. Pokémon: Electric Pikachu Boogaloo Graphic Novel. VIZ Media LLC, April 5 2000. ISBN 1-56931-436-5
  • Kusaka, Hidenori, & Mato. Pokémon Adventures, Volume 2: Legendary Pokémon. VIZ Media LLC, December 6 2000. ISBN 1-56931-508-6
  • Kusaka, Hidenori, & Mato. Pokémon Adventures, Volume 3: Saffron City Siege. VIZ Media LLC, August 5 2001. ISBN 1-56931-560-4

Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue (known in Japan as Pocket Monsters: Red and Green) are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Green were the first Pokémon games released for the Game Boy in Japan. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue (known in Japan as Pocket Monsters: Red and Green) are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Pokémon Ruby and Pokémon Sapphire (ポケットモンスター ルビー&サファイア), released on March 17, 2003 in North America for the Game Boy Advance, mark the beginning of the third generation in the Pokémon series of RPGs. ... Pokémon Ruby and Pokémon Sapphire (ポケットモンスター ルビー&サファイア), released on March 17, 2003 in North America for the Game Boy Advance, mark the beginning of the third generation in the Pokémon series of RPGs. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require restructuring. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require restructuring. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require restructuring. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...

External links

  • Official Pokémon website
  • Bulbapedia (a Pokémon-centric Wiki)’s article about Ivysaur as a species
  • Serebii.net’s 4th Gen Pokédex entry for Ivysaur
  • Pokémon Dungeon Pokédex entry, full of statistics analysis
  • PsyPoke Pokédex entry
  • WikiKnowledge.net’s entry for Ivysaur Previously hosted by Wikibooks

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ivysaur - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (568 words)
The part of Ivysaur's body that is usually bluish turns green, and the flower bud on its back becomes yellow.
Ivysaur (Fushigisou (フシギソウ Fushigisou in Japanese) is a fictional character from the Pokémon franchise.
Ivysaur appeared once in the Base Set, once in Gym Challenge (as Erika’ Ivysaur), once in Expedition, and once in EX Firered and Leafgreen.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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