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Encyclopedia > Irish Famine (1879)

The Irish famine of 1879 was the last main Irish famine. Unlike the earlier Great Famines of 1740-1741 and 1845-1849 the 1879 famine (sometimes called the "mini-famine" or Án Gorta Beag) had relatively minimal effect, causing hunger rather than mass deaths, due to changes in the technology of food production, different structures of land-holding (the disappearance of the sub-division of land and of the cottier class as a result of the earlier great famine), income from Irish emigrants abroad which was sent to relatives back in Ireland, and in particular a prompt response of the British government, which contrasted with its seriously mis-judged Laissez faire response to the earlier Irish potato famine of 1845-1849. Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... Events April 10 – Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz December 19 – Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 – Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius William Browning invents mineral water Elizabeth of Russia became czarina. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Emigration is the action and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country to settle abroad. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... Starvation during the famine The Irish Potato Famine, also called The Great Famine or The Great Hunger (Irish: An Gorta Mór), is the name given to a famine which struck Ireland between 1846 and 1849. ...


Radical Irish Member of Parliament Charles Stewart Parnell of the Home Rule League (later its leader), Michael Davitt of the Irish Land League and some Irish clergy, notably Bishop Logue of Raphoe were actively involved in campaigning to put pressure on the British government and in the distribution of aid. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Charles Stewart Parnell (June 27, 1846 _ October 6, 1891) was an Irish political leader and one of the most important figures in nineteenth century Ireland and the United Kingdom. ... The Home Rule League, sometimes called the Home Rule Party, was a nineteenth and early twentieth century Irish political party which campaigned for home rule for the island of Ireland. ... Michael Davitt c. ... The Irish Land League was an Irish political organization of the late 19th century which aimed to help poor tenant famers. ...


Unlike earlier famines, what is sometimes called the "mini-famine" of 1879 was not marked by many deaths, mainly increased hunger, and was largely focused in the west of Ireland, in the province of Connacht. It was however part of a wider series centre of food shortages and crop failures which swept Ireland in the 1870s to early 1890s, notably food shortages in 1877-78, 1885 and 1889-90. Other countries in the period also experienced famines and food shortages due also to crop failure, with some climatologists suggesting a series of unusual weather patterns, including extremes of weather (very dry or very wet summers, very mild or very cold winters), had triggered off problems with the growth of food, making easy the spread of disease among plants or killing off new seeds. Alone among these failed Irish harvests, the greater scale of the failure of the harvest in 1879 led it to be called a 'famine'. Connaught redirects here. ...


Though it was of a far smaller scale to either of the two Great Famines, its appearance caused widespread panic among Irish people; many of the adults of the period had experienced the Great Famine of 1845-1849 as children and were terrified that their families faced a repeat of the widepread deaths, and in particular a repeat of Black '47 was happening. An increase in emigration occurred, as did a move from foodless parts of rural Ireland into major cities and towns. However the population moves proved temporary. With the re-appearance of the harvest in 1880 many of those who had fled to urban centres repopulated the areas they had left. Emigration is the action and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country to settle abroad. ...


Historians have noted the appearance of a religious revival during the famine months, most famously the alleged apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary along with two saints at a church in Knock in County Mayo. Knock developed as Ireland's internationally known marian shrine in subsequent decades as a result of the alleged apparation. An apparition is an act or instance of appearing. ... Blessed Virgin Mary A traditional Catholic picture sometimes displayed in homes. ... General definition of saint In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ... This article should be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... County Mayo (Irish: Maigh Eo, the plain of the yews) is a county on the west coast of Ireland. ... A Virgin Mary shrine is a shrine marking an apparition or other miracle ascribed to the Blessed Virgin Mary. ...


Because of relatively short period it covered, and relatively low number of deaths compared to the earlier great famines, the 1879 famine is rarely remembered in Irish history, except as a footnote to the battle for the 'Three 'Fs' (fair rent, fixity of tenure, free sale) being waged by Davitt and the Land League, and as a contributory to the Irish land war of the late 1870s and early 1880s. The Three Fs were a series of demands issued by Irish nationalists in their campaign for land reform in Ireland. ...

modern Irish famines

1st Great Irish Famine (Án Gorta Mór), 1740-1741|
2nd Great Irish Famine (Án Gorta Mór), 1845-1849| 2nd Great Famine legacy|
Irish Famine (Án Gorta Beag), 1879 Image:Flag of provinces (Ireland). ... Though most people know only of the Great Famine of 1847-49, Ireland in fact experienced a famine of similar magnitude almost 110 years earlier, also called its day the Great Famine, or the Irish Famine of 1740-41. ... Starvation during the famine The Irish Potato Famine, also called The Great Famine or The Great Hunger (Irish: An Gorta Mór), is the name given to a famine which struck Ireland between 1846 and 1849. ... The Political & Cultural Impact of the Famine In Ireland No major party political reaction resulted from the Famine, ironically given its economic, environmental, social but above all personal impact. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Irish Famine (1879) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (378 words)
Radical Irish Member of Parliament Charles Stewart Parnell of the Home Rule League (later its leader), Michael Davitt of the Irish Land League and some Irish clergy, notably Bishop Logue of Raphoe were actively involved in campaigning to put pressure on the British government and in the distribution of aid.
Unlike earlier famines, what is sometimes called the "mini-famine" of 1879 was not marked by many deaths, mainly increased hunger, and was largely focused in the west of Ireland, in the province of Connacht.
Alone among these failed Irish harvests, the greater scale of the failure of the harvest in 1879 led it to be called a 'famine'.
The Irish Famine, 1845-50 (1878 words)
The Irish Famine of 1846-50 took as many as one million lives from hunger and disease, and changed the social and cultural structure of Ireland in profound ways.
An electronic archive of primary source material on the Irish Famine could be arranged in a number of ways -- according to topics such as hunger and disease, eviction and homelessness, emigration, etc. As the reader will see, interpretations of the Famine vary drastically according to a source's religion, ethnicity and other factors.
The suffering of this catastrophe was deeply embedded in the minds of Irish emigrants and with it died all hope of accomodation with Britain.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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