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Encyclopedia > Ischia
The island of Ischia near Naples, Italy.
The island of Ischia near Naples, Italy.

Ischia is a volcanic island in the Tyrrhenian Sea, at the northern end of the Gulf of Naples. The roughly trapezoidal island lies 17.5 miles from Naples and measures around 10 km east to west and 7 km north to south with a 34 km coastline and a surface area of 46.3 km². It is almost entirely mountainous, with the highest peak being volcanic Mt. Epomeo at 788 meters: the volcano was active in Classical times [1]. It has a population of nearly 58,000 people. Download high resolution version (1514x988, 158 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1514x988, 158 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about volcanoes in geology. ... Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Gulf of Naples The Gulf of Naples is located off the southwestern coast of Italy. ... The Bay of Naples Naples (Italian: , Neapolitan: Nàpule, from Greek Νεάπολη < Νέα Πόλις Néa Pólis New City) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of the Campania region and the Province of Naples. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ...


Ischia is also the principal city (pop.17,256) of the island, divided into its historic centre Ischia Ponte (formerly Borgo Celsa) and Ischia Porto, the waterfront resort area. The main industry is tourism, centering on thermal spas that cater mostly to European (especially German) and Asian tourist clients eager to enjoy the fruits of the island's natural volcanic activity, its thermal hot springs, and its volcanic mud. Tourists at Oahu island, Hawaii Tourism is the act of travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes, and also refers to the provision of services in support of this act. ... This article is about the continent. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Asian people. ... For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ...

Maronti beach, east of the spit of St Angelo
Maronti beach, east of the spit of St Angelo

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (850x425, 324 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (850x425, 324 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

The name

Virgil poetically referred to it as Inarime and still later as Arime[2] Martianus Capella followed Virgil in this allusive name, which was never in common circulation: the Romans called it Aenaria, the Greeks, Pithekoussai [3]. "Pliny rightly derives the Greek name from the local ceramic clay deposits, not from pithekos (ape); he explains the Latin name as connected with Aeneas' beach-head" (Princeton Encyclopedia) The current name appears for the first time in a letter from Pope Leo III to Charlemagne in 813 (iscla from insula) though there is an argument made for a Semitic origin in I-schra, "black island". A bust of Virgil, from the entrance to his tomb in Naples, Italy. ... Martianus Minneus Felix Capella was a writer of the late Latin period, whose career flourished some time during the 5th century, before the year 439. ... Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19c portrait. ... Leo III (died June 12, 816) was Pope from 795 to 816. ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ...


History

Ancient times

An acropolis site of the Monte Vico area was inhabited from the Bronze Age, as Mycenaean and Iron Age pottery finds attest. Euboean Greeks from Eretria and Chalkis arrived in the eighth century BC to establish an emporium for trade with the Etruscans of the mainland. Because of its fine harbor, the settlement of Pithecusae became successful through trade in iron and with mainland Italy; at its peak, Pithecusae was home to about 10,000 people. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... The Helladic is a modern term to identify a sequence of periods characterizing the culture of mainland ancient Greece during the Bronze Age. ... Euboea or Negropont (Modern Greek: Εύβοια Evia, Ancient Greek Εúβοια Eúboia; see also List of traditional Greek place names), is the largest island of the Greek archipelago. ... Emporium is an old-fashioned term for a Department store and for marketplaces or trading centers in ancient cities. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ...


The ceramic Euboean artifact inscribed with a reference to "Nestor's cup" was discovered in a grave on the island in 1953. Engraved upon the cup are a few lines written in the Cumae alphabet. Dating from c. 730 BC, it is the oldest written reference to the Iliad and may be the earliest extant precursor to the Latin alphabet. The term Cup of Nestor or Nestors Cup can refer to: An object described in Homers Iliad, An 8th century BCE drinking vessel found at Pithikoussai, which bears a famous inscription calling itself Nestors cup. ... The inscription of Nestors Cup, found in Ischia; Cumae alphabet, 8th century BC A Western (also Chalcidean) variant of the early Greek alphabet was in use in ca. ... It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ...


In 474 BC Hiero I of Syracuse came to the aid of the Cumaeans against the Etruscans and defeated them on the sea. He occupied Ischia and the surrounding Parthenopean islands and left behind a garrison to build a fortress before the city of Ischia itself. This was still extant in the Middle Ages, but the original garrison fled before the eruptions of 470 BC and the island was taken over by Neapolitans. Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 479 BC 478 BC 477 BC 476 BC 475 BC - 474 BC - 473 BC 472 BC 471... Hiero I was the brother of Gelo and tyrant of Syracuse from 478 to 467 BC. During his Carlos reign he greatly increased the power of Syracuse. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ... Parthenope may refer to: The asteroid 11 Parthenope. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC Years: 475 BC 474 BC 473 BC 472 BC 471 BC - 470 BC - 469 BC 468 BC...


The Romans seized Ischia (and Naples) in 322 BC. Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC - 320s BC - 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 327 BC 326 BC 325 BC 324 BC 323 BC - 322 BC - 321 BC 320 BC 319...


Christian era until 1500

In AD 6 Augustus restored the island to Naples in exchange for Capri. Ischia suffered from the barbarian invasions, being taken first by the Heruli then by the Ostrogoths, being ultimately absorbed into the Eastern Roman Empire. The Byzantines gave the island over to Naples in 588 and by 661 it was being administered by a Count liege to the Duke of Naples. The area was devastated by the Saracens in 813 and 847; in 1004 it was occupied by Henry II of Germany; the Norman Roger II of Sicily took it in 1130; the island was raided by the Pisans in 1135 and 1137 and subsequently fell under the Suebi and then Angevin rule. After the Sicilian Vespers in 1282, the island rebelled, recognizing Peter III of Aragon, but was retaken by the Angevins the following year. It was conquered in 1284 by the forces of Aragon and Charles II d'Anjou was unable to successfully retake it until 1299. For other uses, see 6 (disambiguation). ... Augustus (Latin: IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS;[1] September 23, 63 BC–August 19, AD 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (English Octavian; Latin: C•IVLIVS•C•F•CAESAR•OCTAVIANVS) for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, was the first and among the most important of... Capri (Italian pronunciation Cápri, usual English pronunciation Caprí) is an Italian island off the Sorrentine Peninsula. ... Look up Barbarian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Heruli (spelled variously in Latin and Greek) were a nomadic Germanic people, who were subjugated by the Ostrogoths, Huns, and Byzantines in the 3rd to 5th centuries. ... This article deals with the continental Ostrogoths. ... Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople. ... Events The Lombards are converted to Catholic Christianity. ... Events Caliph Ali Ben Abu Talib is assassinated. ... A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is also still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ... A duke is a nobleman of a specific, high but nominal rank without an actual principality, e. ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... Events June 22 - Byzantine Emperor Michael I is defeated in a war against the Bulgarians. ... Events Succession of Pope Leo IV, (847 - 855) Births Alfred the Great (d. ... Events December: End of the Samanid dynasty in Bokhara. ... Henry II of Germany (972 - 13 July 1024), was the fifth and last Holy Roman Emperor of the Saxon or Ottonian dynasty. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Roger II, from Liber ad honorem Augusti of Petrus de Ebulo, 1196. ... Events February 13 - Innocent II is elected pope An antipope schism occurs when Roger II of Sicily supports Anacletus II as pope instead of Innocent II. Innocent flees to France and Anacletus crowns Roger King. ... This article discusses the Italian city. ... Events January - Byland Abbey founded Stephen of Blois succeeds King Henry I. Empress Maud, daughter of Henry I and widow of Henry V opposed Stephen and claims the throne as her own Owain Gwynedd of Wales defeats the Normans at Crug Mawr. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... Suebi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... Sicilian Vespers (1846), by Francesco Hayez The Sicilian Vespers is the name given to a rebellion in Sicily in 1282 against the rule of the Angevin king Charles I, who had taken control of the island with Papal support in 1266. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Peter III of Aragon (Catalan: Pere) (1239 – November 11, 1285, also Peter I of Valencia, Peter II of Barcelona), known as the Great, was the king of Aragon and Valencia and count of Barcelona from 1276 to 1285. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... Charles II, known as the Lame (Fr. ... Anjou is a former county (c. ... Events Osman I declares the independence of the Ottoman Principality The County of Holland is annexed by the County of Hainaut April 1, 1299 Kings Towne on the River Hull granted city status by Royal Charter of King Edward I of England. ...


As a consequence of the island's last eruption, the population fled to Baia where they remained for 4 years. In 1320 Robert of Anjou and his wife Sancia visited the island and were hosted by Cesare Sterlich, who had been sent by Charles II from the Holy See to govern the island in 1306 and was by this time nearly 100 years of age. Baiae (Italian: Baia), in the Campania region of Italy on the Bay of Naples, today a frazione of the comune of Bacoli, was for several hundred years a fashionable and luxurious coastal resort, especially towards the end of the period of the Roman Republic. ... Events January 20 - Dante - Quaestio de Aqua et Terra January 20 - Duke Wladyslaw Lokietek becomes king of Poland April 6 - The Scots reaffirm their independence by signing the Declaration of Arbroath. ... King Robert I of Naples a. ...


Ischia suffered greatly in the struggles between the Angevin and Durazzo dynasties. It was taken by Carlo Durazzo in 1382, retaken by Louis II of Anjou in 1385 and captured yet again by Ladislav Durazzo in 1386; it was sacked by the fleet of the Antipope John XXIII under the command of Gaspare Cossa in 1410 only to be retaken by Ladislav the following year. In 1422 Joan II gave the island to her adoptive son Alfonso V of Aragon, though, when he fell into disgrace, she retook it with the help of Genoa in 1424. In 1438 Alfonso reoccupied the castle, kicking out all the men and proclaiming it a Castilian colony, marrying to his garrison the wives and daughters of the expelled. He set about building a bridge linking the castle to the rest of the island and he carved out a large gallery, both of which are still to be seen today. In 1442 he gave the island to one of his favorites, Lucretia d'Alagno, who in turn entrusted the island's governance to her brother-in-law, Giovanni Torella. Upon the death of Alfonso in 1458, they returned the island to the Angevin side. Ferdinand I of Naples ordered Alessandro Sforza to chase Torella out of the castle and gave the island over, in 1462, to Garceraldo Requesens. In 1464, after a brief Torellan insurrection, Marino Caracciolo was set up as governor. Charles III, King of Naples, also known as Charles II of Hungary and Charles of Durazzo, reigned as King of Naples from 1381 to 1386 and as King of Hungary (under the name of King Károly II the Small) for one year only from 1385 to 1386. ... The Angevin French prince, Louis II of Anjou (1377 - 1417) was the rival of Ladislas as king of Naples. ... King Ladislas of Naples, titular king of Jerusalem (February 11, 1377-August 6, 1414) was of the Angevin line, and was called The Magnanimous. Son of Charles III, he was the King of Naples from the age of nine (1386) under his mothers regency. ... Antipope John XXIII Baldassare Cossa, (about 1370 – November 22, 1419), also known as John XXIII,was Pope or antipope during the Western Schism (1410–1415) and is now officially regarded by the Catholic Church as an antipope. ... Joan II of Naples (1371-1435), was Queen from 1414 to 1435. ... Alfonso V of Aragon (also Alfonso I of Naples) (1396 – June 27, 1458), surnamed the Magnanimous, was the King of Aragon and Naples and count of Barcelona from 1416 to 1458. ... Genoa (Genova in Italian - Zena in Genoese) is a city and a seaport in northern Italy, the capital of the Province of Genoa and of the region of Liguria. ... The starting point of Crown of Castile can be considered when the union of the Kingdoms of Castile and Leon in 1230 or the later fusion of their Cortes (their Parlaments). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lucrezia dAlagno (ca. ... Ferdinand I (1423 - January 25, 1494), also called Don Ferrante, was the King of Naples from 1458 to 1494. ... Sforza was a ruling family of Renaissance Italy, based in Milan. ... Events Settlers from Portugal begin to settle the Cape Verde islands. ...


In February 1495, with the arrival of Charles VIII, Ferdinand II landed on the island and took possession of the castle, and, after having killed the disloyal castellan Giusto di Candida with his own hands, left the island under the control of Innico d'Avalos, marquis of Pescara and Vasto, who ably defended the place from the French flotilla. With him came his sister Costanza and through them they founded the D'Avalos dynasty which would last on the island into the eighteenth century. Charles VIII the Affable (French: Charles VIII lAffable) (June 30, 1470 – April 7, 1498) was King of France from 1483 to his death. ... Ferdinand II (26 August 1469 - September 7, 1496), sometimes known as Ferrantino, was King of Naples from 1495 to 1496. ... A castellan was the governor or caretaker of a castle or keep. ... Pescaras port in the afterglow. ... Vasto (Greek: ; Latin: Histonium, Istonium, and Histonios; formerly also, Guastaymonis, Il Vasto, and Il Vasto dAmmone) is a town on the Adriatic coast of the Province of Chieti in southern Abruzzo, Italy. ... A flotilla (from Spanish, meaning a flota of small ships, and this from French flotte), or naval flotilla, is a formation of small warships that may be part of a larger fleet. ...


1500 - 1700

Throughout the fifteenth century, the island suffered the incursions of pirates and Barbary privateers - in 1543 and 1544 Khair ad Din, called Barbarossa, laid waste to the island, taking 4,000 prisoners in the process. In 1548 and 1552 Ischia was beset by his successor Dragut Rais. With the increasing rarity and diminishing severity of the piratical attacks later in the century and the construction of better defenses, the islanders began to venture out of the castle and it was then that the historic center of the town of Ischia was begun. Even so many inhabitants still ended up slaves to the pirates, the last known being taken in 1796. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other meanings, see Barbary Coast (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concept in naval history. ... Khair ad Din A statue in Barbaros Park near the ferry stop in BeÅŸiktaÅŸ Khair ad Din (circa 1475-1546) was an Ottoman-Turkish admiral and privateer who served in the Ottoman Empire and in the Barbary Coast. ...


During the 1647 revolution of Masaniello, there was an attempted rebellion against the feudal landowners. Masaniello, an abbreviation of Tommaso Aniello (1622 - July 16, 1647), was an Amalfi fisherman, who became leader of the revolt against Spanish rule in Naples in 1647. ...


From 18th century until today

With the extinction of the D'Avalos line in 1729, the island reverted to state property. In March, 1734 it was taken by the Bourbons and administered by a royal governor seated within the castle. The island participated in the short-lived Republic of Naples starting in March, 1799 but by April 3, Commodore Trowbridge- under the command of Lord Nelson had put down the revolt on Ischia as well as on neighboring Procida. By decree of the governor, many of the rebels were hung in a sqaure on Procida now called Piazza dei martiri (Square of the Martyrs). Among these was Francesco Buonocore who had received the island to administer from the French Championnet in Naples. On February 13, 1806, the island was occupied by the French and on the 24th was unsuccessfully attacked by the English. This article or section should include material from France: Wars of Religion _ Bourbon Dynasty The House of Bourbon dates from at least the beginning of the 13th century, when the estate of Bourbon was ruled by a Lord, vassal of France. ... April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 &#8211; October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... View of Corricella from Cape Pizzaco. ... Jean Étienne Championnet (1762 - January 9, 1800), French general, enlisted in the army at an early age and served in the great siege of Gibraltar. ... February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


On July 28, 1883, an earthquake destroyed the villages Casamicciola Terme and Lacco Ameno. July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Country Italy Region Campania Province Province of Naples (NA) Mayor Elevation m Area 5. ... Lacco Ameno is a town situated at the northwest of the island of Ischia, in the Gulf of Naples off the west coast of Italy. ...


Today Ischia is a popular tourist destination, welcoming up to 6 million visitors per year, mainly from the Italian mainland as well as Germany (approximately 5,000 Germans are resident on the island), although it has become an increasingly popular destination for the well-to-do Eastern Europeans (particularly Russia and Poland). Ischia is easily reached by ferry from Naples, journey time approx 40 minutes - 1 hour. The number of thermal spas on the islands makes it particularly popular with tourists seeking "wellness" holidays.


Trivia

In 1948, American author Truman Capote stayed in room number 3 in the Pensione Lustro in the town of Forio on the island. He wrote an essay about his stay there, which later appeared in Local Color, published in 1950 by Random House. Truman Capote (30 September 1924 – 25 August 1984) was an American writer whose non-fiction, stories, novels and plays are recognized literary classics. ... Random House is a publishing division of the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann based in New York City. ...


Parts of the Hollywood film, The Talented Mr Ripley, starring Matt Damon, Jude Law and Gwyneth Paltrow, were filmed on the island. The Talented Mr. ... Matthew Paige Damon (born October 8, 1970) is an Academy Award-winning American screenwriter and Academy Award-nominated actor. ... David Jude Heyworth Law (born December 29, 1972) is an Academy Award nominated English actor, who is known as Jude Law. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


For many of the inhabitants on the island, German is the second language after English. This is because of the huge number of German tourists that visit the island each year.


In 2006, Ischia became a sister city to San Pedro, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.. For the 1997 film, see Twin Town Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... // San Pedro is connected to Los Angeles by a thin strip of land called the Harbor Gateway which roughly follows the 110 freeway. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized...


Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen lived on the island for a brief period, and is said to have finished Peer Gynt there in 1867. Photo of Henrik Ibsen in his older days Henrik Johan Ibsen (March 20, 1828 – May 23, 1906) was a major Norwegian playwright who was largely responsible for the rise of the modern realistic drama. ... Peer Gynt is a play by the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. ...


Main sights

Castello Aragonese
Castello Aragonese
  • Aragonese Castle / Il Castello Aragonese (Ischia Ponte)

The Aragonese Castle was built in 474 BC on a rock near the island, by Gero of Syracuse. At the same time, two towers were built to control enemy fleet’s movements. The rock was then occupied by Parthenopeans (the ancient inhabitants of Naples). In 326 BCE the fortress was captured by Romans, and then again by the Parthenopeans. Alfonso V of Aragon in 1441 connected the rock to the island through a stone bridge instead of a previous wood bridge, and wanted the walls were fortified in order to defend the inhabitants against the raids of pirates. About in 1700 on the islet, used to live about 2000 families, there was a larisses Convent, the Abbey of Basilians from Greece, the Bishop and the Seminar, the Prince with a military garrison. On the same rock there were 13 churches. In 1912, the Castle was sold to a private owner. Today the Castle is the most visited monument of the island. You can access the Castle through a tunnel with large openings which let the light enter. Along the tunnel there is a small chapel consecrated to Saint John Joseph of the Cross (San Giovan Giuseppe della Croce), the patron saint of the island. Alternatively, a more comfortable access is possible by a modern lift. After arriving outside, it is possible to visit the Church of the Immacolata and the Cathedral of Assunta. The first was built in 1737 at the same place where there was a small chapel dedicated to Saint Francis, and closed after the suppression of Convents in 1806 as well as the Nunnery of Clarisses. Image File history File links Castello_Aragonese. ... Image File history File links Castello_Aragonese. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 479 BC 478 BC 477 BC 476 BC 475 BC - 474 BC - 473 BC 472 BC 471... Margrave Gero I. (the Great) (born circa 900, died 965) was since 937 Margrave of the Sächsische Ostmark, also Margraviate of Meissen. ... Clinton Square in Downtown Syracuse Syracuse is an American city in Central New York. ... The Bay of Naples Naples (Italian: , Neapolitan: Nàpule, from Greek Νεάπολη < Νέα Πόλις Néa Pólis New City) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of the Campania region and the Province of Naples. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC - 320s BC - 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 331 BC 330 BC 329 BC 328 BC 327 BC - 326 BC - 325 BC 324 BC 323... Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Alfonso V of Aragon (also Alfonso I of Naples) (1396 – June 27, 1458), surnamed the Magnanimous, was the King of Aragon and Naples and count of Barcelona from 1416 to 1458. ... This page is about the year 1441. ... This article is about sea pirates. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Saint John Joseph of the Cross ( San Giovan Giuseppe della Croce) (August 15, 1654—March 5, 1739) is an Italian saint. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Immacolata (Latin for immaculate and an epithet for Virgin Mary) aka the Incantatrix is a fictional character, created by Clive Barker and featured in his 1987 epic fantasy novel Weaveworld. ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

  • The gardens of La Mortella / La Mortella (Forio - San Francesco)

The gardens were originally the property of English composer William Walton. Walton lived in the villa next to the gardens with his Argentinian wife, Susanna who later died there in 1983. When the composer arrived on the island in 1946, he immediately called Russell Page from England to lay out the garden. Wonderful tropical and Mediterranean plants were planted and some have now reached amazing proportions. The gardens include wonderful views over the city and harbour of Forio. A museum dedicated to the life and work of William Walton now comprises part of the garden complex. Sir William Turner Walton, OM (March 29, 1902–March 8, 1983) was a British composer whose style was influenced by the works of Stravinsky, Sibelius and jazz. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Russell Page (1906-1985) was a British landscape architect and garden designer. ...

  • Villa La Colombaia (Lacco Ameno - Forio)

Surrounded by a park, the villa (called "The Dovecote") was made by Luigi Patalano, a famous local socialist and journalist. It is now the seat of a cultural institution and museum dedicated to Luchino Visconti. The institution promotes cultural activities such as music, cinema, theatre, art exhibitions, work-shops, and cinema reviews. The villa and the park are open to the public. Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Journalism is a discipline of writing. ... Luchino Visconti, Duke of Modrone (November 2, 1906 - March 17, 1976) was an Italian theatre and cinema director and writer. ...

  • Sant'Angelo (Sant'Angelo - Serrara-Fontana)
  • Maronti Beach (Barano D'Ischia)
  • The Church of the Soccorso (Forio)

References

  1. ^ Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites
  2. ^ His poetical allusion was apparently to the mention in Iliad (ii.783) of Typhoeus being chained down ein Arimois
  3. ^ The plural likely indicated Procida as well.

It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ... Chalcidian black-figure hydria of Typhon fighting Zeus, c. ... View of Corricella from Cape Pizzaco. ...

External links


Tourist Information

Others

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Coordinates: 40°43′N 13°54′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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