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Encyclopedia > Isle of Wight
Isle of Wight
Motto of County Council: All this beauty is of God
Image:EnglandIsleWight.png
Geography
Status Ceremonial & Non-metropolitan/Unitary county
Region South East England
Area
- Total
Ranked 46th
380 km² (146.7 sq mi)
Admin HQ Newport
ISO 3166-2 GB-IOW
ONS code 00MW
NUTS 3 UKG11
Demography
Population
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
- Admin. council
Ranked
140,000
368/km² (953.1/sq mi)
Ranked
Ethnicity 98.7% White
Politics
Conservative
Executive  
Members of Parliament
  • Andrew Turner (C)
Districts

The Isle of Wight is an English island and county in the English Channel five miles from the South Coast of Britain. It is situated south of the county of Hampshire and is separated from mainland Britain by the Solent. Popular since Victorian times as a holiday resort, the Isle of Wight is known for its natural beauty and for its world-famous sailing based in Cowes. Isle of Wight can refer to: In the United Kingdom: The English island and ceremonial county known as the Isle of Wight The unitary authority region covered by the Isle of Wight Council The UK Parliament constituency, the Isle of Wight As of 2004, all of these uses cover the... Image File history File links Isle_of_Wight_flag. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... map of Isle of Wight within England File links The following pages link to this file: Isle of Wight Categories: GFDL images ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Area. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Statistics Population: 23,957 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SZ502893 Administration District: Isle of Wight Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Isle of Wight Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Ambulance service: South Central Post office and telephone Post town... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Population - 2002 mid-year estimates from the Office for National Statistics, unrounded figures published by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister in the Entitlement Notification Reports for Revenue Support Grants [1]. See also: List of Administrative shire counties of... This is a list of non-metropolitan counties of England by population. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Andrew John Turner (born 24 October 1953, Coventry) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Satellite image showing the Solent, separating the Isle of Wight from mainland Britain The Solent is a stretch of sea separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland of Great Britain. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... This article is about the town on the Isle of Wight. ...


The Island possesses a rich history including its own brief status as a vassal kingdom in the fifteenth century. It was home to the poet Alfred Lord Tennyson, and Queen Victoria had her much loved summer residence and final home Osborne House built in East Cowes. Its maritime history encompasses boat building and sail making through to the manufacture of flying boats and the world's first hovercraft. Its space history includes the testing and development of the Black Arrow and Black Knight space rockets, launched from Woomera, Australia. It is home to the Bestival and the recently revived Isle of Wight Festival, which, in 1970, was one of the largest rock music events ever held.[1] The island is also one of the richest fossil locations for dinosaurs in Europe. Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... Cowes is a seaport town on the Isle of Wight, an island due south of the major southern English port of Southampton. ... Boeing 314 A flying boat is an aircraft that is designed to take off and land on water, in particular a type of seaplane which uses its fuselage as a floating hull (instead of pontoons mounted below the fuselage). ... For the band, see Hovercraft (band). ... Black Arrows engine This article is about the rocket, for the novel, see The Black Arrow Black Arrow was a British satellite carrier rocket, based on the Black Knight and Blue Streak rockets. ... Black Knight was a British launch vehicle to test and verify the design of a re-entry vehicle for the Blue Streak missile. ... The Woomera Test Facility (formerly known as the Instrumented Range) is an aerospace testing facility, with the Range Head located at just north-west of Lake Koolymilka (usually dry), about 40km north-west of Woomera, South Australia. ... The Bestival is a music festival on the Isle of Wight. ... The Isle of Wight Festival is a music festival which takes place annually on the Isle of Wight, England. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fossil (disambiguation). ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


In 686 AD, it became the last part of the British Isles to convert to Christianity, a century after the rest of Great Britain had done so.[2][3][4] This article describes the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...


The island has at various points in history been considered a part of Hampshire, however it became an independent administrative county (although still sharing the Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire) in 1890. In 1974 it was reconstituted as a non-metropolitan and ceremonial county with its own Lord Lieutenant and the name was adopted as a postal county. The island is the smallest ceremonial county in England (not including the predominantly urban counties of Bristol and the City of London) at 380 km² (147 sq mi), slightly smaller than Rutland at 382 km² (148 sq mi). With a single Member of Parliament and 132,731 permanent residents according to the 2001 census, it is also the most populated Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... The division into counties is one of the larger divisions of England. ... This is an incomplete list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... This is an incomplete list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of the Isle of Wight: 1980–1985: Sir John Nicholson, 2nd Bt. ... The postal counties of the United Kingdom, now known officially as the former postal counties, were subdivisions of the UK in routine use by the Royal Mail until 1996. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... Oakham Castle Rutland is traditionally Englands smallest county and is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire, northeast by Lincolnshire, and southeast by Northamptonshire. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... To see the list in alphabetical order see the categories UK Parliamentary constituencies and UK Parliamentary constituencies (historic). ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of the Isle of Wight

The pre-Roman name for the island now known as the Isle of Wight was possibly Ynys Gywth meaning channel island. A name given to them by the early celtic speaking inhabitants of the island. These people may have been displaced around 50BC by Belgic refugees from Gaul fleeing the expanding Roman Empire. Later Roman documents describe the island as within the bounds of a Belgae tribe who were probably related to the Belgic people of northern Gaul. Today, the Isle of Wight is rich in historical and archaeological sites dating from prehistoric periods from an extraordinary wealth of fossil discoveries including dinosaur bones through to remains from the Bronze Age, Iron Age and Roman periods onwards. ... Look up Celtic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The first recorded mention of Belgae, part of the mix that make up modern Belgians, was in the year 58 B.C.; Gaius Julius Caesar, departing from the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis (now Provence), decided to conquer the rest of the Gauls. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Belgae were a group of nations or tribes living in north-eastern Gaul, on the west bank of the Rhine, in the 1st century BC, and later also attested in Britain. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ...


The Isle of Wight was conquered by the Legio II Augusta (under the command of Vespasian) of the Roman Empire in c.44AD during the secondary phase of the Roman conquest of Britain. Legio II Augusta, or Second Augustan Legion, was a Roman legion, levied by Gaius Vibius Pansa Caetronianus in 43 BC, and still operative in Britannia in 4th century. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... For alternate uses, see Number 44. ... Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. ...


The Isle of Wight is first mentioned in writing in Geography by Claudius Ptolemaeus written in the mid 2nd Century AD stating in the final entry of chapter II ; This article is about the geographer and astronomer Ptolemy. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...

...below Magnus Portus is the island Vectis...

At the end of the Roman Empire the island of Vectis became extremely vulnerable to the raids of barbarian pirates. In the year 534AD the Jutish buccaneer Wihtgar invaded and conquered the island, probably putting the Romano-British inhabitants who had bravely remained on the island to the sword. The island and the adjacent shore of southern Hampshire became a Jutish kingdom ruled by him and his successors until the year 685AD when it was invaded by Caedwalla of Wessex. The West Saxon invasion was by all accounts prolonged and bloody. It is reported in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle that during Caedwalla's attempts to subdue the population he was gravely wounded - wounds from which he would die within a couple of years. Before final subjugation most of the Jutish population of the island were slaughtered and the remnant forced to accept Christianity as their religion and the West Saxon dialect as their language. Events January 1 - Decimus Theodorius Paulinus appointed consul, the last to hold this office in the West. ... The word Jute is also used in reference to the Germanic people, the Jutes. ... Romano-British is a term used to refer to the Romanized Britons under the Roman Empire (and later the Western Roman Empire) and in the years after the Roman departure exposed to Roman culture and Christian religion. ... Events Umayyad caliph Marwan I (684-685) succeeded by Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (685-705) Justinian II succeeds Constantine IV as emperor of the Byzantine Empire Sussex attacks Kent, supporting Eadrics claim to the throne held by Hlothhere Pope Benedict II succeeded by Pope John V Cuthbert consecrated... Caedwalla (c. ... The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a collection of (mainly) secondary source documents narrating the history of the Anglo-Saxons and their settlement in Britain. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...


From 685 therefore the island can be considered to have became part of Wessex and following the accession of West Saxon kings as kings of all England then part of England. The island became part of the shire of Hampshire and was divided into hundreds as was the norm. Events Umayyad caliph Marwan I (684-685) succeeded by Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (685-705) Justinian II succeeds Constantine IV as emperor of the Byzantine Empire Sussex attacks Kent, supporting Eadrics claim to the throne held by Hlothhere Pope Benedict II succeeded by Pope John V Cuthbert consecrated... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A shire is an administrative area of Great Britain and Australia. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... The word hundred can mean: The word form of the number 100 Hundred (division) Hundred (word) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

The Norman Conquest created the position of Lord of the Isle of Wight. Carisbrooke Priory and the fort of Carisbrooke Castle were founded. The Island did not come under full control of the Crown until it was sold by the dying last Norman Lord, Lady Isabella de Fortibus, to Edward I in 1293. The Lordship thereafter became a Royal appointment, with a brief interruption when Henry de Beauchamp, 1st Duke of Warwick was crowned King of the Isle of Wight, King Henry VI assisting in person at the ceremony, placing the crown on his head. He died in 1445, aged 22. With no male heir, his regal title expired with him. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 113 KB)Memorial to King Charles I of England at Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight By ChrisO File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 113 KB)Memorial to King Charles I of England at Carisbrooke Castle, Isle of Wight By ChrisO File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Carisbrooke Castle Carisbrooke Castle is a historic castle located in the village of Carisbrooke, near Newport, Isle of Wight. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... The Lord of the Isle of Wight is a title that began when William the Conqueror granted the Isle of Wight to William Fitz Osbern. ... Carisbrooke Castle Carisbrooke Castle is a historic castle located in the village of Carisbrooke, near Newport, Isle of Wight. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Henry de Beauchamp, 1st Duke of Warwick (March 21, 1424/5 - June 11, 1445) was an English nobleman. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ...


Henry VIII, who developed the Royal Navy and its permanent base at Portsmouth, fortified the Island at Yarmouth, East & West Cowes and Sandown, sometimes re-using stone from dissolved monasteries as building material. Sir Richard Worsley, Captain of the Island at this time, successfully commanded the resistance to the last of the French attacks in 1545; the French attempts to conquer the Island being decisively stopped after the English victory in the Battle of Bonchurch. Much later on, after the Spanish Armada in 1588, the threat of Spanish attacks remained and the outer fortifications of Carisbrooke Castle were built between 1597 and 1602. During the English Civil War King Charles fled to the Isle of Wight, believing he would receive sympathy from the governor, Robert Hammond. Hammond was appalled, and incarcerated the king in Carisbrooke Castle. Henry VIII redirects here. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... Yarmouth may refer to one of the following places. ... Sandown is a seaside resort town and civil parish[1] on the south-east coast of the Isle of Wight, England, neighbouring the town of Shanklin to the south. ... Combatants France England Commanders Unknown Captain Robert Fyssher Strength 500 Unknown Casualties Unknown Unknown The Battle of Bonchurch, although never having been specifically cited as the Battle of Bonchurch, was a confrontation between the military forces of France; and a local militia raised, and composed of residents of the Isle... Combatants England Dutch Republic Spain Portugal Commanders Elizabeth I of England Charles Howard Francis Drake Philip II of Spain Duke of Medina Sidonia Strength 34 warships 163 armed merchant vessels 22 galleons 108 armed merchant vessels Casualties 50–100 dead[1] ~400 wounded 600 dead, 800 wounded,[2] 397 captured... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ...

Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public
Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public

Queen Victoria made Osborne House on the Isle of Wight her summer home for many years and, as a result, it became a major holiday resort for members of European royalty, whose many houses could later claim descent from her, through the widely flung marriages of her offspring. During her reign, in 1897, the world's first radio station[5] was set up by Marconi, at the Needles battery, at the western tip of the Island. Osborne House Isle of Wight, 2004 View from the North looking up the ornamental drive towards the main house. ... Osborne House Isle of Wight, 2004 View from the North looking up the ornamental drive towards the main house. ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... For the inventor of radio,Marconi see the competing claims in history of radio and the invention of radio. ... The Needles from the cliffs inshore The Needles is a row of distinctive stacks of chalk that rise out of the sea off the western extremity of the Isle of Wight, England, close to Alum Bay. ...


In 1904, a mysterious illness began to kill honeybee colonies on the Island and had nearly wiped out all hives by 1907, when the disease spread to the mainland and decimated beekeeping in the British Isles. Called the Isle of Wight Disease[6], the cause of the mystery ailment was not identified until 1921, when it was traced to the mite Acarapis woodi. The disease (now called Acarine Disease) frightened many other nations, because of the importance of bees in pollination of many food plants. Laws against importation of honeybees were passed, but this merely delayed the eventual spread of the parasite to the rest of the world. Species Apis andreniformis Apis cerana, or eastern honey bee Apis dorsata, or giant honey bee Apis florea Apis koschevnikovi Apis laboriosa Apis mellifera, or western honey bee Apis nigrocincta Apis nuluensis Honey bees are a subset of bees which represent a far smaller fraction of bee diversity than most people... This article is about the medical term. ... Beekeeping, tacuinum sanitatis casanatensis (14th century) Honey seeker depicted on 6000 year old cave painting near Valencia, Spain Beekeeping (or apiculture, from Latin apis, a bee) is the practice of intentional maintenance of honey bee colonies, commonly in hives, by humans. ... This article describes the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... Look up mite in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Acarapis woodi (Rennie, 1921) Acarapis woodi is a mite that is an internal parasite of honey bees. ... Common diseases, parasites, pests, and ailments of the honeybee include: // Varroa mites Varroa mite on a honeybee larva Main articles: Varroa destructor Varroa destructor and Varroa jacobsoni are parasitic mites that feed off the bodily fluids of adult, pupal and larval bees. ... Carpenter bee with pollen collected from Night-blooming cereus Pollination is an important step in the reproduction of seed plants: the transfer of pollen grains (male gametes) to the plant carpel, the structure that contains the ovule (female gamete). ...


The Isle of Wight Festival could describe several events, but usually the term refers to one very large rock festival that took place near Afton Down, West Wight in 1970, following two smaller concerts in 1968 and 1969. The 1970 show was notable both for being one of the last public performances by Jimi Hendrix and for the number of attendees reaching, by many estimates, 600,000[7] (despite only 50,000 tickets being sold), and overtaking the attendance at Woodstock in the previous year. The Festival was revived in 2002 and is now an annual event, with other, smaller musical events of many different genres across the Island becoming associated with it. The Isle of Wight Festival is a music festival which takes place annually on the Isle of Wight, England. ... The Isle of Wight Festival is a music festival which takes place annually on the Isle of Wight, England. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Woodstock may refer to: Woodstock Music and Art Festival, a 1969 U.S. rock festival which inspired a 1970 Warner Bros. ...


Physical geography and wildlife

Isle of Wight map.

Isle of Wight is approximately diamond in shape and covers an area of 380 sq km (147 sq mi). Slightly more than half of the Island, mainly in the west of the Island, is designated as the Isle of Wight Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Island has 258 sq km (99.6 sq mi) of farmland, 52 sq km (20 sq mi) of developed areas, and 92 km (57 mi) of coastline. The landscape of the Island is remarkably diverse, leading to its oft-quoted description of "England in Miniature". The West Wight is predominantly rural, with dramatic coastlines dominated by the famous chalk downland ridge, running across the whole Island and ending in The Needles stacks — perhaps the most photographed aspect of the Isle of Wight. The highest point on the Island is St Boniface Down, at 241 m (791 ft), which is also a Marilyn. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Isle of Wight Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) on the Isle of Wight, Englands largest offshore island. ... A downland is an area of open chalk upland. ... The Needles from the cliffs inshore The Needles is a row of distinctive stacks of chalk that rise out of the sea off the western extremity of the Isle of Wight, England, close to Alum Bay. ... St Boniface Down is a chalk down on the Isle of Wight. ... Map of Marilyns in the British Isles A Marilyn is a mountain or hill in the British Isles (including Ireland) with a relative height of at least 150 metres (492 ft), regardless of absolute height or other merit. ...

The famous view at The Needles and Alum Bay.
The famous view at The Needles and Alum Bay.

The rest of the Island landscape also has great diversity, with perhaps the most notable habitats being the soft cliffs and sea ledges, which are spectacular features as well as being very important for wildlife, and are internationally protected. The River Medina flows north into the Solent, whilst the other main river, the River Yar flows roughly north-east, emerging at Bembridge Harbour on the eastern end of the Island. Confusingly, there is another entirely separate river at the western end also called the River Yar flowing the short distance from Freshwater Bay to a relatively large estuary at Yarmouth. Where distinguishing the two becomes necessary, each may be referred to as the eastern or western Yar. Image File history File links A rocky coastline on the Isle of Wight, England. ... Image File history File links A rocky coastline on the Isle of Wight, England. ... The Needles from the cliffs inshore The Needles is a row of distinctive stacks of chalk that rise out of the sea off the western extremity of the Isle of Wight, England, close to Alum Bay. ... Alum Bay is a sandy bay near the westernmost point of the Isle of Wight, England, within sight of The Needles. ... The River Medina is small river that runs from the hills in the south of the Isle of Wight, through the capital Newport, towards the Solent at Cowes. ... Satellite image showing the Solent, separating the Isle of Wight from mainland Britain The Solent is a stretch of sea separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland of Great Britain. ... The River Yar on the Isle of Wight, England, rises in Niton, and flows across the eastern side of the island to Bembridge where it meets the Solent. ... , Bembridge is a village and civil parish[1] located on the easternmost point of the Isle of Wight. ... The River Yar on the Isle of Wight, England, rises in Freshwater Marshes, and flows only a few miles north to Yarmouth where it meets the Solent. ... Freshwater is a village and parish at the western end of the Isle of Wight. ... Location within the British Isles Yarmouth is a port in the western part of the Isle of Wight, off the southern coast of England. ...


The south coast of the Island borders the English Channel. Without man's intervention the Island may well have been split into three with the sea breaking through 1) at the west end of the Island where a bank of pebbles separates Freshwater Bay from the marshy backwaters of the Western Yar east of Freshwater, and 2) at the east end of the Island where a thin strip of land separates Sandown Bay from the marshy basin of the Eastern Yar, east of Sandown. Yarmouth itself was effectively an island with water on all sides and only connected to the rest of the Island by a regularly breached neck of land immediately east of the town. For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... Freshwater Bay can refer to: The cove on the south coast of the Isle of Wight, England: see Freshwater, Isle of Wight The bay in Newfoundland, Canada: see Freshwater Bay, Newfoundland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same...


Island wildlife is remarkable, and it is one of the few places in England where the red squirrel is flourishing, with a stable population (Brownsea Island is another). Unlike most of England, no grey squirrels are to be found on the Island[8], nor are there any wild deer but, instead, rare and protected species, such as the dormouse and many rare bats, can be found. The Glanville Fritillary butterfly's distribution in the United Kingdom is largely restricted to the edges of the crumbling cliffs of the Isle of Wight. For the North American red squirrel, see American Red Squirrel. ... Brownsea Island is the largest of eight islands in Poole Harbour in the county of Dorset, England. ... Binomial name Sciurus carolinensis Gmelin, 1788 The Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is a tree squirrel that is native to the eastern to midwestern United States and the eastern provinces of Canada. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... Subfamilies and Genera Graphiurinae Graphiurus Leithiinae Dryomys Eliomys Hypnomys Myomimus Selevinia Myoxinae Glirulus Muscardinus Glis Dormice are Old World mammals in the family Gliridae, part of the rodent (Rodentia) order. ... “Chiroptera” redirects here. ... Binomial name Melitaea cinxia Linnaeus, 1758 The Glanville Fritillary (Melitaea cinxia) is a butterfly of the Nymphalidae family. ...


A competition in 2002 named the Pyramidal Orchid as the Isle of Wight's county flower.[9]. Binomial name Anacamptis pyramidalis (L.) Rich. ... A county flower is a flowering plant chosen to symbolise a county. ...


The Island is known as one of the most important areas in Europe for finding dinosaur fossils. The eroding cliffs also assist hidden remains to become more visible. Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ...


Climate

Being one of the most southerly points in the UK, the Isle of Wight has a warmer climate than other areas which results in high levels of tourism, particularly along the south of the island. It also has a longer growing season than other areas in the UK.[10]

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Avg High (°C) 8 8 10 13 16 19 22 21 19 15 11 9
Avg Min (°C) 1 1 2 3 7 9 11 11 9 7 3 2
Mean (°C) 4 4 6 8 11 14 16 16 14 11 7 5
Avg Precip (mm) 89 61 66 48 56 53 41 56 66 79 84 89

Geology

Blackgang Chine circa 1910
Blackgang Chine circa 1910

The Isle of Wight is made up from a wide variety of different rock types which date from Early Cretaceous times (around 127 million years ago) to the middle of the Palaeogene (around 30 million years ago). All the rocks found on the Island are sedimentary, made up of mineral grains from previously existing rocks. These are all consolidated to form the rocks that can be seen on the Island today, such as limestone, mudstone and sandstone. Rocks on the Island are very rich in fossils and many of these can be seen exposed on the beaches as the cliffs erode. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Blackgang Chine on the Isle of Wight Blackgang Chine circa 1910 Blackgang Chine is the location of a natural chine (a coastal ravine) in the soft Cretaceous cliffs near Ventnor at the southern tip of the Isle of Wight, England. ... // The Cretaceous Period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ... Palaeogene (alternatively Paleogene) period is a unit of geologic time that began 65 and ended 23 million years ago. ... Two types of sedimentary rock: limey shale overlaid by limestone. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Mudstone is a fine-grained sedimentary rock whose original constituents were clays or muds. ... Red sandstone interior of Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona, worn smooth due to erosion by flash flooding over millions of years Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-size mineral or rock grains. ...


Cretaceous rocks, normally red, show that the climate was previously hot and dry. This provided suitable living conditions for dinosaurs. Dinosaur bones and footprints can be seen around the Island along beaches, especially at Yaverland and Compton Bay. Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... The Isle of Wight is an English island and county, off the southern English coast, to the south of the county of Hampshire. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Along the northern coast of the Island there is a rich source of fossilised shellfish, crocodiles, turtles and mammal bones. The youngest of these dates back to around 30 million years ago. Genera Crocodylus Osteolaemus Tomistoma A crocodile can be any of the 14 species of large, water-loving reptiles in the family Crocodylidae (sometimes classified instead as the subfamily Crocodylinae). ...


The Island is mainly made up of Tertiary clays, in most of the northern parts of the Island, limestone, upper and lower greensands, wealden and chalk. Tertiary geological time interval covers roughly the time span between the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs and beginning of the most recent Ice Age, approximately 65 million to 1. ... Greensand is an olive-green coloured sandstone rock which found in narrow bands, particularly associated with bands of chalk and clay in northern and western Europe. ... Wealden is a local government district in East Sussex, England. ... The Needles, situated on the Isle Of Wight, are part of the extensive Southern England Chalk Formation. ...


Politics

The Clipper Ship "Flying Cloud" off the Needles, Isle of Wight, by James E. Buttersworth, 1859-60.
The Clipper Ship "Flying Cloud" off the Needles, Isle of Wight, by James E. Buttersworth, 1859-60.

The Isle of Wight is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county. As it has no district councils (only the County Council), it is effectively a unitary county, although not officially. It is unique in England in this way — all other unitary areas are single districts with no county council, while the Isle of Wight is the other way round. It also has a single Member of Parliament, and is by far the most populous constituency in the United Kingdom (more than 50% above the average of English constituencies). As a geographical entity distinct from the mainland, the Isle of Wight has always fought to have this identity recognised. ... Image File history File links Buttersworth_-_flying_cloud. ... Image File history File links Buttersworth_-_flying_cloud. ... James E. Buttersworth (1817 – 1894) was a British-American painter who specialized in maritime art, and is considered among the foremost American ship portraitists of the nineteenth century. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Isle of Wight is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


As a constituency of the House of Commons, it is traditionally a battleground between the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats. The current MP, Andrew Turner is a Conservative, and his predecessor Dr Peter Brand was a Liberal Democrat. Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in Great Britain formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long after... Andrew John Turner (born 24 October 1953, Coventry) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Dr Peter Brand (born 1947) is a United Kingdom general practitioner and Liberal Democrat politician. ...


The Isle of Wight Council election of 2005 was a landslide victory for the Conservative Party, displacing the long serving "Island First" group, a coalition of Liberal Democrats and independents. The Isle of Wight Council is a local council. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in Great Britain formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long after...


There has been a minor regionalist movement, in the form of the Vectis National Party and Isle of Wight Party, but this has generally performed badly in elections. The Vectis National Party was a minor political party operating in the Isle of Wight in the United Kingdom in the early 1970s. ... The Isle of Wight Party is a minor British political party, formed in January 2001 to contest the Isle of Wight constituency at the 2001 United Kingdom General Election. ...


Demographics

From the census taken in 2001, the island's population was at 132,731. This shows a change of 5.4% since the last census in 1991 which is a higher increase than the average for the UK at 2.6%. The mean age of people from the island is 43.19. This is higher than the national average of 38.65.


From the 2001 census data, the population on the Isle of Wight by age group is:

Age Group United Kingdom Isle of Wight UA
Total 58,789,194 132,719
0-4 3,486,469 6,437
5-9 3,738,160 7,604
10-14 3,880,609 8,459
15-19 3,663,899 7,417
20-24 3,546,151 5,564
25-29 3,867,115 6,155
30-34 4,493,585 8,084
35-39 4,625,810 8,746
40-44 4,151,580 8,448
45-49 3,735,964 8,399
50-54 4,040,437 10,133
55-59 3,338,861 9,619
60-64 2,879,948 7,951
65-69 2,596,843 7,441
70-74 2,339,231 7,085
75-79 1,966,929 6,445
80-84 1,313,547 4,524
85-89 752,787 2,750
90+ 371,269 1,458

[11]


The lack of a university on the island causes many younger people to leave for higher education. The Isle of Wight is also considered an attractive place for many people to retire, due to the perception that it is more peaceful than the rest of the UK. This results in a higher proportion of older people.


The most popular religion on the island is Christianity, with 73.72%, however this census question was optional and 7.89% did not wish to state a religion. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...


Main towns

  • Newport is the county town of the Isle of Wight and is located in the centre of the Island and is the main shopping area on the Island. Recent developments include a new bus station with retail complex and a new retail park on the outskirts. Located next to the River Medina, Newport was once a busy port until the mid-19th century, but has now been mainly converted into art galleries, apartments and other meeting places.
  • Ryde, The Island's biggest town with a population of around 30,000, is located in the north east of the Island. It is a Victorian town with a half-mile long pier and four miles of beaches, attracting many tourists each year.
  • Cowes is the location of Cowes week every year and where many people across the UK go to go sailing. It is also the home of famous sailor Dame Ellen MacArthur.
  • Sandown is another seaside resort, attracting many tourists each year. It is also home to the Isle of Wight Zoo and Dinosaur Isle geological museum, and an 18 hole golf course.
  • Shanklin just south of Sandown, also attracts tourists by its sandy beaches. Its main attractions are Shanklin Chine and the old village.
  • Ventnor is on the south coast of the Island and is built on steep slopes leading down to the sea which attract many tourists. Recent developments include Ventnor Haven, a harbour on the coast of Ventnor.

The Isle of Wight has no cities. Newport, located in the centre of the island, is the second largest town and is also the county town. There are also smaller towns along the coasts particularly on the east side of the Island. Many of these such as Sandown and Ryde attract many tourists each year. This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Isle of Wight, England. ... Statistics Population: 23,957 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SZ502893 Administration District: Isle of Wight Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Isle of Wight Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Ambulance service: South Central Post office and telephone Post town... The River Medina is small river that runs from the hills in the south of the Isle of Wight, through the capital Newport, towards the Solent at Cowes. ... Ryde, seen from Ryde Pier and showing the twin spires. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... This article is about the town on the Isle of Wight. ... Ellen MacArthur Dame Ellen Patricia MacArthur, DBE (born July 8, 1976) is an English sailor from Whatstandwell near Matlock in Derbyshire, now based in Cowes, on the Isle of Wight. ... Sandown is a seaside resort town and civil parish[1] on the south-east coast of the Isle of Wight, England, neighbouring the town of Shanklin to the south. ... The Isle of Wight Zoo is in Yaverland on the Isle of Wight. ... Dinosaur Isle is a museum located on the Isle of Wight. ... The seafront at Shanklin, 2003 Shanklin is a popular seaside resort and civil parish[1] on the Isle of Wight, England, just south of Sandown on the south coast. ... Ventnor is a seaside resort and civil parish[1] established in the Victorian era on the south coast of the Isle of Wight, off the southern coast of England. ...


As well as the major towns, the island also has many smaller villages. Some of these smaller villages also attract many tourists (for example, Godshill is a popular tourist destination). Godshill is a village on the Isle of Wight. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of the Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight maintains a culture close to, but distinct from, that of the south of England due to its nature as an offshore island. ...

Language and dialect

The distinctive Isle of Wight accent is a somewhat stronger version of the traditional Hampshire dialect, featuring the dropping of some consonants and an emphasis on longer vowels. This is similar to the West Country dialects heard in Southwestern England, but less removed in sound from the Estuary English of the Southeast. In common with many other English regional dialects and accents, a strong Island accent is not now commonly heard, and, as speakers tend to be older, this decline is likely to continue. For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For dialects of programming languages, see Programming language dialect. ... In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by a closure or stricture of the vocal tract sufficient to cause audible turbulence. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The West Country dialects and West Country accents are generic terms applied to any of several English dialects and accents used by much of the indigenous population of the southwestern part of England, the area popularly known as the West Country. ... Estuary English is a name given to the form of English widely spoken in South East England, especially along the river Thames and its estuary. ...


The Island also has its own local and regional words. Some words, including grockle (visitor) and nipper/nips (a younger male person), are still commonly used and are shared with neighbouring areas. A few are unique to the Island, for example overner (a mainlander who has settled on the Island) and caulkhead (someone born on the Island or, for sticklers, those born there from long-established Island stock). Other words are more obscure and used now mainly for comic emphasis, such as mallishag (meaning caterpillar) and nammit ("noon-meat", meaning food). Some other words are "gurt" as in large or great, also "gallybagger" as in scarecrow.[12]. This article is about a form of an insect. ...


Sport

Cowes is a world-famous centre for sailing, playing host to several racing regattas. Cowes Week is the longest-running regular regatta in the world, with over 1,000 yachts and 8,500 competitors taking part in over 50 classes of yacht racing[13]. In 1851 the first America's Cup race took place around the Island. Other major sailing events hosted in Cowes include the Fastnet race, the Round the Island Race[14], the Admiral's Cup, and the Commodore's Cup[15]. This article is about the town on the Isle of Wight. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... A regatta is a boat race or series of boat races. ... Cowes Week is the longest-running regular regatta in the world. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the yachting competition. ... The Fastnet race is a yachting race in the United Kingdom. ... The Admirals Cup is a yachting race series in the United Kingdom. ...


The Isle of Wight Marathon is the United Kingdom's oldest continuously-held marathon, having been run every year since 1957. [16]. The course starts in Ryde, passing through Newport, Shanklin and Sandown, before finishing back in Ryde. It is an undulating course with a total climb of 1,505 feet.


The Island is home to the Isle of Wight Islanders Speedway team, who compete in the sport's second division, the 'Premier League'. The club was founded in 1996, with a first-night attendance of 1740. The Island is also home to the Wightlink Raiders, an ice hockey team based at Ryde Arena. They compete in the English Premier League, the 2nd Division in the country. There is also an ENL team, Vectis Warriors, also based at Ryde Arena. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The now-disbanded Ryde Sports F.C. was founded in 1888 and became one of the eight founder members of the Hampshire League in 1896. There are several other non-league clubs such as Newport (IW) F.C. There is an Isle of Wight Saturday Football League with three divisions, and a rugby union club[17], plus various other sporting teams [18]. Beach football is particularly prevalent on the Island and boasts several of the nation's premier clubs, such as the Wight Knuckle Ryders. Before their demise, Ryde Sports were for many years a major force in football on the Isle of Wight and in Hampshire. ... The Hampshire League is a name used for two distinct football competitions based in Hampshire, England. ... Newport (IW) F.C. (also known as Newport (IoW) F.C. or Newport (Isle of Wight) F.C.) are a football club based in Newport on the Isle of Wight, England, They were established on 27 January 1888 and were founder members of the Wessex League in 1986. ... The Isle of Wight Saturday Football League is a football competition based in England. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Beach Football is a variation of association football (soccer) played barefoot on a beach or other sand surface. ...


The Isle of Wight competes in the bi-annual Island Games, which it hosted in 1993. The Isle of Wight will host these games again in 2011. The International Island Games Association (IGA) is an organization the sole purpose of which is to organise the Island Games, a friendly biennial athletic competition between teams from several islands. ...


Music

The Isle of Wight is also the home of the band "The Bees". Recently they have been having more national success and often perform at smaller concerts on the island. The Isle of Wight is also home to the Isle of Wight Festival and the Bestival. The Bees can refer to: The Bees (UK band), an indie group from the Isle of Wight. ... The Isle of Wight Festival is a music festival which takes place annually on the Isle of Wight, England. ... The Bestival is a music festival on the Isle of Wight. ...


Economy

A satellite photograph of the Isle of Wight and the Solent.
A satellite photograph of the Isle of Wight and the Solent.

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added by the Isle of Wight economy at current basic prices by the Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling.[19] Isle of Wight satellite image Adapted from: Earth Sciences and Image Analysis, NASA-Johnson Space Center. ... Isle of Wight satellite image Adapted from: Earth Sciences and Image Analysis, NASA-Johnson Space Center. ... Satellite image showing the Solent, separating the Isle of Wight from mainland Britain The Solent is a stretch of sea separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland of Great Britain. ... Office for National Statistics logo The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the United Kingdom government executive agency charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. ... For details of notes and coins, see Coins of the pound sterling and Banknotes of the pound sterling. ...

Year Regional Gross Value Added[20] Agriculture[21] Industry[22] Services[23]
1995 831 28 218 585
2000 1,202 27 375 800
2003 1,491 42 288 1,161

Industry and agriculture

The largest industry on the Isle of Wight is tourism, but the Island has a strong agricultural heritage, including sheep and dairy farming and the growing of arable crops. Traditional agricultural commodities are more difficult to market off the Island because of transport costs, but Island farmers have managed successfully to exploit some specialist markets. The high price of these products overcomes the transport costs. One of the most successful agricultural sectors at present is the growing of crops under cover, particularly salad crops, including tomatoes and cucumbers. The Isle of Wight has a longer growing season than much of the United Kingdom and this also favours such crops. Garlic has been successfully grown in Newchurch for many years, and is even exported to France. This has led to the establishment of an annual Garlic Festival at Newchurch, which is one of the largest events of the Island's annual calendar. The favourable climate has led to the success of vineyards, including one of the oldest in the British Isles, at Adgestone near Sandown.[24] Lavender is also grown for its oil.[25] The largest sector of agriculture has been dairying, but due to low milk prices, and strict UK legislation for UK milk producers, the dairy industry has declined. There were nearly one-hundred and fifty dairy producers of various sizes in the mid-eighties, but this has now dwindled down to just twenty-four. Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... Newchurch is a village on the Isle of Wight. ... The Garlic Festival is a fundraising event that is held on the Isle of Wight. ... A common vineyard. ... Adgestone is a small village on the Isle of Wight. ... Sandown is a seaside resort town and civil parish[1] on the south-east coast of the Isle of Wight, England, neighbouring the town of Shanklin to the south. ... Species About 25-30, including: Lavandula abrotanoides Lavandula angustifolia Lavandula canariensis Lavandula dentata Lavandula lanata Lavandula latifolia Lavandula multifida Lavandula pinnata Lavandula stoechas Lavandula viridis Lavandula x intermedia The Lavenders Lavandula are a genus of about 25-30 species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae, native from the...


The making of sailcloth, boats and other connected maritime industry has long been associated with the Island, although this has somewhat diminished in recent years. Cowes is still home to various small marine-related companies such as boat-builders. This article is about the town on the Isle of Wight. ... Traditional boat building in South East Maluku, Indonesia. ...


Although they have reduced the extent of the plants and workforce, including the sale of the main site, GKN operates what was once the British Hovercraft Corporation a subsidiary of, and known latterly, when manufacturing focus changed, as Westland Aircraft. Prior to its purchase by Westland, it was the independent company known as Saunders-Roe. It remains one of the most notable historic firms, having produced many of the flying boats, and the world's first hovercraft. GKN plc is a British engineering company formerly known as Guest, Keen and Nettlefolds and tracing its origins back to 1759 and the birth of the industrial revolution. ... British Hovercraft Corporation is the corporate entity created when Saunders Roe and Vickers Supermarine combined with the intention of creating viable commercial hovercraft. ... Westland Aircraft was a British aircraft manufacturer located in Yeovil in Somerset, formed just before the start of World War II. During the war the company produced a number of generally unsuccessful designs, but their Lysander would serve as an important liaison aircraft with the RAF. After the war the... Saunders-Roe Princess G-ALUN History Saunders-Roe Limited was a British aircraft manufacturing company based in East Cowes, Isle of Wight. ... Boeing 314 A flying boat is an aircraft that is designed to take off and land on water, in particular a type of seaplane which uses its fuselage as a floating hull (instead of pontoons mounted below the fuselage). ... For the band, see Hovercraft (band). ...


The Island's major manufacturing activity today is in composite materials, used by boat-builders and the wind turbine manufacturer Vestas, which has a wind turbine blade factory and testing facilities in Newport and East Cowes. A cloth of woven carbon fiber filaments, a common element in composite materials Composite materials (or composites for short) are engineered materials made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties and which remain separate and distinct on a macroscopic level within the finished structure. ... This article is about the machine for converting the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy. ... Vestas is a Danish company that designs, manufactures, and sells wind turbines. ... Statistics Population: 23,957 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SZ502893 Administration District: Isle of Wight Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Isle of Wight Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Ambulance service: South Central Post office and telephone Post town... Cowes is a seaport town on the Isle of Wight, an island due south of the major southern English port of Southampton. ...


Bembridge Airfield is the home of Britten-Norman, manufacturers of the world-famous Islander and Trislander aircraft. This is shortly to become the site of the European assembly line for Cirrus light aircraft. The Norman Aeroplane Company is a smaller aircraft manufacturing company operating in Sandown. There are have been 3 other aircraft manufacturers that built planes on the Island.[26] Bembridge Airport (IATA: BBP, ICAO: EGHJ) is located 2. ... Britten-Norman (officially the Britten-Norman Group or BNG) is a British aircraft manufacturer owned by members of the Zawawi family from the Sultanate of Oman, making it one of the UKs two remaining independent commercial aircraft producers, the other being Slingsby Aviation of Kirkbymoorside in Yorkshire. ... The Britten-Norman Islander (also known as the BN-2) is a light utility aircraft manufactured by Britten-Norman of the United Kingdom. ... A Trislander aircraft at Guernsey airport. ... 2003 Cirrus SR22 The Cirrus Design Corporation is an aircraft manufacturer founded in 1984 by Alan and Dale Klapmeier. ... Sandown is a seaside resort town and civil parish[1] on the south-east coast of the Isle of Wight, England, neighbouring the town of Shanklin to the south. ...


In 2005, Northern Petroleum began exploratory drilling for oil, with its Sandhills-2 borehole at Porchfield but ceased operations in October that year, after failing to find significant reserves. Petro redirects here. ... Porchfield is a village on the Isle of Wight. ...


Breweries

There are three breweries on the Island. Goddards Brewery in Ryde opened in 1993.[27] David Yates, who was head brewer of Burts and Island Brewery, started brewing as Yates Brewery at the Inn at St Lawrence in 2000.[28] Ventnor Brewery, under new management, is the latest incarnation of Burt's Brewery, which has been brewing on the Island since the 1840s in Ventnor. [29]. Ryde, seen from Ryde Pier and showing the twin spires. ... This page concerns the Christian martyr. ... Ventnor is a seaside resort and civil parish[1] established in the Victorian era on the south coast of the Isle of Wight, off the southern coast of England. ...


Services

Tourism and heritage

Compton Chine, looking east towards Blackgang
Compton Chine, looking east towards Blackgang

The heritage of the Island is a major asset, which has for many years kept its economy going. Holidays focused on natural heritage, including both wildlife and geology, are becoming a growing alternative to the traditional seaside resort holiday. The latter has been in decline in the United Kingdom domestic market, due to the increased affordability of air travel to alternative destinations. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1473x940, 416 KB) Description: Isle of Wight Landscape 1995. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1473x940, 416 KB) Description: Isle of Wight Landscape 1995. ... Blackgang Chine on the Isle of Wight Blackgang Chine circa 1910 Blackgang Chine is the location of a natural chine (a coastal ravine) in the soft Cretaceous cliffs near Ventnor at the southern tip of the Isle of Wight, England. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Tourism is still the largest industry on the Island. In 1999, the 130,000 Island residents were host to 2.7 million visitors. Of these, 1.5 million stayed overnight, and 1.2 million visits were day visits. Only 150,000 of these visitors were international visitors. Between 1993 and 2000, visits increased at a rate of 3% per year, on average.[30]


At the turn of the nineteenth century the Island had ten pleasure piers including two at Ryde and a "chain pier" at Seaview. The Victoria Pier in Cowes succeeded the earlier Royal Pier but was itself removed in 1960. The piers at Ryde, Seaview, Sandown, Shanklin and Ventnor originally served a coastal steamer service that operated from Southsea on the mainland. The piers at Seaview, Shanklin, Ventnor and Alum Bay were all destroyed by storms during the last century. Today only the railway pier at Ryde and the piers at Sandown, Totland Bay (currently closed to the public) and Yarmouth survive. Blackgang Chine is arguably the oldest theme park in the UK, and one of the oldest in the world. For architectural piers, see Pier (architecture). ... Ryde Pier is an early 19th century pier serving the town of Ryde, on the Isle of Wight, off the south coast of England. ... Seaview is a small village located on the North East corner of the Isle of Wight. ... Seaview is a small village located on the North East corner of the Isle of Wight. ... Sandown is a seaside resort town and civil parish[1] on the south-east coast of the Isle of Wight, England, neighbouring the town of Shanklin to the south. ... The seafront at Shanklin, 2003 Shanklin is a popular seaside resort and civil parish[1] on the Isle of Wight, England, just south of Sandown on the south coast. ... Alum Bay is a sandy bay near the westernmost point of the Isle of Wight, England, within sight of The Needles. ... Totland is a town at the western tip of the Isle of Wight. ... Blackgang Chine on the Isle of Wight Blackgang Chine circa 1910 Blackgang Chine is the location of a natural chine (a coastal ravine) in the soft Cretaceous cliffs near Ventnor at the southern tip of the Isle of Wight, England. ...


As well as more traditional tourist attractions, the Island is often host to walking holidays [31]. or cycling holidays through the attractive scenery. Almost every town and village on the Island plays host to hotels, hostels and camping sites. Out of the peak summer season, the Island is still an important destination for coach tours from other parts of the United Kingdom and an annual walking festival has attracted considerable interest.


A major contribution to the local economy comes from sailing and marine-related tourism. For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ...


Transport

A map of the island from 1945
A map of the island from 1945

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2264x1576, 995 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Isle of Wight Solent Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2264x1576, 995 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Isle of Wight Solent Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner...

Sea

By far the main form of access is by boat from the mainland, with regular vehicle ferry services and passenger services being available through the ferry companies: For other uses, see Boat (disambiguation). ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ...

There are regular proposals for further routes, and during Cowes Week additional services have been known to operate — notably a fast catamaran service between West Cowes and Lymington. Red Funnel (strapline: The Original Isle of Wight Ferries) is the name used to refer to The Southampton, Isle of Wight and South of England Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... This article is about the town on the Isle of Wight. ... This article is about the town on the Isle of Wight. ... A Wightlink ferry and catamaran at the entrance to Portsmouth Harbour. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... Fishbourne is a small village between Wootton and Ryde, on the Isle of Wight. ... Ryde, seen from Ryde Pier and showing the twin spires. ... Cobbled streets in Lymington town centre. ... Location within the British Isles Yarmouth is a port in the western part of the Isle of Wight, off the southern coast of England. ... Portsmouth Harbour railway station is a railway station in Portsmouth, England. ... Ryde Pier is an early 19th century pier serving the town of Ryde, on the Isle of Wight, off the south coast of England. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... Hovertravel is a ferry company operating from Southsea, Portsmouth to Ryde, Isle of Wight, UK. They are the last company operating in Britain with passenger hovercraft, after Hoverspeed stopped using their craft in favour of catamarans. ... Southsea is a seaside resort located in Portsmouth at the southern tip of Portsea Island in the county of Hampshire in England. ... Ryde, seen from Ryde Pier and showing the twin spires. ... For the band, see Hovercraft (band). ... Cowes Week is the longest-running regular regatta in the world. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... Cobbled streets in Lymington town centre. ...


Rail

The Island is the home of the smallest train operating company in the United Kingdom's National Rail network, the Island Line. This runs some 8½ miles from Ryde Pier Head to Shanklin, down the eastern side of the island via Brading and Sandown. These are electric trains, using former London Underground rolling stock. National Rail uses the BR double arrow logo National Rail is a brand name describing the passenger rail service previously provided by British Rail, the now defunct UK state-owned rail operator. ... National Rail uses the BR double-arrow logo A typical National Rail station sign showing the double-arrow logo National Rail is a brand name of the Association of Train Operating Companies (ATOC). ... Island Line is the smallest of the Train Operating Companies that make up Britain’s National Rail network. ... Ryde Pier Head railway station Serves the town of Ryde in the Isle of Wight External links Train times and station information for Ryde Pier Head railway station from National Rail Street map and aerial photo of Ryde Pier Head railway station from Multimap. ... Shanklin railway station is a railway station serving Shanklin on the Isle of Wight. ... The ancient Kynges Towne of Brading is the main town of the civil parish[1] of the same name, which used to cover about a tenth of the Isle of Wight but now includes the town itself and Adgestone, Morton, Nunwell and other outlying areas between Ryde, St Helens... Sandown is a seaside resort town and civil parish[1] on the south-east coast of the Isle of Wight, England, neighbouring the town of Shanklin to the south. ... The London Underground is an underground railway system - also known as a rapid transit system - that serves a large part of Greater London, United Kingdom and some neighbouring areas. ...


The Island also has a steam-operated heritage railway, the Isle of Wight Steam Railway. The steam railway connects with the Island Line at Smallbrook Junction. This was part of the former Ryde to Newport line. Vintage carriage and O2 Class 0-4-4T no. ... Smallbrook Junction railway station serves Smallbrook in the Isle of Wight and Isle of Wight Railway External links Train times and station information for Smallbrook Junction railway station from National Rail Street map and aerial photo of Smallbrook Junction railway station from Multimap. ... Statistics Population: 23,957 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SZ502893 Administration District: Isle of Wight Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Isle of Wight Historic county: Hampshire Services Police force: Hampshire Constabulary Ambulance service: South Central Post office and telephone Post town...


Before the days of Richard Beeching in the 1950s and 1960s, the Island boasted a comprehensive railway network based on a triangle of lines connecting Ryde, Newport and Sandown. Branch lines led from Sandown to Bembridge and from Newport north to Cowes and west to Yarmouth and Freshwater. Two other lines ran to Ventnor: Richard Beeching Richard Beeching, Baron Beeching (21 April 1913 - 23 March 1985), commonly known as Doctor Beeching, was chairman of British Railways and a physicist and engineer. ... Sandown is a seaside resort town and civil parish[1] on the south-east coast of the Isle of Wight, England, neighbouring the town of Shanklin to the south. ... , Bembridge is a village and civil parish[1] located on the easternmost point of the Isle of Wight. ... Freshwater is a village and parish at the western end of the Isle of Wight. ... Ventnor is a seaside resort and civil parish[1] established in the Victorian era on the south coast of the Isle of Wight, off the southern coast of England. ...

  1. an extension of the aforementioned Island Line from Shanklin and
  2. a branch of the Newport-Sandown line via Godshill and Wroxall.

The two lines terminated at different levels above the town. Wroxall is the name of two English villages. ...


Today much of the old rail network has been converted to cycle ways, including the Newport-Cowes, Newport-Sandown and Yarmouth-Freshwater sections. Other sections can still be traced on the ground, including the two tunnels where the Ventnor lines were taken through the downs.


Roads

A sign used to greet visitors to the Island disembarking from the car ferry at Fishbourne, stating Island Roads are Different, Please Drive Carefully.[32] It is a joke amongst local residents that the reason Island roads are different is due to a lack of maintenance by the Council. Nevertheless the lighter traffic, quieter roads and slower speeds are noticeable to the visitor and are one of the reasons the Island has remained attractive to tourists from the busier mainland. The Island has 489 miles of roadway and is one of the few counties in the UK not to have a motorway. Fishbourne is a small village between Wootton and Ryde, on the Isle of Wight. ...


Buses

The main bus company for the Isle of Wight is Southern Vectis. It provides a total of 24 different bus routes for the island with most of the island towns getting a 24 hour service. The most regular services run between the larger towns such as Ryde and Cowes. From April 2006, the company changed its livery on all buses (excluding open top buses) to two shades of green and also operated buses on a newly designed, simplified network. This new network did not allocate certain routes with different livery, as had been done previously. During the summer, Southern Vectis also operates four open top tour routes; The Medina Tour, The Sandown Bay Tour, The Downs Tour and The Needles Tour. These are popular for many tourists visiting the island during the summer months. The current, soon to be axed Southern Vectis logo. ...


Wightbus also operate buses on the island, mainly taking students to and from school; however they do also help Southern Vectis with some of its routes. Wightbus is the second commercial bus operator on the Isle of Wight. ...


Walking and cycling

The Island has an extensive network of byways, bridleways, footpaths and cycle tracks, including 520 miles of public rights of way. Several long distance paths are highlighted on Ordinance Survey maps and local signs, including a coastal path round the whole Island. Sustrans National Cycle Network routes 22 and 23 have sections through the Isle of Wight, including off road sections of route 23 between Cowes and Newport and Newport and Sandown along disused railway lines. There is a signed "round-the-island" cycle route primarily on road, as well as a 12 mile on and off road leisure route called the Sunshine Trail. The Island holds an annual Walking Festival in May and Cycling Festival in July. Sustrans is a British engineering charity which promotes sustainable transport. ... The first section of the NCN to be built was the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, opened in 1984. ...


Air

There are two small airfields for general aviation: Isle of Wight Airport at Sandown and Bembridge Airport. These are busy with day-trippers in summer, travelling by light aircraft. Isle of Wight/Sandown Airport (IATA: N/A, ICAO: EGHN) is located 1 nautical mile (1. ... Bembridge Airport (IATA: BBP, ICAO: EGHJ) is located 2. ...


Fixed Link

Currently the only ways to get to the island is by boat or by air. However, a fixed link by tunnels or bridges has been discussed.


Communications

All of the Island telephone exchanges are broadband-enabled and in addition, some urban areas such as Cowes and Newport are covered by cable lines. Some areas, such as Arreton, have no broadband access in certain places. This article is about the town on the Isle of Wight. ... Arreton is a village in the central eastern part of the Isle of Wight, England. ...


Media

The Isle of Wight has one local broadsheet newspaper, The Isle of Wight County Press. It discusses local issues and is published each Friday, or on the last working day if a public holiday falls on a Friday. The Isle of Wight County Press is a local, broadsheet newspaper which is published every Friday on the Isle of Wight. ...


The Island's television station was Solent TV. It started broadcasting on March, 2006. Unfortunately, this enterprise was not financially sustainable and the station became insolvent, causing its closure on Thursday, 24th May, 2007. However it was recently announced that a new television channel would be broadcast from the island, scheduled to go on air in December. The venture could initially create up to 20 new jobs. The new channel will focus on traditional family entertainment, being very similar to the BBC in the 1950's. [33] Solent TV was an independent not-for-profit television channel broadcasting on the Isle of Wight. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


The Island has two native, commercial radio stations and has access to other nearby local stations based off the Island. Since 1998, Isle of Wight Radio has broadcast on 107 and 102 FM, as well as on the internet, and on the AM band since 1990. In 2007, Angel Radio began broadcasting on 91.7 FM from studios in Cowes.[34] Isle of Wight Radio is an Independent Local Radio station based on the Isle of Wight. ... This article is about the town on the Isle of Wight. ...


Prisons

The Island geography, close to the densely populated south of England, led to it gaining three prisons: Albany, Camp Hill and Parkhurst which are located outside Newport on the main road to Cowes. Albany and Parkhurst were once among the few Category A prisons in the UK until they were downgraded in the 1990s. The downgrading of Parkhurst was precipitated by a major escape: three prisoners (two murderers and a blackmailer) made their way out of the prison on 3 January 1995 for four days of freedom before being recaptured. Parkhurst especially enjoyed notoriety as one of toughest gaols in the British Isles and "hosted" many notable inmates, including the Yorkshire Ripper Peter Sutcliffe and the Kray twins. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Camp Hill was built in 1912 using prisoner labour from HMP Parkhurst and opened by Winston Churchill. ... HM Prison Parkhurst is a prison situated in Parkhurst, Isle of Wight. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Peter Sutcliffe (born June 2, 1946), infamous as the Yorkshire Ripper, was convicted in 1981 of the murders of thirteen women and attacks on seven more from 1975 to 1980. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Ronald Ronnie Kray (24 October 1933 – 17 March 1995) and Reginald Reggie Kray (24 October 1933 – 1 October 2000) were identical twin brothers, and the foremost organised crime leaders dominating Londons East End during the 1950s and 1960s. ...


Camp Hill is located to the west of, and adjacent to, Albany and Parkhurst, on the very edge of Parkhurst Forest, having been converted first to a borstal and later to later a category C prison. It was originally on the site of an army camp (both Albany and Parkhurst were barracks), where there is a small estate of tree-lined roads with well-proportioned officers' quarters (with varying grandeur according to rank, but now privately owned), to the south and east. In the United Kingdom, a borstal was a juvenile detention centre or reformatory, an institution of the criminal justice system, intended to reform delinquent male youths aged between about 16 and 21. ...


Education

There are sixty-nine Local Education Authority-maintained schools on the Isle of Wight, and two independent schools. As a rural community, many of these schools are small, with average numbers of pupils lower than in many urban areas. There are currently five high schools. However, there are plans to close at least one of the high schools. There is also the Isle of Wight College, which is located on the outskirts of Newport. // Schools There are 69 LEA maintained schools on the Isle of Wight, and two private schools. ... A Local Education Authority (LEA) is the part of a council in England or Wales that is responsible for education within that councils jurisdiction. ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


The Island uses a middle school system. Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ...


Major events

Many events take place each year across the island, all designed to appeal to different groups of people. Many of these take place in the summer, and so attract many tourists visiting the island. A few notable examples include:

Event Description Running Dates
Isle of Wight Festival A music festival which takes place annually at Seaclose Park in Newport. After three early festivals featuring such acts as Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan and The Who, the festival was discontinued in 1970; but was revived in a modern format in 2002. 1968-1970, 2002-present
Bestival A music festival held in the late summer, at a country park, Robin Hill. The event is considered much more alternative and diverse, which appeals to families. Many people attending wear fancy dress. A few notable acts include The Scissor Sisters and The Pet Shop Boys. 2004-present
Garlic Festival An annually held fundraising event organised until 2006 by the Newchurch Parish Sports & Community Association and since then by the Garlic Festival Ltd.[35] It has over 250 stallholders selling many locally produced foods such as garlic beer, garlic seafood and garlic ice cream. Music performances take place and the event also has a large central arena for other activities. 1985-present
Cowes Week Cowes Week is the longest running regular regatta in the world,[36] and takes place on the Solent. 1826-present
White Air White Air is an extreme sports festival held in Yaverland, on the eastern side of the island, near Sandown. In 2007 the date was moved from October to August. It is a week long event. The event also has a live music stage and in 2007 had headlining act The Bees performing. However due to the negative views local residents have towards the event, it is possible it could be moved to a new location on the mainland.[37] 1996-present

The Isle of Wight Festival is a music festival which takes place annually on the Isle of Wight, England. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... The Bestival is a music festival on the Isle of Wight. ... Robin Hill is a family theme park, billed as a countryside adventure park, in the centre of the Isle of Wight, United Kingdom. ... Scissor Sisters is an American band that formed in 2001, who have had massive success in the UK and Ireland. ... Pet Shop Boys (often used without the definite article the) are a highly influential UK electronic music act. ... The Garlic Festival is a fundraising event that is held on the Isle of Wight. ... Newchurch could be Newchurch, Isle of Wight Newchurch, Kent Newchurch, Wales This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Cowes Week is the longest-running regular regatta in the world. ... Satellite image showing the Solent, separating the Isle of Wight from mainland Britain The Solent is a stretch of sea separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland of Great Britain. ... The Isle of Wight is an English island and county, off the southern English coast, to the south of the county of Hampshire. ... Sandown is a seaside resort town and civil parish[1] on the south-east coast of the Isle of Wight, England, neighbouring the town of Shanklin to the south. ... The Bees can refer to: The Bees (UK band), an indie group from the Isle of Wight. ...

Famous residents

Over the years, the island has had many well known visitors. Many come over for health reasons due to the cool sea breeze and clean air. For example, Winston Churchill and Karl Marx were visitors to the Island. Alan Titchmarsh, the renowned UK gardener, has been nominated to be High Sheriff of the Isle of Wight in 2008/9.[38] This is a list of people born in or strongly associated with the Isle of Wight, alphabetically within categories. ... Churchill redirects here. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Alan Fred Titchmarsh, MBE (born 2 May 1949) is a famous English broadcaster, particularly in the field of gardening programmes on UK television, although Titchmarsh has also had lengthy stints presenting daytime and religious programming on BBC TV and BBC Radio 2. ... == Roll of High Sheriffs of the Isle of Wight == [position only created in 1974] 1974-5 Lieutenant Colonel CRH Kindersley, DSO, MC, DL 1975-6 Rear Admiral J L Blackham, CB DL 1976-7 FRJ Britten Esq. ...


Selected places of interest

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Abbeys and priories in England is a link page for any abbey, priory, friary or other monastic religious house in England. ... Access Land icon for use on UK lists of places of interest, created by Joe D. File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This is a list of amusement parks which are or were based in the UK. Alton Towers Adventure Island American Adventure Barry Island Pleasure Park Blackpool Pleasure Beach Blackgang Chine Brean Leisure Park Brighton Pier Camelot Theme Park Chessington World of Adventures Clarence Pier Crealy Dobwalls Diggerland Drayton Manor Dreamland... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Castles in England is a link page for any castle in England. ... Image File history File links Country_Park1. ... A country park is an area designated for people to visit and enjoy recreation in a countryside environment. ... English Heritage icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest. ... The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... Forrestry Commision logo for use on UK lists of places of intrest. ... The Forestry Commission (established in 1919) is a non ministerial Government Department responsible for forestry in Great Britain. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... A scene on a heritage railway. ... Historic House icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... Historic houses in England is a link page for any stately home, country house or other historic house in England. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... The Palais du Louvre in Paris, which houses the Musée du Louvre, one of the worlds most famous museums, and most certainly the largest. ... Small National Trust for England logo for use on UK lists of places of interest. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The following is a partial list of zoological gardens (zoos): // Egypt Giza Zoo Alexandria Zoo Qariyet El Assad (Lions Village) South Africa National Zoo, Pretoria Johannesburg Zoo[1] East London Tanzania Saa Nane Museum and Zoo, Mwanza Afghanistan Kabul Zoo, Kabul Bangladesh Dhaka Zoo, Mirpur, Dhaka China Beijing Zoo Chengdu... Alum Bay is a sandy bay near the westernmost point of the Isle of Wight, England, within sight of The Needles. ... Appuldurcombe House is the impressive shell of a grand 18th-century baroque style stately home of the Worsley family. ... English Heritage icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest. ... Blackgang Chine on the Isle of Wight Blackgang Chine circa 1910 Blackgang Chine is the location of a natural chine (a coastal ravine) in the soft Cretaceous cliffs near Ventnor at the southern tip of the Isle of Wight, England. ... Brading Roman Villa was a Roman courtyard villa which has been excavated and put on public display in Brading on the Isle of Wight. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Carisbrooke Castle Carisbrooke Castle is a historic castle located in the village of Carisbrooke, near Newport, Isle of Wight. ... English Heritage icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Dimbola Lodge was the Isle of Wight home of the Victorian pioneer photographer Julia Margaret Cameron. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... A portrait of Julia Jackson who was Camerons niece and favorite subject, an albumen silver print by Julia Margaret Cameron, taken in 1867. ... Dinosaur Isle is a museum located on the Isle of Wight. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... Fort Victoria was a single tier battery with defensible barracks west of Yarmouth, Isle of Wight, England, built in the 1850s, later used as a submarine mining centre and training area for military purposes. ... Country park icon For use with Template:EngPlacesKey or any other use. ... Godshill is a village on the Isle of Wight. ... Vintage carriage and O2 Class 0-4-4T no. ... icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest, created by Joe D File links The following pages link to this file: Cornwall Isle of Wight Bristol Somerset Buckinghamshire Northamptonshire Bedfordshire County Durham Template:EngPlacesKey Wikipedia:Counties of England List of places in Dorset Wikipedia talk:UK Wikipedians notice... The Isle of Wight Zoo is in Yaverland on the Isle of Wight. ... The Isle of Wight is an English island and county, off the southern English coast, to the south of the county of Hampshire. ... The Needles from the cliffs inshore The Needles is a row of distinctive stacks of chalk that rise out of the sea off the western extremity of the Isle of Wight, England, close to Alum Bay. ... Small National Trust for England logo for use on UK lists of places of interest. ... Osborne House and its grounds are now open to the public Osborne House is a former royal residence in East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England. ... English Heritage icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Prince Albert piercing Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence Prince Albert of Monaco Prince Albert, Saskatchewan Prince Albert National Park, Canada Prince Albert in a Can This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... // The Quarr Abbey of the Middle Ages The ancient Quarr Abbey was founded in 1132 by Baldwin de Redvers, Earl of Devon and fourth lord of the Isle of Wight. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Robin Hill is a family theme park, billed as a countryside adventure park, in the centre of the Isle of Wight, United Kingdom. ... Ventnor Botanic Garden, New Zealand wild habitat, February 2007 Ventnor Botanic Garden is botanic garden located in Ventnor, Isle of Wight, United Kingdom. ... Yarmouth Castle is a small off-square blockhouse built by Henry VIII in 1547, to guard Yarmouth, Isle of Wight harbour, an unusual device fort because its not rounded at all. ... English Heritage icon for use on UK lists of places of intrest. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Henry VIII King of England and Ireland by Hans Holbein the Younger His Grace King Henry VIII (28 June 1491–28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ...

Notable media references

Level 42 is a popular British pop and funk band. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... For other uses, see Bede (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... When Im Sixty-Four is a love song by The Beatles, written by Paul McCartney[1][2] (but co-credited to John Lennon) and released in 1967 on their album Sgt. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Thomas Hardy redirects here. ... The English author Thomas Hardy set all of his major novels in the south and southwest of England. ... Barnes as Francophile and Francophone in Bernard Pivots Double je (France 2, March 2005) Julian Patrick Barnes (born January 19, 1946 in Leicester) is a contemporary English writer whose novels and short stories have been seen as examples of postmodernism in literature. ... Spoiler warning: On the one hand, the novel is the fictional biography of Martha Cochrane, a clever and ambitious Englishwoman with a rural lower middle-class background who, after graduating from university, attempts to climb the ladder of success within corporate Britain. ... John Wyndham (July 10, 1903 – March 11, 1969) was the pen name used by the often post-apocalyptic British science fiction writer John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris. ... The Day of the Triffids is a post-apocalyptic novel (categorised by author Brian Aldiss as a cosy catastrophe) written in 1951 by the English science fiction author John Wyndham. ... Simon Clark is a horror novel writer from Doncaster, England. ... The Night of The Triffids, written by Simon Clark, is the sequel to the novel The Day of the Triffids. ... Nebulous is a science fiction comedy that premiered on BBC Radio 4 and is produced independently by Baby Cow Productions. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Highway 61 Revisited track listing Like a Rolling Stone (1) Tombstone Blues (2) Music sample: Bob Dylan - Like a Rolling Stone 30 seconds (of 6:10) Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Quinn the Eskimo (The Mighty Quinn) is a popular song written by Bob Dylan. ... She Belongs To Me is a song by Bob Dylan first appearing in 1965 on the album Bringing It All Back Home. ... Self-portrait by Vincent Van Gogh A portrait is a painting, photograph, or other artistic representation of a person. ... D. H. Lawrence David Herbert Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was one of the most important, certainly one of the most controversial, English writers of the 20th century, who wrote novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, and letters. ... Novel written by Dennis Feltham Jones. ... Graham Masterton, Warsaw (Poland), May 18, 2007 Graham Masterton (b. ... Calista Kay Flockhart (born on November 11, 1964) is an Emmy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning American actress, primarily on soap operas and television. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

See also

This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Isle of Wight, England. ... This is a list of civil parishes in the Isle of Wight, England. ...

References

  1. ^ Isle of Wight Festival history
  2. ^ Saxon Graves at Shalfleet, Isle of Wight History Centre, August, 2005
  3. ^ England, A Narrative History, Peter N. Williams
  4. ^ The English Accept Christianity, The Story of England, Samuel B. Harding
  5. ^ http://www.connected-earth.com/Galleries/Telecommunicationsage/Awirelessworld/Theoriginsofradio/index.htm
  6. ^ http://beebase.csl.gov.uk/public/BeeDiseases/adultDiseases.cfm
  7. ^ Movies
  8. ^ Operation Squirrel
  9. ^ http://www.plantlife.org.uk/uk/plantlife-discovering-plants-county-flowers.html Plantlife: County flowers
  10. ^ http://uk.weather.com/weather/climatology/UKXX1881 Isle of Wight Climate Statistics
  11. ^ Population 2001 census data
  12. ^ Lavers, Jack (1988). The Dictionary of the Isle of Wight Dialect. Dovecote Press. ISBN 0-946159-63-7. 
  13. ^ http://www.skandiacowesweek.co.uk/web/code/php/main.php?section=home
  14. ^ http://www.roundtheisland.org.uk
  15. ^ http://www.rorc.org/comcup/
  16. ^ http://www.rydeharriers.co.uk/Marinfo.htm
  17. ^ http://www.iwrfc.co.uk/
  18. ^ http://www.solent.tv/sports.aspx
  19. ^ published (pp.240-253)
  20. ^ Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
  21. ^ includes hunting and forestry
  22. ^ includes energy and construction
  23. ^ includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured
  24. ^ [1]
  25. ^ [2]
  26. ^ A list of aircraft and airplane manufacturers as well as airfields on the Isle of Wight
  27. ^ http://www.goddards-brewery.co.uk/aboutus.htm
  28. ^ http://www.yates-brewery.co.uk/
  29. ^ http://www.ventnorbrewery.co.uk/1840.html
  30. ^ A website with Isle of Wight statistics for investors
  31. ^ http://www.wight-walks.co.uk
  32. ^ Hansard 20 Dec 1995 : Column 1457
  33. ^ New global TV channel to launch from Isle of Wight
  34. ^ "History of Our Station" and "Gallery" (Flash). Angel Radio Isle of Wight Website. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  35. ^ The Garlic Festival Ltd
  36. ^ Cowes Week
  37. ^ White Air will go to mainland
  38. ^ High Sheriff's new Badge of Office - July 2007, High Sheriff of the Isle of Wight website.
  39. ^ arrival of Christianity

Hansard is the traditional name for the printed transcripts of parliamentary debates in the Westminster system of government. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... The Isle of Wight County Press is a local, broadsheet newspaper which is published every Friday on the Isle of Wight. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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General Information: Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ...

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Articles and Categories about the Isle of Wight, England The Isle of Wight

Category:Isle of Wight | Category:Buildings and structures on the Isle of Wight | Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight | Education on the Isle of Wight | History of the Isle of Wight | List of Isle of Wight people | List of civil parishes in the Isle of Wight | List of places on the Isle of Wight | Politics of the Isle of Wight | Category:Visitor attractions on the Isle of Wight | Category:Geography of the Isle of Wight | Category:Railway stations on the Isle of Wight| Category:Heritage railway stations on the Isle of Wight| Isle of Wight (disambiguation) For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Escutmenorwight. ... The Isle of Wight is one of the richest dinosaur localities in Europe, with over 20 species of dinosaur having been recognised from the early Cretaceous Period (in particular between 132 and 110 million years ago), some of which were first identified on the island, as well as the contemporary... // Schools There are 69 LEA maintained schools on the Isle of Wight, and two private schools. ... Today, the Isle of Wight is rich in historical and archaeological sites dating from prehistoric periods from an extraordinary wealth of fossil discoveries including dinosaur bones through to remains from the Bronze Age, Iron Age and Roman periods onwards. ... This is a list of people born in or strongly associated with the Isle of Wight, alphabetically within categories. ... This is a list of civil parishes in the Isle of Wight, England. ... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Isle of Wight, England. ... As a geographical entity distinct from the mainland, the Isle of Wight has always fought to have this identity recognised. ... Isle of Wight can refer to: In the United Kingdom: The English island and ceremonial county known as the Isle of Wight The unitary authority region covered by the Isle of Wight Council The UK Parliament constituency, the Isle of Wight As of 2004, all of these uses cover the...

Coordinates: 50°40′51″N, 1°16′51″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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Isle of Wight Holidays & Tourist Information (IOW) | Isle of Wight Vacation (339 words)
The Isle of Wight is the perfect place to enjoy a relaxing break, at any time of the year.
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The Glanville Fritillary butterfly, in Britain is restricted to the edges of the crumbling cliffs of the Isle of Wight.
The distinctive Isle of Wight accent is a somewhat stronger version of the traditional Hampshire dialect, featuring the dropping of some consonants an emphasis on longer vowels similar to the West Country drawl heard in south-eastern England, but less removed in sound from the Estuary English of the South East.
The Jutes in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight (http://www.channel4.com/history/timeteam/archive/timeteamlive2001/feature_jutes.html)
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