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Encyclopedia > Iranian woman
A Persian woman here as depicted during the Safavi period of Iran. From wall painting in Chehel-sotoon Palace, Isfahan.
A Persian woman here as depicted during the Safavi period of Iran. From wall painting in Chehel-sotoon Palace, Isfahan.
The conservatively religious view toward women is a relatively new phenomenon in Iran; The traditional image of a Persian woman holding a cup of wine, as depicted at Hasht-behesht palace, Isfahan, 17th century Iran.
The conservatively religious view toward women is a relatively new phenomenon in Iran; The traditional image of a Persian woman holding a cup of wine, as depicted at Hasht-behesht palace, Isfahan, 17th century Iran.

An Iranian woman (or Persian woman) usually refers to a woman of or from the traditional Persian culture. Download high resolution version (548x733, 632 KB)Persian woman pouring wine. ... Download high resolution version (548x733, 632 KB)Persian woman pouring wine. ... An example of Safavid architecture Safavi is an adjective, created for the name Safi. Translated to English, Safavi would correspond roughly to Safi-ish or Safidian Safavi is the correct Persian Language reference to Safi, the name of Sheikh Safi Al-Din Ardebili. ... Part of Shah Abbas large urban project in his new capital, the Chahār Bāgh Four Gardens, is a four-kilometer avenue in the city of Isfahan. ... A Persian Woman dancing. ... A Persian Woman dancing. ... Part of Shah Abbas large urban project in his new capital, the Chahār Bāgh Four Gardens, is a four-kilometer avenue in the city of Isfahan. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ...


Although she is seen as Iranian, the Persian woman need not be from any specific nationality or ethnicity, and can be thought to be associated with any of the peoples sharing the Persian culture. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Contents


Persian women in history

It is an indisputable fact, that at Persepolis, where stone preserves the ideas and ideals of ancient Persia, women are absent. All the splendid reliefs and noble statues carved at the peak of empire represent bulls, maned lions, winged stallions, and warring men. Even the servants who walk behind the kings swinging fans or swatting flies are men. But it is not ancient ruins that attest to the power of Iranian patriarchy. It is society itself. Like many other Central Asian societies, Iran has always been a patriarchical one with the degrees of freedom for women differing in various eras. Location of Persepolis Persepolis was an ancient capital of the Persian Achaemenid Empire, situated some 70 km northeast of Shiraz, not far from where the small river Pulwar flows into the Kur (Kyrus). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A patriarch (from Greek: patria means father; arché means rule, beginning, origin) is a male head of an extended family exercising autocratic authority, or, by extension, a member of the ruling class or government of a society controlled by senior men. ...


Some historians in fact argue that it was Cyrus the Great who, ten centuries before Islam, established the custom of covering women to protect their chastity. According to their theory, the veil passed from the Achaemenids to the Hellenistic Seleucids. They, in turn, handed it to the Byzantines, from whom the Arab conquerors inherited it, transmitting it over the vast reaches of the Arab world.(Note 1) But even if one were to accept this theory, it wouldn't change the fact that the view toward women in Iran changed significantly with the arrival of Islam in Iran. Common misspelling of Cyprus. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( (help· info)), the peaceful submission to the will of God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... Achaemenid Empire The Achaemenid Dynasty was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire, including Cyrus II the Great, Darius I and Xerxes I. At the height of their power, the Achaemenid rulers of Persia ruled over territories roughly emcompassing some parts of todays Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Israel, Lebanon... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... The Seleucid Empire was one of several political states founded after the death of Alexander the Great, whose generals squabbled over the division of Alexanders empire. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βασιλεία Ῥωμαίων) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ...

A Sassanid era mosaic excavated at Bishapur. Some mosaics were denuded during the Islamic period. This one is kept at The Louvre.
A Sassanid era mosaic excavated at Bishapur. Some mosaics were denuded during the Islamic period. This one is kept at The Louvre.

On the other hand, women played an important role in everyday life in Achaemenid dynasty. They worked beside men in workshops and received the same salary as men. High-born women even exercised an influence on affairs of state. Female members of the Achaemenid royal family posessed their own estates, and documents survive showing their active involvement in management: letters relate to the shipment of grain, wine, and animals to palaces from distant land-holdings. The only limits on the extent of the authority exercised by the King's mother, for instance were set by the monarch himself.[(Cotterell, 434)] Such traditions continued into Sassanid times, however with less extent. Purandokht, who were daughter of king Khosrau II ruled Persian empire for almost 2 years before resigning, and women can be seen on some Sassanid reliefs as well. Image File history File linksMetadata Bishapur_zan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Bishapur_zan. ... Sassanid Empire at its greatest extent The Sassanid dynasty (also Sassanian) was the name given to the kings of Persia during the era of the second Persian Empire, from 224 until 651, when the last Sassanid shah, Yazdegerd III, lost a 14-year struggle to drive out the Umayyad Caliphate... City of Bishapur Another view of Bishapur Bishapur (or Bishâpûr) is an ancient city situated south of modern Faliyan, Iran on the ancient road between Persis and Elam. ... I.M. Peis Louvre Pyramid: the entrance to the galleries lies below the glass pyramid The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre, pronounced in French) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Achaemenid empire at its greatest extent The Achaemenid Dynasty (Hakamanishiya in the Old Persian (Avestan ??) language - transliterated Hakamanshee in Modern Persian) - was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire. ... Achaemenid Empire The Achaemenid Dynasty was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire, including Cyrus II the Great, Darius I and Xerxes I. At the height of their power, the Achaemenid rulers of Persia ruled over territories roughly emcompassing some parts of todays Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Israel, Lebanon... -1... Queen Poran, the only woman on the throne of the Sassanid dynasty, 630 AD.State Hermitage Museum ,St. ... Khosrau II, the Victorious (Parvez), king of Persia, son of Hormizd IV, grandson of Khosrau I, 590 - 628. ...


In Shahnameh, the greatest persian poet and Iranologist, Ferdowsi, tried to offer a picture of persian women. More than 20 women appear in Shahnameh, all of them are wise, intelligent and respectable women. Two women, Homai and Gardieh, become kings of Iran in these stories. Ferdowsi himself married an educated and kind woman. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Shahnama. ... Statue of Ferdowsi in Tehran Ferdowsi Mausoleum in Tus Ferdowsi Tousi (فردوسی طوسی in Persian) (more commonly transliterated Firdausi, Ferdosi or Ferdusi) (935–1020) is considered to be one of the greatest Persian poets to have ever lived. ...


The beauty of Persian girl and Persian mentality can be seen in numerous masterpieces of persian paintings and miniatures. Persian girl dressed in colors with Persian wine at hand has been a classic style for portraying love. However nudity can not be seen in these works in contrast to western paintings with religious themes or ancient Greek style. The themes of Persian miniature are mostly related to the Persian mythology and poetry. ...


Gender equality has been one of the basic principles of Persian culture for centuries. Lack of gender prejudice is one of the fundamental tenets of Zoroastrianism. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Faravahar (or Ferohar), the depiction of the human soul before birth and after death. ...


Centuries later, at the dawn of the 20th century, many Iranian modernists who had traveled to Europe for higher education, came back to view the Islamic veil as a symbol of backwardness. Its removal, in their view, was essential to the advancement of Iran and its dissociation from Arab-Islamic culture. For the counter-modernists who wanted to uphold the Islamic social and gender orders, the European woman became a scapegoat and a symbol of corruption, immorality, and Westernization. In the Iranian body-politic the imagined European woman provided the subtext for political maneuvers over women's rights and appearance in the public space.

Iran's Constitutional Revolution of 1905-11 became a turning point in the lives of Iranian women. Women participated in huge numbers and gained important positions for expressing their views, including journals, schools, and associations that flourished in the following period (1911-24).[2] Image File history File links Zeta_jones_ebadi. ... Image File history File links Zeta_jones_ebadi. ... Catherine Zeta-Jones as seen in the 2004 film The Terminal Catherine Zeta_Jones (born September 25, 1969) is an Academy Award-winning Welsh actress. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Shirin Ebadi Shirin Ebadi (Persian: شیرین عبادی; born June 21, 1947) is a Persian (Iranian) lawyer and human rights activist. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 195 km 710 km 2. ... The Persian Constitutional Revolution against the despotic rule of the last Qajar Shah started in 1905 and lasted until 1911. ...


But the defeat of the constitutionalists (1921-5) and the consolidation of power by Reza Shah (1925-41) had two contradictory impacts. Independent women's journals and groups were destroyed, while the state implemented social reforms such as mass education and paid employment for women. Reza Shah also initiated his controversial policy of Kashf-e-Hijab, banning the wearing of the Islamic Hijab in public. But like other sectors of the society in those years under Reza Shah's rule, women lost the right to express themselves and dissent was repressed. Shah Reza Pahlavi Reza Pahlavi (Persian: رضا پهلوی), (March 16, 1877–July 26, 1944), called Reza Shah the Great after his death, was Shah of Persia (later Iran) from December 15, 1925 to September 16, 1941. ...


With the advent of Iran's revolution in 1979, women's rights took yet another wild swing toward religious conservatism. Despite the decree of many of Iran's top clerics such as Ayatollah Taleghani, the state, under the rule of Ayatollah Khomeini made wearing the Hijab mandatory for all women, implementing strict religious codes for women in society. However, revolution brought many low and middle class women into public sphere. For many years, breaking the barrier of confinement of the private sphere has been a major source of frustration for advocates of women's rights in Iran. The Islamic revolution broke the barrier overnight. When Khomeini called for women to attend public demonstration and ignore the night curfew, millions of women who would otherwise not have dreamt of leaving their homes without their husbands' and fathers' permission or presence, took to the streets. Khomeini's call to rise up against the Shah took away any doubt in the minds of many devoted Muslim women about the propriety of taking to the streets during the day or at night. Ayatollah Khomeini founded the first modern Islamic republic Ayatollah Seyyed Ruhollah Khomeini (آیت‌الله روح‌الله خمینی in Persian) (May 17, 1900 – June 3, 1989) was an Iranian Shia cleric and the political and spiritual leader of the 1979 revolution that overthrew Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the then Shah of Iran. ...


The early 1990s witnessed a marked increase of employment for women. This increase was much more than the rate prior to the revolution. Such dramatic change in the pattern of labor force participation might not have been possible if Khomeini had not broken the barriers to women entering into the public sphere. Educational attainment for women, also a product of free education and the literacy campaign, contributed to this increase. In fact, today there are more women in higher education than there are men. The Islamic Republic had adopted certain policies to expand educational levels for women in order to ensure that sexual segregation paid off. These policies were to encourage women to become skilled workers in domains exclusive to women. For example, the government set quotas for female pediatricians and gynecologists and set up barriers against women wanting to become civil engineers.


In May 1997, a large number of women participated in presidential elections and overwhelmingly voted for Hojatolislam Mohammad Khatami, a reformist cleric who had promised reduction of repression and toleration of civil society institutions. His election opened a period when women could voice their ideas once again, with many becoming increasingly bolder in their demands and in their criticisms. The awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to Shirin Ebadi, an Iranian human rights and feminist activist, further emboldened Iranian feminists inside Iran and cemented their relationships with Iranian feminist activists abroad. Khatami may refer to either of three Iranian reformist politicians: Mohammad Khatami, President of Iran 1997-2005 Mohammad Reza Khatami, Vice Speaker of Iranian Parliament from 2001 to 2004 and brother of Mohammad Khatami, Ali Khatami, Iranian Vice President and Chief of Staff and brother of Mohammad and Mohammad Reza... Shirin Ebadi Shirin Ebadi (Persian: شیرین عبادی; born June 21, 1947) is a Persian (Iranian) lawyer and human rights activist. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ...


The Sixth Majles saw the emergence of some of Iran's strongest advocates of women's rights. Almost all of the 11 female lawmakers of The 190-seat Majles took on the challenge of trying to change some of Iran's more conservative laws amidst a male dominated culture. However, during the elections for the Seventh Majles, all of those representatives were banned to run for office by the all male Council of Guardians, only allowing conservative females to run for election. The new representatives, as expected, upon their arrival into office began reversing many of the laws passed by the reformist 6th Majles. مجلس شورای اسلامی - The Majles; Irans Parliament. ... The Guardian Council of the Constitution (شورای نگهبان قانون اساسی in Persian) is a high office within the constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran which has the authority to interpret the constitution and to determine if the laws passed by the parliament are in line with the constitution of...


Persian women's day

According to Iranian calendar, 29th of Bahman (18 February) is considered Persian women's day. History of the celebration dates back to ancient times and Zoroastrian tradition. Iranians also celebrate International Women's Day and also Islamic women's day (birthday of Prophet's daughter). The latter is the official women's day in Islamic Republic. This article is in need of attention. ... Zoroastrianism was adapted from an earlier, polytheistic faith by Zarathushtra (Zoroaster) in Persia very roughly around 1000 BC (although, in the absence of written records, some scholars estimates are as late as 600 BC). ... International Womens Day, or International Womans Day (IWD), is marked on 8 March every year. ... Muhammad (c. ...


Famous Iranian women and female entities

see also List of famous Iranian women Persian woman or Iranian woman usually refers to a woman of or from the traditional Persian culture. ...

Scientists

The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... Tufts University is a private university located in Medford, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston. ... Linköping University Linköping University (LiU) or Linköpings universitet is a state university in Linköping, Sweden. ... Linköping University Linköping University (LiU) or Linköpings universitet is a state university in Linköping, Sweden. ... The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a privately-funded American university in Stanford, California. ... NASA logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Northwestern University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian university, located in Evanston, Illinois and Chicago, Illinois. ... The University of California, Davis, commonly abbreviated to UC Davis or UCD is one of the ten University of California campuses. ... UT College of Social Sciences. ... Farshid Moussavi is founder of Foreign Office Architects Farshid Moussavi is an internationally recognized Iranian born architect. ... Anousheh Ansari is co-founder and CEO of Telecom Technologies, Inc. ... The X prize logo shows a stylised letter X representing a spacecraft trajectory and containing a starfield. ... Dr. Saba Valadkhan is an Iranian-born Assistant Professor and RNA researcher at Case Western Reserve University. ... The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an organization that promotes cooperation between scientists, defends scientific freedom, encourages scientific responsibility and supports scientific education for the betterment of all humanity. ...

Scholars and authors

  • Shirin Ebadi, 2003 Nobel Laureate.
  • Mehrangiz Kar, lawyer.
  • Jaleh Amouzegar, Iranologist
  • Simin Daneshvar, Highly celebrated novelist
  • Lady Amin (Banoo Amin), Jurisprudent and Theologian.
  • Sediqeh Dowlatabadi, author and pioneer of persian women's movement in modern Iran
  • Negar Mottahedeh, Professor of literature and author
  • Mahnaz Kousha, Author and Professor of Sociology at Macalester College
  • Forough Jahanbakhsh, Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies at Queen’s University
  • Afsaneh Najmabadi, Professor of History and of Studies of Women, Harvard University
  • Ziba Mir-Hosseini, Iranian Anthropologist and Professor of Middle Eastern studies
  • Mehrnaz Saeed-Vafa, Author, critic and film professor at Columbia College, Chicago.
  • Farideh Goldin, Author, Wedding Song: Memoirs of an Iranian Jewish Woman. www.FaridehGoldin.com

Shirin Ebadi Shirin Ebadi (Persian: شیرین عبادی; born June 21, 1947) is a Persian (Iranian) lawyer and human rights activist. ... Mehrangiz Kar(Born 1944 Ahvaz Iran) is a prominent Iranian lawyer, human right activist and author. ... Simin Daneshvar ( سیمین دانشور ;in Persian) ( 1921) was an Iranian novelist and translator . ... Hajiyeh Seyyedeh Nosrat Beygom Amin also Banoo Amin or Lady Amin (1886 -1983, in Persian: بانو امين) was an Iranian jurisprudent and theologian. ...

Artists and poets

Niki Karimi Niki Karimi (In Persian: نیکی کریمی) born on 10 November 1971, Tehran (Iran), is an internationally recognised beautiful Iranian actress and movie director. ... Image:Makhmalbaf-samira. ... Shohreh Aghdashloo (Persian: شهره آغداشلو, born 11 May 1952 in Tehran, Persia (Iran) is a Los Angeles-based, Persian actress and self-proclaimed activist. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Catherine Bell For the politician, see Catherine J. Bell Catherine Lisa Bell (born August 14, 1968 in London, England) is a British born American actress & model who was, until recently, the co-star of the CBS television show JAG. // Biography Bell is the daughter of a British father of Scottish... JAG (the American Military acronym for Judge Advocate General) was an American adventure drama television show, produced by Belisarius Productions, in association with Paramount Television Network. ... Tami Stronach, (born Tamara Stronach in Teheran, Iran, 31 July 1972), is a dancer and choreographer, and has worked as an actor. ... The Neverending Story, 1997 Puffin Books paperback edition The Neverending Story (Die Unendliche Geschichte) is a fantasy novel by Michael Ende, first published in 1979. ... Sooni Taraporevala is best known as the screenwriter for the Oscar-nominated Salaam Bombay! and Mississippi Masala, both directed by Mira Nair. ... This article is about (members of) the Parsi Zoroastrian community in and from India. ... Mahsati Dabira was a 12th century poetess of Persia. ... Rabee or Rabee Ghazdari (in Persian:رابعه قزداري; ca. ... Mah Sharaf Khanom Mastoureh Ardalan or Mastura Ardalan ( Mestûrey Erdelan in Kurdish ) (1805 -1848) was a Kurdish poet and writer. ... Parvin Etesami is one of Irans greatest poetesses. ... Forooghs tomb is located in Darband, Shemiran, Tehran. ... Simin Behbahani (in Persian: سیمین بهبهانی; born in 1927, Tehran, Iran) is an Iranian poetess. ... Says Classical Guitar Magazine in 2002: Lily Afshar is a guitarist of the highest order. ... Arfa Atrai One of Irans most renouned masters of Santour was born in 1941 in Tehran. ... The santur (سَنتور) is a hammered dulcimer of Persia. ... Leila (real name: Leila Arab) moved to London after the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran. ... Laleh Pourkarim is a Persian-Swedish singer-songwriter of Iranian origin. ... Esmat Bagherpour Panbehzan(باقرپور پنبه زن), known as Delkash (دلکش), (February 26, 1925 - September 2, 2004) was an Iranian female singer, singing in Persian and the local Iranian languages of Guilaki and Mazandarani. ... Faegheh Atashin (born 1950), nick named Googoosh, is an Iranian (Persian) pop singer and actress. ... Nooshafarin (also spelled Noosh Afarin--which means creator of joy in Persian) is an Iranian singer residing in southern California. ... Marzieh or Marziyeh is a Persian traditional singer. ...

Political

Masoumeh Ebtekar (معصومه ابتکار; born 1960) is an Iranian Vice President and the head of the Environment Protection Organization of Iran under President Mohammad Khatami. ... Goli Ameri Goli Ameri (in Persian:Ú¯Ù„ÛŒ عامری) (nee Goli Yazdi) is a Republican Iranian-American businesswoman who ran for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives from Oregon. ... Christiane Amanpour Christiane Amanpour (born January 12, 1958) is chief international correspondent for CNN. Based out of CNNs London bureau, Amanpour is one of the most recognized and highly distinguished international correspondents on American television. ... Fatemeh Haghighatjou (فاطمه حقیقت‌جو in Persian) was a member of the Iranian Parliament. ... President Rafsanjani Akbar Hashemi Bahramani kharkosteh (Persian: اکبر هاشمی بهرمانی), famously known as Hashemi Rafsanjani (هاشمی رفسنجانی) (born August 25, 1934) is one of the most influential Iranian politicians, and the Chairman of the Expediency Discernment Council of Iran. ... Elaheh Koulaei is an Iranian (persian) political scientist and a reformist intellectual. ... Maryam Rajavi is an Iranian political activist, born in 1953 in Tehran, Iran. ... Shahla Habibi was Irans Presidential Advisor on Womens Affairs from 1995 to 1999. ... Dr. Nasrin Soltankhan is an Iranian politician who presently holds positions in both the local and the executive branch of the Iranian government. ... Fatemeh Javadi is an Iranian paleontologist and Vice-President. ...

Royalty

Temple of Anahita: Goddess of ancient Persia, Iran. ... Roxana (in Bactrian Roshanak, currently Rukhsana in the Indian Subcontinent, lit. ... Queen Poran, the only woman on the throne of the Sassanid dynasty, 630 AD.State Hermitage Museum ,St. ... Gordafarid is one of the heroines in Ferdowsis Shahnama. ... Shahr Banu was a daughter of the last Sassanid emperor, Yazdegerd III. After the defeat of her father, she was taken captive by the Arab armies and sent to Medina where she was married to Husayn ibn Ali, the grandson of Muhammad. ... Mughal empress Nur Jehan. ... Seyyedeh Khatun (decease 1029) was a sultaness of Buwayhids (Diylamids) of Ray (Rages), Isfahan and Hamadan (Buwayhid dynasty of Iran). ... Akhangan tomb, where Gohar-Taj is buried. ... Princess Soraya of Iran Soraya Esfandiary Bakhtiari (b. ... Farah Diba-Pahlavi Farah Diba, as she appeared during the visit of US president Richard Nixon to Iran on May 30, 1972. ... Princess Fawzia Her Royal Highness Princess Fawzia bint Fuad of Egypt (Arabic: فوزية بنت الملك فؤاد) (Alexandria, Egypt, November 5, 1921 -) was a Queen of Iran having been the first wife of the last Shah of Iran and a sister of King Farouk I. Though referred to as a princess out of courtesy, she... Leila Pahlavi (March 27, 1970 – June 10, 2001) was a Princess of Iran. ... Arjumand Banu Begum was born April 1593 in Agra. ... The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... This article or section should be merged with Shah Jahen—preferably maintaining this as the main entry. ... The Taj Mahal This article is about the Indian monument. ...

Sport

Laleh Seddigh (sometimes spelled Sadiq) (born 1977, Iran) is one of the only Iranian women race car drivers. ...

In the news

Ramona Amiri Ramona Amiri (Persian:رامونا امیری ) is an Iranian Canadian woman who won the Miss World Canada contest in 2005. ... Nazanin Afshin-Jam (نازنین افشین جم in Persian), born 1979 in Tehran, Iran, is a former Miss Canada. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Ladan and Laleh Bijani (in Persian: لادن و لاله بیژنی) (January 17, 1974–July 8, 2003) were Iranian law graduates. ... Joschka Fischer Joseph Martin Joschka Fischer (born April 12, 1948) was German foreign minister and Vice Chancellor in the government of Gerhard Schröder from 1998 to 2005. ... Rudi Bakthiar Rudi Bakhtiar (born June 21, 1966 in Fresno, California) (born Rudabeh Bakhtiar, in Persian:رودابه بختیار) is a contributor to Anderson Cooper 360° on CNN. Although born in California, Bakhtiar was raised in Iran until the revolution when her family moved to the United States. ...

Others

Fatemeh Haghighatjou, bold reformist of the 6th Majlis who resigned in protest. Currently a visiting scholar at MIT.
Fatemeh Haghighatjou, bold reformist of the 6th Majlis who resigned in protest. Currently a visiting scholar at MIT.
  • Esther of the Purim Story
  • Shahrazad of 1001 Nights
  • Táhirih
  • Katajun Amirpur, Journalist and feminist author
  • Shahla Lahiji, human right activist and one of the pioneers of persian women's movement
  • Shahla Sherkat, editor and one of the pioneers of women's movement in contemporary Iran
  • Zahra Rahnavard, the first female chancellor of University after revolution
  • Masih Alinejad , parliamentary journalist expelled from Majlis
  • Zahra Eshraghi, feminist activist
  • Pari Esfandiari
  • Parisa Khosravi, Senior Vice President and Managing Editor, International Newsgathering
  • Zahra Kazemi, slain political photographer.
  • Azar Nafisi, feminist activist and novelist
  • Marjane Satrapi, activist and graphic novelist
  • Shadi Sadr, feminist activist
  • Nassim Sahar, vegan activist.
  • Massoumeh Shafi'ei (Akbar Ganji's wife), activist
  • Mahsa Shekarloo, feminist activist
  • Susan Shariati, activist and daughter of Ali Shariati


see also List of famous Iranian women Fatemeh Haghighatjoo, Member of Irans Sixth Parliament. ... Fatemeh Haghighatjoo, Member of Irans Sixth Parliament. ... Fatemeh Haghighatjou (فاطمه حقیقت‌جو in Persian) was a member of the Iranian Parliament. ... Majlis is an Arabic term used to describe various types of formal legislative assemblies in countries with linguistic or cultural connections to Islamic countries. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a research and educational institution located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is a world leader in science and technology, as well as in many other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... Haddassah more commonly known as Esther (אֶסְתֵּר, Standard Hebrew Ester, Tiberian Hebrew ʾEstÄ“r) was a woman in the Hebrew Bible, the queen of Ahasuerus (commonly identified with Xerxes I or Artaxerxes I), and heroine of the Biblical Book of Esther which is named after her. ... Scheherazade or Shahrazad (Persian: شهرزاد Shahrzad) is the (fictional) storyteller of The Book of One Thousand and One Nights. ... Táhirih (literally The Pure One) and Qurrat al-Ayn (قرة العين, literally Comfort of the Eyes or Solace of the Eyes) are the religious titles of Fatima Baraghani (1814-1820, died 1852 - birth date uncertain, as birth records were destroyed at her execution), an influential poet and theologian of the B... Shahla Lahiji (Born 1942) is an Iranian writer-publisher, translator, and director of Roshangaran, a prominent publishing house of books on womens issues. ... Shahla Sherkat (Born 1956 Isfahan Iran) is a prominent Persian feminist author, journalist and one of the pioneers of Iranian womens movement. ... Suffrage parade in New York City on May 6, 1912 The Feminist movement (also known as the Womens Movement and Womens Liberation) campaigns on issues such as reproductive rights, domestic violence, maternity leave, equal pay, sexual harassment, discrimination and sexual violence. ... Zahra Rahnavard (Persian: زهرا رهنورد) is the chancellor of Al-zahra University in Tehran, Iran, since September 23, 1998, and a Political Adviser to the Iranian President Mohammad Khatami. ... Granddaughter of the late Supreme Ayatollah Khomeini, and wife of Mohammad Reza Khatami (since 1983), head of the Islamic Iran Participation Front, the main reformist party in the country. ... Zahra Ziba Kazemi-Ahmadabadi (زهرا کاظمی احمدآبادی in Persian)‎ (1949 - July 11, 2003) was an Iranian (Persian)-born freelance photographer, residing in Montreal (Canada), who died in custody of Iranian officials following her arrest in her native country. ... Azar Nafisi speaking at the 2004 National Book Festival in Washington D.C. Azar Nafisi, Ph. ... Marjane Satrapi self portrait Marjane Satrapi (born November 22, 1969 in Rasht, Iran) is a contemporary graphic novelist and illustrator. ... Akbar Ganji (اکبر گنجی in Persian) is an Iranian journalist and writer, imprisoned in Evin prison since April 22, 2000 after he took part in a conference held in Berlin on April 7 and 8, 2000. ... Dr Shariati Ali Shariati (Persian: علی شريعتی‎) (1933–1977) was an Iranian sociologist, well known and respected for his works in the field of sociology of religion. ... Persian woman or Iranian woman usually refers to a woman of or from the traditional Persian culture. ...


Sources

  • Note 1: The Iranians: Persia, Islam and the Soul of a Nation, by Sandra Mackey. (Penguin Group, 1996).
  • Note 2: J. Afary, The Iranian constitutional revolution, 1906-11. Grassroots democracy, social democracy, and the origins of feminism, New York 1996.
  • Arthur Cotterell, From Aristotle to Zoroaster, 1998, ISBN 0-684-85596-8
  • Piyrnia, Mansoureh. Salar Zanana Iran. 1995. Maryland: Mehran Iran Publishing.

See also

// Persian art See main article: Iranian art Iranian art has gone throuigh numerous phases of evolution. ...

Further Info and external links


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