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Encyclopedia > Iva Toguri D'Aquino
Iva Toguri

Iva Toguri D'Aquino (July 4, 1916September 26, 2006), a Japanese-American, was most identified with "Tokyo Rose", a generic name given by Allied forces in the South Pacific during World War II to any of approximately a dozen English-speaking female broadcasters of Japanese propaganda. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Tokyo Rose (alternate spelling Tokio Rose) was a generic name given by Allied forces in the South Pacific during World War II to any of approximately one dozen English-speaking female broadcasters of Japanese propaganda. ... In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... The Pacific Ocean (from the Latin name Mare Pacificum, peaceful sea, bestowed upon it by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan) is the largest body of water on Earth – at 165. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... An Australian anti-conscription propaganda poster from World War One U.S. propaganda poster, which warns against civilians sharing information on troop movements (National Archives) The much-imitated 1914 Lord Kitchener Wants You! poster Swedish Anti-Euro propaganda for the referendum of 2003. ...


Identified by the press as Tokyo Rose after the war, she was detained for a year by the U.S. military before being released for lack of evidence. Regardless, upon return to the U.S., the Federal Bureau of Investigation began an investigation of her activities and she was subsequently charged by the United States Attorney's Office with eight counts of treason. Her 1949 trial resulted in a conviction on one count, making her the seventh American to be convicted on that charge. In 1974, investigative journalists found key witnesses had lied during testimony and other serious problems with the conduct of the trial. She was pardoned by U.S. President Gerald Ford in 1977, becoming the only U.S. citizen convicted of treason to be pardoned.[1] The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... Traitor redirects here. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Investigative journalism is a kind of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a topic of interest, often related to crime, scandals, government corruption, or white collar crime. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ...

Contents

Early life

She was born Ikuko Toguri (戸栗郁子 Toguri Ikuko?) in Los Angeles, the daughter of Japanese immigrants. Her father, Jun Toguri, had come to the U.S. in 1899, and her mother in 1913. Ikuko, who went by the name Iva, was a Girl Scout as a child, and raised as a Methodist. She attended grammar schools in Calexico, California, and San Diego before returning with her family to Los Angeles. There she finished grammar school, attended high school, and graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles with a degree in Zoology. She then worked in her parents' shop. Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... A Girl Guide is a girl, usually 11 to 17 years of age, participating in the worldwide Scouting movement. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Grammar school can refer to various types of schools in different English-speaking countries. ... Location [[Image:{{{image_map}}}|280px|Location of Calexico, California]] {{{map_caption}}} Political Charateristics County Imperial Mayor Alex Perrone Physical Characteristics Incorporated 1908 Area      Land      Water 7. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... Main article: Secondary education High school is a name used in some parts of the world, and particularly in North America, to describe the last segment of compulsory education. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, generally known as UCLA, is a public university whose main campus is located in the affluent Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Zoology (rarely spelled zoölogy) is the biological discipline which involves the study of non-human animals. ...


On July 5, 1941, she sailed for Japan from Los Angeles' San Pedro area, ostensibly to visit an ailing relative and to possibly study medicine. The U.S. State Department issued her a Certificate of Identification; she did not have a passport. That September in Japan, Toguri applied to the U.S. Vice Consul for a passport, stating she wished to return to the U.S. for permanent residence. Her request was forwarded to the State Department, but the answer had not returned by the attack on Pearl Harbor (December 7, 1941), and she was declared an enemy alien in Japan. // San Pedro is connected to Los Angeles by a thin strip of land called the Harbor Gateway which roughly follows the 110 freeway. ... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... For other Types of Travel Document, see Travel Document. ... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders Husband Kimmel (USN), Walter Short (USA) Chuichi Nagumo (IJN), Mitsuo Fuchida (IJNAS), Shigekazu Shimazaki (IJNAS) Strength 8 battleships, 8 cruisers, 29 destroyers, 9 submarines, ~50 other ships, ~390 planes 6 aircraft carriers, 9 destroyers, 2 battleships, 2 heavy cruisers, 1 light cruiser, 8... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ...


Zero Hour

Toguri in December 1944 at Radio Tokyo
Toguri in December 1944 at Radio Tokyo

Following American involvement in the Pacific War, Toguri, like a number of other Americans in Japanese territory, was pressured by the Japanese central government under Hideki Tojo to renounce her United States citizenship, which she refused to do. She gained work as a typist at a Japanese news agency and eventually worked in a similar capacity for Radio Tokyo. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... NHK (日本放送協会, Nippon Hōsō Kyōkai), or Japan Broadcasting Corporation, is Japans public broadcaster. ... Combatants China (from 1937) Việt Minh (from 1941) United States (from 1941) United Kingdom (from 1941) British India (1941) Australia (1941) Free France (1941) Philippines (1941) Netherlands (1941) New Zealand (1941) Canada (1941) Soviet Union (from 1945) Mongolia (from 1945) Empire of Japan Wang Jingwei Government Thailand (1942) Mengjiang... In the administration of Japan dominated by the Imperial Way Faction movement during World War II, the civil central government of Japan was under the management of some military men, and of some civilians: // Central government Supreme head of government Emperor Hirohito: supreme Commander in Chief of Armed Imperial Forces... Hideki Tojo (KyÅ«jitai: 東條 英機; Shinjitai: 東条 英機;  ) (December 30, 1884 – December 23, 1948) was a General in the Imperial Japanese Army and the 40th Prime Minister of Japan during the time when Japan was Empire of Japan; he served as prime minister during much of World War II, from October 18, 1941... // Possession of citizenship U.S. citizens have the right to participate in the political system of the United States (with most U.S. states having restrictions for felons, and federal restrictions on naturalized persons), are represented and protected abroad by the United States (through U.S. embassies and consulates), and... A news agency is an organization of journalists established to supply news reports to organizations in the news trade: newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasters. ... NHK (日本放送協会, Nippon Hōsō Kyōkai), or Japan Broadcasting Corporation, is Japans public broadcaster. ...


In November 1943, Allied prisoners of war forced to broadcast propaganda selected her to host portions of the one-hour radio show The Zero Hour. Under the stage name "Orphan Anne" and possibly "Your Favorite Enemy, Anne", reportedly in reference to the comic strip character Little Orphan Annie, Toguri performed in comedy sketches and introduced newscasts, with on-air speaking time of generally about 20 minutes. Though earning only 150 yen, or about $7, per month, she used some of her earnings to feed P.O.W.s.[2] Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... An Australian anti-conscription propaganda poster from World War One U.S. propaganda poster, which warns against civilians sharing information on troop movements (National Archives) The much-imitated 1914 Lord Kitchener Wants You! poster Swedish Anti-Euro propaganda for the referendum of 2003. ... Radio broadcasts have been a popular entertainment since the 1910s, though popularity has declined a little in some countries since television became widespread. ... The Zero Hour was the first of over a dozen live radio programs broadcast by Japan in WWII featuring Allied prisoners of war (POW) reading current news and playing prerecorded music and message from POWs to their families back home and former fellow soldiers and sailors still serving in the... Bold textA stage name, or a screen name, is a pseudonym used by performers and entertainers (such as actors, comedians, musicians, clowns, and professional wrestlers. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Cover of Cupples & Leon strip collection (1933) Little Orphan Annie is a full page (later half page or tab) American comic strip, created by Harold Gray (1894-1968), that first appeared on August 5, 1924. ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ... For other uses, see News (disambiguation). ... Japanese 10 yen coin (obverse) showing Phoenix Hall of Byodoin Yen is the currency used in Japan. ...


She married Felipe D'Aquino (last name sometimes given only as Aquino), a Portuguese citizen of Japanese-Portuguese descent, on April 19, 1945. The marriage was registered with the Portuguese Consulate in Tokyo, with Toguri declining to take her husband's citizenship.


Postwar arrest and trial

Toguri being interviewed by the press in September 1945

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Arrest

After Japan's unconditional surrender (August 15, 1945), reporters Henry Brundidge and Clark Lee offered $250 — an act considered unethical checkbook journalism by press associations and journalism professors — for the identity of Tokyo Rose. The identification led to D'Aquino's arrest, on September 5, 1945, in Yokohama, but she was released after a year in jail when neither the FBI nor General Douglas MacArthur's staff had found any evidence she had aided the Japanese Axis forces.[2] As well, the American and Australian prisoners-of-war who wrote her scripts also assured her she had committed no wrongdoing.[3] Victory over Japan Day or V-J Day is the celebration of the August 15, 1945 Surrender of Japan and the end of World War II. In Japan, the day is known as, Shusen-kinenbi, which literally means the Memorial day for the end of the war. This is commemorated... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Chequebook journalism (or checkbook journalism in American English) is the form of journalism where the essential characteristic is that the journalist pays the subject of the work money for the right to publish their story. ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... For the town of Yokohama in Aomori Prefecture, see Yokohama, Aomori. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Douglas MacArthur (January 26, 1880 - April 5, 1964), was an American general who played a prominent role in the Pacific theater of World War II. He was poised to command the invasion of Japan in November 1945 but was instead instructed to accept their surrender on September 2, 1945. ... Area under Axis control over the course of the war shown in black. ...


The case-history at the FBI's website states, "The FBI's investigation of Aquino's activities had covered a period of some five years. During the course of that investigation, the FBI had interviewed hundreds of former members of the U.S. Armed Forces who had served in the South Pacific during World War II, unearthed forgotten Japanese documents, and turned up recordings of Aquino's broadcasts". Investigating with the U.S. Army's Counterintelligence Corps, they "conducted an extensive investigation to determine whether Aquino had committed crimes against the U.S. By the following October, authorities decided that the evidence then known did not merit prosecution, and she was released". A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... The United States Army is the branch of the United States armed forces that has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ...


Nevertheless, influential gossip columnist Walter Winchell lobbied against D'Aquino in 1948 upon learning of her attempt to return home. D'Aquino, forcibly separated from her husband, was brought to San Francisco, on September 25, 1948, where she was charged by federal prosecutors with the crime of treason for "adhering to, and giving aid and comfort to, the Imperial Government of Japan during World War II". A gossip columnist is someone who writes a gossip column in a newspaper or magazine, especially a gossip magazine, that prints gossip stories, spreading news of a personal, private nature, and/or rumors and lies, usually about show business, the motion picture and television industries, celebrities, movie stars, superstars, people... Walter Winchell (April 7, 1897 – February 20, 1972), an American newspaper and radio commentator, invented the gossip column at the New York Evening Graphic. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ...

Mugshot during Toguri's first detention in Japan
Mugshot during Toguri's first detention in Japan

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Treason trial

Her trial on eight "overt acts" of treason began on July 5, 1949, at the Federal District Court in San Francisco. During what was at the time the costliest trial in American history, totaling more than half a million dollars, the prosecution presented 46 witnesses, including two of Toguri's former supervisors at Radio Tokyo, and soldiers who testified said they could not distinguish between what they had heard on radio broadcasts and what they had heard by way of rumour. Although boxes of tapes were brought by prosecutors to the courthouse and rested near the prosecution table, none were entered into evidence and played for the jury. Toguri claimed she and her associates subtly sabotaged the Japanese war effort. In legal parlance, a trial is an event in which parties to a dispute present information (in the form of evidence) in a formal setting, usually a court, before a judge, jury, or other designated finder of fact, in order to achieve a resolution to their dispute. ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... United States one-dollar bill Canadian one-dollar coin (Loonie) One New Taiwan dollar Australian one-dollar coin 500 old Zimbabwean dollars The dollar (often represented by the dollar sign: $) is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions. ...


The supervisor at Radio Tokyo testified that: In law and in religion, testimony is a solemn attestation as to the truth of a matter. ...

I said to Toguri I had a release from the Imperial General Headquarters giving out results of American ship losses in one of the Leyte Gulf battles, and I asked that she allude to this announcement, make reference to the losses of American ships in her part of the broadcast, and she said she would do so.

Another co-worker testified that Toguri said, "Now you fellows have lost all your ships. Now you really are orphans of the Pacific. How do you think you will ever get home?" Combatants United States Australia Empire of Japan Commanders William Halsey, Jr (3rd Fleet) Thomas C. Kinkaid (7th Fleet) Jisaburo Ozawa Strength 17 aircraft carriers 18 escort carriers 12 battleships 24 cruisers 141 destroyers and destroyer escorts Many PT boats, submarines and fleet auxiliaries About 1,500 planes 4 aircraft carriers... The Pacific Ocean (from the Latin name Mare Pacificum, peaceful sea, bestowed upon it by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan) is the largest body of water on Earth – at 165. ...


On September 29, 1949, the jury found Toguri guilty on a sole count, Count VI, which stated, "That on a day during October, 1944, the exact date being to the Grand Jurors unknown, said defendant, at Tokyo, Japan, in a broadcasting studio of The Broadcasting Corporation of Japan, did speak into a microphone concerning the loss of ships." She was fined US$10,000 and given a 10-year prison sentence. She was sent to the Federal Reformatory for Women at Alderson, West Virginia. She was paroled after serving six years and two months, and released January 28, 1956. The FBI's case history notes, "Neither Brundidge nor the witness testified at trial because of the taint of perjury. Nor was Brundidge prosecuted for subornation of perjury." September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... Alderson is a town located in West Virginia. ... Parole can have different meanings depending on the area and judiciary system. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Presidential pardon

President Ford pardoned Mrs. D’Aquino on January 19, 1977, his last full day in office, after she had appealed to him in writing. The decision was supported by a unanimous vote in both houses of the California State Legislature, the national Japanese-American Citizens League, and S. I. Hayakawa, then a United States Senator-elect from California. Previously an investigation by Chicago Tribune reporter Ron Yates located Toguri's accusers, who publicly admitted they had committed perjury, claiming they had lied under oath under pressure from federal prosecutors, which was followed by a Morley Safer report on the television news program 60 Minutes. Californias Capitol, where the State Legislature meets California State Assembly chamber California state Senate chamber The California Legislature is the legislative branch of the state government of California. ... Samuel Ichiye Hayakawa (July 18, 1906–February 27, 1992) was an English professor and academic who served as a United States Senator from California from 1977 to 1983. ... The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... Morley Safer (born November 8, 1931 in Toronto, Canada) is a reporter and correspondent for CBS News. ... 60 Minutes is an investigative television newsmagazine on United States television, which has run on CBS News since 1968. ...


Later life

After the pardon, resisting efforts at deportation, Toguri moved to Chicago, where her father had opened the Japanese-import retail store J. Toguri Mercantile before the war. Deportation is the expelling of someone from a country. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ...


Toguri never reunited with or again saw her husband, who had returned to Japan after her trial. Toguri divorced him in 1980; he died in 1996.


Toguri died of natural causes in a Chicago hospital.


Legacy

  • The FBI case-history cited under References, below, states: "As far as its propaganda value, Army analysis suggested that the program had no negative effect on troop morale and that it might even have raised it a bit". The New York Times in her obituary noted, "The broadcasts did nothing to dim American morale. The servicemen enjoyed the recordings of American popular music, and the United States Navy bestowed a satirical citation on Tokyo Rose at war’s end for her entertainment value."[4]
  • On 15 January 2006, the World War II Veterans Committee, citing "her indomitable spirit, love of country, and the example of courage she has given her fellow Americans", awarded her its annual Edward J Herlihy Citizenship Award.[5] According to her biographer, Toguri found it the most memorable day of her life.[1]
  • In 2004, actor George Takei announced he was working on a film titled Tokyo Rose, American Patriot, about Toguri's activities during the war.[6]
  • Iva Toguri has been the subject of two movies and four documentaries:
    • 1946: Tokyo Rose, film; directed by Lew Landers; Blake Edwards played Joe Bridger.
    • 1969: The Story of "Tokyo Rose", CBS-TV and WGN radio documentary written and produced by Bill Kurtis.
    • 1976: Tokyo Rose, CBS-TV documentary segment on 60 Minutes by Morley Safer, produced by Imrel Harvath.
    • 1995: U.S.A. vs. "Tokyo Rose", self-produced documentary by Antonio A. Montanari Jr., distributed by Cinema Guild.
    • 1995: Tokyo Rose: Victim of Propaganda, A&E Biography documentary, hosted by Peter Graves, available on VHS (AAE-14023).
    • 2008: Tokyo Rose, film; in development with Darkwoods Productions, the only entity granted life story rights by Iva Toguri, Frank Darabont to direct. Christopher Hampton, is the screenwriter for Tokyo Rose.

The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... George Hosato Takei (IPA: ) (b. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bill Kurtis (born September 21, 1940) is a television journalist and producer best known as the host of numerous A&E crime and news documentary shows, including Investigative Reports, American Justice, and Cold Case Files. ... 60 Minutes is an investigative television newsmagazine on United States television, which has run on CBS News since 1968. ... Morley Safer (born November 8, 1931 in Toronto, Canada) is a reporter and correspondent for CBS News. ... Peter Graves (actor) (born March 18, 1926) is an American actor who made more than 70 screen and TV films or series. ... Frank Darabont (born on January 28, 1959) is an American film director, screenwriter, and producer. ... Christopher Hampton (born January 26, 1946) is a British playwright, screen writer and film director. ...

See also

Lord Haw-Haw was a propaganda radio program broadcast by Nazi German radio to audiences in Britain and Ireland on the mediumwave station Radio Hamburg and by shortwave to the United States. ... Trinh Thi Ngo (born 1931), known as Hanoi Hannah, was a Vietnamese woman who, during the Vietnam War in the 1960s and 1970s, read broadcast radio messages and propaganda to convince U.S. troops to go AWOL, a psychological warfare scheme set forth by the Communist North Vietnamese. ... Iraqi Information Minister Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf (also Mohammed Said al-Sahhaf) (born 1940) is an Iraqi diplomat and politician. ... Axis Sally was a female radio personality during World War II who made propaganda broadcasts for Radio Berlin to Allied troops. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Adam Blenford, Death ends the myth of Tokyo Rose, BBC News, 28 September 2006
  2. ^ a b Siemaszko, Corky. New York Daily News (July 4, 2006): "Still not Tokyo Rose: Long free, at 90, she's imprisoned by a myth"
  3. ^ National Public Radio: "Iva Toguri D'Aquino Dies at 90"
  4. ^ Richard Goldstein. "D’Aquino, Convicted as Tokyo Rose, Dies at 90", September 27, 2006. 
  5. ^ Setting the Record Straight, World War II Chronicles, Issue 33 (Winter 2005), pp. 28-29
  6. ^ Chun, Gary C.W. "Star Trek 's Lt. Sulu plans to make his film, Tokyo Rose: American Patriot, in Hawaii", StarBulletin.com, April 12, 2004.

The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Daily News is the name of two major newspapers in the United States: Los Angeles Daily News New York Daily News This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

External links

Dated articles and reports

The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... All Things Considered, sometimes abbreviated ATC, is a news radio program in the United States, broadcast on the National Public Radio network. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
'Tokyo Rose' dies aged 90. 28/09/2006. ABC News Online (639 words)
Iva Toguri D'Aquino, an American woman charged with treason as the "Tokyo Rose" who broadcast World War II Japanese propaganda, has died in Chicago at the age of 90.
Ms D'Aquino was eventually pardoned by US President Gerald Ford for the role she played in undermining the morale of US troops with the English-language radio shows.
Ms D'Aquino was charged with eight vague counts of treason and was convicted on one after a judge bullied the hung jury into reaching a verdict.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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