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Encyclopedia > It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
Directed by Stanley Kramer
Produced by Stanley Kramer
Written by William Rose
Tania Rose
Starring Spencer Tracy
Milton Berle
Sid Caesar
Jonathan Winters
Mickey Rooney
Buddy Hackett
Buster Keaton
Jimmy Durante
Dick Shawn
Edie Adams
Barrie Chase
Ethel Merman
Dorothy Provine
Cinematography Ernest Laszlo, ASC
Editing by Gene Fowler Jr.
Robert C. Jones
Frederic Knudtson
Distributed by United Artists
Release date(s) November 7, 1963
Running time 161 Min
Theatrical
192 Min
Director's Cut
Language English
Budget $9,400,000
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World is a 1963 American comedy film directed by Stanley Kramer about the madcap pursuit of $350,000 of stolen cash by a diverse and colorful group of strangers. The ensemble comedy premiered on November 7, 1963. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (500x732, 61 KB) Licensing This image is of a movie poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the movie or the studio which produced the movie in question. ... Stanley Kramer (September 29, 1913 – February 19, 2001) was a Jewish-American film director and producer. ... William Rose (December 12, 1914 - February 10, 1987) was a major American screenwriter of British and Hollywood films. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ... Sid Caesar (born September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning American comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television series Your Show of Shows, and to younger generations as Coach Calhoun in Grease and Grease 2. ... Jonathan Harshman Winters III (born November 11, 1925 in Bellbrook, Ohio) is an American film and television actor. ... Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Buddy Hackett (August 31, 1924 – June 30, 2003) was an American comedian and actor. ... Joseph Frank Buster Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American comic actor and filmmaker. ... “Inka Dinka Doo” redirects here. ... Richard Schulefand (December 1, 1924 – April 17, 1987), an American actor and comedian known professionally as Dick Shawn, was born in Buffalo, New York. ... Edie Adams (born Elizabeth Edith Enke) is an American singer and light comedienne who was born on April 16, 1927, in Kingston, Pennsylvania. ... Barrie Chase (born October 20, 1933), a dancer and actress, made four television specials as Fred Astaires young partner in the 1960s, taking the place that Ginger Rogers had held thirty years before as Astaires primary dance partner. ... Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 – February 15, 1984) was a Tony Award- and Grammy Award-winning American star of stage and film musicals, well known for her powerful voice, often hailed by critics as The Grande Dame of the Broadway stage. // Merman was born Ethel Agnes Zimmermann in her maternal... Dorothy Provine born in South Dakota on January 20, 1937, is a singer, dancer, actress, and comedian. ... Ernest Laszlo (April 23, 1898–January 6, 1984) was an American cinematographer. ... The eldest son of Gene Fowler, Denver-born Gene Fowler Jr. ... Robert C. Jones, sometimes credited as Robert Jones, is a screenwriter and film editor. ... Frederic Knudtson (1906 - 1964) was an editor whose career stretched from 1932 until his sudden death in 1964, which ironically came at the peak of his career when he racked up five Academy Award nominations in six years. ... This article is about the film studio. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ... Much like American popular music, the American film industry has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... Comedy film is genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humor. ... Stanley Kramer (September 29, 1913 – February 19, 2001) was a Jewish-American film director and producer. ... An ensemble cast is a cast in which the principal performers are assigned roughly equal amounts of importance in a dramatic production. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Plot

The film begins as the occupants of four vehicles on a lonely highway in the Southern California desert stop to help "Smiler" Grogan (Jimmy Durante in his last screen appearance), who has just careened off the highway in a spectacular crash. This article is about the region of Southern California. ... “Inka Dinka Doo” redirects here. ...


With his dying breaths, he tells the bystanders, comedy writer Dingy "Ding" Bell (Mickey Rooney), his writing partner Benjy Benjamin (Buddy Hackett), moving van driver Lennie Pike (Jonathan Winters), dentist Melville Crump (Sid Caesar), and edible seaweed company owner J. Russell Finch (Milton Berle) about "three hundred and fifty G's" ($350,000) hidden in the city of Santa Rosita, less than a day's drive away, under a mysterious "big W”. Grogan then expires, literally kicking a bucket. The witnesses immediately begin arguing over how to divide the money, sparking a wild race. Each carload of characters races to be first to Santa Rosita and find the money. Many others, including Lt. Col. J. Algernon Hawthorne, a cactus-collecting RAF officer played by Terry Thomas; and Otto Meyer, a sneaky con man played by Phil Silvers, join the race as it progresses. Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Buddy Hackett (August 31, 1924 – June 30, 2003) was an American comedian and actor. ... Jonathan Harshman Winters III (born November 11, 1925 in Bellbrook, Ohio) is an American film and television actor. ... Sid Caesar (born September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning American comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television series Your Show of Shows, and to younger generations as Coach Calhoun in Grease and Grease 2. ... Ascophyllum nodosum exposed to the sun in Nova Scotia, Canada Dead Mans Fingers (Codium fragile) off Massachusetts coast For the band, see; Seaweed (band) For the rock musician, see; Seaweed (musician) Seaweeds are any of a large number of marine benthic algae. ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ... RAF is an three letter acronym for: Royal Air Force -- the Air Force of the United Kingdom (see also Air Ministry) Red Army Faction (Rote Armee Fraktion) -- a German terror organisation Rigas Autobusu Fabrika -- a factory making buses in Riga, Latvia Rapid Action Force in India Računarski Fakultet RAF... Terry-Thomas (left) and Clive Morton in Lucky Jim (1957) Terry-Thomas (July 14, 1911 – January 8, 1990) was a distinctive English comic actor. ... Phil Silvers (May 11, 1911 – November 1, 1985) was an American entertainer and comedy actor. ...


Berle's character, J. Russell Finch, is recovering from a nervous breakdown. He continually pops pills for his nerves throughout the film. His mother-in-law, Mrs. Marcus (Ethel Merman) is loud, overbearing and opportunistic. Marcus' son Sylvester (Dick Shawn), a beatnik lifeguard, is introduced in a wild frenzied dance sequence with his girlfriend (Barrie Chase) to "31 Flavors", sung by the Shirelles. Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 – February 15, 1984) was a Tony Award- and Grammy Award-winning American star of stage and film musicals, well known for her powerful voice, often hailed by critics as The Grande Dame of the Broadway stage. // Merman was born Ethel Agnes Zimmermann in her maternal... Richard Schulefand (December 1, 1924 – April 17, 1987), an American actor and comedian known professionally as Dick Shawn, was born in Buffalo, New York. ... For other uses, see Beatnik (disambiguation). ... Barrie Chase (born October 20, 1933), a dancer and actress, made four television specials as Fred Astaires young partner in the 1960s, taking the place that Ginger Rogers had held thirty years before as Astaires primary dance partner. ... The Shirelles were an influential American girl group in the early 1960s. ...


Unbeknownst to the treasure hunters, Captain Culpeper (Spencer Tracy) of the Santa Rosita Police has been working on the Smiler Grogan case for years. He suspects the various people who heard Grogan's last words may know where the money is hidden and has their progress tracked by various police units, including helicopters. Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ...


Bell and Benjamin enlist the aid of Tyler Fitzgerald (Jim Backus), a wealthy pilot who has a penchant for drink, even while flying. Mr. Crump and his wife Monica (Edie Adams) charter a Curtiss JN-4D "Jenny" World War I-era biplane which almost falls apart in mid-flight. They ultimately get locked in a hardware store basement once they arrive in Santa Rosita, eventually freeing themselves with dynamite. Peter Falk and Eddie Anderson (who played Rochester on Jack Benny's radio and TV shows) appear as Santa Rosita Yellow Cab drivers. James Gilmore Backus (February 25, 1913 in Cleveland, Ohio - July 3, 1989 In Los Angeles, California) was a radio, television, film actor, character actor, and voice actor. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of an alcohol includes many other compounds. ... Edie Adams (born Elizabeth Edith Enke) is an American singer and light comedienne who was born on April 16, 1927, in Kingston, Pennsylvania. ... 1st Aero Squadron on the Mexican US border, 1916 A veteran reconditioned Standard J-1, which is often confused with the Curtiss JN-4 Printed upside-down in error, the Curtiss JN-4 appears on a famous stamp; the stamp is known as the Inverted Jenny. The Curtiss JN-4... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Peter Michael Falk (born September 16, 1927) is an American actor. ... Edmund Lincoln Anderson (September 18, 1905 - February 28, 1977), often known as Eddie Rochester Anderson, was an African-American comic actor who became famous playing Rochester van Jones (usually known simply as Rochester), the valet to Jack Bennys eponymous title character on the long-running radio and television series... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... The original Yellow Cab Company based in Chicago, Illinois is one of the largest taxicab companies still in existence. ...


Otto Meyer stops to pick up the bicycling Lennie Pike, whose van is kaput, but when the dim-witted van driver reveals all he knows about the treasure, Meyer tricks Pike into getting out of his car. The clever Meyer leaves Pike on the roadside while speeding off to get the money for himself (Winters' facial expressions provide the bulk of the humor in his role, especially during this sequence). Pike later catches up with Meyer at a newly opened service station owned by two nerdy attendants, Irwin (Marvin Kaplan) and Ray (Arnold Stang), and tries to attack Meyer. Ray knocks Pike out with a bottle of oil and the two station owners tie him up with duct tape as Meyer escapes. Pike awakens, breaks out of the duct tape, goes on a rampage that destroys the station, and steals a Dodge Power Wagon tow truck. For other uses, see Nerd (disambiguation). ... Marvin Kaplan (born January 24, 1924 in Brooklyn, New York) is a character actor and voice artist. ... Arnold Stang (born September 28, 1925 in Chelsea, Massachusetts) is a comic actor who plays a small and bespectacled, yet brash and knowing big-city type. ... A roll of silver duct tape. ... The Dodge Power Wagon was a four wheel drive pickup truck produced from 1945 through 1969. ... Heavy Tow truck A tow truck (also called a wrecker, a breakdown truck or a breakdown lorry), is a vehicle used to take disabled motor vehicles off a roadway to another location in case of breakdown or collision, or to impound illegally parked vehicles on public or (more commonly) private...


Culpeper is anticipating a nice vacation since the Smiler Grogan case, which he has worked for 15 years, will be solved once the travelers find the hidden cash. He continues to monitor their progress as reports filter in from various police units. He starts to get ideas of his own about what should happen to all that money, however, spurred on by his imminent retirement and the low pension for his job.

Berle, Caesar, Rooney, and Hackett mug for the camera in the opening scene of It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.
Berle, Caesar, Rooney, and Hackett mug for the camera in the opening scene of It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

Leaving a trail of destruction in their wake, all the main characters eventually converge on Santa Rosita State Park. Culpeper hurries to intercept them, telling his officers to back off and let him handle the situation. The money is soon dug up under the "Big W," a group of four palm trees planted diagonally to resemble the letter. Culpeper quietly approaches (after they finish arguing about how the money will be divided) and requests that they turn themselves in. Obviously, the authorities will be more lenient if they go voluntarily. Everyone piles into two taxicabs and heads for police headquarters, while Culpeper makes a break for it with the money. Ironically, just as this happens, Culpeper's Chief, Aloysius (William Demarest) blackmails the mayor into trebling Culpepper's pension. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... William Demarest (February 27, 1892 – December 28, 1983) was an American character actor. ...


Culpeper has decided to flee to nearby Mexico (strongly hinted as he looks at a map of California and the camera focuses on a strip on the bottom labeled "Mexico" as instrumental Mexican music plays softly on the soundtrack). His plan is in place, including a fast boat to deliver him south. But the treasure-seekers realize that Culpeper has turned the opposite way out of the State Park, so they pursue him. Culpeper, driving his police-issue Dodge, is chased by the treasure-seekers and his scheme unravels. The pursuit is a great car chase on highways and through town resulting in the eventual destruction of all three vehicles at an old building in downtown Santa Rosita that is about to be torn down. Upon hearing of the chase, and failure to contact Culpeper, Aloysius realizes that his superior has become a criminal, and sadly orders that he be arrested. For other uses, see Dodge (disambiguation). ...


In a madcap conclusion, all the men are tossed off a rescue ladder and the suitcase filled with cash spills open. The money flutters down to the excited crowd on the street below, and the male treasure hunters wind up in the hospital. The film ends as Culpeper and the other men are moaning and bandaged in traction, lamenting the loss of the money and facing punishment. Culpeper, in visible disgust, remarks in dark sarcasm: "The only reason that you ten idiots are gonna get off lightly is because the judge will have me up there to throw the book at!" Culpeper mentions a litany of troubles before him, including a divorce and his pension being revoked, doubting that he will laugh about anything ever again. Benjy Benjamin, who is eating a banana, then tosses the peel on the floor in disgust. The women from the story, dressed in prison uniforms, enter the hospital room. Loud-mouthed Mrs. Marcus, in the midst of another bombastic tirade, slips on the banana peel and falls hard on her rear end. All the men burst into hysterical laughter as she is taken away by orderlies. A smile slowly comes to Culpeper's face, and he finally joins in the laughter. In orthopaedic medicine, Traction refers to the set of mechanisms for straightening broken bones or relieving pressure on the skeletal system. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Background

Although well known for serious films such as Inherit the Wind and Judgment at Nuremberg (both starring Spencer Tracy), Kramer set out to make the ultimate comedy film with It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. At more than three hours in its original roadshow version, including overture, intermission and exit music, the result is certainly one of the longest. Inherit the Wind is a play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, which opened on Broadway in January 1955, a 1960 Hollywood film based on the play, and three television remakes. ... Judgment at Nuremberg (released in the UK as Judgement at Nuremberg) (1961) is a fictionalized film account of the post-World War II Nuremberg Trials, written by Abby Mann and directed by Stanley Kramer, starring Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Marlene Dietrich, Maximilian Schell, Judy Garland, Montgomery Clift, Werner... The roadshow theatrical release (also commonly known as reserved seat engagement) is a practice whereas a film opens in a special limited number of theaters in large cities like Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco for a specific period of time before it spreads to nationwide release (also known... Overture (French ouverture, meaning opening) in music is the instrumental introduction to a dramatic, choral or, occasionally, instrumental composition. ... An intermission or interval is a break between two performances or sessions, in events such as a theatrical play, opera or musical concert. ...


Filmed in Ultra Panavision 70 and presented in Cinerama (becoming one of the first Cinerama films originated with one camera), it also had an all-star cast, with dozens of major comedy stars from all eras of cinema making appearances in the film. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Cinerama is the trademarked name for a widescreen process which works by simultaneously projecting images from three synchronized 35 mm projectors onto a huge, deeply-curved screen, subtending 146° of arc, and for the corporation which was formed to market it. ...


The film followed a Hollywood trend in the 1960s of producing "epic" films as a way of wooing audiences away from television and back to movie theaters. Television had sapped the regular moviegoing audience and box-office revenues were dropping, so the major studios experimented with a number of gimmicks to attract audiences, including widescreen films. This article is about motion pictures. ... ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... The Wikipedia main page as viewed with a widescreen monitor. ...


The title was taken from Thomas Middleton's 1605 comedy A Mad World, My Masters. Kramer considered adding a fifth "mad" to the title before deciding that it would be redundant, but noted in interviews that he later regretted it. Thomas Middleton (1580 – 1627) was an English Jacobean playwright and poet. ... 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... A Mad World, My Masters is a Jacobean stage play written by Thomas Middleton, a comedy first performed around 1605 and first published in 1608. ...


The film's theme music was written by Ernest Gold with lyrics by Mack David. Ernest Gold (born July 13, 1921, Vienna, Austria; died March 17 Santa Monica, California, 1999) was an Austrian-born Jewish-American Academy Award winning composer of the theme from the movie Exodus. ... Mack David (born July 5, 1912) was an American lyricist and songwriter, best known for his work with movies and television in the 1960s, particularly his work on the Disney films Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland. ...


In the 1970s, ABC broadcast the film on New Year's Eve. The last reported showing of the film on major network television was on May 16, 1978. is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...


Production

The early scenes in which Grogan goes off the road and the four vehicles briefly speed before slowing down to stop and talk were filmed on the “Seven Steps” section of the Palms-to-Pines Highway (state highway 74), a generally east-west route mostly south of, and west of, Palm Desert, California. Culpepper forecasts the vehicles — going east — will turn south (a right turn), but the movie shows them turn left. The corner where Durante's car sails off, known by "Mad World" fans as "Smiler's Point", can easily be spotted today on Highway 74, minus the man-made ramp that was removed after the stunt was performed. State Route 74, a part of the Pines to Palms Scenic Byway, is a mostly scenic highway that runs from Palm Desert in Riverside County westward to San Juan Capistrano in Orange County. ... Palm Desert is a city located in Riverside County, California, in the Palm Springs area, approximately eleven miles east of Palm Springs. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Many of the actors performed some of their own stunts, including some crashing falls by Caesar, physical antics by Jonathan Winters, and Phil Silvers' drive into a flowing river where he almost drowned. Caesar severely injured his back while filming the hardware store scene and was unable to return to the film for some time. Silvers injured himself shortly before the shooting of the scene (one of the last) where the male characters chase Culpepper up several flights of stairs and onto fire-escape ladders. As shot, the scene features Silvers' stunt double.


The gas station scene with Jonathan Winters, Marvin Kaplan and Arnold Stang was filmed at a specially constructed set built on composer Jimmy Van Heusen's property near Palm Springs, California. Van Heusen first saw the completed gas station on his Friday drive from Los Angeles out to his weekend retreat. He did not know the gas station was a movie set, thinking instead that his business manager had leased a portion of his property for an actual service station. The destruction scene with Winters, Kaplan and Stang was filmed that weekend, with the site cleanup scheduled for the next week. On Monday morning's return trip to Los Angeles, Van Heusen saw the destroyed gas station lying in a pile and thought something terrible had happened. As the property owner, he believed he might be sued by injured parties. Jonathan Harshman Winters III (born November 11, 1925 in Bellbrook, Ohio) is an American film and television actor. ... Marvin Kaplan (born January 24, 1924 in Brooklyn, New York) is a character actor and voice artist. ... Arnold Stang (born September 28, 1925 in Chelsea, Massachusetts) is a comic actor who plays a small and bespectacled, yet brash and knowing big-city type. ... Jimmy Van Heusen (January 26, 1913 - February 7, 1990), was an American composer. ... Palm Springs is a desert city in Riverside County, California approximately 110 miles (177 km) east of Los Angeles and 140 miles (225 km) northeast of San Diego. ...


During shooting of the gas station's destruction, the water tower began to collapse too soon because of a special-effects miscue. A combination of a split-screen effect and use of the optical printer repaired the scene. An optical printer with two projector heads, used in producing movie special effects. ...


Much of the scenes that take place on what look like lonely stretches of road were filmed in areas of Southern California that have become heavily urbanized in the decades following the movie's production; in the scene where Jack Benny encounters Milton Berle's character and his group, the entire area, which was practically open desert in the movie, is now a modern suburban neighborhood in Yucca Valley, with a Walgreens store, a Wal-Mart, and other major retailers all around. Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ... Yucca Valleys West End Yucca Valley is an incorporated town located in San Bernardino County, California, United States. ... Walgreen Co. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ...


The airport terminal scenes were filmed at the now-defunct Rancho Conejo Airport in Newbury Park, California, though the control tower shown was constructed only for filming. Other plane sequences were filmed at the Sonoma County Airport north of Santa Rosa, California. The community of Newbury Park, California lies on a western portion of the city of Thousand Oaks and an unincorporated portion of southern Ventura County. ... Sonoma County is a county located on Californias Pacific coast north of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Location in Sonoma County and the state of California Country State County Sonoma Area  - City 40. ...


In one scene, a Beech model C-18S flies through a billboard. The plane was flown by stuntman Frank Tallman, but a communications mix up resulted in the use of linen graphic sheets on the sign rather than paper, as planned. Linen is much tougher than paper, and the plane was nearly destroyed on impact. Tallman managed to fly it back to the airstrip, discovering that the leading edges of the wings had been smashed all the way back to the wing spars. Tallman considered that the closest he ever got to dying on film. Beechcraft 18 on floats. ... Frank Gifford Tallman (b. ...


In the movie the airplane is shown crashing through an airport restaurant plate glass window and stopping abruptly. Careful viewing will show an arresting cable that was tied to the tail of the airplane at just the right length to make the aircraft stop as it hits a curbing while smashing through the restaurant windows.


The park, where the big W was shown, was located on the grounds of a private residence, located in Rancho Palos Verdes, where only one of the four palm trees remains. There is speculation that the missing trees may be replanted sometime in the future in commemoration of the film. Location of Rancho Palos Verdes in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1973-09-07 [2] Government  - Mayor Thomas D. Long [1] Area  - City  13. ...


The final chase scene was filmed in Santa Monica, most notably at the California Incline, and downtown Long Beach. The cars can be seen passing the Pike amusement park with its wooden roller coaster and traveling around Rainbow Pier. The Arcade under Ocean Boulevard near Pine Avenue also is part of the scene. For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles County Government  - Mayor Bob Foster Area  - City  65. ... The Pike was an amusement park and arcade near the beach south of Ocean Boulevard in Long Beach, California. ...


Compulsive gambler Phil Silvers had a running craps game going during the production. Jerry Lewis reportedly stopped by the set and left $500 poorer according to Something a Little Less Serious: A Tribute to 'It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World', a 1991 documentary on the DVD version; (Lewis has a cameo appearance in the original film). Veteran stuntman Carey Loftin was also featured in the documentary, explaining some of the complexity as well as simplicity of stunts, such as the day he "kicked the bucket" as a stand-in for Durante. [1] Craps (previously known as crabs[1]) is a casino dice game. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Carey Loftin (b: January 31, 1914 Blountstown, Florida d: March 4, 1997 Huntington Beach, California) was an American actor and stuntman whose most famous role, though he wasnt visible, was as the truck driver in Steven Spielbergs Duel. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation), Dead (disambiguation), Death (band) or Deceased (band). ...


Versions

The film ran 210 minutes in its preview showing. Stanley Kramer cut the film to 192 minutes for the premiere release. This was the version that Kramer was satisfied with. During its Roadshow 70mm run, United Artists, seeing that it had a mammoth hit on its hands, cut the film to 162 minutes without Kramer's involvement in order to add an extra daily showing. The general release 35mm version runs 154 minutes, with overture and exit music excised. At the film's premiere, radio transmissions between the film's fictional police played in the theater lobby and rest rooms during the intermission. The police transmissions featured Detective Matthews (Charles McGraw) and the police personnel that follow the group. These three reports (each approx. one minute in length) may have added to the 210 minute length.


Some of the cut footage remains missing, although 20 minutes of material was found, consisting of a mixture of Cinerama (rectified for screen curve) footage and Ultra-Panavision footage. MGM/UA also located a 20 minute 70mm preview reel which contained a few scenes in their entirety. These two 70mm reels provided the extra scenes for the "Special Edition version with restored footage" project of 1991. No out-take footage was used, with the exception of a two-second wide shot of the Beechcraft aircraft, needed to bridge a highly sought-after bit of Buddy Hackett being doused with a bucket of water.


While not officially referring to it as a director's cut, Stanley Kramer helped oversee the re-incorporation of this missing footage into a 182-minute "special edition" video version for VHS and LaserDisc. Screenwriter Tania Rose was also contacted by the Special Edition team and after viewing the footage gave her endorsement to the project. Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ...


Because of the quality of the missing scenes, the lack of a large budget for a film restoration, and a lack of interest at the time by restoration experts, it was decided that a digital tape reconstruction for presentation on Laserdisc would at least be a venue for film fans to finally see the footage. Years later, the improved quality of DVD would make the poor quality of the restored footage more jarring, so the standard edited version is presented instead. The special edition version has aired on Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Comparisons between the two show that the extended version is of inferior video quality to that of the DVD, since film transfer techniques and formats have improved. Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ...


Currently, the best existing footage is in the form of original 70mm elements of the general release version (recent restored versions shown in revival screenings are derived from these elements). However, some, if not all of the remaining footage does exist in some form, although it has deteriorated over time. A restoration effort currently is under way by preservationist Robert A. Harris in an attempt to bring the film back as close as possible to the original roadshow release. Robert A. Harris is a film historian and preservationist who has restored and reconstructed a number of classic films. ...


The official release from MGM is the 161-minute general release version, taken from its original 35mm elements. Because of this, it's presented in a 2.35:1 aspect ratio, as opposed to the full 2.75:1 in anamorphic 70mm form. Two versions of the film have been released on DVD. The first, from 2001, is a double-sided disc containing an hour of missing scenes on the second side, along with the original documentary "Something A Little Less Serious", and trailers and TV spots. In 2003, the film was released on DVD as a movie-only edition, with disc art on the disc as opposed to being dual-sided. It should be noted that the 2001 release had a yellow spine and is now hard to find, while the 2003 release had a blue spine and is relatively easy to find in stores. Interestingly, the colors in the cartoon credits sequence are incorrect (too red) in the current DVD version. The older Special Edition Laserdisc version is surprisingly more accurate, with the green background in the opening, and the subtle color changes occurring later on. The Special Edition team (consisting of volunteer "Mad World" experts from around the country) had MGM/UA pull a 70mm print for the correct colors. This article is about the year. ...


Fans on message boards such as us.imdb.com have listed the differences between the TCM and DVD versions, since the DVD's deleted scenes are not properly organized to explain their context and some scenes are essentially the same as seen on the DVD, only extended with a bit of material. However, even without the deleted scenes the current DVD version contains what general audiences saw in 1963. The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ...


According to one fan's analysis of the TCM extended version (70mm 2.55:1 aspect ratio) and the DVD theatrical version (35mm 2.35:1 aspect ratio):

  • The DVD does not contain the overture, and the main titles are in red, as opposed to the original multi-colored sequence.
  • The TCM version opens with the 1980s animated MGM/UA logo, while the DVD version opens with the familiar MGM Leo The Lion logo (United Artists releases are now part of the MGM library).
  • Part One of the TCM extended version has 14 minutes and 2 seconds of added footage.
  • Part Two of the TCM extended version has 3 minutes and 49 seconds of added footage.
  • The longest stretch of time in the film without added material is 25 minutes and 3 seconds, from timecode 1:53:45 to timecode 2:18:48.

It has been rumored that Kramer's original cut lasted more than five hours, but no evidence has been found to support this. Leo the Lion is the common nickname for The MGM logo, it was orignally used by Goldywn Films beofe it merged and became MGM. Category: ‪Film stubs‬ ...


Home video, LaserDisc and DVD releases

The film was first released on VHS and LaserDisc by CBS/FOX Video in 1985. In 1990, MGM/UA Home Video released "restored" video version of the film on VHS and LaserDisc. In 2001, MGM Home Entertainment released the film on two-sided DVD with extras. In 2003, MGM Home Entertainment released another DVD of the film but has one-sided disc containing no extras. Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... CBS/Fox Video was a home video company formed and established in 1982. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Cast

Main characters

Edie Adams (born Elizabeth Edith Enke) is an American singer and light comedienne who was born on April 16, 1927, in Kingston, Pennsylvania. ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ... Sid Caesar (born September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning American comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television series Your Show of Shows, and to younger generations as Coach Calhoun in Grease and Grease 2. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Buddy Hackett (August 31, 1924 – June 30, 2003) was an American comedian and actor. ... Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 – February 15, 1984) was a Tony Award- and Grammy Award-winning American star of stage and film musicals, well known for her powerful voice, often hailed by critics as The Grande Dame of the Broadway stage. // Merman was born Ethel Agnes Zimmermann in her maternal... Dorothy Provine born in South Dakota on January 20, 1937, is a singer, dancer, actress, and comedian. ... Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Richard Schulefand (December 1, 1924 – April 17, 1987), an American actor and comedian known professionally as Dick Shawn, was born in Buffalo, New York. ... Phil Silvers (May 11, 1911 – November 1, 1985) was an American entertainer and comedy actor. ... Terry-Thomas (left) and Clive Morton in a scene from Lucky Jim (1957) Terry-Thomas (Thomas Terence Hoare-Stephens) (14 July 1911 - 8 January 1990) was a distinctive British comic actor of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Jonathan Harshman Winters III (born November 11, 1925 in Bellbrook, Ohio) is an American film and television actor. ...

Secondary characters

Rochester Eddie Anderson (September 18, 1905 - February 28, 1977) was an African-American comic actor and star of movies, television and especially old-time radio, where he played the butler Rochester van Jones (usually known simply as Rochester) to Jack Bennys eponymous title character on The Jack Benny Show. ... William Demarest (February 27, 1892 – December 28, 1983) was an American character actor. ... “Inka Dinka Doo” redirects here. ... Peter Michael Falk (born September 16, 1927) is an American actor. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

Cameo appearances

Judy Garland, Groucho Marx, Stan Laurel, George Burns, Bob Hope, Jackie Mason, Don Rickles, Judy Holliday, and Red Skelton were among the many celebrities offered or considered for roles in the film.[citation needed] A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... James Gilmore Backus (February 25, 1913 in Cleveland, Ohio - July 3, 1989 In Los Angeles, California) was a radio, television, film actor, character actor, and voice actor. ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... The Maxwell was a brand of automobiles manufactured in the United States of America from about 1903 to 1925. ... Paul Birch, born Paul Smith (13 January 1912-24 May 1969), was an American actor of stage and film. ... Ben Blue (Benjamin Bernstein) (September 12, 1901 – March 7, 1975) was a Canadian actor and comedian. ... Joe E. Brown in the late 1920s. ... Alan Carney (Born David Boughal) (born December 22, 1909 in Brooklyn, New York; died May 2, 1973 in Van Nuys, California) was an American actor and comedian. ... Barrie Chase (born October 20, 1933), a dancer and actress, made four television specials as Fred Astaires young partner in the 1960s, taking the place that Ginger Rogers had held thirty years before as Astaires primary dance partner. ... John Clarke (born April 14, 1932) is an American actor. ... Stanley Clements (born Stanislaw Klimowicz) (July 16, 1926 - October 16, 1981) was an American actor and comedian. ... Lloyd Corrigan (October 16, 1900 - November 5, 1969) was an American film actor, producer, screenwriter and director who began working in films in the 1920s. ... Actor Howard Da Silva in The Lost Weekend Howard Da Silva (born May 4, 1909; died February 16, 1986) was an American actor. ... For the Emmerdale actor, see Andy Devine (actor). ... Selma Diamond (August 5, 1920 - May 13, 1985) was a Canadian-born comedic actress and TV writer. ... Minta Durfee (October 1, 1889-September 9, 1975) was a silent film actress from Los Angeles, California. ... Norman Fell (born Norman Feld March 24, 1924 – December 14, 1998) was a Golden Globe award-winning American film and television actor most famous for his role as landlord Mr. ... James William Flavin Jr. ... Stanley Victor Freberg (born August 7, 1926 in Los Angeles) is an American author, recording artist, animation voice actor, comedian, puppeteer and advertising creative director. ... Leo Gorcey (June 3, 1917 - June 2, 1969) is an American actor. ... Sterling Price Holloway, Jr. ... Edward Everett Horton (March 18, 1886 - September 29, 1970) was an American actor with a long career including motion pictures, theater, radio, television and voice work for animated cartoons. ... Allen Jenkins (April 9, 1900 – July 20, 1974), originally Alfred McGonegal, was a character actor born on Staten Island, New York. ... Marvin Kaplan (born January 24, 1924 in Brooklyn, New York) is a character actor and voice artist. ... Joseph Frank Buster Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American comic actor and filmmaker. ... Tom Kennedy, (born July 15, 1885, in New York, NY, died October 6, 1965, in Los Angeles, CA), was an American actor best known for his roles in Hollywood comedies from the silent days,with such producers as Mack Sennett and Hal Roach, mainly supporting lead comedians such as The... Jesse Donald Knotts (July 21, 1924 – February 24, 2006) was an American comedic actor best known for his portrayal of Barney Fife on the 1960s television sitcom The Andy Griffith Show (a role which earned him five Emmy Awards), and as landlord Ralph Furley on the television sitcom Three’s... Charles Lane (born as Charles Gerstle Levison January 26, 1905 – July 9, 2007[1] ) was an American character actor seen in many movies and TV shows, and at the time of his death was the oldest living American actor. ... Harry Lauter (born Herman Arthur Lauter) (June 19, 1914 - October 30, 1990) was an American character actor. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Mazurki in Nightmare Alley (1947) Mike Mazurki (born Mihailo Mazurski on December 25, 1907 in Tarnopol, Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Ternopil, Ukraine); died December 9, 1990 in Glendale, California) was a Ukrainian-born actor and professional wrestler who appeared in over 100 movies. ... Born Charles Butters in Ohio May 10, 1914, square-jawed Charles McGraw grew up to become an actor and eventually made his first movie in 1942. ... Clifford Charles Norton AKA Cliff Norton (March 21, 1918 – January 25, 2003) was an American character actor and radio announcer who had appeared in various movies and television series over a career that spanned over 40 years. ... Barbara Pepper (May 31, 1915-July 18, 1969) was an American actress. ... ZaSu Pitts (January 3, 1894 – June 7, 1963) (IPA: ) was an American movie actress. ... Carl Reiner (born March 20, 1922) is an American actor, film director, producer, writer and comedian. ... Madlyn Rhue (born October 3, 1935 in Washington, D.C., USA; died December 16, 2003 in Woodland Hills, California), was an American character actress. ... For other Roy Roberts with the same name, see Roy Roberts (disambiguation). ... Arnold Stang (born September 28, 1925 in Chelsea, Massachusetts) is a comic actor who plays a small and bespectacled, yet brash and knowing big-city type. ... This article is about the comedy trio. ... Curly-Joe DeRita Curly-Joe DeRita (July 12, 1909 - July 3, 1993), born Joseph Wardell, was an American comedian who is best known as the sixth and last of the Three Stooges. ... Moe Howard (June 19, 1897 – May 4, 1975) was the leader of the Three Stooges. ... Larry Fine is the name of several people: Larry Fine, a US film comedian, and member of The Three Stooges. ... Sammee Tong (born April 21, 1901, in San Francisco, CA, died October 27, 1964, in Palms, CA), was a film and television character actor. ... Doodles Weaver Television screen-shot Winstead Sheffield Doodles Weaver (May 11, 1911 – January 17, 1983) was an American comedian. ... Jesse White can refer to: Jesse White, film and television actor Jesse White, Illinois politician Jesse (Jesco) White, the West Virginia Dancing Outlaw OR It can Refer to the One time Junior Achiever of the year Jesse T. White, A luchador wrestler. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Groucho redirects here. ... Stan Laurel (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson; 16 June 1890 – 23 February 1965) was an English comic actor, writer and director, famous as part of the comedy double act Laurel and Hardy, whose career stretched from the silent films of the early 20th Century until post-World War II. // Stan Laurel... George Burns[1], born Nathan Birnbaum (January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996), was an American comedian and actor. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Jackie Mason (born Yacov Moshe Maza on June 9, 1931, in Sheboygan, Wisconsin) is an American stand-up comedian. ... Donald Jay Rickles (born May 8, 1926 in New York City, New York) is an American comedian and actor. ... Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921–June 7, 1965) was an Academy- and Tony Award-winning American actress. ... Richard Bernard Red Skelton (July 18, 1913 – September 17, 1997) was an American comedian whose greatest impact — in a career which began as a teen circus clown and graduated to vaudeville, Broadway, MGM films, and radio — began when he reached television stardom with The Red Skelton Show (NBC, 1951–1952...


Taglines

  • It's the biggest entertainment ever to hit the Cinerama screen! (70mm Cinerama version)
  • The biggest entertainment ever to rock the screen with laughter! (35mm general release version)
  • Everybody who's ever been funny is in it!
  • If ever this mad, mad, mad, mad world needed It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World it's now! (1970 re-release)

Cinerama is the trademarked name for a widescreen process which works by simultaneously projecting images from three synchronized 35 mm projectors onto a huge, deeply-curved screen, subtending 146° of arc, and for the corporation which was formed to market it. ...

Homages

  • The plot of the novel Florida Roadkill by Tim Dorsey is an homage to the film, with a wide variety of characters chasing after a suitcase containing $5 million in stolen drug money, which was hidden by the thief before he died. There is even a direct reference to the movie, in a scene in which a man drives over a turtle "like Jerry Lewis running over Spencer Tracy's hat in It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World."
  • The New Avengers episode "The Tale of the Big Why" seems to have borrowed part of its storyline from It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World — at the end of the episode the characters realise they are looking not for a metaphysical "big why" but a physical "big Y".
  • In an episode of Tiny Toon Adventures, the characters, following a treasure map, find that they have not been looking for an X marked in the sand, but the location where the shadows of two crossed palm trees falls. Of course, this would change throughout the day, but that does not matter in the greater scheme of the plot (see suspension of disbelief).
  • The crossed palm trees are also used at (real world) In-N-Out Burger restaurants. Founder Harry Snyder's favorite movie was It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, which is why many stores have crossing palm trees in front, and some have two.[citation needed]
  • A 1993 episode of Cheers, titled "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Bar," had the Cheers gang tearing up the bar to find a money belt with $6,000,000 supposedly hid there by Robin Colcord several years earlier.
  • An episode of The Simpsons is named "It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Marge".
    • A 1994 episode of The Simpsons, "Homer the Vigilante", features money supposedly hidden beneath a "big T", along with other elements borrowed from the movie, such as Otto Meyer driving into the river while yelling at Bart. The big "W" is in the background. Caricatures of Milton Berle and Buddy Hackett also appear during the scene where the money is being dug up.
    • The Simpsons Movie mob scenes are meant to serve as a homage to this film.
  • The 1987 film Million Dollar Mystery, and the 2001 film Rat Race have similar basic premises.
  • Several references to the film have been made in episodes of Mystery Science Theater 3000:
    • In Godzilla vs. Megalon there is a car chase of cars driving downs stairs and Crow T. Robot says in a Phil Silvers voice, "This is no place for a convertible!" The same line is used during Master Ninja when a car flies off of a dock into the water.
    • Similarly, during the film Eegah, there is a scene that takes place outside a hotel where some palm trees are shown, and Crow says (this time imitating Jimmy Durante), "It's under a big W!" The same reference is made during The Thing That Couldn't Die.
    • During the film Laserblast, a gas station is blown up. One of the characters is heard to remark that the place had just been rebuilt "after Jonathan Winters' rampage."
    • At various times, characters in the series can be heard to say the line "out, baby, out, out, out!" which (if not a direct reference) bears more than a passing resemblance to a line Dick Shawn's character says during the "digging" sequence.
  • A 2007 episode of Lost opens with a framing of a "W" of palm trees, and includes a shot of one character reproducing Phil Silvers between trees at Santa Rosita, and another reproducing the dying Jimmy Durante. The serial also features similar theme music, a sanitarium named Santa Rosa, an implausibly crashed Beechcraft, and according to some interpretations a similarly themed plot.
  • MAD Magazine issued a book titled "It's a World, World, World, World Mad" and made numerous references to the movie during the 1960s and 1970s. Mad artist Jack Davis illustrated the film's poster, as well as the book-cover parody of the poster.
  • An Indian film "Dhamaal" released in September 2007 was based on a similar story line. The garden in this film was the San Sebastian garden in the coastal Indian state of Goa.
  • Comedian Patton Oswalt mentions the movie on his "Werewolves and Lollipops" CD when explaining his love for high-class restaurants.
  • Daredevil # 317 and 318 are a homage to the film.

Cover of US paperback edition of Florida Roadkill Florida Roadkill is the first book in the unnamed series of books by Tim Dorsey which were centered on his character Serge Storms. ... Tim Dorsey (born 1961) is an American novelist. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... A 1970s New Avengers paperback features Mike Gambit (Gareth Hunt), Purdey (Joanna Lumley) and the ubiquitous John Steed (Patrick Macnee). ... Steven Spielberg Presents Tiny Toon Adventures (also known as Tiny Toon Adventures or Tiny Toons) is an American animated television series created and produced as a collaborative effort between Steven Spielberg and Warner Bros. ... Map created by Robert Lewis Stevenson in Treasure Island A treasure map is a common device used in fictional stories. ... For other uses, see X (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In-N-Out headquarters at University Tower in Irvine In-N-Out Burger is a privately owned and operated fast food restaurant chain in the Western United States. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Robin Colcord, was a character on the American television show Cheers, portrayed by Roger Rees. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Its A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Marge is the twenty-first episode of the eleventh season of The Simpsons. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Homer the Vigilante is the eleventh episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... For the comic book series of the same name, see Bart Simpson comics. ... The Simpsons Movie is a 2007 animated comedy film based on the animated television series The Simpsons, directed by David Silverman, and scheduled to be released worldwide by July 27, 2007. ... Million Dollar Mystery is a movie released in 1987 as a promotional piece for Glad-Lock brand bags. ... Rat Race is a 2001 comedy film (not to be confused with The Rat Race of 1960) directed by Jerry Zucker. ... Mystery Science Theater 3000 (often abbreviated MST3K, sometimes MST 3000 or MST 3K or just MST) is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... Godzilla vs. ... Crow T. Robot Crow T. Robot is a fictional character from the American science fiction comedy television series Mystery Science Theater 3000 (MST3K). ... Phil Silvers (May 11, 1911 – November 1, 1985) was an American entertainer and comedy actor. ... Saab 900 Convertible 1962 Rambler American 1981 AMC Eagle 4-WD convertible Convertible can also refer to a convertible security A convertible (sometimes called cabriolet in British English) is a car body style with a folding or retracting roof (aka soft top or top in USA, hood in UK). ... The Master (1984) is a short-lived ninja-themed action-adventure TV series created by Michael Sloan which aired on NBC. The show focused on the adventures of John Peter McAllister, an aging ninja master, (Lee Van Cleef) and his young pupil, Max Keller (Timothy Van Patten). ... Eegah is a 1962 film starring Arch Hall Sr. ... “Inka Dinka Doo” redirects here. ... The Thing that Couldnt Die is a 1958 science fiction film directed by Will Cowan. ... Laserblast is a low-budget 1978 science fiction film. ... Jonathan Harshman Winters III (born November 11, 1925 in Bellbrook, Ohio) is an American film and television actor. ... Richard Schulefand (December 1, 1924 – April 17, 1987), an American actor and comedian known professionally as Dick Shawn, was born in Buffalo, New York. ... The Suite Life of Zack and Cody, is an American childrens television series that airs on the Disney Channel. ... The following is an episode list for the Disney Channel comedy, The Suite Life of Zack & Cody. ... LOST redirects here. ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... There are several notable people called Jack Davis. ... Patton Oswalt (born January 27, 1969 in Portsmouth, Virginia) is an American actor, writer, voiceover artist, and professional comedian. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ...

Sequel

On January 9, 2007, Karen Sharpe Kramer, widow of Stanley Kramer, and film producer Edward Bass announced that a sequel entitled It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, MAD World is in the works. The film would be, like the original, a large ensemble movie mixing comics and dramatic actors. The story follows the descendants of the characters from the first movie who are thrust into another madcap chase to find a cache of money after it is revealed that the bills found in the first movie were counterfeit. Original cast members Sid Caesar and Jonathan Winters, among others, may reprise their original roles. is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Stanley Kramer (September 29, 1913 – February 19, 2001) was a Jewish-American film director and producer. ... The Right Reverend Edward Bass (November 23, 1726 – September 10, 1803), was the first American Episcopal bishop of the Diocese of Massachusetts and second bishop of the Diocese of Rhode Island. ... Sid Caesar (born September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning American comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television series Your Show of Shows, and to younger generations as Coach Calhoun in Grease and Grease 2. ... Jonathan Harshman Winters III (born November 11, 1925 in Bellbrook, Ohio) is an American film and television actor. ...


References

  1. ^ Something a Little Less Serious: A Tribute to It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World' (1991) . IMDB.
  2. ^ Cameos. Filmography. Three Stooges Official Website. Retrieved on 2008-04-19.

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The year 1991 in film involved some significant events. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Stanley Kramer (September 29, 1913 – February 19, 2001) was a Jewish-American film director and producer. ... Not as a Stranger was a 1954 novel written by Morton Thompson. ... French movie poster for The Pride and The Passion The Pride and the Passion is an 1957 historical film drama made by Stanley Kramer productions and released by United Artists. ... The Defiant Ones is a 1958 film which tells about two escaped prisoners who are shackled together, one white and one black, who must co-operate in order to survive. ... On the Beach is a 1959 movie based on Nevil Shutes novel of the same name featuring Gregory Peck (USS Sawfish captain Dwight Lionel Towers), Ava Gardner (Moira Davidson), Fred Astaire (scientist Julian – John in the novel – Osborne) and Anthony Perkins (Australian naval officer Peter Holmes). ... Inherit the Wind is a play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, which opened on Broadway in January 1955, a 1960 Hollywood film based on the play, and three television remakes. ... Judgment at Nuremberg (released in the UK as Judgement at Nuremberg) (1961) is a fictionalized film account of the post-World War II Nuremberg Trials, written by Abby Mann and directed by Stanley Kramer, starring Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Marlene Dietrich, Maximilian Schell, Judy Garland, Montgomery Clift, Werner... Ship of Fools is a 1965 film which tells the overlapping stories of several passengers aboard an ocean liner during the 1930s. ... For the 1981 album by Black Uhuru, see Guess Whos Coming to Dinner (album). ... The Secret of Santa Vittoria is a 1969 film made by Stanley Kramer Productions and distributed by United Artists. ... Bless the Beasts and Children is a 1971 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Glendon Swarthout. ... The Domino Principle is a 1977 thriller starred by Gene Hackman, Candice Bergen and Richard Widmark. ...

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