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Encyclopedia > Isleham Hoard

The Isleham Hoard is a hoard of more than 6500 pieces of worked and unworked bronze found in 1959 at Isleham in the English county of Cambridgeshire and dating from the Bronze Age. Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Isleham is a small village and civil parish in the English county of Cambridgeshire. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ...


The hoard is the largest Bronze Age hoard ever discovered in England and is one of the finest. It consists in particular of swords, spear-heads, arrows, axes, palstaves, knives, daggers, armour, decorative equipment (in particular for horses) and many fragments of sheet bronze[1] , all dating from the Wilburton-Wallington Phase of the late Bronze Age (about 1000 bc). The swords show holes where rivets or studs helt the wooden hilts in place (studs were usually made of bronze except for commanders who had silver-studded swords or for a commander-in-chief who had a gold-studded sword[citation needed]). The greater part of these objects have been entrusted to the Moyse's Hall Museum in Bury St Edmunds, while other items are within the University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Cambridge. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... A rivetted buffer beam on a steam locomotive A rivet is a mechanical fastener consisting of a smooth cylindrical shaft with heads on either end. ... Stud could refer to any of these : stud, a horse or other male animal employed for breeding, or stud farm, an establishment for horse breeding: see horse breeding, animal husbandry, dog breeding, selective breeding a traction device used on the bottom of horse shoes. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... Map sources for Bury St Edmunds at grid reference TL8564 Bury St Edmunds is a town in the county of Suffolk, England, with a population of 35,015 (2001 census). ... Shown within Cambridgeshire Geography Status: City (1951) Region: East of England Admin. ...


References

  1. ^ Hall, David [1994]. Fenland survey : an essay in landscape and persistence / David Hall and John Coles. London; English Heritage. ISBN 1-85074-477-7. , p. 81-88

 
 

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