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Encyclopedia > Irish Catholic

Irish Catholics is a term used to describe people of Roman Catholic background who are Irish or of Irish descent. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


The term is of note due to Irish immigration to many countries of the English speaking world, particularly as a result of the Irish Famine in the 1840s - 1850s, following which the population declined by over half in the following century (from approx. over 8 million to just over 4 million) due to the pattern of immigration begun then. The term has currency in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. These nations had, or have, a majority of Protestants hence both aspects, being Catholic and being Irish, at times separated them from the mainstream culture. In the United States, hostility to both these aspects was expressed through the Know-Nothing movement and Nativism in general. The term Anglosphere describes a certain group of English-speaking countries. ... Starvation during the famine The Irish Potato Famine, also called The Great Famine or The Great Hunger (Irish: An Gorta Mór), is the name given to a famine which struck Ireland between 1846 and 1849. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Know-Nothing movement was a nativist American political movement of the 1850s. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ...


The term can also relate to a period when Catholicism in Ireland was somewhat divergent from the "Roman" church which, though mostly reconciled with the Synod of Cashel in 1172, some elements unique to the practice of Catholicism and Catholic culture remained in Ireland. Celtic Christianity, or Insular Christianity (sometimes commonly called the Celtic Church) broadly refers to the Early Medieval Christian practice that developed around the Irish Sea in the fifth and sixth centuries: that is, among Celtic/British peoples such as the Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Cornish, Manx (the inhabitants of the British...


'Irish Catholic' is also used to distinguish Catholic inhabitants of Ireland from the Ulster-Scots and the Anglo-Irish, and the North American descendants of Irish Catholic emigrants from the Scots-Irish.[citation needed] Ulster-Scots is a term mainly used in Ireland and Britain (Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irishis commonly used in North America) primarily to refer to Presbyterian Scots, or their descendents, who migrated from the Scottish Lowlands to Ulster (the northern province of Ireland), largely across the 17th century. ... Anglo-Irish was a term used historically to describe a ruling class inhabitants of Ireland who were the descendants and successors of the Protestant Ascendancy[1], mostly belonging to the Anglican Church of Ireland or to a lesser extent one of the English dissenting churches, such as the Methodist church. ... Scots-Irish (also called Ulster Scots) is a Scottish ethnic group that historically resided in Ireland which ultimately traces its roots back to settlers from Scotland, and to a lesser extent, England. ...


The Irish Catholic is also the name of a popular newspaper in Ireland published for lay people. The Irish Catholic is an Irish weekly Catholic newspaper, providing news and commentary about the Roman Catholic Church. ...


See also

// The Irish diaspora consists of Irish emigrants and their descendants in countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Argentina, Mexico, New Zealand, South Africa and states of the Caribbean and continental Europe. ... St. ... Anti-Catholicism is discrimination, hostility or prejudice directed at Catholics or the Catholic Church. ... Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... Irish Australian is the third largest ethnic group in Australia, after Australian and English. ... Irish Canadians are people of Irish descent living in Canada or born as native Canadians. ... The Catholic Church in Ireland is part of the worldwide Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and curia in Rome. ... David Moran, best known as D. P. Moran (1869 - 1936) was a principal ideologist for Irish-Ireland through his paper The Leader. // Given the parliamentary success of Irish nationalism in 1885-1914, an ideology was developed to define its scope and to identify who was truly Irish. ...

External links

  • Library of Congress
  • The Irish Catholic Diaspora in America, describes the book ISBN 0-8132-0896-3
  • On Irish Catholics of Australia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Irish Catholic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (240 words)
Irish Catholics is a term used to describe Irish people or people of Irish descent who are of Roman Catholic background.
The term is of note due to Irish emigration in the colonies of the British empire.
'Irish Catholic' is also used to distinguish catholic inhabitants of Ireland from the Ulster-Scots, and the North American descendents of Irish catholic emigrants from the Scots-Irish.
Irish American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3505 words)
The issue of job discrimination against Irish immigrants is a hotly debated among historians, with some insisting that the "No Irish need apply" signs so familiar to the Irish in memory were myths,[9], and others arguing that the Irish continued to be discriminated against in various professions into the 20th century.
Many Irish Americans Catholics were enthusiastic supporters of Irish independence; after that was achieved in 1921, they generally lost interest in the politics of the old country until political violence erupted in Northern Ireland in 1969.
The Irish had a reputation of being very well organized, and, since 1850, have produced a majority of the leaders of the Catholic Church in the U.S., labor unions, the Democratic Party in larger cities, and Catholic high schools, colleges and universities.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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