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Encyclopedia > Isernia
Comune di Isernia
Coat of arms of Comune di Isernia
Municipal coat of arms
Country Italy Italy
Region Molise
Province Isernia (IS)
Mayor Avv. Gabriele Melogli
Elevation 423 m
Area 68.74 km²
Population
 - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 21,500
 - Density 313/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 41°36′N 14°14′E
Gentilic Isernini
Dialing code 0865
Postal code 86170
Frazioni Acquazolfa, Bazzoffie, Breccelle, Capruccia, Castagna, Castelromano, Colle de' Cioffi, Colle Martino, Colle Pagano, Collecroci, Conocchia, Coppolicchio, Fragnete, Marini, Salietto, Valgianese
Patron Saint Pope Celestine V
 - Day May 19
Website: www.comune.isernia.it

Isernia (Latin: Aesernia or, in Pliny and later writers, Eserninus, or in the Antonine Itinerary, Serni; Greek: Αἰσερνία) is a town and comune in the southern Italian region of Molise, and the capital of Isernia province. Isernia is a flourishing center of pasta makers, stone masons, and embroidery crafts. Image File history File links Isernia-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Molise is a region of central Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... In Italy, the province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of an intermediate level, between municipality (comune) and region (Regione). ... Isernia (It. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... Saint Celestine V, né Pietro Angelerio (according to some sources Angelario or Angelieri or Angelliero or Angeleri), also known as Pietro del Morrone (1215 – May 19, 1296) was Pope in the year 1294. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19c portrait. ... The Antonine Itinerary is a Latin document that can be described as the Road Map of Roman Britain. ... In Italy, the comune, (plural comuni) is the basic administrative unit of both provinces and regions, and may be properly approximated in casual speech by the English word township or municipality. ... Molise is a region of central Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... Isernia (It. ...

Contents

Geography

Situated on a rocky crest rising from 350 m to 475 m between the Carpino and the Sordo rivers, the plan of Isernia still reflects the ancient layout of the Roman town, with a central wide street, the cardo maximus, still represented by Corso Marcelli, and side streets at right angles on both sides. metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ... Carpino, a small village of the Italian Gargano region, has tied its name to the rebirth of the traditional popular music of Gargano as an artistic value to preserve and study. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


The commune of Isernia includes 16 frazioni. The most densely populated is Castelromano which is positioned in a plain at the base of the La Romana mount (862 m), 5 km far from Isernia. A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ...


History

Isernia in a vintage photo.
Isernia in a vintage photo.

The area of Isernia was settled at least 700,000 years ago: the nearby site called Pineta has been cited in the magazine Science as the most ancient site where traces of use of fire by men have been found. Image File history File links Isernia. ... Image File history File links Isernia. ... Science, the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), is one of the worlds most prestigious scientific publications. ...


The city's Roman name, Aesernia, reflects probably a former Samnite toponym, but a connection to an Indo-European root, aeser, which means "water", is tenuous. Samnite warriors Samnium (Oscan Safinim) was a region of the southern Apennines in Italy that was home to the Samnites, a group of Sabellic tribes that controlled the area from about 600 BC to about 290 BC. Samnium was delimited by Latium in the north, by Lucania in the south... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages. ...


Classical Aesernia was a city of Samnium, included within the territory of the Pentri tribe, situated in the valley of the Vulturnus (modern Volturno), on a small stream flowing into that river, and distant 22 km from Venafrum (modern Venafro). The Itinerary (in which the name is written "Serni") places it on the road from Aufidena to Bovianum, at the distance of 28 M.P. from the former, and 18 from the latter; but the former number is corrupt, as are the distances in the Tabula Peutingeriana. (Itin. Ant. p. 102; Tab. Peut.; Plin. iii. 12. 17; Ptol. iii. 1. § 67; Sil. Ital. viii. 568.) Samnite warriors Samnium (Oscan Safinim) was a region of the southern Apennines in Italy that was home to the Samnites, a group of Sabellic tribes that controlled the area from about 600 BC to about 290 BC. Samnium was delimited by Latium in the north, by Lucania in the south... The Pentri (Greek: ) were a tribe of the Samnites, and apparently one of the most important of the subdivisions of that nation. ... The Volturno is a river in south-central Italy. ... Venafro is a medium-sized town on the South of Italy, in the province of Isernia, region of Molise. ... Castel di Sangro is a city of 5. ... Two cities of ancient Italy were named Bovianum, both in Samnium: Bovianum Undecumanorum, now Boiano Bovianum Vetus, a colonia of uncertain location, sometimes (erroneously, according to the OCD), identified with Pietrabbondante This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The Tabula Peutingeriana (Peutinger table) is a map showing the road network in the Roman Empire. ... A medieval artists rendition of Claudius Ptolemaeus Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: ; c. ... Silius Italicus, in full Titus Catius Silius Italicus (AD 25 or 26 - 101), was a Latin epic poet. ...


The first mention of it in history occurs in 295 BCE, at which time it had already fallen into the hands of the Romans, together with the whole valley of the Vulturnus. (Livy x. 31.) After the complete subjugation of the Samnites, a colony, with Latin rights (colonia Latina) was settled there by the Romans in 264 BCE the city, a key communication center between southern Italy and the inner Appennine Regions. This colony is again mentioned in 209 BCE as one of the eighteen which remained faithful to Rome at the most trying period of the Second Punic War. (Liv. Epit. xvi. xxvii. 10; Vell. Pat. i. 14.) During the Social War it adhered to the Roman cause, and was gallantly defended against the Samnite general Vettius Cato, by Marcus Claudius Marcellus, nor was it till after a long protracted siege that it was compelled by famine to surrender, 90 BCE. Henceforth it continued in the hands of the confederates; and at a later period of the contest afforded a shelter to the Samnite leader, Papius Mutilus, after his defeat by Lucius Cornelius Sulla. It even became for a time, after the successive fall of Corfinium (modern (Corfinio) and Bovianum, the headquarters of the Italic League. (Liv. Epit. lxxii, lxxiii.; Appian B.C. i. 41, 51; Diod. xxxvii. Exc. Phot. p. 539; Sisenna ap. Nonium, p. 70.) At this time it was evidently a place of importance and a strong fortress, but it was so severely punished for its defection by Sulla after the final defeat of the Samnites in 84 BCE, that Strabo speaks of it as in his time utterly deserted. (Strab. v. p. 238, 250.) (Redirected from 295 BCE) Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 300 BC 299 BC 298 BC 297 BC 296 BC 295 BC 294... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ... Samnite warriors Samnium (Oscan Safinim) was a region of the southern Apennines in Italy that was home to the Samnites, a group of Sabellic tribes that controlled the area from about 600 BC to about 290 BC. Samnium was delimited by Latium in the north, by Lucania in the south... (Redirected from 264 BCE) Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC - 260s BC - 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC Years: 269 BC 268 BC 267 BC 266 BC 265 BC - 264 BC... (Redirected from 209 BCE) Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC Years: 214 BC 213 BC 212 BC 211 BC 210 BC - 209 BC... Combatants Roman Republic Carthage Commanders Publius Cornelius Scipio†, Tiberius Sempronius Longus Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus, Gaius Flaminius†, Fabius Maximus, Claudius Marcellus†, Lucius Aemilius Paullus†, Gaius Terentius Varro, Marcus Livius Salinator, Gaius Claudius Nero, Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio Calvus†, Masinissa, Minucius+, Geminus+, Regulus+ Hannibal Barca, Hasdrubal Barca†, Mago Barca†, Hasdrubal Gisco†, Maharbal... Template:Campaignbox Social War This article is about the conflict between Rome and her allies between 91 and 88 BC The Social War (also called the Italian War or the Marsic War, Social come from Socii meaning ¨Allies¨) was a war from 91 – 88 BC between the Roman Republic and... Marcus Claudius Marcellus (c. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC - 90s BC - 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC Years: 95 BC 94 BC 93 BC 92 BC 91 BC - 90 BC - 89 BC 88 BC 87... Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (Latin: L·CORNELIVS·L·F·P·N·SVLLA·FELIX)[1] ( 138 BC–78 BC) Roman general and dictator, was usually known simply as Sulla. ... Corfinio is a comune and town in the Province of LAquila in the Abruzzo region of Italy Abruzzo · Communes of the province of LAquila Categories: | ... Appian (c. ... Diodorus Siculus was a Greek historian, born at Agyrium in Sicily (now called Agira, in the province of Enna). ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC - 80s BC - 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC Years: 89 BC 88 BC 87 BC 86 BC 85 BC - 84 BC - 83 BC 82 BC 81... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ...


We learn, however, that a colony was sent there by Julius Caesar, and again by Augustus; but apparently with little success, on which account it was recolonized under Nero. It never, however, enjoyed the rank of a colony, but appears from inscriptions to have been a municipal town of some importance in the time of Trajan and the Antonines. To this period belong the remains of an aqueduct and a fine Roman bridge, still visible; while the lower parts of the modern walls present considerable portions of polygonal construction, which may be assigned either to the ancient Samnite city, or to the first Roman colony. The modern city is still the see of a bishop. (Lib. Colon. pp. 233, 260; Zumpt, de Coloniis, pp. 307, 360, 392; Inscrr. ap. Romanelli, vol. ii. pp. 470, 471; Craven's Abruzzi, vol. ii. p. 83; Hoare's Classical Tour, vol. i. p. 227.) The massively constructed podium now unlying the cathedral probably supported the Capitolium. Gāius JÅ«lius Caesar (IPA: ;[1]), July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Augustus (Latin: IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS;[1] September 23, 63 BC–August 19, AD 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (English Octavian; Latin: C•IVLIVS•C•F•CAESAR•OCTAVIANVS) for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, was the first and among the most important of... Nero[1] Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37 – June 9, 68), born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty (54–68). ... Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus (September 18, 53–August 9, 117), Roman Emperor (98–117), commonly called Trajan, was the second of the Five Good Emperors of the Roman Empire. ... The Antonines most often referred to were two successive Roman Emperors who ruled between A.D. 138 and 180: Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius, famous for their skilled leadership. ... Pont du Gard, France, a Roman aqueduct built circa 19 BC. It is one of Frances top tourist attractions and a World Heritage Site. ... A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ...


Even after the fall of the Roman Empire, Isernia has suffered destruction numerous times in history. Isernia was destroyed by the Saracens in 800, sacked by Markward of Anweiler, Count of Molise, in 1199, and set on fire in 1223 by the soldiers of Frederick II. In 1519 it was freed from feudal servitude by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and became a free city. The Roman Empire is the name given to both the imperial domain developed by the city-state of Rome and also the corresponding phase of that civilization, characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... Events December 25, Rome, coronation of Charles the Great (Charlemagne) as emperor by Pope Leo III. Celtic monks begin work on the Book of Kells on the Island of Iona. ... Markward von Annweiler in an illustration from the Liber ad honorem Augusti by Petrus de Ebulo, 1196. ... Events John Lackland, becomes King of England Births Isobel of Huntingdon (d. ... // Events August 6 - Louis VIII is crowned King of France. ... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), Holy Roman Emperor of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212, unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215, and Holy Roman Emperor from 1220 until his death in 1250. ... Events March 4 - Hernán Cortés lands in Mexico. ... Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain. ...


Earthquakes in 847, 1349, 1456 and 1805 caused massive destruction. Events Succession of Pope Leo IV, (847 - 855) Births Alfred the Great (d. ... // Events January 9 - The Jewish population of Basel, Switzerland is rounded up and incinerated, believed by the residents to be the cause of the ongoing bubonic plague. ... // Events July 7 - Joan of Arc acquitted (but she had already been executed). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


On the morning of September 10, 1943, during World War II, American planes launched their bombs from B-17 planes over a crowded town on market day causing thousands of deaths.[citation needed] In the following weeks they came back twelve times without ever hitting their targets: the bridges of Isernia, Cardarelli and Santo Spirito, then built entirely of iron, towards the internal area. All the bridges were vital to the German retreat. September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... A B_17 nicknamed Sally B in England in 2001 The B_17 Flying Fortress was the first mass_produced, four_engine heavy bomber. ...


In 1970 Isernia became the capital of the homonymous province, created out of part of the province of Campobasso. Campobasso (It. ...


Coinage

The coins of Aesernia, which are found only in copper, and have the legend "AISERNINO", belong to the period of the first Roman colony; the style of their execution attests the influence of the neighboring Campania. (Millingen, Numismatique de l'Italie, p. 218.) Campania is a region of Southern Italy, bordering on Lazio to the north-west, Molise to the north, Puglia to the north-east, Basilicata to the east, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west. ...


Main sights

Although having been object of repeated destruction, Isernia preserves a large number of monuments of fairly good archaeological interest. The historical center still keeps intact the spare map structure of the Roman cities: in fact it represents the largest raced Marcelli street, around which there is an infinity of alleys and little spares, as for example, "Trento e Trieste" spares. The famous Fraterna Fountain is the main symbol in this town and it was built in the 13th century : it is made up of living- stone's slabs coming from ruined Roman monuments, while all the rest is a work of local masters, as it was built by the Rampini family in Isernia. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


La Pineta

Isernia is also known for the archaeological excavation located within its borders, at Isernia La Pineta. Isernia La Pineta contains thousands of bones and stone tools covering 24,000 square yards. It was discovered in 1979, by an amateur naturalist noticed a bone sticking out of the side of a cut that had been created by the construction of the Napoli-Vasto motorway. The site was clearly created by humans, but its purpose is still unknown. The man who lived there was called Homo Aeserniensis. [1] Excavation is the best-known and most commonly used technique within the science of archaeology. ...


Notes

  1.   Novaresio, Paolo (1996). The Explorers. Stewart, Tabori & Chang, NY ISBN 1-55670-495-X p. 14 "In 1979 an amateur naturalist was passing the construction site for the Napoli-Vasto motorway ... object protruding from a wall ... thousands of bones and stone tools piled up in an area of over 24,000 square yards. ... Evidence of human activity is incontrovertible"

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Isernia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (808 words)
Isernia, a very ancient town in the region of Molise, lies on the side of a hill between two rivers: the "sorsi (Sordo)" and the Carpino.
Isernia is the capital city of the province of Isernia, and a flourishing center of pasta makers, stone work, and embroidery crafts.
Isernia is also known for the archaeological excavation located within it's borders, at Isernia La Pineta.
Isernia (204 words)
The town of Isernia rises in the western part of Molise, where the Sorde and Carpino tributaries flow into the Cavaliere river.
A Roman colony in 263 BC, Isernia gradually acquired a remarkable importance in its relations with Rome.
Isernia has crafts shops where, through the same skills of two thousand years ago, flutes, bagpipes, and tambourines are made.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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