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Encyclopedia > Isles of Scilly
Isles of Scilly
Ynysek Syllan
An aerial photo of the islands
An aerial photo of the islands
Geography

Location in relation to Cornwall
Location Atlantic Ocean, 45 km (28 mi) off the coast of Great Britain
Coordinates 49°56′10″N 6°19′22″W / 49.93611, -6.32278Coordinates: 49°56′10″N 6°19′22″W / 49.93611, -6.32278
Total islands 6 inhabited, 140 others
Major islands St Mary's, Tresco, St Martins, Bryher, St Agnes
Area 16.33 km² (6.3 sq mi)
(ranked 351st)
Administration
Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Status Sui generis, Unitary
Largest city Hugh Town (1,068)
Leadership Cllr. Mrs. Christine Savill
Executive Philip Hygate B.A., F.R.S.A.
MP Andrew George
Demographics
Population 2,100 (ranked 354th) (as of 2006)
Density 129 / km²/km²
Indigenous people 99.6% White
St Martin's taken from the helicopter to Penzance
St Martin's taken from the helicopter to Penzance
View from Tresco, the second largest member of the Isles of Scilly
View from Tresco, the second largest member of the Isles of Scilly

The Isles of Scilly (Cornish: Ynysek Syllan) form an archipelago off the southwestern tip of Great Britain. Traditionally administered as part of the county of Cornwall, the islands now have their own Council of the Isles of Scilly. They are also designated the Isles of Scilly Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Scilly Isles is an area and landmark between the English towns of Esher and Kingston-upon-Thames, and mark one of the boundaries of Thames Ditton. ... Map of Society Islands One of the islands. ... Map of Manuae Country France French Polynesia Archipelago Society Islands Leeward Islands Region South Pacific Ocean Area 4 km² Coastline - km Highest elevation - - m Population  - Density 0 ppl. ... The Isles of Scilly in relation to Cornwall Created & uploaded by Keith Edkins File links The following pages link to this file: Isles of Scilly Categories: GFDL images ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... St. ... The view from the helicopter leaving Tresco Tresco (Cornish: ), is the second largest island of the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, UK. It is 735 acres in size. ... St Martins taken from the helicopter to Penzance St Martins is the northernmost populated island of the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom. ... Bryher (grid reference SV880150) is the smallest of the five inhabited islands of the Isles of Scilly. ... St Agnes is the southernmost populated island of the Isles of Scilly, England. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by area. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Sui generis is a (post) Latin expression, literally meaning a scholar like what pradeep is or unique in its characteristics. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Hugh Town (population 1,068) is the main settlement on the Isles of Scilly, located south west of Cornwall, England. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 2530 KB) Summary St Martins, Isles of Scilly, taken from a helicopter. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 2530 KB) Summary St Martins, Isles of Scilly, taken from a helicopter. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 690 KB)  ©  This image is copyrighted. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 690 KB)  ©  This image is copyrighted. ... The view from the helicopter leaving Tresco Tresco (Cornish: ), is the second largest island of the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, UK. It is 735 acres in size. ... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ...


The correct name for the islands is the Isles of Scilly, or simply Scilly; the people of Scilly consider the terms "Scillies" and "Scilly Isles" to be incorrect. The adjective "Scillonian" is sometimes used for people or things related to the archipelago.

Contents

Geography

The Isles of Scilly, the most westerly part of Great Britain, form an archipelago of six inhabited islands and numerous other small rocky islets (around 140 in total) lying 45 km (28 miles) off Land's End. The table provides an overview of the most important islands: This is a list of the extreme points of the United Kingdom: the points that are farther north, south, east or west than any other location. ... Lands End shown within Cornwall Lands End, the most westerly point in England The wreck of the RMS Mülheim at Lands End, 2003 This article is about the location at the western tip of Cornwall. ...

Island Population
(Census
2001)
Area
km²
Main
settlement
St Mary's 1,666 6.29 Hugh Town
Tresco 180 2.97 New Grimsby
St Martin's (with White Island) 142 2.37 Higher Town
St Agnes 70 1.48 Saint Agnes
Gugh 3  
Bryher (with Gweal) 92 1.32 Bryher
Samson -(1) 0.38  
Annet - 0.21  
St. Helen's - 0.20  
Teän - 0.16  
Great Ganilly - 0.13  
remaining 45 islets - 0.50  
Isles of Scilly 2,153 16.03 Hugh Town

(1) inhabited until 1855 Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... St Marys as seen from the air Hugh Town For alternate uses, see St Marys (disambiguation). ... Hugh Town (population 1,068) is the main settlement on the Isles of Scilly, located south west of Cornwall, England. ... The view from the helicopter leaving Tresco Tresco (Cornish: ), is the second largest island of the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, UK. It is 735 acres in size. ... St Martins taken from the helicopter to Penzance St Martins is the northernmost populated island of the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Saint Agnes (disambiguation). ... Gugh is an island in the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom. ... Bryher (grid reference SV880150) is the smallest of the five inhabited islands of the Isles of Scilly. ... Gweal (Cornish: Gwithial, meaning place of trees) is one of the Isles of Scilly. ... Samson is one of the largest uninhabited islands in the Isles of Scilly. ... Annet is the second largest of the 50 uninhabited Isles of Scilly, 28 miles off the coast from Land’s End. ... St Helens (Cornish: Ynys Elidius) is one of the Isles of Scilly. ... Hugh Town (population 1,068) is the main settlement on the Isles of Scilly, located south west of Cornwall, England. ...


The islands' position produces a place of great contrast—the ameliorating effect of the sea means they rarely have frost or snow, which allows local farmers to grow flowers well ahead of those on the island of Britain. The largest agricultural product is cut flowers, mostly daffodils. Exposure to Atlantic winds means that spectacular winter gales lash the islands from time to time. Species ????? Daffodils are a group of large flowered members of the genus Narcissus. ... Atlantic and North Atlantic redirect here. ...


This is reflected in the landscape, most clearly seen on Tresco where the lush sub-tropical Abbey Gardens on the sheltered southern end of the island contrast with the low heather and bare rock sculpted by the wind on the exposed northern end. Tresco Abbey Gardens are located on the island of Tresco in the Isles of Scilly. ... Heather may be: In botany, the plant Calluna vulgaris, or, more loosely, various species of the closely related genera Erica and Cassiope, low evergreen shrubs (also called heaths). The term is also used to describe land which is vegetated with these plants; In apparel or textiles, interwoven yarns with a...


As part of a 2002 marketing campaign, the plant conservation charity Plantlife chose Thrift (Armeria maritima) as the "county flower" of the islands.[1] Plantlife is a U.K. plant conservation charity. ... Binomial name Armeria maritima (Mill. ... In a number of countries, plants have been chosen as symbols to represent specific geographic areas. ...


History

Scilly was one of the Hundreds of Cornwall in the early 19th century, (formerly known as Cornish Shires).
Scilly was one of the Hundreds of Cornwall in the early 19th century, (formerly known as Cornish Shires).

Scilly has been inhabited since the Stone Age and its history has been one of subsistence living until the 20th century with people living off the land and the sea. Farming and fishing continue today, but the main industry now is tourism. Image File history File links Kernow_Hundreds. ... Image File history File links Kernow_Hundreds. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Stone Age fishing hook. ... The following is a list of subsistence techniques: Hunting and Gathering, also known as Foraging freeganism involves gathering of discarded food in the context of an urban environment gleaning involves the gathering of food that traditional farmers have left behind in their fields Cultivation Horticulture - plant cultivation, based on the... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ... Tourist redirects here. ...


The islands may correspond to the Cassiterides (Tin Isles) visited by the Phoenicians and mentioned by the Greeks. However, the archipelago itself does not contain much tin - it may be that they were used as a staging post from the mainland. Cassiterides (from the Greek for tin, i. ... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon and Syria. ...


It is likely that until relatively recently the Isles were much larger with many of them joined into one island and that the land has subsided. Evidence for this includes:

  • A description in Roman times describes Scilly as "Scillonia insula" in the singular, as if there was an island much bigger than any of the others.
  • Remains of a prehistoric farm have been found on Nornour, which is now a small rocky skerry far too small for farming.
  • At certain low tides the sea becomes shallow enough for people to walk between some of the islands. This is possibly one of the sources for stories of drowned lands, e.g., Lyonesse.
  • Ancient field walls are visible below the high tide line off some of the islands (e.g. Samson).
  • Some of the Cornish language placenames also appear to reflect past shorelines, and former land areas.[2]

Offshore, midway between Land's End and the Isles of Scilly, is the supposed location of the mythical lost land of Lyonesse, referred to in Arthurian literature. This may be a folk memory of inundated lands, but this legend is also common amongst the Brythonic peoples; the legend of "Ys" is a parallel and cognate legend in Brittany. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... For other uses of number, see number (disambiguation). ... Look up skerry in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lyonesse, Lyoness, or Lyonnesse is the sunken land believed in legend to lie off the Isles of Scilly, to the south-west of Cornwall. ... Samson is one of the largest uninhabited islands in the Isles of Scilly. ... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... Lands End shown within Cornwall Lands End, the most westerly point in England The wreck of the RMS Mülheim at Lands End, 2003 This article is about the location at the western tip of Cornwall. ... Lyonesse, Lyoness, or Lyonnesse is the sunken land believed in legend to lie off the Isles of Scilly, to the south-west of Cornwall. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... Folk memory is a term often used to describe stories, folklore or myths about past events that are passed orally from generation to generation. ... Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ... Flight of King Gradlon, by E. V. Luminais, 1884 (Musée des Beaux-Arts, Quimper) Ys (also spelled Is or Ker-Ys in Breton) is a mythical city built in the Douarnenez bay in Brittany by Gradlon, King of Cornouaille, for his daughter Dahut. ... This article is about the historical kingdom, duchy and French province, as well as one of the Celtic nations. ...


Norse and Norman period

Olaf Tryggvason, who supposedly visited the islands in 986. It is said an encounter with a cleric there led him to Christianise Norway
Olaf Tryggvason, who supposedly visited the islands in 986. It is said an encounter with a cleric there led him to Christianise Norway
At the time of King Canute, the Isles of Scilly fell outside his British realms, as did Wales and Cornwall

It is generally considered that Cornwall, and possibly the Isles of Scilly came under the dominion of the English Crown in the time of Athelstan's rule, i.e. 924-939, if the English crown as such can be said to have actually existed at that time. Image File history File links Painting by Norwegian artist Peter Nicolai Arbo (1831-1892). ... Image File history File links Painting by Norwegian artist Peter Nicolai Arbo (1831-1892). ... Olaf Tryggvason (Old Norse: Óláfr Tryggvason, Norwegian: Olav Tryggvason), (960s-September 9? 1000), was King of Norway from 995 to 1000. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (633x609, 83 KB) I doctored the wiki Image:Cnut 1014 1035. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (633x609, 83 KB) I doctored the wiki Image:Cnut 1014 1035. ... Canute the Great, or Canute I, also known as Cnut in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den Store, Danish: Knud den Store) (died November 12, 1035) was a Viking king of England and Denmark, and Norway, and of... This article is about the country. ... Athelstan redirects here. ...


During the latter part of the pre-Norman period, the eastern seaboard of modern-day England became increasingly under the sway of the Norse. The Isles of Scilly, called Syllingene by the Norse, themselves came under Viking attack, as it is recorded in the Orkneyinga saga. Norse is an adjective relating things to Denmark, Norway, Iceland and Sweden. ... The Orkneyinga saga (also called the History of the Earls of Orkney) is an unique historical narrative of the history of the Orkney Islands from their capture by the Norwegian king in the 9th century onwards until about 1200 AD. The saga was written around 1200 AD by an unknown...


In 995 Olaf Tryggvason would become King Olaf I of Norway. Born c. 960, Olaf had raided various European cities and fought in several wars. In 986 however, he (supposedly) met a Christian seer on the Isles of Scilly. In Snorre Sturlason's Royal Sagas of Norway, it is stated that this seer told him: Olaf Tryggvason (Old Norse: Óláfr Tryggvason, Norwegian: Olav Tryggvason), (960s-September 9? 1000), was King of Norway from 995 to 1000. ... Seer has several possible meanings: A fortune teller or prophet The fictional character on the television series Charmed The Seasonal energy efficiency ratio standard for air conditioning appliances This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Snorri Sturlason (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ...

Thou wilt become a renowned king, and do celebrated deeds. Many men wilt thou bring to faith and baptism, and both to thy own and others' good; and that thou mayst have no doubt of the truth of this answer, listen to these tokens. When thou comest to thy ships many of thy people will conspire against thee, and then a battle will follow in which many of thy men will fall, and thou wilt be wounded almost to death, and carried upon a shield to thy ship; yet after seven days thou shalt be well of thy wounds, and immediately thou shalt let thyself be baptized.

The legend continues that, as the seer foretold, Olaf was attacked by a group of mutineers upon returning to his ships. As soon as he had recovered from his wounds, he let himself be baptized. He then stopped raiding Christian cities and lived in England and Ireland. In 995 he used an opportunity to return to Norway. When he arrived, the Haakon Jarl was already facing a revolt. Olaf Tryggvason could convince the rebels to accept him as their king. (And Haakon Jarl was betrayed and killed by his own slave, while he was hiding from the rebels in a pig sty.) Mutiny AKA. Matt Daye Is A conspiracy among members of a group of similarly-situated individuals (typically members of the military; or the crew of any ship, even if they are civilians) to openly oppose, change or overthrow an existing authority. ... Haakon Sigurdsson Jarl (d. ...


Eventually England became ruled by Norse monarchs, and the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms fell one by one, with Wessex being conquered in 1013 by King Sweyn Forkbeard. Notably, while Sweyn's realms, which included Denmark and Norway in the north, and modern-day English areas such as Mercia (an Anglian kingdom of the current Midlands), much of which, along with northern England, fell under the "Danelaw". But while Sweyn ruled Wessex, along with his other realms, from 1013 onwards, followed by his son Canute the Great, the Isles of Scilly were not part of his realm of Wessex. Sweyn I Forkbeard (actually Svein Otto Haraldsson; in Danish, Svend Tveskæg, originally Svend Tjugeskæg or Tyvskæg) (circa 960 - February 3, 1014). ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gold: Danelaw The Danelaw, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles also known as the Danelagh, (Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a name given to a part of Great Britain, now northern and eastern England, in which the laws of the Danes[1] held predominance over those of the Anglo... Canute the Great, or Canute I, also known as Cnut in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den Store, Danish: Knud den Store) (died November 12, 1035) was a Viking king of England and Denmark, and Norway, and of...


With the Norman Conquest, the Isles of Scilly came more under centralised control. About twenty years later, the Domesday survey was conducted. The islands would have formed part of the "Exeter Domesday" circuit, which included Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Somerset, and Wiltshire. Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dɔ.sət], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Not to be confused with Wilshire. ...


Middle Ages and early modern period

At the turn of the 14th century, the Abbot and convent of Tavistock Abbey petitioned the king saying that

"state that they hold certain isles in the sea between Cornwall and Ireland, of which the largest is called Scilly, to which ships come passing between France, Normandy, Spain, Bayonne, Gascony, Scotland, Ireland, Wales and Cornwall: and, because they feel that in the event of a war breaking out between the kings of England and France, or between any of the other places mentioned, they would not have enough power to do justice to these sailors, they ask that they might exchange these islands for lands in Devon, saving the churches on the islands appropriated to them."[3]

William le Poer, coroner of Scilly is recorded in 1305, about being worried about the extent of wrecking in the islands, and sent a petition to the King. The names provide a wide variety of origins, e.g. Robert and Henry Sage (English), Richard de Tregenestre (Cornish), Ace de Veldre (French), Davy Gogch (possibly Welsh, or Cornish), and Adam le Fuiz Yaldicz (?Spanish) For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ... Bayonne (French: Bayonne, pronounced ; Gascon Occitan and Basque: Baiona) is a city and commune of southwest France at the confluence of the Nive and Adour rivers, in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the country. ...


In 1375, Boreman, with 28 mariners, was captured in the Isles of Scilly in a barge of Normandy by Fulbroke, Borde and others and brought to Bristol as prisoners. This article is about the English city. ...


It is not known at exactly what time the islands' inhabitants stopped speaking Cornish, but it seems to have gone into decline during the Middle Ages, and lost the language before parts of Penwith. The islands thus appeared to have lost the old Celtic language before parts of the mainland, in contrast to the situation of Irish or Scottish Gaelic. For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Satellite image of the Penwith peninsula farmland in St Buryan parish looking south towards the sea Cattle being raised in the south of the district Aerial photo looking across Lands End to Cape Cornwall Celtic cross near St Loys Cove, St Buryan Rocky cove at St Loy in... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ...


During the English Civil War, the Parliamentarians captured the isles, only to see its garrison mutiny and return them to the Royalists. By 1651, the Royalist governor, Sir John Grenville, was using the islands as a base of privateering raids on Commonwealth and Dutch shipping. It was during this period that the Three Hundred and Thirty Five Years' War started between the isles and the Netherlands. In June 1651, Admiral Robert Blake captured the isles for the Parliamentarians. Blake's initial attack, on Old Grimsby, failed, but the next attacks, succeded in taking Tresco and Bryher. Blake set up a battery on Tresco to fire on St. Mary's, but one of the guns exploded, killing its crew and injuring Blake himself. Still, a second battery proved more successful. Consequently, Grenville and Blake negotiated terms that permitted the Royalists to surrender honorably. The Parliamentary forces then set to fortifying the islands. They built Cromwell's Castle - a gun platform on the west side of Tresco - using materials scavenged from an earlier gun platform further up the hill. Although this poorly sited earlier platform dated back to the 1550s, it is now referred to King Charles's Castle. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... Prince Rupert of the Rhine Cavaliers was the name used by Parliamentarians for the Royalist supporters of King Charles I during the English Civil War (1642–1651). ... The Three Hundred and Thirty Five Years War (1651–1986) was a war between the Netherlands and the Isles of Scilly (located off the southwest coast of the United Kingdom). ... Robert Blake, General at Sea, 1599–1657 by Henry Perronet Briggs, painted 1829. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... The view from the helicopter leaving Tresco Tresco (Cornish: ), is the second largest island of the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, UK. It is 735 acres in size. ... Bryher (1894-1983) was the pen name of Annie Winnifred Ellerman. ... St. ... Cromwells Castle is on the island of Tresco in the Isles of Scilly (grid reference SV882159). ... King Charless Castle is near the northern extremity of the island of Tresco in the Isles of Scilly (grid reference SV882161). ...


The islands appear to have been depredated frequently by Barbary pirates. The Moorish ambassador of the Barbary States to the Court of Queen Elizabeth I of England. ...


Modern period

Scilly is famous for its danger to shipping and its many shipwrecks. The wreck of Sir Cloudesley Shovell's ship HMS Association and three others of his fleet in 1707 off the Isles of Scilly due to inaccuracies in navigation led to the establishment of the Board of Longitude and consequently the development of the method of lunar distances, and to the invention of the marine chronometer by John Harrison, the first reliable methods of determining longitude at sea. The list of shipwrecks of the Isles of Scilly is a list of ships sank on or near the Isles of Scilly. ... A portrait of Cloudesley Shovell at the museum in Rochester, Kent, where he was an MP. Sir Cloudesley Shovell (c. ... HMS Association was the flagship of Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell which sank off the Isles of Scilly in 1707 in one of the worst maritime disasters in British history. ... The Board of Longitude was a British Government body formed in 1714 to solve the problem of finding longitude at sea. ... Finding Greenwich time while at sea using a lunar distance. ... A marine chronometer is a timekeeper precise enough to be used as a portable time standard, used to determine longitude by means of celestial navigation. ... John Harrison John Harrison (March 24, 1693–March 24, 1776) was an English clockmaker, who designed and built the worlds first successful chronometer (maritime clock), one whose accuracy was great enough to allow the determination of longitude over long distances. ... Longitude is the east-west geographic coordinate measurement most commonly utilized in cartography and global navigation. ...


The sea has always played a huge part in Scillonian history but it was in the 19th century that Scilly had its maritime heyday. Beaches which are now enjoyed by sunbathers were then factories for shipbuilding; the harbours now full of pleasure boats were once packed with local and visiting fishing and trading boats. Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ...


In 1834, Augustus Smith acquired the lease on the Isles of Scilly from the Duchy of Cornwall for £20,000, and set about changing the islanders' way of life, expelling those who could not find a job locally and evicting some of the inhabitants of smaller islands, in a manner similar to that practiced in the Scottish clearances. In 1855, he expelled the ten inhabitants of Samson, in order to turn the island into a deer park. (The deer did not like the habitat, and escaped.) Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Augustus John Smith (1804-1872) was governor of the Isles of Scilly for over thirty years, and was largely responsible for the economy of the islands as it is today. ... This article or section should include material from Tenancy agreement A lease is a contract conveying from one person (the lessor) to another person (the lessee) the right to use and control some article of property for a specified period of time (the term), without conveying ownership, in exchange for... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Highland Clearances (Scottish Gaelic: Fuadaich nan Gàidheal, the expulsion of the Gael) is a name given to the forced displacement of the population of the Scottish Highlands from their ancient ways of warrior clan subsistence farming, leading to mass emigration. ... Samson is one of the largest uninhabited islands in the Isles of Scilly. ...

A map of the Isles of Scilly from 1945
A map of the Isles of Scilly from 1945

Smith created the quasi-aristocratic title Lord Proprietor for himself, and, many of his actions were unpopular. However, it can be said that not all his actions were detrimental to the inhabitants, for example, besides building a new quay at Hugh Town on St. Mary's, he sowed gorse and trees to provide shelter for the agricultural land. He built schools on the well-inhabited islands. These were the first compulsory schools in the whole of Britain. It cost one penny a time but if you missed school then it was 2d. Hugh Town (population 1,068) is the main settlement on the Isles of Scilly, located south west of Cornwall, England. ... St Marys as seen from the air Hugh Town For alternate uses, see St Marys (disambiguation). ... Species Ulex argenteus Ulex boivinii Ulex borgiae Ulex cantabricus Ulex densus Ulex europaeus - Common Gorse Ulex gallii - Dwarf Furze or Furse Ulex genistoides Ulex micranthus Ulex minor - Dwarf Gorse Ulex parviflorus Ref: ILDIS Version 6. ...


The archipelago became fairly popular in the 20th century as a holiday and holiday home location. For example, former Prime Minister Harold Wilson regularly holidayed on the Isles and eventually bought a cottage there as a holiday home. He is buried on St Mary's. His widow Mary Wilson is still a frequent visitor. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... For other persons named Harold Wilson, see Harold Wilson (disambiguation). ... Mary Wilson (born 1918) is a British poet, best known as the wife of former British prime minister, Harold Wilson. ...


Government

The flag of the Council of the Isles of Scilly.
The flag of the Council of the Isles of Scilly.
The Scillonian Cross, the unofficial flag of the Isles of Scilly.
The Scillonian Cross, the unofficial flag of the Isles of Scilly.
The St Piran's cross, flag of Cornwall. The Isles of Scilly are a former Hundred of Cornwall, but their relationship to Cornwall is an unclear one.
The St Piran's cross, flag of Cornwall. The Isles of Scilly are a former Hundred of Cornwall, but their relationship to Cornwall is an unclear one.

Image File history File links Isles_of_Scilly_Council_Flag. ... Image File history File links Isles_of_Scilly_Council_Flag. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cornwall. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cornwall. ... Saint Piran is the patron saint of tin-miners. ... Hundreds of Cornwall in the early 19th century, (formerly known as Cornish Shires). ...

Local government

Historically, the Isles of Scilly were administered as one of the hundreds of Cornwall, although the Cornwall quarter sessions had limited jurisdiction there. The archipelago is part of the Duchy of Cornwall, the Duke being the heir to the British throne, and he is allowed special rights and privileges in the islands. Hundreds of Cornwall in the early 19th century, (formerly known as Cornish Shires). ... The Courts of Quarter Sessions or Quarter Sessions were periodic courts held in each county and county borough in England and Wales until 1972, when together with the Assize courts they were abolished by the Courts Act 1971 and replaced by a single permanent Crown Court of England and Wales. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Local Government Act 1888 allowed the Local Government Board to establish in the Isles of Scilly "councils and other local authorities separate from those of the county of Cornwall"... "for the application to the islands of any act touching local government." Accordingly, in 1890 the Isles of Scilly Rural District Council (the RDC) was formed as a sui generis unitary authority, outside the administrative county of Cornwall. Cornwall County Council provided some services to the Isles, for which the RDC made financial contributions. Section 265 of the Local Government Act of 1972 allowed for the continued existence of the RDC, but renamed as the Council of the Isles of Scilly.[4][5] The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... The President of the Local Government Board was a ministerial post, frequently a Cabinet position, in the United Kingdom, established in 1871. ... Sui generis is a (post) Latin expression, literally meaning a scholar like what pradeep is or unique in its characteristics. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... An administrative county is an administrative area in the British Isles. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ...


This unusual status also means that much administrative law (for example relating to the functions of local authorities, the health service and other public bodies) that applies in the rest of England applies in modified form in the islands.[6]


With a total population of just over 2,000, the council represents fewer inhabitants than many U.K parish councils, and is by far the smallest unitary council within the U.K. In 2005, there were 21 elected councillors (all independent), 13 elected by St Mary's residents and two each, elected by residents of Bryher, St Martins, St Agnes and Tresco. There are some 164 staff were employed by the council. These numbers are significant in that almost 10 per cent of the population is directly linked to the council as either an employee or councillor.[7] Main articles: Local government in the United Kingdom, Parish and Civil parish In England parish councils were formed in 1894 to take over local oversight of social welfare and civic duties in towns and villages. ... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and other parts of the Commonwealth. ...


For judicial, shrievalty and lieutenancy purposes the Isles of Scilly are "deemed to form part of Cornwall".[8] The High Sheriff is, or was, a law enforcement position in Anglosphere countries. ... Flag of a Lord-Lieutenant The title Lord-Lieutenant is given to the British monarchs personal representatives around the United Kingdom. ...


National government

The phrase "England and Cornwall" (or the Latin equivalent Anglia et Cornubia) remained in use after the Norman Conquest. Before the Tudor period, laws were typically designated as taking effect in Anglia et Cornubia. A similar situation exists today with the Isles of Scilly within Cornwall (i.e Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly). Both the relationship of Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly, and the constitutional status of Cornwall are a matter of some debate. Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c. ... Look up Anglia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The SS Cornubia was built in Hayle, Cornwall, by Harvey and Co in 1858 as a packet ship and ferry for the Hayle Steam Packet Company. ... The flag of Cornwall (Kernow) The constitutional status of Cornwall, in the southwest of United Kingdom is the subject of ongoing debate. ...


Politically, the islands are part of the United Kingdom. They are represented in the United Kingdom Parliament as part of the St Ives constituency, currently held by Andrew George of the Liberal Democrats. Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... St Ives is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long...


As part of the United Kingdom, the islands are part of the European Union and are represented in the European Parliament as part of the multi-member South West England constituency. The Isles of Scilly are not the most remote part of this constituency, as it also includes the United Kingdom dependent territory of Gibraltar. Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... The constituency (first used 2004) within England; Gibraltar is in the inset. ... World map of dependent territories. ...


Flags

There are primarily two flags used to represent Scilly:

  • The flag of the Council of the Isles of Scilly, which incorporates their logo.[9]
  • The unofficial Scillonian Cross, voted for by readers of Scilly News[9][10]

An adapted version of the old Board of Ordnance flag has also been used, after it was left behind when munitions were removed from the isles. The Cornish Ensign has also been used.[9][11]


Education

Education is available on the islands up to age 16. There is one school, the Five Islands School, which provides primary schooling at sites on St Agnes, St Mary's, St Martin's and Tresco, and secondary schooling at a site on St Mary's. Secondary students from outside St Mary's live at a hostel during the week. In 2004, 93% of pupils (26 out of 28) achieved 5 or more GCSEs at grade C and above, compared to the English average of 53.7%. [2] Sixteen to eighteen year olds are entitled to a free sixth form place at a state school or sixth form college on the mainland, and are provided with free flights and a grant towards accommodation. Post eighteen, suitably qualified students attend universities and colleges on the mainland. GCSE is an acronym that can refer to: General Certificate of Secondary Education global common subexpression elimination - an optimisation technique used by some compilers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... England, Wales, Northern Ireland The sixth form, in the English, Welsh and Northern Irish education systems, is the term used to refer to the final two years of secondary schooling (when students are about sixteen to eighteen years of age), during which students normally prepare for their GCE A-level...


Subdivisions

The Isles of Scilly are subdivided into four wards that have no administrative function, but only serve statistical purposes [3]: A ward is a department in a hospital or similar such institution. ...

  1. St. Agnes
  2. St. Martin's
  3. St. Mary's
  4. Tresco

The list of parishes, also without any administrative function since 1929, numbers five [4]: A parish is a subdivision of a diocese or bishopric within the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Church of Sweden, and of some other churches. ...

  1. Bryher
  2. St. Agnes
  3. St. Martin's
  4. St. Mary's
  5. Tresco

Economy

Historical context

Since the mid-eighteenth century the Scillionian economy has relied on trade with the mainland and beyond as a means of sustaining its population. Over the years the nature of this trade has varied, due to wider economic and political factors that have seen the rise and fall of industries such as kelp harvesting, pilotage, smuggling, fishing, shipbuilding and, latterly, flower farming. In a study of the Scillionian economy by Neate in 1987, it was found that many farms on the islands were struggling to remain profitable due to increasing costs and strong competition from overseas producers resulting in a diversification into tourism. Recent statistics suggest that agriculture on the islands now represent less than 2 percent of all employment.[12][13][14] Families Alariaceae Chordaceae Laminariaceae Lessoniaceae Phyllariaceae Pseudochordaceae Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... left|Signal flag H(Hotel) - Pilot on Board Boarding is tricky, as both vessels are moving and cannot afford to slow down. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... The Latin words hortus (garden plant) and cultura (culture) together form horticulture, classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ... Tourist redirects here. ...


Tourism

Today, tourism is estimated to account for 85 per cent of the island's income. The islands have been efficient in attracting this investment due to its unique environment, favourable summer climate, relaxed culture, efficient co-ordination of tourism providers and good transport links by sea and air to the mainland, uncommon in scale to similar sized island communities.[15][16] The majority of visitors stay on St Mary's, which has a concentration of holiday accommodation and other amenities. Of the other inhabited islands, Tresco is run as a timeshare resort, and is consequently the most obviously tourist-orientated. Bryher and St Martin's are more unspoilt, although each has a hotel and other accommodation. St Agnes has no hotel and is the least developed of the islands. St. ... The view from the helicopter leaving Tresco Tresco (Cornish: ), is the second largest island of the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, UK. It is 735 acres in size. ... Bryher (grid reference SV880150) is the smallest of the five inhabited islands of the Isles of Scilly. ... St Martins taken from the helicopter to Penzance St Martins is the northernmost populated island of the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom. ... St Agnes is the southernmost populated island of the Isles of Scilly, England. ...


However the level of dependency on tourism is high, even by the standards of other island communities. “The concentration [on] a small number of sectors is typical of most similarly sized UK island communities. However, it is the degree of concentration, which is distinctive along with the overall importance of tourism within the economy as a whole and the very limited manufacturing base that stands out.”[13]


Due to its scale, tourism stands to justify the existence of many other island activities, for example, transport links to the mainland which could not be maintained with reduced visitor numbers. Therefore the implications of tourism are far ranging, as they essentially affect the sustainability of the whole community.


Tourism is also a highly seasonal industry due to its reliance on outdoor recreation, and the low level of tourist activity in winter causes a near shutdown of the islands during that season. However, the tourist season benefits from an extended period of business in October when many birdwatchers (or birders) arrive. Because of its position, Scilly is the first landing for many migrant birds, including extreme rarities from North America and Siberia. Birding or birdwatching is a hobby concerned with the observation and study of birds (the study proper is termed American origin; birdwatching is (or more correctly, was) the commonly-used word in Great Britain and Ireland and by non-birders in the United States. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... This article is about Siberia as a whole. ...


Employment

The predominance of tourism means that "tourism is by far the main sector throughout each of the individual islands, in terms of employment… [and] this is much greater than other remote and rural areas in the United Kingdom”. Tourism accounts for approximately 63 per cent of all employment.[13]


Businesses dependent on tourism, with the exception of a few hotels, tend to be small enterprises typically employing fewer than 4 people and many of these are family run suggesting an entrepreneurial culture amongst the local population.[13] However, much of the work generated by this, with the exception of management, is low skilled and thus poorly paid, especially for those involved in cleaning, catering and retail.[17]


Because of the seasonality of tourism, many jobs on the islands are seasonal and part time as work cannot be guaranteed throughout the year. Some islanders take up other temporary jobs ‘out of season’ to compensate for this. Due to a lack of local casual labour at peak holiday times, many of the larger employers accommodate guest workers who come to the islands for the summer to have a ‘working holiday’.


Transport

The islands are linked to the mainland by both air and sea services, and rely on boat services for inter-island connections. St. Mary's is the only island with a significant road network.

Helicopter from Penzance to the Isles of Scilly
Helicopter from Penzance to the Isles of Scilly
Scillonian III approaching St Mary's Harbour
Scillonian III approaching St Mary's Harbour

By air, the islands are served by St. Mary's Airport on the main island of St. Mary's and by Tresco Heliport on the island of Tresco. The following air services currently operate: St. ... The heliport with one of British International Helicopters Sikorsky S-61 helicopters on the ramp The terminal building, with part of the islands famous Abbey Gardens in the background Tresco Heliport (ICAO: EGHT) is a heliport located on the island of Tresco, in the Isles of Scilly off the...

By sea, the Isles of Scilly Steamship Company provides a passenger and cargo service from Penzance to St Mary's: Scillonian III passenger ferry and Gry Maritha cargo vessel. The other islands are linked to St. Mary's by a network of inter-island launches.[20] For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... British International Helicopters is an airline based at Penzance heliport, in Cornwall, England. ... Penzance Heliport (IATA: PZE, ICAO: EGHK) is located 0. ... Airplane and Aeroplane redirect here. ... Isles of Scilly Skybus is an airline based at Lands End airport, near St Just and Penzance in Cornwall, England,UK. It operates seasonal and year round domestic scheduled services to the Isles of Scilly. ... Lands End Airport (IATA: LEQ, ICAO: EGHC), situated in St Just, Cornwall, is the most south westerly airport of mainland Britain. ... Newquay Cornwall International Airport (IATA: NQY, ICAO: EGDG) is a commercial airport located a few kilometers northeast of Newquay in England. ... Exeter International Airport (IATA: EXT, ICAO: EGTE) is an international airport close to the city of Exeter in the county of Devon, England. ... Bristol International Airport (IATA: BRS, ICAO: EGGD) is the commercial airport serving the city of Bristol and the south west of England. ... This airport is located in the United Kingdom, for the airport in Canada, see Southampton Airport (Ontario) Southampton Airport (IATA: SOU, ICAO: EGHI) is the 20th largest airport in the UK, located in Eastleigh near Southampton. ... Scillonian III, as seen from the air, halfway between St Marys and Penzance The Isles of Scilly Steamship Company operates a seasonal passenger service from Penzance, in the English county of Cornwall, to the offshore Isles of Scilly, together with a year round cargo service. ... Penzance Harbour and surrounding area as seen from the air Penzance (Cornish: Pensans) is a civil parish and port town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. Granted various Royal Charters from 1512 onwards and incorporated in 1614,[2] it has a population of 21,168[1] people and... Scillonian III, as seen from the air, halfway between St Marys and Penzance Scillonian III is a passenger ship based at Penzance in Cornwall, England run by the Isles of Scilly Steamship Company. ... Today a Launch is a motorboat with an open or half open deck. ...


Real estate

The freehold of the islands is the property of the British Crown (except for Hugh Town on St Mary's, which was sold to the inhabitants in 1949). The crown estate on the islands is administered by the Duchy of Cornwall. The duchy also holds 3,921 acres (16 km²) as duchy property, part of the duchy's landholding.[21] Fee simple, also known as fee simple absolute or allodial, is a term of art in common law. ... Hugh Town (population 1,068) is the main settlement on the Isles of Scilly, located south west of Cornwall, England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Housing availability is a contentious yet critical issue for the Isles of Scilly, especially as it affects the feasibility of residency on the islands. Few properties are privately owned, with many units being let by the Duchy of Cornwall, the Council, and a few by housing associations. The management of these subsequently impacts the possibility of residency on the islands.[22] Housing associations in the United Kingdom are independent not-for-profit bodies that provide low cost housing for people in housing need. ...


Housing demand outstrips supply, a problem compounded by restrictions on further development designed to protect the islands unique environment and prevent the infrastructural carrying capacity from being exceeded. This has pushed up the prices fetched for the few private properties that become available, but significantly for the majority of the island's population, this has also impacted the rental sector where rates have likewise drastically increased.[23][24]


High housing costs pose significant problems of affordability for the local population, especially as local incomes (in Cornwall) are only 70% of the national average, whilst house prices are almost £5,000 more than the national average. This in turn affects the retention of ‘key workers’ and the younger generation, which has a consequent impact upon the viability of the school(s) and other essential community services.[24][15]


The access to housing provokes strong local politics. It is often assumed that tourism is to blame for this, attracting incomers to the area who can afford to out-price locals for available housing. Many buildings are used for tourist accommodation which reduces the number available for local residency. Second homes are also thought to account for a significant proportion of the housing stock, leaving many buildings empty for much of the year.[25]


Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

In 1975, the islands were designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The designation covers the entire archipelago, including the uninhabited islands and rocks, and is the smallest such area in the UK. The islands of Annet and Samson have large terneries and the islands are well populated by seals. The Isles of Scilly are the only British haunt of the Lesser White-toothed Shrew (Crocidura suaveolens). An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an area of countryside with significant landscape value in England, Wales or Northern Ireland, that has been specially designated by the Countryside Agency on behalf of the United Kingdom government; the Countryside Council for Wales on behalf of the Welsh Assembly Government... Genera Sterna (Gelochelidon) (Hydroprogne) (Thalasseus) Chlidonias Phaetusa Anous Procelsterna Gygis Larosterna Terns are seabirds in the family Sternidae, previously considered a subfamily Sterninae of the gull family Laridae. ... Families Odobenidae Otariidae Phocidae Pinnipeds (fin-feet, lit. ... Binomial name Crocidura suaveolens (Pallas, 1811) The lesser white-toothed shrew Crocidura suaveolens is a tiny shrew found in Europe. ...


The islands are famous amongst birdwatchers, especially twitchers for their almost magnetic ability to attract rare birds from all corners of the globe. The peak time of year for this is generally in October when it is not unusual for several of the rarest birds in Europe to share this archipelago. One reason for the success of these islands in producing rarities is the extensive coverage these islands get from birdwatchers, but island archipelagos are favoured by rare birds which like to make landfall and eat before continuing their journeys and often arrive on far flung islands first. Birding or birdwatching is a hobby concerned with the observation and study of birds (the study proper is termed ornithology). ...


Culture

People

Main articles: Cornish people and English people

The vast majority of the population are either Cornish or English, and the ethnic makeup of the islands is almost exclusively white european. As with other parts of the UK, a large number of Eastern Europeans, particularly Poles have been brought in to do low paid labour in the early 21st century. The Cornish people are a British ethnic group originating in Cornwall. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... The Cornish people are a British ethnic group originating in Cornwall. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... You may also be looking for the plural of the word pole. ...


Whilst there is little evidence to substantiate the claim, it is sometimes rather tenuously suggested, that the early inhabitants of the islands may have had a genetic link to the "Ancient British" who inhabited the islands long before the arrival of the Celts or Romans.


The criterion for claiming oneself to be a "Scillonian" typically relies on proof of being "island-born". Recent evidence from Essex University indicates that the young indigenous Cornish are increasingly underrepresented in the demographic profile, having been economically and socially displaced by older mainland-incomers. Census and subjective observations suggest that the ethnic makeup of the islands is almost exclusively white. Introduction The University of Essex is a Campus university based at Wivenhoe Park on the outskirts of Colchester (the oldest recorded town in Britain) in the English county of Essex, less than a mile from the town of Wivenhoe. ...


Sport

One continuing legacy of the isles' past is gig racing, wherein fast rowing boats ("gigs") with crews of six (or in one case, seven) race between the main islands. Gig racing has been said to derive from the race to collect salvage from shipwrecks on the rocks around Scilly, but the race was actually to deliver a pilot onto incoming vessels, to guide them through the hazardous reefs and shallows. (The boats are correctly termed "pilot gigs".) The colourful lignup of gigs on St. ... Marine salvage is the process of rescuing a ship, its cargo and sometimes the crew from peril. ... left|Signal flag H(Hotel) - Pilot on Board Boarding is tricky, as both vessels are moving and cannot afford to slow down. ...


The Isles of Scilly feature what is reportedly the smallest football league in the world. The league's two clubs, Woolpack Wanderers and Garrison Gunners, play each other sixteen times a season and compete for two cups as well as the league title. The two share a ground, Garrison Field, but travel to the mainland for part of the year to play other non-professional clubs. Soccer redirects here. ... Woolpack Wanderers F.C. is a football club from the Isles of Scilly. ... Garrison Gunners F.C. is a football club from the Isles of Scilly. ...


In December 2006, Sport England published a survey which revealed that residents of the Isles of Scilly were the most active in England in sports and other fitness activities. 32% of the population participate at least 3 times a week for 30 minutes.[26] Sport England logo Sport England (formerly the English Sports Council) is the body responsible for distributing funds and providing strategic guidance for sporting activity in England. ...


Scilly is also popular scuba diving area. Scuba diving is swimming underwater while using self-contained breathing equipment. ...


Ornithology

The islands are famous for their birdwatching. Because Scilly is situated far into the Atlantic Ocean, American vagrant birds will make first European landfall in the archipelago. This fact attracts many birdwatchers each year, notably in the month of October.


Scilly is responsible for many firsts for Britain and never fails to produce good birds. It is particularly good at producing vagrant American Passerines (perching birds). If an extremely rare bird turns up the island will see a significant increase in numbers of birders. This type of birding, chasing after rare birds, is called 'twitching'.


Media

There is a small transmitter relay on St.Mary's island, which covers BBC Radio 1, 2, 3 & 4 as well as BBC Radio Cornwall. Radio Scilly, a community radio station, launched in September 2007. The amateur radio station M1IOS also operates on the islands. BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and the most popular station in the UK. As well as having most listeners nationally, it ranks first in all regions above local radio stations. ... BBC Radio 3 is a radio station operated by the BBC within the United Kingdom. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... BBC Radio Cornwall is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Cornwall. ... Radio Scilly is a not for profit, non-profit distributing community radio station. ... An amateur radio station is a facility equipped with the apparatus necessary for carrying on radiocommunications in the Amateur Radio Service. ...


Only four of the analogue television stations are relayed onto the islands (i.e. Five is not covered). DAB and DVB/Freeview are not currently receivable on the islands. This is hoped to change when digital switch-over happens in the ITV Westcountry area in 2009, and transmissions from the Redruth transmitting station are increased in power. Analog television encodes picture information by varying the voltages and/or frequency of the signal. ... Five, launched in 1997, is the fifth and final national terrestrial analogue television channel to launch in the United Kingdom. ... Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB), also known as Eureka 147, is a technology for broadcasting of audio using digital radio transmission. ... Official DVB logo, found on compliant devices DVB, short for Digital Video Broadcasting, is a suite of internationally accepted open standards for digital television. ... Westcountry Television is the ITV franchise holder in the South West of England, replacing its predecessor, TSW (Television South West), on 1 January 1993. ... The Redruth transmitting station is a broadcasting and telecommunications facility in West Cornwall (grid reference 690395) situated in the Fourlanes area. ...


There is no local newspaper; however Scilly News is a locally based website which captures items of community interest. A maximum ADSL speed of 8Mbit/s is available to all of the inhabited islands. Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) is a form of DSL, a data communications technology that enables faster data transmission over copper telephone lines than a conventional modem can provide. ... A megabit per second (mbps or mbit/s) is a unit of data transmission equal to 1,000 kilobits per second or 1,000,000 bits per second. ...


The Isles of Scilly were featured on the TV programme Seven Natural Wonders as one of the wonders of South West England. In early 2007 the islands featured in the BBC series An Island Parish, following various real life stories but featuring the newly appointed Chaplain to the Isles of Scilly. A new 12-part series was filmed in 2007, and debuted on BBC2 in January 2008.[27] Seven Natural Wonders is a television programme that aired on BBC Two from 3 May to 20 June 2005. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... An Island Parish is a British television documentary made by Tiger Aspect Production for BBC2. ... BBC Two (or BBC2 as it was formerly styled) was the second UK television station to be aired by the BBC. History The channel was scheduled to begin at 7:20pm on April 20, 1964 and show an evening of light entertainment, starting with the comedy show The Alberts and...


Trivia

The novel Unnatural Selection by Aaron Elkins is set on St. Mary's. Aaron Elkins (born July 24, 1935) is an American writer of mystery novels. ...


References

  1. ^ County flower of Isles of Scilly. Plantlife International - The Wild Plant Conservation Charity. Retrieved on 7 April, 2006.
  2. ^ Weatherhill, Craig Cornish Placenames and Language London. Sigma Leisure.
  3. ^ National Archives
  4. ^ Isles of Scilly Cornwall through time. visionofbritain.org.uk. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  5. ^ Isles of Scilly RD Cornwall through time. visionofbritain.org.uk. Retrieved on January 19, 2007.
  6. ^ Examples include the Health and Social Care Act 2003, section 198 and the Environment Act 1995, section 117.
  7. ^ Council of the Isles of Scilly Corporate Assessment December 2002 (pdf). Audit Commission. Retrieved on January 21, 2007.
  8. ^ Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c.70) section 216(2)
  9. ^ a b c Isles of Scilly (United Kingdom). fotw.net. Retrieved on January 16, 2007.
  10. ^ How Do You Get A Scillonian Cross. Scilly News. Retrieved on January 16, 2007.
  11. ^ Cornwall (United Kingdom). fotw.net. Retrieved on January 16, 2007.
  12. ^ Gibson, F, My Scillionian Home… its past, its present, its future, St Ives, 1980
  13. ^ a b c d Isles of Scilly Integrated Area Plan 2001-2004, Isles of Scilly Partnership 2001
  14. ^ Neate, S, The role of tourism in sustaining farm structures and communities on the Isles of Scilly in M Bouquet and M Winter (eds) Who From Their Labours Rest? Conflict and practice in rural tourism Aldershot, 1987
  15. ^ a b Isles of Scilly Local Plan: A 2020 Vision, Council of the Isles of Scilly, 2004
  16. ^ Isles of Scilly 2004, imagine…, Isles of Scilly Tourist Board, 2004
  17. ^ J.Urry, The Tourist Gaze (2nd edition), London, 2002
  18. ^ British International home page. British International Ltd.. Retrieved on January 17, 2007.
  19. ^ Isles of Scilly Travel - Travel by air. Isles of Scilly Travel. Retrieved on January 17, 2007.
  20. ^ Isles of Scilly Travel - Travel by sea. Isles of Scilly Travel. Retrieved on January 17, 2007.
  21. ^ Mitchel, Sandy. Duchy of Cornwall - Prince Charles' Backyard - Prince Charles - Not Your Typical Radical. National Geographic Magazine. May 2006:96-115. Map ref 104. Map source Duchy of Cornwall Property Services Department [1]
  22. ^ Martin D, 'Heaven and Hell', in Inside Housing, 31st October, 2004
  23. ^ Sub Regional Housing Markets in the South West, South West Housing Board, 2004
  24. ^ a b S. Fleming et al, “In from the cold” A report on Cornwall’s Affordable Housing Crisis, Liberal Democrats, Penzance, 2003
  25. ^ The Cornishman, Islanders in dispute with Duchy over housing policy, 19 August, 2004
  26. ^ Active People Survey - national factsheet appendix (Microsoft Excel). Sport England. Retrieved on January 16, 2007.
  27. ^ An Island Parish. BBC. Retrieved on January 16, 2007.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Audit Commission is a non-departmental public body in the United Kingdom which is responsible for auditing local government in England, National Health Service Trusts and other local agencies in England and Wales. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • ScillyOnLine
  • Council of the Isles of Scilly
  • Radio Scilly
  • Tresco and Bryher
  • Postcards of the Isles of Scilly
  • http://www.scillywebcam.com A daily updated website with high quality photographs of Scilly.
  • Map sources for Isles of Scilly
  • http://www.gkershaw.co.uk A website by St Marys resident George Kershaw with lots of digital images of the Isles of Scilly.
  • Cornwall Record Office Online Catalogue for Scilly
  • http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/m1ios/index.html Islands on the Air - Radio Station M1IOS - Islands of Scilly.
  • http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/godolphin.lodge/ - Freemasonry on Scilly -
This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... . For the disagreement and different views on using the term British Isles, particularly in relation to Ireland, see British Isles naming dispute. ... It has been suggested that British Isles#Names of the islands through the ages be merged into this article or section. ... Islands of the North Atlantic (IONA) was suggested by Sir John Biggs-Davison as a less contentious alternative to the term British Isles to refer to Britain and Ireland and the smaller associated islands. ... This article discusses states as sovereign political entities. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... “UK” redirects here. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... The Isle of Man is situated in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland, and the bailiwicks of Jersey and Guersey are situated in the English Channel to the west of the Cotentin Crown dependencies are possessions of The Crown in Right of the United Kingdom, as opposed to... The British–Irish Council (sometimes known as the Council of the Isles) is a body created by the Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement). ... The British-Irish Inter-Parliamentary Body (BIIPB) was established in 1990 to bring together 25 members of the United Kingdom Parliament and 25 members of the Oireachtas (the Irish parliament) to develop understanding between elected representatives of the UK and Ireland . ... The Common Travel Area includes the UK, the Isle of Man, Jersey, Guernsey, and the Republic of Ireland The Common Travel Area (or, informally, the passport free zone) refers to the fact that citizens of the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the Crown Dependencies (the Isle of Man... The North/South Ministerial Council (NSMC, Irish: An Chomhairle Aireachta Thuaidh/Theas, Ulster-Scots: The Noarth-Sooth Cooncil o Männystèrs) is a body established under the Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement) to co-ordinate activity and exercise certain limited governmental powers across the whole... This article is about the British dependencies. ... Map showing location of the islands The Islands of the lower Firth of Clyde is the smallest of the three major Scottish island groups after the Hebrides and the Northern Isles. ... This article is about the Hebrides islands in Scotland. ... The Northern Isles are a chain of islands off the north coast of Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2006) 19,800  - Density 20 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... For other uses, see Shetland (disambiguation). ... This is a list of islands of the Isle of Man: Isle of Man (Population - c. ... This is a list of the islands of England, the mainland of which is part of the island of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest English islands by area. ... This is a list of the islands of Scotland, the mainland of which is part of the island of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest Scottish islands. ... This is a list of the islands of Wales, the mainland of which is part of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest Welsh islands by area. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to Norman conquest of England, a moment that defined much of the history of the British Isles since. ... The history of England is similar to the history of Britain before the arrival of the Saxons. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... Caerphilly Castle. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... This article is about the historical state known as the Principality of Wales (1267-1542). ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... This article is about the prior state. ... Auregnais or Aurignais was the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Alderney (French:Aurigny, Auregnais:Aoeurgny/Auregny). ... British Sign Language (BSL) is the sign language used in the United Kingdom (UK), and is the first or preferred language of an unknown number of Deaf people in the UK (published estimates range from 30,000 to 250,000 but it is likely that the lower figures are more... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Guernésiais, also known as Dgèrnésiais, Guernsey French, Guernsey Norman French, is the variety of Norman language spoken in Guernsey. ... Irish Sign Language (ISL) is the sign language of Ireland, used primarily in the Republic of Ireland. ... Jèrriais is the form of the Norman language spoken in Jersey, in the Channel Islands. ... Northern Ireland Sign Language (NISL) is a sign language used in Northern Ireland, mainly Belfast. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... Ulster Scots, also known as Ullans, Hiberno-Scots, or Scots-Irish, refers to the variety of Scots (sometimes referred to as Lowland Scots) spoken in parts of the province of Ulster, which spans the six counties of Northern Ireland and three of the Republic of Ireland. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Sercquiais also known as Sarkese or Sark-French is the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Sark. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... This article concerns those peoples who consider themselves, or have been considered by others, to be Celts in modern times, ie post 1800. ... The Cornish people are a British ethnic group originating in Cornwall. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Romnichal or Romanichal is the name by which groups of Romani people (often known as Gypsies) found in some parts of the United Kingdom, notably England, are called in their own language, Anglo-Romany. ... Irish Travellers (sometimes known as Tinkers) are a nomadic or itinerant people of Irish origin living in Ireland, Great Britain and the United States. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... Ulster-Scots is a term mainly used in Ireland and Britain (Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irishis commonly used in North America) primarily to refer to Presbyterian Scots, or their descendents, who migrated from the Scottish Lowlands to Ulster (the northern province of Ireland), largely across the 17th century. ... The Welsh are, according to Hastings (1997), an ethnic group and nation associated with Wales and the Welsh language, which is a Celtic language. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Isles of Scilly Wildlife Trust (207 words)
Committed to the conservation of wildlife, the landscape, archaeological and historical remains of Scilly.
In July 1986, the Isles of Scilly Environmental Trust was formed as a registered charity.
The Trust is responsible for the management of all the land that is leased to it by the Duchy of Cornwall on the inhabited islands, in addition to all the uninhabited islands, islets and rocks.
ScillyOnLine - Isles of Scilly holiday information (263 words)
The Isles of Scilly is an archipelago of five inhabited islands and numerous other small rocky islets 28 miles off Lands End - the most South Westerly point of the British Isles.
With a total population of just over two thousand, an exceptionally mild climate, and countless golden sandy beaches, Scilly is a beautiful haven of peace and tranquility loved by visitors and locals alike.
For the latest news from the islands visit Scilly News, or for a range of daily photos of the islands visit Richard Pearce's Scilly webcam.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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