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Encyclopedia > Italian American
Italian American
Italoamericani

Flag of Italy Flag of the United States Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...



Notable Italian Americans:
Rudy Giuliani · Nancy Pelosi · Fiorello LaGuardia
Frank Sinatra · Sylvester Stallone · Martin Scorsese
Lee Iacocca · Samuel Alito
Total population

17,829,184
6.0% of the US population (2006)[1] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 289 × 386 pixelsFull resolution (289 × 386 pixel, file size: 24 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2171x2716, 552 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Fiorello H. LaGuardia ... Image File history File links Sylvester_Stallone. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 578 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2034 × 2108 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Summary Lee Iacocca headshot Template:Headshot Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... This is a list of famous Italian Americans. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani (pronounced ;[1] born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, businessman, and politician from the state of New York who was Mayor of New York City from 1994 to 2001. ... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is currently the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... Sylvester Gardenzio Stallone[1] (born July 6, 1946) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, director, producer and screenwriter. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... Lido Anthony Lee Iacocca (born October 15, 1924) is an American industrialist most commonly known for his revival of the Chrysler Corporation in the 1980s[1], serving as President and CEO from 1978 and additionally as chairman from 1979, until his retirement at the end of 1992. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ...

Regions with significant populations
Found in the Northeast, Florida, Illinois,
Michigan, Ohio, and the West Coast
Heavily concentrated in New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Boston, south St. Louis, Chicago and Detroit
Languages
American English · Italian · Sicilian · Neapolitan, other (predominantly southern) Italian dialects and languages of Italian historical minorities
Religions
Roman Catholic (predominantly), Protestant, Jewish, Waldensians

An Italian American is an American of Italian descent and/or dual citizenship. The phrase refers to someone born in the United States or who has immigrated to the United States and is of Italian heritage. Map of the US northeast. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... Sicilian (, Italian: ) is a Romance language. ... Neapolitan (autonym: napulitano; Italian: ) is a Romance language spoken in the city and region of Naples, Campania (Neapolitan: Nàpule, Italian: Napoli); close dialects are spoken throughout most of southern Italy, including the Gaeta and Sora districts of southern Lazio, parts of Abruzzo, Molise, Basilicata, northern Calabria, and northern and... The Mezzogiorno is generally viewed as encompassing Basilicata, Campania, Calabria, Apulia, and Sicily, which lie in Italys south, as well as Molise and Abruzzo, which are geographically in central or south-central Italy. ... The Italian people generally indicates as Italian dialects all vernacular idioms spoken in Italy other than Italian and other recognized languages. ... Map of languages and dialects of Italy Italy currently has one national language: Standard Italian. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Waldensians, Waldenses or Vaudois are a Christian denomination believing in poverty and austerity, promoting true poverty, public preaching and the literal interpretation of the scriptures. ...

Contents

History

The Italian Giovanni da Verrazzano was the first European explorer to pass New York Harbor. Other Italians played an important role in early United States history, as Filippo Mazzei, an important Italian physician and a promoter of liberty, close friend of Thomas Jefferson. He acted as an agent to purchase arms for Virginia during the American Revolutionary War. Throughout the 1800s, Italians arrived in the US in small numbers, though most immigration from Italy occurred in the 20th century between 1880 and 1960. Most Italian Americans came from Southern Italy, Naples at first, and Sicily, many as rural peasants with very little education. Smaller but significant numbers came from the northern regions of Liguria and Veneto. From 1890 to 1900, 655,888 immigrants arrived in the United States, of which two-thirds were men. The main reasons for Italian immigration were the poor economic conditions in Italy during this period, particularly in the southern regions. In the United States, Italians settled in and dominated specific neighborhoods (often called "Little Italy") where they could interact with one another, establish a familiar cultural presence, and find favorite foods.Many Italian immigrants arrived with very little cash or cultural capital (that is, they were not educated or intellectually sophisticated) and generally performed manual labor. Their neighborhoods were typically slums with overcrowded tenements and poor sanitation. Tuberculosis was rampant. Italian immigration peaked from 1900 until 1914, when World War I made such intercontinental movement impossible. In many cases, the Italian immigrants were subjected to severe anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant discrimination and even violence such as lynching.[2] By 1978, 5.3 million Italians had immigrated to the United States; two million arrived between 1900 and 1914. About a third of these immigrants intended to stay only briefly, in order to make money and return to Italy, and were commonly referred to as "Birds of Passage." While one in four did return home, the rest either decided to stay or were prevented from returning by the war. Giovanni da Verrazzano (c. ... New York Harbor, a geographic term, refers collectively to the rivers, bays, and tidal estuaries near the mouth of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City. ... Dr.Filippo Mazzei (aka Philip Mazzei Pronunced: mah-tzay-ee, but sometimes is erroneously cited with the name of Philip Mazzie) (December 25, 1730-March 19, 1816) was an Italian American surgeon, merchant, horticulturist,political philosopher, pamphleteer, revolutionary, secret agent, diplomat, author. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Southern Italy, often referred to in Italian as the Mezzogiorno (a term first used in 19th century in comparison with French Midi ) encompasses six of the countrys 20 regions: Basilicata Campania Calabria Puglia Sicilia Sardinia Sicilia although it is geographically and administratively included in Insular Italy, it has a... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Categories: 1911 Britannica | Historical stubs | Feudalism ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... Veneto is my fatherland. ... Little Italy is a general name for an ethnic enclave populated (or formerly populated) primarily by Italians or people of Italian ancestry, usually in an urban neighborhood. ... A slum is an overcrowded and squalid district of a city or town usually inhabited by the very poor. ... A red brick apartment block in central London, England, on the north bank of the Thames An apartment building, block of flats or tenement is a multi-unit dwelling made up of several (generally four or more) apartments (US) or flats (UK). ... E. Coli bacteria under magnification Sanitation is the hygienic disposal or recycling of waste, as well as the policy and practice of protecting health through hygienic measures. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial...


Internment during World War II

The internment of Italian Americans during World War II has often been overshadowed by the Japanese American experience. Recently, however, books such as Una storia segreta (ISBN 1-890771-40-6) by Lawrence DiStasi and Uncivil Liberties (ISBN 1-58112-754-5) by Stephen Fox have been published, and movies, such as Prisoners Among Us have been made. These efforts reveal that during World War II, roughly 600,000 Italians were required to carry identity cards that labeled them "resident aliens." Some 10,000 people in war zones on the West Coast were required to move inland, while hundreds of others were held in military camps for up to two years. Lawrence DiStasi claims that these wartime restrictions and internments contributed more than anything else to the loss of spoken Italian in the United States. After Italy declared war on the U.S., many Italian language papers and schools were forced, almost overnight, to close by the U.S. Government because of their past support for an enemy government. Italian American Internment in the United States during World War II is less known than the internment of Japanese-Americans in the same period, and although there are emotional and common-sense similarities, there are important differences that must be observed. ... Serving from 1999 to 2003, Army General Eric Shinseki of Hawaii became the first Asian American military chief of staff. ...


Involvement in World War II

During World War II, many Italian Americans joined or were drafted into the U.S. armed forces to fight the Axis Powers; many women also enlisted. An estimated 1.2 million Italian Americans served in the armed forces during World War II; this represented 7.5% of the 16 million total who served. Italian American service assistance was pivotal during the Allied invasion of Sicily, where United States government troops worked with locals, including Mafiosi, to secure and fortify the newly-acquired foothold in Europe. Numerous texts document the delicate relations the United States government established with Italian American organized crime figures in the U.S. and the manner in which these were used to help ensure a successful landing. It is rumored that even Lucky Luciano helped smooth relations between the two communities during World War II. The United States Armed Forces are the overall unified military forces of the United States. ... Black: Zenith of the Axis Powers Capital Not applicable Political structure Military alliance Historical era World War II  - Tripartite Pact September 27, 1940  - Anti-Comintern Pact November 25, 1936  - Pact of Steel May 22, 1939  - Dissolved 1945 This article is about the independent countries (states) that comprised the Axis powers. ... Belligerents United States United Kingdom Canada Australia South Africa Free French Germany Italy Commanders Dwight D. Eisenhower Harold Alexander Bernard Montgomery George S. Patton Albert Kesselring Alfredo Guzzoni Fridolin von Senger und Etterlin Strength 160,000 personnel 14,000 vehicles 600 tanks 1,800 guns 300,000 Italian personnel 40... This article is about the criminal society. ... Charles Lucky Luciano (born Salvatore Lucania) (November 24, 1897 – January 26, 1962) was a Sicilian-American mobster. ...


Demographics

Numbers

In the 2000 U.S. Census, Italian Americans constituted the fifth largest ancestry group in America with about 15.6 million people (5.6% of the total U.S. population).[3] Sicilian Americans are a subset of numerous Americans of regional Italian ancestries. As of 2006, the Italian-American population climbed to 17.8 million persons constituting 6 percent of the population. The United States Census is a decennial census mandated by the United States Constitution. ... Most common ancestries in the United States (as of 2000) The United States is a diverse country racially. ... Sicilian Americans are a subset of Italian Americans from Sicily. ...


Politics

Logo of Sons of Italy, which is the largest Italian American fraternal organization in the United States.
Logo of Sons of Italy, which is the largest Italian American fraternal organization in the United States.

In the 1930s, Italian Americans voted heavily Democratic; since the 1960s, they have split about evenly between the Democratic and the Republican parties.[citation needed] The U.S. Congress includes Italian Americans who are regarded as leaders in both the Republican and Democratic parties. The highest ranking Italian American politician is currently Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) who became the first woman and Italian American Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, but former Republican New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani was a candidate for the U.S. presidency in the 2008 election, as was Colorado Congressman Tom Tancredo. Image File history File links Sons_of_italy_logo. ... Logo of Sons of Italy, which is the largest Italian American fraternal organization in the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is currently the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... GOP redirects here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani (pronounced ;[1] born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, businessman, and politician from the state of New York who was Mayor of New York City from 1994 to 2001. ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Thomas Gerard Tancredo (born December 20, 1945) is an American politician and member of the Republican Party. ...


Culture

Many Italian Americans still retain aspects of their culture. This includes Italian food, drink, art, Roman Catholicism, annual Italian American feasts and a strong commitment to extended family. Italian Americans influenced popular music in the 1940s and as recently in the 1970s, one of their major contributions to American culture. In movies that deal with cultural issues, Italian American words and lingo are sometimes spoken by the characters. Although most will not speak Italian fluently, a dialect of sorts has arisen among Italian Americans, particularly in the urban Northeast, often popularized in film and television. For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Italian American cuisine is what is commonly called Italian food in the United States. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Map of the US northeast. ...


Among the most characteristic and popular of Italian American cultural contributions has been their feasts. Throughout the United States, wherever one may find an "Italian neighborhood" (often referred to as 'Little Italy'), one can find festive celebrations such as the well known Feast of San Gennaro in New York City, the unique Our Lady of Mount Carmel "Giglio" Feast in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, New York, the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary celebrated in Cleveland's Little Italy, the Ciciarata in Ambler, Pennsylvania or the lesser known Festa Italiana, in Seattle. For the past 125 years, the Our Lady of Mount Carmel Festival has been celebrated annually in Hammonton, New Jersey. The Feast of St. Rocco has been celebrated in Denver, Colorado since 1892 & at Il Societa Nativi di Potenza, Basilcata (Potenza Lodge)since the 1930's. Our Lady of Mount Carmel hosts their bazaar every July in honor of the feast of Our Lady of Mt Carmel (Founded in North Denver 1894 by Father Mariano LePore) Italian feasts involve elaborate displays of devotion to God and patron saints. Perhaps the most widely known is St. Joseph's feast day on March 19th. These feasts are much more than simply isolated events within the year. They express a "typically Italian" approach to life and are taken very seriously by the communities who prepare them. Feast (Festa in Italian) is an umbrella term for the various secular and religious, indoor and outdoor activities surrounding a religious holiday. Typically, Italian feasts consist of festive communal meals, religious services, games of chance and skill and elaborate outdoor processions consisting of statues resplendent in jewels and donations. This merriment usually takes place over the course of several days, and is communally prepared by a church community or a religious organization over the course of several months. Facing south on Mulberry Street during the 2006 Festival. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Williamsburg is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, bordering Greenpoint, Bed-Stuy, and Bushwick. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... , United States Pennsylvania Montgomery 0. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Festál Breakdancing competition at Festival Sundiata Man dressed as Saint Patrick, Irish Week Festival. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Map of Hammonton in Atlantic County Hammonton, founded by Charles K. Landis, is a town in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ...

The First Lady Laura Bush meets the Secretary General of Italy-USA Foundation, Corrado Maria Daclon.
The First Lady Laura Bush meets the Secretary General of Italy-USA Foundation, Corrado Maria Daclon.

Currently, there are more than 300 Italian feasts celebrated throughout the United States. These feasts are visited each year by millions of Americans from various backgrounds who come together to enjoy Italian delicacies such as Zeppole and sausage sandwiches. Though in past, and still unto this day, much of Italian American culture is centered around music and food, in recent years, a large and growing group of Italian American authors are having success publishing and selling books in America. These stories, novels, poems, and essays have little or nothing at all to do with the Mafia stereotype that has been foisted upon Italian Americans. It is a fact that there is no larger percentage of crime among this group than any other nationality in the United States. Many texts and statistics show this to be a mere false stereotype in the populist American mind. [1]. Also see, "Stereotypes," below. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 619 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2032 × 1968 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 619 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2032 × 1968 pixels, file size: 2. ... Italy-USA Foundation logo Italy-USA Foundation (also Fondazione Italia USA) was established on July 4, 2005 to honour the friendship between Italians and Americans. ...


Some of the authors who have written about everyday, hardworking Italians are Pietro DiDonato [2], Lawrence Ferlinghetti [3], Dana Gioia [4], Executive Director of the National Endowment for the Arts; Daniela Gioseffi [5], Winner of the John Ciardi Award for Lifetime Achievement in Poetry, and Helen Barolini, author of The Dream Book, a collection of Italian American women's writings. Both women are American Book Award Winners [6] and pioneers of Italian American writing, as is poet, Maria Mazziotti Gillan [7]. These women have authored many books depicting Italian American women in a new light. They, along with several other poets and writers, can be found at Italian American Writers [8]. Helen Barolini is a notable American author, born in Syracuse, New York, she is a graduate of syracuse University. ...


Among the scholars who have led the Renaissance in Italian American literature are professors Richard Gambino, Anthony Julian Tamburri, Paolo Giordano, and Fred Gardaphe. The later three founded Bordighera Press, Inc. and edited From the Margin, An Anthology of Italian American Writing, Purdue University Press. These men along with professors like novelist and accomplished critic, Dr. Josephine Gattuso-Hendin of New York University, have taught Italian American studies far and wide, at such institutions as The City University of New York, John D. Calandra Institute [9], Queens College, CUNY, and The State University of New York at Stonybrook, as well as Brooklyn College, where Dr. Robert Viscusi, founded the Italian American Writers Association [10], and is an author and American Book Award winner, himself.


As a result of the efforts of magazines like VIA: Voices in Italian Americana, and Italian Americana, and many authors old and young, too numerous to mention, as well as early immigrant, pioneer writers like poet, Emanuel Carnevali, "Furnished Rooms," and novelist, Pietro DiDonato, author of "Christ in Concrete " --Italian Americans are beginning to read more of their own writers. A growing number of books featuring ordinary, hardworking Italians--having nothing to do with criminality--are published yearly to confront the cruel television and Hollywood stereotyping of this ethnic group. (See "Stereotypes," below.) Famed authors like Don DeLillo, Gilbert Sorrentino, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Tina DeRosa, Kim Addonizio, Daniela Gioseffi, Dana Gioia, to name a mere few who have broken through to main stream American literature and publishing, are changing the image of Italians in America with their books, stories, poems and essays far too numerous to site. Many of these authors' books and writings are easily found on the internet and on Italian American Writers [11] as well as in bibliographies online at Stonybrook University's Italian American Studies Dept. in New York [12] or at The Italian American Writers Association website [13]. The cultural face of Italian Americana is widening and changing daily to combat stereotyping by American movies and television.


Religion

Most immigrants had been Catholics in Italy. Observers have noted that they often became more devoutly Catholic in the United States, since their faith was a distinctive characteristic in the U.S.; devout Italian Americans often identified themselves as "Catholics" when talking to coworkers or neighbors. In spite of the Catholic dominance among the immigrants, it can be noted that the Italian religious minorities such as Waldensians, Greek Catholics, Greek Orthodox and Italian Jews, also took part in the Italian immigration to America. The Waldensians, Waldenses or Vaudois are a Christian denomination believing in poverty and austerity, promoting true poverty, public preaching and the literal interpretation of the scriptures. ... The Greek Catholic Church is a Catholic Church of the Eastern Rite. ... Greek Orthodox Church can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... // Under the Roman Empire See also: Jewish-Roman wars The first definite appearance of Jews in the history of Italy was that of the embassy sent by Simon Maccabeus to Rome to strengthen the alliance with the Romans against the Syrians. ...


In some Italian American communities, Saint Joseph's Day (March 19) is marked by celebrations and parades. Columbus Day is also widely celebrated, as are the feasts of some regional Italian patron saints, most notably St. Januarius (San Gennaro) (September 19) (especially by those claiming Neapolitan heritage), and Santa Rosalia (September 4) by immigrants from Sicily. The immigrants from Potenza, Italy celebrate the Saint Rocco's day feast at the Potenza Lodge in Denver, Colorado. Rocco is the patron saint of Potenza. Many still celebrate the Christmas season with a Feast of the seven fishes.In Cleveland, Ohio, the Feast of Assumption is celebrated in Cleveland's Little Italy on August 15. On this feast day, people will pin money on Blessed Virgin Mary statue as symbol of prosperity. The statue is paraded through Little Italy to Holy Rosary Parish. For almost 25 years,Cleveland Catholic Bishop Anthony Pilla would join in the parade and mass due to his Italian heritage. Pilla resigned in April 2006, but he still celebrates. Saint Josephs Day, commonly called the Feast of St. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Columbus Day is a holiday celebrating the anniversary of Christopher Columbuss arrival in the Americas, which happened on the October 12, 1492 in the Julian calendar, or October 21, 1492 in the modern Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Januarius is the name of the month in the ancient Roman calendar, called January in English. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... A statue of St. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Potenza (IPA: /poteηtsa/) is a town and comune in the Southern Italian region of Basilicata (former Lucania). ... Saint Roch Saint Roch (Latin: Rochus; Italian: Rocco; French: Roch; Spanish and Portuguese: Roque; c. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in the State of Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State State of Colorado City and County Denver[1] Founded 1858-11-22, as Denver City, K.T.[2] Incorporated 1861-11-07, as Denver City, C.T.[3] Consolidated... Potenza (IPA: /poteηtsa/) is a town and comune in the Southern Italian region of Basilicata (former Lucania). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... According to Catholic theology and the traditions of the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches, the body of Mary, the mother of Jesus, venerated by these denominations as the Blessed Virgin Mary or Theotokos, respectively, was taken into Heaven along with her soul after her death. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Our Lady redirects here. ...


While most Italian-American families have a Catholic background, there are various groups of Italian-American Christians who have chosen to practice Protestant Christianity for various reasons. In many cases, families may have decided to regularly worship at a local non-Catholic parish with which they and their community identify, but keep with the Catholic tradition in schooling their children at Catholic parochial or private schools, as well as fully participating in Catholic worship when attending Catholic churches for whatever reason. In some cases, there are individuals and families who have become resentful or disenchanted with the Catholic religion, and completely leave the Church, no longer considering themselves as being a part of the Catholic traditions in any way. Many joined the Episcopal Church because of disagreement with local Catholic Church leadership. Many converted to Evangelical Christianity because they did not agree with the ritualistic nature of the Catholic religion, as well as their belief that Catholics have an incorrect interpretation of certain doctrines concerning the Magisterium, the Virgin Mary and the Saints, and the doctrine of Transubstantiation. There are many ex-Catholic Italian-American members of mainline Protestant churches, in particular the United Church of Christ, most of whom left the Catholic Church because they thought it to be too doctrinally conservative. There are also a significant number of ex-Catholic Italian-American converts to the Unitarian Universalist Church, which is not a Christian faith. [14] This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ...


For example, Fiorello La Guardia was an Episcopalian (on his father's side; his mother was from the small but significant community of Italian Jews). Frank Santora is an ex-Catholic Italian-American pastor of Faith Church, a large Evangelical megachurch in New Milford, Connecticut.[4] There is a small charismatic denomination, called the Christian Church of North America, which is rooted in the Italian Pentecostal Movement that came out of Chicago in the early 1900's. It should also be noted that the first group of Italian immigrants to Trenton converted to the Baptist denomination. In the early 1900s, a number of Protestant denominations and missionaries worked in urban Italian American neighborhoods of the Northeast. Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ... // Under the Roman Empire See also: Jewish-Roman wars The first definite appearance of Jews in the history of Italy was that of the embassy sent by Simon Maccabeus to Rome to strengthen the alliance with the Romans against the Syrians. ... The interior of Rev. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1707 Incorporated 1712 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Patricia A. Murphy Area  - Total 165. ... Location in New Jersey Founded  -Incorporated c. ...


Education

According to 2000 Census data, Italian Americans have a greater high school graduation rate than the national average, and a greater than or equal rate of advanced degrees compared to the national average. Italian Americans throughout the United States are well represented in a wide variety of occupations and professions, from skilled trades, to the arts, to engineering, science, mathematics, law, and medicine, and include numerous Nobel prize winners. [15] 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Winners of the Nobel Prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ...


Italian language in the United States

Main article: Italian language in the United States

According to the Sons of Italy News BureauPDF (339 KiB) from 1998 to 2002, the enrollment in college Italian language courses grew by 30%, faster than the enrollment rates for French and German. Italian is the fourth most commonly taught foreign language in U.S. colleges and universities behind Spanish, French, and German. According to the U.S. 2000 Census, Italian is the fifth (seventh overall) most spoken language in the United States (tied with Vietnamese) with over 1 million speakers.[5] The Italian language has been a widely spoken language in the United States of America for more than one hundred years, due to large-scale immigration beginning in the late 19th century. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Italian ( , or lingua italiana) is a Romance language spoken by about 63 million people,[4] primarily in Italy. ...


As a result of the large wave of Italian immigration to the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th centuries, the Italian language was once widely spoken in much of the U.S., especially in northeastern and Great Lakes area cities like Rochester, Chicago, Cleveland, and Milwaukee, as well as San Francisco, Saint Louis and New Orleans. Italian-language newspapers exist in many American cities, especially New York City, and Italian-language movie theatres existed in the U.S. as late as the 1950s. This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Cleveland redirects here. ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The name Saint Louis has several referents: Catholic Saints King Saint Louis IX of France; Saint Louis, bishop of Toulouse in France Locations Saint Louis, Missouri St. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Today, Prizes like The Bordighera Annual Poetry Prize [16] founded by Daniela Gioseffi and Alfredo di Palchi with support from the Sonia Rraiziss-Giop Foundation, and Bordighera Press, [17] which publishes the winners in bilingual editions, have helped to encourage writers of the diaspora to write and read in Italian. Chelsea Books in New York City and Gradiva Press on Long Island have published many bilingual books also due to the efforts of bilingual writers of the diaspora like Paolo Valesio [18], Alfredo de Palchi [19], Luigi Fontanella. Dr. Luigi Bonaffini [20] of The City University of New York, publisher of The Journal of Italian Translation at Brooklyn College, has fostered Italian dialectic poetry throughout his homeland and the USA. Joseph Tusiani of New York and New York University [21], a highly distinguised linguist and prize winning poet born in Italy, paved the way for Italian works of literature in English and has published many bilingual books and Italian classics for the American audience, among them the first complete works of Michaelangelo's poems in English to be published in the United States. All of this literary endeavor has helped to foster the Italian language, along with the Italian opera, of course, in the United States. Many of these authors and their bilingual books are located throughout the internet.

This sign appeared in post offices and in government buildings during World War II. The sign designates Japanese, German, and Italian, the languages of the Axis powers, as enemy languages.
This sign appeared in post offices and in government buildings during World War II. The sign designates Japanese, German, and Italian, the languages of the Axis powers, as enemy languages.

Author Lawrence Distasi [22] argues that the loss of spoken Italian among the Italian American population can be tied to U.S. government pressures during World War II. During World War II, in various parts of the country, the U.S. government displayed signs that read, Don't Speak the Enemy's Language. Such signs designated the languages of the Axis powers, German, Japanese, and Italian, as "enemy languages". Shortly after the Axis powers declared war on the U.S., many Italian, Japanese and German citizens were interned. Among the Italian Americans, those who spoke Italian, who had never taken out citizenship papers, and who belonged to groups that praised Benito Mussolini, were most likely to become candidates for internment. Distasi claims that many Italian language schools closed down in the San Francisco Bay Area within a week of the U.S. declaration of war on the Axis powers. Such closures were inevitable since most of the teachers in Italian languages were interned. Image File history File links This is a picture of a poster reproduced in the book Una Storia Segreta by Lawrence Distasi. ... Image File history File links This is a picture of a poster reproduced in the book Una Storia Segreta by Lawrence Distasi. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Black: Zenith of the Axis Powers Capital Not applicable Political structure Military alliance Historical era World War II  - Tripartite Pact September 27, 1940  - Anti-Comintern Pact November 25, 1936  - Pact of Steel May 22, 1939  - Dissolved 1945 This article is about the independent countries (states) that comprised the Axis powers. ... Mussolini redirects here. ... Bay Area redirects here. ...


Despite the pressures of the US government during World War II, now more than ever, children of Italian heritage, especially paternal heritage, are given Italian names, and raised in traditional Italian ways. The Italian language is still spoken and studied by those of Italian American descent, and it can be heard in various American communities, especially among older Italian Americans. During the late 20th and early 21st centuries, interest in Italian language and culture has surged among Italian Americans. Today's Italian American youth no longer take for granted the impressive contributions Italians and Italian Americans have made to Western civilization, especially in the areas of fine art, music, science, philosophy, law, medicine, education, literature, architecture, and cuisine. For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ...


There is, however, a dilemma for Italian Americans who consider re-learning the language of their ancestors. The formal "Italian" that is taught in colleges and universities is generally not the "Italian" with which Italian Americans are acquainted. Eighty percent of Italian Americans are of Southern Italian origin; therefore, the languages spoken by their families who arrived between 1880-1920 were most likely variations of the Neapolitan and Sicilian dialects with perhaps some degree of influence from Standard Italian. Because the Italian of Italian Americans comes from a time just after the unification of the state, their language is in many ways anachronistic and demonstrates what the dialects of Southern Italy used to be at the time. Because of this, Italian Americans studying Italian are often learning a language that does not include all of the words and phrases they know, and which their ancestors would not have recognized well. Neapolitan (autonym: napulitano; Italian: ) is a Romance language spoken in the city and region of Naples, Campania (Neapolitan: Nàpule, Italian: Napoli); close dialects are spoken throughout most of southern Italy, including the Gaeta and Sora districts of southern Lazio, parts of Abruzzo, Molise, Basilicata, northern Calabria, and northern and... Sicilian (, Italian: ) is a Romance language. ... Italian ( , or lingua italiana) is a Romance language spoken by about 63 million people,[4] primarily in Italy. ... Southern Italy, often referred to in Italian as the Mezzogiorno (a term first used in 19th century in comparison with French Midi ) encompasses six of the countrys 20 regions: Basilicata Campania Calabria Puglia Sicilia Sardinia Sicilia although it is geographically and administratively included in Insular Italy, it has a...


The situation is even more pronounced among Italian Americans whose ancestors came to the United States from Northern Italy. Italian Americans variously of Emilia-Romagnan, Lombardian, Genoese, Marchigiano, Piedmontese, Venetian and other Northern Italian heritage are even further moved away, linguistically, from the languages of their ancestors through the contemporary standard Italian language. Northern Italy comprises of two areas belonging to NUTS level 1: North-West (Nord-Ovest): Aosta Valley, Piedmont, Lombardy, Liguria North-East (Nord-Est): Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Veneto, Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, Emilia-Romagna Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol and Aosta Valley are regions with a... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... // The Marche (plural, originally le marche de Ancona = the Marches of Ancona) are a region of Central Italy, bordering Emilia-Romagna north, Tuscany to the north-west, Umbria to west, Abruzzo and Latium to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. ... Piedmont is a region of northwestern Italy. ... Veneto is my fatherland. ... Italian ( , or lingua italiana) is a Romance language spoken by about 63 million people,[4] primarily in Italy. ...


Stereotypes

History

In the 1890-1920 period Italian Americans were often stereotyped as being "violent" and "controlled by the Mafia". [23] In the 1920s, many Americans used the Sacco and Vanzetti trial, in which two Italian anarchists were wrongly sentenced to death, to denounce Italian immigrants as anarchists and criminals. During the 1800s and early 20th century, Italian Americans were one of the most likely groups to be lynched. In 1891, eleven Italian immigrants in New Orleans were lynched due to their ethnicity and suspicion of being involved in the Mafia. This was the largest mass lynching in US history.[6] This article is about the criminal society. ... Bartolomeo Vanzetti (left) and Nicola Sacco in handcuffs. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity...


Present

To this day, Italian Americans are frequently and unfairly associated with organized crime, and New York in the minds of many Americans, largely due to pervasive media stereotyping, a number of popular gangster movies (such as The Godfather and Goodfellas) and television series such as The Sopranos. A Zogby International survey revealed that 78 percent of teenagers 13 to 18 associated Italian Americans with either criminal activity or blue-collar work. A survey by the Response Analysis Corp. reported that 74 percent of adult Americans believe most Italian Americans have "some connection" to organized crime. [24]PDF (90.1 KiB) Italian Americans still report some workplace discrimination and harassment. (see Anti-Italianism) Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... This article is about the state. ... A crime film, in its most general sense, is a film that deals with crime, criminal justice and the darker side of human nature. ... This article is about the 1972 film. ... Goodfellas (also spelled GoodFellas) is an Academy Award winning 1990 crime drama film directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi, the true story of mob informer Henry Hill. ... This article is about the television series. ... --Shanel 02:55, September 4, 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota...


However, the National Italian American Foundation, the National American Italian Association and other Italian American organizations have asserted that the Mafia in the United States have never numbered more than a few thousand individuals, and that it is unfair to associate such a small minority with the general population of Italian Americans. Further, a majority of Italian Americans hold white collar jobs, including many distinguished positions in business, academia, the arts, medicine, and public service, as well as possessing advanced degrees. The National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) is the major advocate in Washington, DC for nearly 25 million Italian Americans, the nations fifth largest ethnic group. ... This article is about the criminal society. ... White-collar workers perform tasks which are less laborious yet often more highly paid than blue-collar workers, who do manual work. ... In economics, a business (also called firm or enterprise) is a legally recognized organizational entity designed to provide goods and/or services to consumers or corporate entities such as governments, charities or other businesses. ... Academia is a collective term for the scientific and cultural community engaged in higher education and research, taken as a whole. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Public services is a term usually used to mean services provided by government to its citizens, either directly (through the public sector) or by financing private provision of services. ...


Communities

Main article: List of Italian-American Neighborhoods

States known for their high concentrations of Italian Americans include New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Michigan, Maryland, Illinois, California, Ohio and Florida. Among major cities across the country: Boston, Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia and Miami have America's five largest Italian communities. An influx of elderly Italian Americans relocated to the American Southwest for retirement in the states of Arizona and Nevada (the Las Vegas area). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see Las Vegas (disambiguation) and Vegas (disambiguation). ...


State totals

Distribution of Italian Americans according to the 2000 census

Image File history File links Italian1346. ... Image File history File links Italian1346. ... By county. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...

Numbers

1. New York 3,254,298
2. New Jersey 1,590,225
3. Pennsylvania 1,547,470
4. California 1,149,351
5. Florida 1,147,946
6. Massachusetts 918,838
7. Illinois 739,284
8. Ohio 720,847
9. Connecticut 652,016
10. Michigan 484,486
11. Texas approx. 363,354
12. Louisiana approx. 195,561
This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Percentage

1. Rhode Island 19.7%
2. Connecticut 18.6%
3. New Jersey 16.8%
4. New York 16.4%
5. Massachusetts 14.5%
6. Pennsylvania 13%
This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


References and notes

  1. ^ US demographic census. Retrieved on 2008-04-15.
  2. ^ Gambino, Richard (1977). Vendetta: A true story of the worst lynching in America, the mass murder of Italian-Americans in New Orleans in 1891, the vicious motivations behind it, and the tragic repercussions that linger to this day.. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-12273-X. 
  3. ^ Brittingham, Angela, and G. Patricia De La Cruz. Ancestry: 2000. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, U.S. Census Bureau, 2004.PDF (468 KiB)
  4. ^ Contact; A LITTLE ABOUT US.... Retrieved on 2008-05-23.
  5. ^ Language Use and English-Speaking Ability: 2000PDF (481 KiB)
  6. ^ National Great Blacks in Wax Museaum - Italian Lynching
  • Baily, Samuel L. Immigrants in the Lands of Promise : Italians in Buenos Aires and New York City, 1870-1914 (1999) Online in ACLA History E-book Project
  • Bona, Mary Jo. Claiming a Tradition: Italian American Women Writers (1999)
  • Diggins, John P. Mussolini and Fascism: The View from America (1972)
  • D'Agostino, Peter R. Rome in America: Transnational Catholic Ideology from the Risorgimento to Fascism (2004).
  • Delicato, Armando, Italians in Detroit, ARCADIA PUB (SC), 2005, ISBN 0738539856
  • Gans, Herbert J. Urban Villagers (1982)
  • Guglielmo, Thomas A. White on Arrival: Italians, Race, Color, and Power in Chicago, 1890-1945 (2003)
  • Gardaphe, Fred L. Italian Signs, American Streets: The Evolution of Italian American Narrative (1996)
  • Giordano, Paolo A. and Anthony Julian Tamburri, eds. Beyond the Margin: Essays on Italian Americana (1998).
  • Hobbie, Margaret. Italian American Material Culture: A Directory of Collections, Sites, and Festivals in the United States and Canada (1992)
  • Juliani, Richard N. The Social Organization of Immigration: The Italians in Philadelphia (1980)[25]
  • Juliani, Richard N. Building Little Italy: Philadelphia's Italians before Mass Migration (1998)[26]
  • Juliani, Richard N. Priest, Parish, and People: Saving the Faith in Philadelphia's Little Italy (2007) [27]
  • Lagumina, Salvatore J. et al eds. The Italian American Experience: An Encyclopedia (2000)
  • Stefano Luconi. The Italian-American Vote in Providence, R.I., 1916-1948 2005
  • Nelli, Humbert S. The Business of Crime: Italians and Syndicate Crime in the United States (1981)
  • Nelli, Humbert S. Italians in Chicago, 1880-1930: A Study in Ethnic Mobility (2005).
  • Prendergast, William B. The Catholic Voter in American Politics: The Passing of the Democratic Monolith (1999)
  • Smith, Tom. The Crescent City Lynchings: The Murder of Chief Hennessy, the New Orleans "Mafia" Trials, and the Parish Prison Mob (2007) [28]
  • Sterba, Christopher M. Good Americans: Italian and Jewish Immigrants During the First World (2003)
  • Tamburri, Anthony Julian. A Semiotic of Ethnicity: In (Re)cognition of the Italian/American Writer (1998).
  • Tamburri, Anthony Julian, Paolo A. Giordano, Fred L. Gardaphé, eds. From the Margin: Writings in Italian Americana (2000, 2nd ed.)
  • Whyte, William Foote. Street Corner Society: The Social Structure of an Italian Slum (1993).
  • "Italians in the United States". Catholic Encyclopedia. (1913). New York: Robert Appleton Company. 
  • Fox, Stephen, The unknown internment: an oral history of the relocation of Italian Americans during World War II, (Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1990). ISBN 0-8057-9108-6.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that The Crime Club be merged into this article or section. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ...

See also

Italy-USA Foundation logo Italy-USA Foundation (also Fondazione Italia USA) was established on July 4, 2005 to honour the friendship between Italians and Americans. ... 2000 Census Population Ancestry Map Immigration to the United States of America is the movement of non-residents to the United States. ... This is a list of famous Italian Americans. ... The National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) is the major advocate in Washington, DC for nearly 25 million Italian Americans, the nations fifth largest ethnic group. ... It has been suggested that Order of the Sons of Italy be merged into this article or section. ... Sicilian Americans are a subset of Italian Americans from Sicily. ... // Utah Italians include the descendants of immigrants from Italy, and a small number of recent immigrants from Italy. ... Italian American cuisine is what is commonly called Italian food in the United States. ... The term Italian Diaspora refers to the large-scale migration of Italians away from Italy in the period roughly between the unification of Italy in 1861 and the beginning of World War I in 1914. ...

External links

  • (English) H-ItAm daily discussion email group moderated by scholars
  • (English) National Italian American Foundation
  • (English) National Organization of Italian American Women
  • (English) Sons of Italy in America
  • (English) Italian American Writers: A Growing Online Archive
  • (English) Towards a New Italian American Identity
  • (English) ItalianAmericanTalk.com
  • (English)(Italian) Italy-USA Foundation
  • (English) Italian Heritage & Culture Month Committee of New York
  • (English)(Italian) Italian American Committee on Education
  • Italy Revisited (photo archives)

Useful links for Italians in USA

  • (English) Italian American History
  • (English) Ministry for Foreign Affairs
  • (Italian) How to vote AbroadPDF (1.24 MiB)
  • (Italian) How to vote Abroad FAQsPDF (26.1 KiB)
  • (English) Italian American Writers: A Growing Online Archive
  • (English) The Italian American Press
  • (Italian) America Oggi, an Italian-language daily published in the US
  • (Italian)(English) L'Idea MagazineA Magazine for the Italians in USA
  • (Italian)(English) Italian Americana: The voice of leading cultural, intellectual and literary Italian Americans

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