FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Islamic view of Jesus

Part of a series on
Islam
For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...



Image File history File links Mosque02. ...

Beliefs
Aqidah (sometimes spelled as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah) (Arabic: عقيدة) is an Islamic term meaning creed. ...

Allah · Oneness of God
Muhammad · Prophets of Islam Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Allah. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Prophets of Islam are human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ...

Practices

Profession of Faith · Prayer
Fasting · Charity · Pilgrimage The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... Black flag featuring the Shahada text The shahadah (Arabic:  ) is the Islamic creed. ... It has been suggested that Salat of Quran be merged into this article or section. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... This article is about the Islamic tradition. ...

History & Leaders
Muslim history began in Arabia with Muhammads first recitations of the Quran in the 7th century. ... Islamic religious leaders have traditionally been persons who, as part of the clerisy, mosque, or government, performed a prominent role within their community or nation. ...

Timeline of Muslim history
Ahl al-Bayt · Sahaba
Rashidun Caliphs · Shi'a Imams There is much more to Muslim history than military and political history; this particular chronology is almost entirely of military and political history. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... In Islam, the SÌ£aḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ... The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs ( transliteration: ) is a term used in Sunni Islam to refer to the rightly guided Caliphs. ... This article is about the Shia concept, for the more general Islamic term, see Imam. ...

Texts & Laws
// Quran Text Surahs Ayah Commentary/Exegesis Tafsir ibn Kathir (by Ibn Kathir) Tafsir al-Tabari (by Tabari) Al Kordobi Tafseer-e-kabir (by Imam Razi) Tafheem-al-Quran (by Maulana Maududi) Sunnah/Hadith Hadith (Traditions of The Prophet) The Siha-e-Sitta al-Bukhari (d. ... Madhhab (Arabic مذهب pl. ...

Qur'an · Sunnah · Hadith
Fiqh · Sharia
Kalam · Tasawwuf (Sufism) The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Sharia (Arabic: transliteration: ) is the body of Islamic law. ... Kalam (علم الكلم)is one of the religious sciences of Islam. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam and encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ...

Major branches
The religion of Islam has many divisions, sects, schools, traditions, and related faiths. ...

Sunni · Shi'a

Culture & Society
Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Muslim culture is a term primarily used in secular academia to describe all cultural practices common to historically Islamic peoples. ... Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ...

Academics · Animals · Architecture · Art
Calendar · Children · Demographics
Festivals · Mosques · Philosophy
Politics · Science · Women Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... This article is about the attitudes of Islam regarding animals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The term Islamic art denotes the arts produced from the 7th century onwards by people (not necessarily Muslim) who lived within the territory that was inhabited by culturally Islamic populations. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... This article discusses childrens rights given by Islam, childrens duties towards their parents, parents treatment of their children, both males and females, biological and foster children, also discussed are some of the differences regarding rights with respect to different schools of thoughts. ... Muslim percentage of population by country Distribution of Islam per country. ... Muslim holidays generally celebrate the events of the life of Islams main prophet, Muhammad, especially the events surrounding the first hearing of the Kuran. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a branch of Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between philosophy (reason) and the religious teachings of Islam (faith). ... - - - Islam as a political movement has a diverse character that has at different times incorporated elements of many other political movements, while simultaneously adapting the religious views of Islamic fundamentalism, particularly the view of Islam as a political religion. ... In the history of science, Islamic science refers to the science developed under the Islamic civilisation between the 8th and 15th centuries (the Islamic Golden Age). ... The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world. ...

Islam & other religions
This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Christianity · Jainism
Judaism · Sikhism

See also
This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jainism and Islam came in close contact with each other following the Islamic Conquest from Central Asia and Persia in the seventh to the twelfth centuries when much of north and central India came under the rule of the Delhi Sultanate, and later the Mughal dynasty. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

Criticism of Islam · Islamophobia
Glossary of Islamic terms Criticism of Islam has existed since Islams formative stages on philosophical, scientific, ethical, political and theological grounds. ... It has been suggested that Persecution of Muslims be merged into this article or section. ... The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Islamic and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language. ...

Islam Portal

view
A series of articles on

Jesus Christ and Christianity
Chronology
Virgin Birth
MinistryMiraclesParables
Death and resurrection
Second Coming
Christology
Names and titles
Relics Image File history File links JesusYeshua. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Christ is the English term for the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... The chronology of Jesus depicts the traditional chronology established for the events of the life of Jesus by the four canonical gospels (which allude to various dates for several events). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... According to the Canonical Gospels, the Ministry of Jesus began when Jesus was around 30 years old, and lasted a period of 1-3 years, with the Synoptic Gospels generally being considered to argue for it having been a period of 1 year, and the Gospel of John arguing for... According to the canonical Gospels, Jesus worked many miracles in the course of his ministry. ... The parables of Jesus, found in the synoptic gospels, embody much of Jesus teaching. ... The death and resurrection of Jesus are two events in the New Testament in which Jesus is crucified on one day (the Day of Preparation, i. ... The Second Coming refers to the Christian and Islamic belief in the return of Jesus Christ, an event that will fulfill aspects of Messianic prophecy such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Christology is a field of study... A large variety of names and titles are used in the New Testament to describe Jesus. ... There are many relics attributed to Jesus that people believe or believed to be authentic relics of the Gospel accounts. ...

Cultural and Historical Background
AramaicGreekRace
Genealogy of Jesus This article — a part of the Jesus and history series of articles — discusses the cultural and historical background of Jesus, the central figure of Christianity, without regard to his divinity, or to his existence as an actual historical figure. ... Most scholars believe that Jesus primarily spoke Aramaic, with some Hebrew and Greek, although there is some debate in academia as to what degree. ... “Black Jesus” redirects here. ... Lukes genealogy of Jesus, from the Book of Kells transcribed by Celtic monks circa 800 The genealogy of Jesus through either one or both of his earthly parents (Mary and Joseph) is given by two passages from the Gospels, Matthew 1:2–16 and Luke 3:23–38. ...

Perspectives on Jesus
Biblical Jesus
Religious perspectives
ChristianJewishIslamic
Historicity • Non-historicity
Historical perspective
Mythographic perspective
This article presents a description of Jesus life, as based on the four gospels. ... Religious perspectives on Jesus is the specific significance some religions place on Jesus. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Judaism has no special or particular view of Jesus, and very few texts in Judaism directly refer to or take note of Jesus. ... This article is about the veracity of Jesus existence. ... The Jesus-Myth is a historical theory usually associated with a skeptical position on the historicity of Jesus, which claims that Jesus did not exist as an historical figure. ... This article is about Jesus the man, using historical methods to reconstruct a biography of his life and times. ... The study of Jesus from a mythographical perspective is the examination of the narrative of Jesus, the Christ (the Anointed) of the gospels, Christian theology and folk Christianity as a central part of Christian mythology. ...

Jesus in culture
Cultural depictions of Jesus
Images
Jesus has inspired artistic and cultural works for nearly two millennia. ... There are no undisputed historical images of Jesus; he sat for no portraits which are preserved and of unquestioned authenticity and undoubted provenance. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

Islam holds Jesus (Arabic: عيسى `Īsā) to have been a messenger and a prophet of God.[1] The Qur'an gives him the unique title of the Messiah.[2] According to the Qur'an, Jesus was one of God's most beloved messengers, a precursor to Muhammad,[3] and was sent to guide the Children of Israel.[4] The Qur'an tells of his miraculous birth to Mary (Arabic: Maryam), cites the miracles he performed by God's permission, and states that God raised him to His Presence. The Qur'an also alludes to Jesus's future return.[2] According to the traditional Muslim interpretation, the Qur'an also states that Jesus was not crucified and that God lifted him to heaven [2][5], and that he will return to Earth before the Day of Judgment and defeat the "Dajjal" and the enemies of Islam. For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Prophets of Islam are human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... Masih is the Arabic word for Messiah. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... The Children of Israel, or Bnei Yisrael (בני ישראל) in Hebrew (also Bnai Yisrael, Bnei Yisroel or Bene Israel) is a Biblical term for the Israelites. ... “Saint Mary” redirects here. ... Yawm al-QÄ«yāmah (Arabic: literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ... al-Dajjal sometimes spelled Dajal, (Arabic: الدّجّال, al-dajjāl) (The Deceiver/impostor), also known as the false Messiah (see also: Antichrist) is an evil figure in Islamic eschatology, who will appear before Yawm al-Qiyamah (The Day of Resurrection, Judgement Day). ...

Contents

Etymology

The Anglicized name of Jesus is derived from the Latin Iēsus, which in turn comes from the Greek Ἰησοῦς (Iēsoûs). Based on some strong evidences from the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, Western scholars are certain that Jesus's name was the Hebrew Yehōšua (יהושע) (Aramaic: Yēšua (ישוע)). Yehōšua (יהושע) originally meant "Yahweh helps," but was popularly understood to mean 'Yahweh saves'.[2] Yehōšua (יהושע) is the name by which Moses called his successor as leader of the Israelites, known in English as Joshua.[2] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible is a term that refers to the common portions of the Jewish canon and the Christian canons. ... Tetragrammaton redirects here. ... Tetragrammaton redirects here. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... “The Twelve Tribes” redirects here. ... Joshua, Jehoshuah or Yehoshua. ...


The Qur'anic reference as 'Isa has puzzled the Western scholars and several theories have been proposed:[2]

  • The first theory is that "y-sh-' , the Hebrew consonants of Yeshua, have been reversed for some cryptic reason to give 's-y, the Arabic consonants of `Īsā." In support of this theory it has been said that "in ancient Mesopotamia certain divine names were written in one way and pronounced in another; for example EN-ZU was read ZU-EN"[2]
  • Another theory is that "the Jews called Jesus "Esau" (Hebrew 'Esaw) out of hatred and that Muhammad learned this name from them not realizing that it was an insult." In support of this it is said that the Arabic Esau is written as 'Isu and this might have been changed to `Īsā to assimilate it to other qur'anic names ending in -ā. In opposition to this theory, it has been said that there is no evidence that the Jews ever called Jesus Esau. Further, Muhammad criticized Jews for insulting Jesus' mother [Qur'an 4:156] and that those Christians who were acquaintances of Muhammad would have corrected him had Muhammad not realized that it is a Jewish insult to Jesus.[2]
  • The other theory is that the Qur'an deliberately used the word `Īsā to assimilate it to Musa (Moses) because they were sometimes paired. This also occures in some modern languages, f. e. slovak (Ježiš - Mojžiš) or czech (Ježíš - Mojžíš). Other examples of assonant pairs include Ṭālūt-Ḏj̲ālūt (Saul and Goliath), Yād̲j̲ūdj-Mād̲j̲ūd̲j̲ (Gog and Magog), etc[2]
  • The last theory is that Christians in Arabia had coined the term `Īsā from the Syric forms of Yeshu or Ishu. The Arabic words that are borrowed from Aramaic or Syriac are often employed by 'ayn . Further the Manichaean fragments provide an evidence for dropping the final 'ayin of the borrowed Hebrew terms. But there is no evidence that the term `Īsā had been in use in pre-Islamic times. "There is however a monastery in Syria known as `Īsāniyya as early as 571 C.E."[2]

For other uses, see Mesopotamia (disambiguation). ... Esau (Hebrew ‎, Standard Hebrew Esav, Tiberian Hebrew Ēśāw) is the oldest son of Isaac and Rebekah and the twin brother of Jacob in the biblical Book of Genesis. ... Esau (Hebrew ‎, Standard Hebrew Esav, Tiberian Hebrew Ēśāw) is the oldest son of Isaac and Rebekah and the twin brother of Jacob in the biblical Book of Genesis. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Jahiliyyah or jahalia (Arabic: جاهلية) is an Islamic concept of ignorance of divine guidance or the state of ignorance of the guidance from God[1] referring to the condition Arabs found themselves in pre-Islamic Arabian society prior to the revelation of the Quran. ...

Life

Birth

Muslims believe in the virgin birth of Jesus through Mary, which is recounted throughout several passages in the Qur'an. In the Qur'anic story an angel appears before Mary to announce her the gift of a holy son. Mary is surprised and answers the angel that she is virgin. The angel replies "So (it will be): Thy Lord saith, 'that is easy for Me: and (We wish) to appoint him as a Sign unto men and a Mercy from Us':It is a matter (so) decreed...when He determines a matter, He only says to it, 'Be', and it is." ([Qur'an 19:21], [Qur'an 19:35]) The Qur'an rejects the idea that virgin birth implies that Jesus is divine - the example of Adam [Qur'an 3:59] is used in argument against such belief. Sahih Bukhari records that John was a cousin to Jesus.[6] Soon after his birth, Jesus speaks as an infant to defend Mary from accusations of adultery. Two others are noted to have spoken as infants.[7] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ...


Other relevant verses from the Qur'an:

And she (Mary) who guarded her chastity, so We breathed into her of Our Spirit and made her and her son a sign for the nations.

Qur'an[Qur'an 21:91]

Other references in hadith are: The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

When any human being is born. Satan touches him at both sides of the body with his two fingers, except Jesus, the son of Mary, whom Satan tried to touch but failed, for he touched the placenta-cover instead. Sahih Bukhari 4:54:506

The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ...

Mission

Muslims believe that God gave a Direct Revelation to Jesus, the Injil (derived from the Greek for Gospel), while also declaring the truth of the previous revelation, the Torah. Muslims believe that they have been misinterpreted, misrepresented, mistranslated, passed over, and/or textually distorted over time, and that even the earliest manuscripts discovered by archaeologists reflect these changes. Muslims believe that the New Testament no longer represents the original revelation, which the Qur'an calls a "Light", guidance, and a divine scripture ([Qur'an 5:45]). Direct Revelation is also known as “Dialogue Revelation” or “Revelation-Discourse”, where God or his angels communicates directly, in person, or by voice and impression or just by impression. ... The Injil (Arabic إنجيل , also transcribed Injeel) is one of the four Islamic Holy Books the Quran records as revealed by Allah - the others being the Zabur, Tawrat, and Quran. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... The Tawrat (Tawrah) is considered by Muslims to be the original divine revelation given to Moses and one of the three Divine Books revealed before the Quran, the other two being the Injil and Zabur. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...


Jesus is depicted in Islam as having been given miracles as evidence of his prophetic mission. Such miracles, all performed by the leave of God, include: speaking while still the cradle;[8] breathing life into clay models of birds;[9] curing a leper and a life-long blind man;[10] raising the dead;[10] and requesting the descent of a table from heaven upon which was a feast, upon petition of his disciples.[11][5]


Islamic view on his claimed death

Verses [Qur'an 3:55], [Qur'an 4:157], [Qur'an 5:117] and [Qur'an 19:33] of the Qur'an touch the issue of the death of Jesus. [12] According to verse the [Qur'an 4:157], the Jews sought to kill Jesus but they did not kill him nor crucify him but that it appeared so to them: [13] This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

And their saying: Surely we have killed the Messiah, Jesus son of Mary, the messenger of God; and they did not kill him nor did they crucify him, but it appeared to them so (like Jesus) and most surely those who differ therein are only in a doubt about it; they have no knowledge respecting it, but only follow a conjecture, and they killed him not for sure. Nay! God took him up to Himself; and God is Mighty, Wise.

Qur'an[Qur'an 4:157]

Muslim tradition completes the Qur'anic statement. According to some, God replaced Jesus with a double. Others say God transformed another person, probably Judas Iscariot or Simon of Cyrene, to appear exactly like Jesus in order to deceive the Romans and be crucified in Jesus' stead. [5] Some claim that this is evidence of Christian docetist theology influencing Islam at an early stage.[14] Some Muslim rationalists disagreed with this version of the story and proposed that after the authorities failed to arrest Jesus, they knowingly crucified another person. Being kept at a distances, the crowds were misled into thinking that the substitute was Jesus as Jesus's appearance was disfigured by the ordeal.[13] Another less well-known, but nonetheless widely held view (particularly in South Asia) is the so-called Swoon hypothesis: that Jesus didn't die on the cross, but merely fell unconscious, and was later revived in the tomb. The Muslim scholar Ahmed Deedat has been very influential in the spread of this view. [12] Finally, other Muslims notably Mahmoud Ayoub hold that the Qur'an does not in fact deny the crucifixion of Jesus: among other textual and theological arguments, it is argued that the above verse "belongs not to history but to theology in the broadest sense" (like the Qur'anic statement that Mary, mother of Jesus, was a sister of Aaron)[12][15] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other uses, see Judas. ... According to the Gospel of Mark (15:21-22), Matthew (27:32), and Luke (23:26) Simon of Cyrene (שמעון Hearkening; listening, Standard Hebrew Šimʿon, Tiberian Hebrew Šimʿôn) was compelled by the Romans to carry the cross of Jesus as... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... In Christianity, Docetism (from the Greek [dokeō], to seem) is the belief that Jesus physical body was an illusion, as was his crucifixion; that is, Jesus only seemed to have a physical body and to physically die, but in reality he was incorporeal, a pure spirit, and hence could not... The swoon hypothesis is a hypothesis which attempts to explain Jesus apparent resurrection from death described in the Gospels. ... Sheikh Ahmed Hussein Deedat (July 1, 1918 - August 8, 2005), was a Muslim scholar of Comparative religion, an author, lecturer, and an orator. ...


Muslims believe Jesus was raised to heaven alive by God This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ...


On the interpretation of those scholars who deny the crucifixion, the Encyclopedia of Islam writes:[5] The Encyclopedia of Islam (EI) is a scholarly encyclopedia covering all aspects of Islamic civilization and history. ...

The denial, furthermore, is in perfect agreement with the logic of the Qur’an. The Biblical stories reproduced in it (e.g., Job, Moses, Joseph etc.) and the episodes relating to the history of the beginning of Islam demonstrate that it is “God's practice” (sunnat Allah ) to make faith triumph finally over the forces of evil and adversity. “So truly with hardship comes ease”, (XCIV, 5, 6). For Jesus to die on the cross would have meant the triumph of his executioners; but the Quran asserts that they undoubtedly failed: “Assuredly God will defend those who believe”; (XXII, 49). He confounds the plots of the enemies of Christ (III, 54). Members Jay and John playing at the Ska Summit 2003. ...

On the interpretation of the minority of Muslims who accept the crucifixion, Mahmoud Ayoub, a professor of Islamic Studies and Comparative Religion states: Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... The Major religious groups of the world. ...

The Qur'an is not here speaking about a man, righteous and wronged though he may be, but about the Word of God who was sent to earth and returned to God. Thus the denial of killing of Jesus is a denial of the power of men to vanquish and destroy the divine Word, which is for ever victorious.[16]

Second coming

The neutrality of this section is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.
See also: Second Coming

Most Muslims believe that Jesus is alive in Heaven, and will return to Earth to defeat the Dajjal (Antichrist). But Islamic scholars like Javed Ahmed Ghamidi and Amin Ahsan Islahi question hadith regarding the second coming of Jesus, since, according to their interpretation and understanding, it seems to contradict many verses of the Qur'an.[17][18][19][20] Yusuf ibn Abd-al-Barr, an 11th century Maliki jurist, writes that there have been differences of opinion on this issue[21] and Sunnis accept the second coming through hadith by narrators who are of sound character.[22] Both views are discussed below: Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... The Second Coming refers to the Christian and Islamic belief in the return of Jesus Christ, an event that will fulfill aspects of Messianic prophecy such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God... al-Dajjal sometimes spelled Dajal, (Arabic: الدّجّال, al-dajjāl) (The Deceiver/impostor), also known as the false Messiah (see also: Antichrist) is an evil figure in Islamic eschatology, who will appear before Yawm al-Qiyamah (The Day of Resurrection, Judgement Day). ... Revelation 13:16-18 And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast... Islamic studies scholars or simply Islamic scholars are both Muslim and non-Muslim scholars who work in one or more fields of Islamic studies. ... Javed Ahmed Ghamidi (Urdu: جاوید احمد غامدی) (b. ... Amin Ahsan Islahi (1904–1997) was an Indian/Pakistani exegete of the Quran , who became famous for his Urdu exegeses of Quran, Tadabbur-i-Qur’an—an exegesis that he based on Hamiduddin Farahis (1863-1930) idea of thematic and structural coherence in the Quran. ... The Second Coming refers to the Christian and Islamic belief in the return of Jesus Christ, an event that will fulfill aspects of Messianic prophecy such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God... Yusuf ibn Abd-Allah, known as Ibn Abd-al-Barr [1] (463/1070) [2] (b. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... This page deals with Islamic thought. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Qur'an

In the following verses, refuters of Jesus' return translate the verb “mutavafika” (متوفيك) as the physical death of Jesus before ascension of his body while proponents translate it as the termination of Jesus' period on earth. Ali ibn Abu Talha, a Tabi‘in, has also reported that `Abd Allah ibn `Abbas said: Mutawaffika connotes Mumayyituka (I am going to give you death).[23] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Ali bin Abu Talha was a well known Muslim tabii and muhaddith (transmitter of Prophetic traditions), particularly from Abdullah ibn Abbas. ... The Tābi‘īn (Arabic: ‎ Followers) are the generation of Muslims who were born after the death of Muhammad but who were contemporary of the Sahaba Companions. As such they played an important part in the development of Islamic thought and philosophy, and in the political development of the early... Abd-Allah ibn Abbas (Arabic: عبد الله ابن عباس ) was a cousin of the Prophet Muhammad. ...

And when Allah said: O Jesus, I am going to terminate the period (or give you death or take you back) and cause you to ascend unto Me and purify you of those who disbelieve and make those who follow you above those who disbelieve to the day of resurrection; then to Me shall be your return, so l will decide between you concerning that in which you differed.[Qur'an 3:55] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

Refuters believe that the pronoun "him" in the following verse points to Muhammad while others believe that "him" points to Jesus. Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari has mentioned three possible interpretations of the verse; firstly, all the People of the Book will believe in Jesus before his death; secondly, all the People of the Book will believe in Jesus before their own deaths, and thirdly, all the People of the Book will believe in Muhammad before their deaths.[24] Yusuf ibn Abd-al-Barr in his book Al-Tamhid has said that Imam Tabari opined that the verse is specific for the People of the Book of the times of Jesus and not for the People of the Book of all times.[25] Amin Ahsan Islahi, however interprets that, everyone from among the People of the Book would believe in the Qur’an before Muhammad’s death.[20] Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Balamis 14th century Persian version of Universal History by al-Tabari Abu Jafar Muhammad ibn Jarir at-Tabari 838–923 (father of Jafar, named Muhammad, son of Jarir from the province of Tabaristan, Arabic الطبري), was an author from Persia, one of the earliest, most prominent and famous Persian... The term People of the Book (Hebrew עם הספר, Am HaSefer) is used in Judaism where it refers specifically to the Jewish people and the Torah. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Yusuf ibn Abd-Allah, known as Ibn Abd-al-Barr [1] (463/1070) [2] (b. ... Balamis 14th century Persian version of Universal History by al-Tabari Abu Jafar Muhammad ibn Jarir at-Tabari 838–923 (father of Jafar, named Muhammad, son of Jarir from the province of Tabaristan, Arabic الطبري), was an author from Persia, one of the earliest, most prominent and famous Persian... Amin Ahsan Islahi (1904–1997) was an Indian/Pakistani exegete of the Quran , who became famous for his Urdu exegeses of Quran, Tadabbur-i-Qur’an—an exegesis that he based on Hamiduddin Farahis (1863-1930) idea of thematic and structural coherence in the Quran. ...

And there is not one of the People of the Book but most certainly believes in this before his death, and on the day of resurrection he shall be a witness against them.[Qur'an 4:159] The term People of the Book (Hebrew עם הספר, Am HaSefer) is used in Judaism where it refers specifically to the Jewish people and the Torah. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

Refuters argue that Jesus' ignorance of his deification on day of judgement shows that he will not come back after his ascension.[26] Traditionally, this verse hasn't been looked at from this angle. This article or section should be merged with End times and Last judgment The Last Judgement - Tympanum sculpture at the Abbey Church of Ste-Foy, Conques-en-Rouergue, France In Christian eschatology, the Last Judgement is the ethical-judicial trial, judgement, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to heaven...

And when Allah will say: O Jesus son of Mary! did you say to men, Take me and my mother for two gods besides Allah he will say: Glory be to Thee, it did not befit me that I should say what I had no right to (say); if I had said it, Thou wouldst indeed have known it; Thou knowest what is in my mind, and I do not know what is in Thy mind, surely Thou art the great Knower of the unseen things. I did not say to them aught save what Thou didst enjoin me with: That serve Allah, my Lord and your Lord, and I was a witness of them so long as I was among them, but when Thou didst cause me to die, Thou wert the watcher over them, and Thou art witness of all things.[Qur'an 5:116] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

While commenting on following verse, Geoffrey Parrinder observes that there is no futurity in the grammar of the Qur’an to suggest a post-millennial death. The plain meaning seems to be his physical death at the end of his present human life on earth.[27] However, proponents believe that the day of Jesus' rise would be when he will come again. Geoffrey Parrinder (April 10, 1910–June 16, 2005), was a professor of comparative religion at Kings College London, Methodist minister, and author of over thirty books. ... This article is about the tv programme Life on Earth. ...

And peace on me (Jesus) on the day I was born, and on the day I die, and on the day I am raised to life.[Qur'an 19:33] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

Refuters argue that the following verse is for present tense rather than future tense and he was a sign of the Judgement day for the direct addressees of the Qur'an.[18] Proponents translate it for future tense and argue that after his second coming, he will be a sign for day of judgement. The present tense is the tense (form of a verb) that is often used to express: Action at the present time A state of being A habitual action An occurrence in the near future An action that occurred in the past and continues up to the present There are two... It has been suggested that Future perfect tense be merged into this article or section. ... The term Judgement Day may refer to: The Last Judgement; the ethical-judicial trial, judgement, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to Heaven or to Hell) by a divine tribunal at the end of time. ...

And most surely he (Jesus) is a sign of the hour (Judgement day), therefore have no doubt about it and follow me: this is the right path.

Hadith

Most Muslims believe that Jesus will descend before the Day of Judgment and will slay al-Masīh al-Dajjāl (literally "the Deceiving Messiah," loosely the Antichrist; often referred to simply as "Dajjāl") at the Gate of Ludd in Palestine, They also believe that he will marry, die and be buried in the Masjid al Nabawi. During his life, he will have revealed that Islam is the true religion of God. Most Muslims give these hadith as proof of Jesus' second coming: This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... al-Dajjal sometimes spelled Dajal, (Arabic: الدّجّال, al-dajjāl) (The Deceiver/impostor), also known as the false Messiah (see also: Antichrist) is an evil figure in Islamic eschatology, who will appear before Yawm al-Qiyamah (The Day of Resurrection, Judgement Day). ... Revelation 13:16-18 And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast... al-Dajjal (Arabic: الدّجّال, al-dajjāl) (The Deceiver/impostor) is an evil figure in Islamic eschatology, who will appear before Yawm al-Qiyamah (Resurrection Day). ... Downtown area of Lod Lod (Hebrew לוֹד; Arabic اَلْلُدّْ al-Ludd, Greco-Latin Lydda, Tiberian Hebrew לֹד Lōḏ) is a city in the Center District of Israel in Israel. ... The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old Kingdoms of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi... Masjid al-Nabawi (Mosque of the Prophet), Medina Masjid al-Nabawi or Mosque of the Prophet is the second holiest mosque in the Islamic world. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

  • Narrated Abu Huraira: Allah's Apostle said, "The Hour will not be established until the son of Mary (i.e. Jesus) descends amongst you as a just ruler, he will break the cross, kill the pigs, and abolish the Jizya tax. Money will be in abundance so that nobody will accept it (as charitable gifts)." Sahih Bukhari 3:43:656
  • Abu Huraira reported Allah's Messenger (may peace be upon him) as saying: "The Last Hour would not come until ... the time of prayer shall come and then Jesus (peace be upon him) son of Mary would descend and would lead them in prayer..." Sahih Muslim 041:6924
  • Hudhaifa b. Usaid Ghifari reported: Allah's Messenger (may peace be upon him) came to us all of a sudden as we were (busy in a discussion). He said: What do you discuss about? They (the Companions) said. We are discussing about the Last Hour. Thereupon he said: It will not come until you see ten signs before and (in this connection) he made a mention of the smoke, Dajjal, the beast, the rising of the sun from the west, the descent of Jesus son of Mary (Allah be pleased with him), the Gog and Magog, and land-slidings in three places, one in the east, one in the west and one in Arabia at the end of which fire would burn forth from the Yemen, and would drive people to the place of their assembly. Sahih Muslim 041:6931
  • Also similar hadith in Sahih Muslim 041:6932,Sahih Muslim 041:6933,Sahih Muslim 041:6934
  • "...He would then call (that young man) and he will come forward laughing with his face gleaming (with happiness) and it would at this very time that Allah would send Christ, son of Mary, and he will descend at the white minaret in the eastern side of Damscus wearing two garments lightly dyed with saffron and placing his hands on the wings of two Angels..." Sahih Muslim 041:7015
  • "...and Allah would then send Jesus son of Mary who would resemble 'Urwa b Mas'ud. He (Jesus Christ) would chase him and kill him. ..." Sahih Muslim 041:7023
  • Narrated Abu Hurairah: The Prophet (peace be upon him) said: There is no prophet between me and him, that is, Jesus (peace be upon him). He will descend (to the earth). When you see him, recognise him: a man of medium height, reddish fair, wearing two light yellow garments, looking as if drops were falling down from his head though it will not be wet. He will fight for the cause of Islam. He will break the cross, kill swine and abolish jizyah. Allah will cause all religions except Islam to perish. He will destroy the Antichrist and will live on the earth for forty years and then he will die. The Muslims will pray over him. Sunnan Abu Dawud 37:4310
  • How will you be when the son of Mary descends amongst you and he will judge people by the Law of the Qur'an and not by the Law of the Gospel. Sahih Bukhari 4:55:658

However, refuters of Jesus' return question many hadith including those in Sahih Bukhari and argue that as this event (if happens) would be an extra-ordinary event and still not discussed in the first book of hadith, Muwatta by Imam Malik.[19] The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, á¹£aḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, á¹£aḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, á¹£aḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, á¹£aḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, á¹£aḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, á¹£aḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... Sahih Muslim (Arabic: صحيح مسلم, á¹£aḥīḥ muslim) is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Imam Muslim. ... `Abd al-Rahman ibn Sakhr Al-Azdi (Arabic: ‎) (d. ... In Islamic law, jizyah (Arabic: جزْية) is a per capita tax required of adult males of other faiths under Muslim rule in exchange for the protection of the Muslim community. ... Sunan Abu Daud is one of the Sunni Six Major Hadith collections , collected by Abu Daud. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... The Muwatta is a collection of hadith of the Muhammad that form the basis for the jurisprudence of the Maliki school. ... Malik ibn Anas ibn Malik ibn Amr (714 - 796) was one of the most highly respected scholars of fiqh in the Sunni sect of Islam. ...


In Islamic thought

Jesus is described by various means in the Qur'an. The most common reference to Jesus occurs in the form of "Ibn Maryam" (son of Mary), sometimes preceded with another title. Jesus is also recognised as a prophet (nabī) and messenger (rasūl) of God. The terms wadjih ("worthy of esteem in this world and the next"), mubārak ("blessed", or "a source of benefit for others"), `abd-Allāh (servant of God) are all used in the Qur'an in reference to Jesus.[5] Nabi can refer to the Arabic and Hebrew word for Prophet the Korean word for butterfly one of the Nabis, a group of artists in Paris in the 1890s the 2005 Typhoon Nabi North American Bus Industries, a major transit bus manufacturing company Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, a Biopharmaceutical company based in... In Islam, a rasul ( رسول) (Arabic: messenger, plural rusul) is a prophet sent by God (Allah in Arabic) with a revelation. ...


Another title frequently mentioned in the al-Masīḥ, which translates to "the Messiah." This does not correspond to the Christian concept of Messiah, as Islam regards all prophets, including Jesus, to be normal men without any share in divinity. Muslim exegetes explain the use of the word masīh in the Qur'an as referring to Jesus' status as the one anointed by means of blessings and honors; or as the one who helped cure the sick, by anointing the eyes of the blind, for example.[5] Qur'anic verses also employ the term "kalimatullah" (meaning the "word of God") as a descriptor of Jesus, which is interpreted as a reference to the creating word of God, uttered at the moment of Jesus' conception;[28] or as recognition of Jesus' status as a messenger of God, speaking on God's behalf.[5] Masih is the Arabic word for Messiah. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Arabic: ,  ; Aramaic:  ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Arabic: ,  ; Aramaic:  ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ...


Theology

Muslim understanding of the Trinity rejects the mainstream Christian view that Jesus was the Son of God, regarding belief in the Trinity as a blasphemous denial of tawhid (monotheism). The Qur'an states repeatedly that Jesus was only a human. Muslims do not believe 'Isa (Jesus) is God (in Arabic: Allah), nor that he was the "begotten" Son of God but rather only a man. The mainstream Christian belief, however, is that Jesus is the begotten, divine Son of God. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Christian views of Jesus. ... This article or section contains too many quotations for an encyclopedic entry. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the Celtic Frost album, see Monotheist (album) In theology, monotheism (from Greek one and god) is the belief in the existence of one deity or God, or in the oneness of God. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Son of God is...


The Qur'an asserts that Jesus was a righteous Prophet and that he had a special relationship with God. Also, the Qur'an rejects the use of the word "begotten" when used to describe this special relationship Jesus had with God. "Begetting" is, by definition, having an offspring with characteristics of the parent. The Qur'an view such an act as undignifying to the majesty of God and an act of polytheism. The Qur'an also asserts that Allah is the Judge, that He does not die, thus no son is needed to carry out his work as He will not grow old nor die.[29] Polytheism is belief in or worship of multiple gods or deities. ...

And they say: Allah has taken to himself a son. Glory be to Him; rather, whatever is in the heavens and the earth is His; all are obedient to Him.

Qur'an[Qur'an 2:116]

The Qur'an asserts that Jesus was only a Prophet of God (not God himself) who worshipped God and taught his followers to do the same. The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

O followers of the Book! do not exceed the limits in your religion, and do not speak (lies) against Allah, but (speak) the truth; the Messiah, Jesus son of Mary is only a messenger of Allah and His Word which He communicated to Mary and a spirit from Him; believe therefore in Allah and His messengers, and say not, "Trinity". Desist, it is better for you; Allah is only one Allah; far be It from His glory that He should have a son, whatever is in the heavens and whatever is in the earth is His, and Allah is sufficient for a Protector.

Qur'an[Qur'an 4:171]

The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

Minor beliefs

The quotes attributed to Muhammad (Hadith) contain additional information about Jesus. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

  • There were no prophets between Jesus and Muhammad.[30]
  • Muhammad describes Jesus as he appeared in a dream, and during Muhammad's ascension to Heaven. Jesus is medium in height with a red complexion and long, brown hair.[31]
  • On one occasion, when he witnessed a man stealing who denied it by swearing to God, Jesus suspected his eyes rather than disbelieve his oath.[32]
  • In one narration, sins of several prophets are mentioned but nothing is mentioned of Jesus' sins.[33]
  • John was a cousin to Jesus.[34]

Isra is an Arabic word referring to what Muslims regard as Muhammads miraculous night journey from Mecca to Jerusalem - specifically, to the site of Masjid al-Aqsa - alluded to in Surat Al-Isra 1: سبحان الذي أسرى ب&#1593... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ...

References to Jesus in the Qur'an

Meccan period

The widespread consensus is that the following verses were revealed in Mecca:[2]

Medinan period

The list of verse belonging revealed in Medina are as follows:[2] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

See also

This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Prophets of Islam are human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... The Virgin Mary is a loved and admired by Muslims. ... Itmām al-hujjah (Arabic completion of proof, from completion, realization and pretext, proof) is an Islamic term, which is used when the unveiling of truth by a Messenger of God to his addressees occurs to the extent that the addressees have no excuse but stubbornness and enmity to deny... Marcus Aurelius and members of the Imperial family offer sacrifice in gratitude for success against Germanic tribes: contemporary bas-relief, Capitoline Museum, Rome For other uses, see Sacrifice (disambiguation). ... Islamic eschatology is concerned with the Qiyamah (end of the world; Last Judgement) and the final judgement of humanity. ... The Gospel of Barnabas is a work purporting to be a depiction of the life of Jesus by his disciple Barnabas. ... The Infancy Gospel of Thomas is a non-canonical Christian text that was part of a popular genre of the 2nd and 3rd centuries— a miracle literature of Infancy gospels that was both entertaining and inspirational, written to satisfy a hunger for more miraculous and anecdotal stories of the childhood... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jesus through Shiite Narrations is a collection of hadith about the Islamic view of Jesus, collected by Mahdi Muntazir Qaim. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The concept of prophecy in Islam is broader than Judaism and Christianity since Muslims distinguish between "messengers" (ar: rasul) and "prophets" (ar: nabi). Unlike prophets, messengers are given a message/scripture (ar: risalah) in book form. All messengers are prophets but not vice versa) cf John Esposito (2002), p. 12, see also Itmam al-hujjah
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Encyclopedia of the Qur'an, Jesus
  3. ^ [Qur'an 61:6]
  4. ^ The Oxford Dictionary of Islam, p.158
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Isa", Encyclopedia of Islam
  6. ^ Sahih Bukhari 4:55:640
  7. ^ Sahih Bukhari 4:55:645
  8. ^ [Qur'an 19:30]
  9. ^ [Qur'an 3:43]
  10. ^ a b [Qur'an 5:110]
  11. ^ [Qur'an 5:111]
  12. ^ a b c Did Jesus Die, Joseph L. Cumming, Yale University
  13. ^ a b Neal Robinson, Crucifixion, Encyclopedia of the Qur'an
  14. ^ A History Of The Church, by Philip Hughes. Retrieved on 27 August 2007.
  15. ^ M.M. Ayoub, Towards an Islamic Christology. II: The death of Jesus, reality or delusion, The Muslim World journal, 70 (1980), 91-121
  16. ^ The death of Jesus: Reality or Delusion (Muslim World 70 (1980) pp. 91-121)
  17. ^ Geoffrey Parrinder, Jesus in the Quran, p.121, Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 1996. ISBN 1-85168-094-2
  18. ^ a b Javed Ahmed Ghamidi, Qur'anic Verse regarding Second Coming of Jesus.
  19. ^ a b Tariq Hashmi. The Second Coming of Jesus. Renaissance - Monthly Islamic Journal, 14(9). September 2004.
  20. ^ a b Islahi, Amin. Tadabbur-i-Qur’an, 1st, Lahore: Faran Foundation. OCLC 60341215.  vol.2, p.423
  21. ^ Yusuf ibn Abd-al-Barr, Al-Istidhkar, Ist ed., vol. 26, (Cairo: Daru’l-Wa‘i Halb, 1993), p. 235
  22. ^ Yusuf ibn Abd-al-Barr, Al-Istidhkar, Ist ed., vol. 26, (Cairo: Darul Wa‘i Halb, 1993), p. 236
  23. ^ Yusuf ibn Abd-al-Barr, Al-Tamhid, vol. 14, (Maktabah Al-Mu’id), p. 203
  24. ^ Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari, 1st ed., vol. 6, (Beirut: Dar Ahya al-Turath al- ‘Arabi, 2001), pp. 24-8
  25. ^ Yusuf ibn Abd-al-Barr, Al-Tamhid, vol.14, (Maktabah Al-Mu‘id), p. 205
  26. ^ Jhangeer Hanif. Why would Jesus come back?, Al-Mawrid
  27. ^ Geoffrey Parrinder, Jesus in the Quran, p.105, Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 1996. ISBN 1-85168-094-2
  28. ^ "She said: "O my Lord! How shall I have a son when no man hath touched me?" He said: "Even so: Allah createth what He willeth: When He hath decreed a plan, He but saith to it, 'Be,' and it is!" - [Qur'an 3:47], cf. Encyclopedia of Islam
  29. ^ Encyclopedia of Islam, "Isa" article
  30. ^ 4.55.651
  31. ^ 4:55:649, 4:55:650, and 4:55:607
  32. ^ Sahih Bukhari 4.55.653
  33. ^ Sahih Bukhari 6.60.3
  34. ^ Sahih Bukhari 4.55.640

In Islam, a rasul ( رسول) (Arabic: messenger, plural rusul) is a prophet sent by God (Allah in Arabic) with a revelation. ... Nabi can refer to the Arabic and Hebrew word for Prophet the Korean word for butterfly one of the Nabis, a group of artists in Paris in the 1890s the 2005 Typhoon Nabi North American Bus Industries, a major transit bus manufacturing company Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, a Biopharmaceutical company based in... Risalah is the Arabic word for message or (postal) letter. ... Professor John Esposito John Louis Esposito (born 19 May 1940, Brooklyn, New York City) is a professor of International Affairs and Islamic Studies at Georgetown University. ... Itmām al-hujjah (Arabic completion of proof, from completion, realization and pretext, proof) is an Islamic term, which is used when the unveiling of truth by a Messenger of God to his addressees occurs to the extent that the addressees have no excuse but stubbornness and enmity to deny... Encyclopedia of Quran (EQ) is an scholarly work published by Brill Academic Publishers. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Oxford Dictionary of Islam is a dictionary of Islam, with John Esposito as editor-in-chief. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ... Geoffrey Parrinder (April 10, 1910–June 16, 2005), was a professor of comparative religion at Kings College London, Methodist minister, and author of over thirty books. ... Javed Ahmed Ghamidi (Urdu: جاوید احمد غامدی) (b. ... Al-Mawrid is an Islamic research institute in Lahore, Pakistan founded in 1983 and then re-established in 1991. ... Amin Ahsan Islahi (1904–1997) was an Indian/Pakistani exegete of the Quran , who became famous for his Urdu exegeses of Quran, Tadabbur-i-Qur’an—an exegesis that he based on Hamiduddin Farahis (1863-1930) idea of thematic and structural coherence in the Quran. ... Tadabbur-i-Qur’an is a tafsir (exegeses) of the Quran by Amin Ahsan Islahi based on the concept of thematic and structural coherence, which was originally inspired by Allama Hamiduddin Farahi. ...   (Urdu: لاہور, Punjabi: لہور, pronounced ) is the capital of the province of Punjab, and is the second most densely populated city in Pakistan. ... OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ... Yusuf ibn Abd-Allah, known as Ibn Abd-al-Barr [1] (463/1070) [2] (b. ... Yusuf ibn Abd-Allah, known as Ibn Abd-al-Barr [1] (463/1070) [2] (b. ... Yusuf ibn Abd-Allah, known as Ibn Abd-al-Barr [1] (463/1070) [2] (b. ... Balamis 14th century Persian version of Universal History by al-Tabari Abu Jafar Muhammad ibn Jarir at-Tabari 838–923 (father of Jafar, named Muhammad, son of Jarir from the province of Tabaristan, Arabic الطبري), was an author from Persia, one of the earliest, most prominent and famous Persian... Yusuf ibn Abd-Allah, known as Ibn Abd-al-Barr [1] (463/1070) [2] (b. ... Al-Mawrid is an Islamic research institute in Lahore, Pakistan founded in 1983 and then re-established in 1991. ... Geoffrey Parrinder (April 10, 1910–June 16, 2005), was a professor of comparative religion at Kings College London, Methodist minister, and author of over thirty books. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Alcoran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ... The authentic collection (Arabic: الجامع الصحيح, al-Jaami al-Sahih [1]) or popularly al-Bukharis authentic (Arabic: صحيح البخاري, Sahih al-Bukhari) is one of the Sunni six major Hadith collections (Hadith are oral traditions recounting events in the lives of the Islamic prophet Muhammad ). Sunni view this as their most trusted collection. ...

References

  • John L Esposito (2002). What Everyone Needs to Know About Islam. Oxford University Press US. ISBN 0-19-515713-3. 

Professor John Esposito John Louis Esposito (born 19 May 1940, Brooklyn, New York City) is a professor of International Affairs and Islamic Studies at Georgetown University. ...

External links

Prophets of Islam in the Qur'an
Adam Idris Nuh Hud Saleh Ibrahim Lut Ismail Is'haq Yaqub Yusuf Ayub
آدم ادريس نوح هود صالح إبراهيم لوط اسماعيل اسحاق يعقوب يوسف أيوب
Adam Enoch Noah Eber Shelah Abraham Lot Ishmael Isaac Jacob Joseph Job

Shoaib Musa Harun Dhul-Kifl Daud Sulayman Ilyas Al-Yasa Yunus Zakariya Yahya Isa Muhammad
شعيب موسى هارون ذو الكفل داود سليمان إلياس اليسع يونس زكريا يحيى عيسى محمد
Jethro Moses Aaron Ezekiel David Solomon Elijah Elisha Jonah Zechariah John Jesus
v  d  e

  Results from FactBites:
 
Isa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1649 words)
The understanding of Jesus in Islam is very unlike the mainstream Jewish tradition, in which he is regarded as a false Messiah, and the Mandean religion (which views John the Baptist as the faithful one, and Jesus as a trickster).
Jesus' message to mankind was originally the same as all of the other prophets, from Adam to Muhammad, but has been distorted by those who claim to be its adherents.
Jesus is alive in heaven and will return to the world in the flesh with Imam Mahdi to defeat the dajjal ("the deceiver", anti-Christ in Islamic belief), once the world has become filled with injustice.
Islamic eschatology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (687 words)
Islamic eschatology is concerned with the Qiyamah (end of the world; Last Judgement) and the final judgement of humanity.
According to the Islamic view Jesus (Isa, in Arabic) is not the Son of God, but was a very important prophet and will become the messiah.
Islamic descriptions of Jannah (Heaven) are couched in the language of physical pleasure, sometimes interpreted literally, sometimes allegorically.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m