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Encyclopedia > Ipswich
Ipswich
—  Town  —
Borough of Ipswich

Shown within Suffolk
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent Country England
Region East of England
County Suffolk
Borough Ipswich
Government Leadership:Leader & Cabinet
 - Type Ipswich Borough Council
 - MPs Michael Lord, Chris Mole
Area - Ranked 320th
 - Borough 15.2 sq mi (39.42 km²)
Population
 - Borough Ranked 164th
120,400
 - Density 7,909.8/sq mi (3,054/km²)
 - Urban 138,718
 - Ethnicity 90.5% White
2.1% Black
3.9% S.Asian
1.1% Chinese or Other
2.4% Mixed RaceUNIQ17f328de73,069c8-ref-00,000,000-QINU
ONS code 42UD
Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street
Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street
The Ancient House is decorated with a particularly fine example of pargeting
The Ancient House is decorated with a particularly fine example of pargeting

Ipswich (pronunciation ; IPA: /ˈɪpswɪtʃ/) is a non-metropolitan district in and the county town of Suffolk, England on the estuary of the River Orwell. The town of the same name overspills the borough boundaries significantly, with only 85% of the town's population living within the borough at the time of the 2001 Census, when it was the third-largest settlement in the United Kingdom's East of England region, and the 38th largest urban area in England.[2] There are a number of places named Ipswich: Ipswich, Queensland, Australia Ipswich, England Ipswich, Massachusetts, United States Ipswich, South Dakota, United States There are also articles about: Ipswich Town F.C. - an English Football League team Ipswich (musician) - the stage name for a British singer Ipswichian interglacial This is a... Suffolk districts File links The following pages link to this file: Ipswich Categories: GFDL images ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... This article discusses states as sovereign political entities. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to administrative counties of England. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Sir Michael Nicholson Lord (born October 17, 1938, Manchester) is a British politician, and Conservative Member of Parliament for Suffolk Central and Ipswich North. ... Chris Mole Christopher David Mole (born March 16, 1958, Bromley) is the current member of Parliament for Ipswich in east England, and a member of the ruling Labour Party. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1076x768, 211 KB) Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street in Ipswich town centre. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1076x768, 211 KB) Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street in Ipswich town centre. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x774, 212 KB) The Ancient House in Buttermarket Ipswich has a facade which shows a particularly fine example of w:pargeting. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x774, 212 KB) The Ancient House in Buttermarket Ipswich has a facade which shows a particularly fine example of w:pargeting. ... The Ancient House, Ipswich The Ancient House, Ipswich, also known as Sparrowes House, is a Grade I listed building dating from the 1400s located in the Buttermarket area. ... Pargeting is a decorative plastering applied to building walls. ... Image File history File links En-uk-Ipswich. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... The River Orwell from Suffolk Yacht Harbour The River Orwell is a river in the county of Suffolk, England. ... In 2001 censuses were conducted in Canada: Canada 2001 Census Nepal: Demographics of Nepal Portugal Slovakia: Demographics of Slovakia United Kingdom: United Kingdom Census 2001 Categories: Demographics ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


As of 2006, the borough is estimated to have a population of approximately 120,000 inhabitants. 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

The Eemian interglacial is known as the Ipswichian period in geology and occurred about 120,000 years ago.[3] Two ice core temperature records; the Eemian is at a depth of about 1500-1800 meters in the lower graph The Eemian interglacial era (known as the Sangamon interglacial in North America, the Ipswichian interglacial in the UK, and the Riss-Würm interglacial in the Alps) is the second...


Under the Roman empire, the area around Ipswich formed an important route inland to rural towns and settlements via the Orwell and Gipping. A large Roman fort, part of the coast defences of Britain, stood at Felixstowe (13 miles, 21 km), and the largest villa in Suffolk stood at Castle Hill (north-west Ipswich). For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Orwell (or Orwellian) can refer to: The writer George Orwell (pen name for Eric Blair). ... The River Gipping is the source river for the River Orwell in the county of Suffolk in East Anglia, England. ... Basic ideal plan of a Roman castrum. ... , For the Aircraft manufacturer, see Seaplane Experimental Station, Felixstowe Felixstowe is a North Sea seaport in Suffolk, England. ... The Albertian Villa Medici in Fiesole: terraced grounds on a sloping site. ...


Ipswich is one of England's oldest towns,[4][5] and took shape in Anglo-Saxon times as the main centre between York and London for North Sea trade to Scandinavia and the Rhine. It served the Kingdom of East Anglia, and began developing in the time of King Rædwald, supreme ruler of the English (616-624). The famous ship-burial and treasure at Sutton Hoo nearby (9 miles, 14.5 km) is probably his grave. The Ipswich Museum houses replicas of the Roman Mildenhall Treasure and the Sutton Hoo treasure. A gallery devoted to the town's origins includes Anglo-Saxon weapons, jewellery and other artefacts. There are various towns which lay rival claims to be the oldest town in Britain: Abingdon in Oxfordshire Colchester in Essex Marazion in Cornwall Contents // (See talk. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rhine (disambiguation). ... Norfolk and Suffolk, the core area of East Anglia. ... Rædwald, son of Tytila, was King of the East Angles from c 600 AD until his death in c 624 AD. From c 616 he became the most powerful of the English rulers south of the River Humber, and by military action installed a Northumbrian ruler acquiescent to his... Sutton Hoo ceremonial helmet (British Museum, restored). ... IPSWICH MUSEUM Early History 1846-1945 Ipswich Museum was founded in 1846 and opened in 1847 in Museum Street, then newly laid-out, with the specific remit to educate the working classes in natural history. ... Look up replica in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the village of Mildenhall, Suffolk. ... Sutton Hoo parade helmet Sutton Hoo, near Woodbridge, Suffolk, is the site of an early 7th century Anglo-Saxon ship burial, discovered in 1939 that contains a wealth of artifacts. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... For other uses, see Weapon (disambiguation). ... For the Korean music group, see Jewelry (group). ...


The seventh-century town, called 'Gippeswick'[6] was centred near the quay. Towards 700 AD, Frisian potters from the Netherlands area settled in Ipswich and set up the first large-scale potteries in England since Roman times. Their wares were traded far across England, and the industry was unique to Ipswich for 200 years.[7][8] With growing prosperity, in about 720 AD a large new part of the town was laid out in the Buttermarket area. Ipswich was becoming a place of national and international importance.[9] Parts of the ancient road plan still survive in its modern streets. After the invasion of 869 Ipswich fell under Viking rule. The earth ramparts circling the town centre were probably raised by Vikings in Ipswich around 900 to prevent its recapture by the English.[10][11] They were unsuccessful. The town operated a Mint under royal licence from King Edgar of England in the 970s, which continued through the Norman Conquest until the time of King John, in about 1215.[12] The abbreviation 'Gipes' appears on the coins. For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ... King Edgar or Eadgar I ( 942 – July 8, 975) was the younger son of King Edmund I of England. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... This article is about the King of England. ...


King John granted the town its first charter in 1200, laying the mediaeval foundations of its modern civil government.[13][14] In the next four centuries it made the most of its wealth, trading Suffolk cloth with the Continent.[citation needed] Five large religious houses, including two Augustinian Priories (St Peter and St Paul, and Holy Trinity, both mid-12th century[15]), and those of the Greyfriars (Franciscans, before 1298), Ipswich Whitefriars (Carmelites founded 1278-79) and Blackfriars (Dominicans, before 1263), stood in mediaeval Ipswich. The last Carmelite Prior of Ipswich was the celebrated John Bale, author of the oldest English historical verse-drama (Kynge Johan, c.1538).[16] There were also several hospitals, including the leper hospital of St Mary Magdalene, founded before 1199. During the Middle Ages the Marian Shrine of Our Lady of Grace was a famous pilgrimage destination, and attracted many pilgrims including Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon.[17][18] At the Reformation the statue was taken away to London to be burned, though some claim that it survived and is preserved at Nettuno, Italy.[19] A city charter or town charter (generically, municipal charter) is a legal document establishing a municipality such as a city or town. ... It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... The Order of Our Lady of Mt. ... John Bale John Bale (21 November 1495–November, 1563) was an English churchman, historian and controversialist, Bishop of Ossory. ... Our Lady redirects here. ... This article is about the religious or spiritual journey. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... The recently-widowed young Catherine of Aragon, by Henry VIIs court painter, Michael Sittow, c. ... Nettuno is a town and commune of the province of Rome in the Lazio region of central Italy, 60 kilometers south of Rome. ...


Around 1380, Geoffrey Chaucer satirised the merchants of Ipswich in the Canterbury Tales. Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, the son of a wealthy landowner, was born in Ipswich about 1475. One of Henry VIII's closest political allies, he founded a college in the town in 1528, which was for its brief duration one of the homes of the Ipswich School.[20] He remains one of the town's most famed figures. Chaucer redirects here. ... Canterbury Tales Woodcut 1484 The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). ... Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, (c. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... Ipswich School is a private day and boarding school in Ipswich, Suffolk, England, serving pupils of both sexes from two to eighteen years of age. ...


In the time of Queen Mary the Ipswich Martyrs were burnt at the stake on the Cornhill for their Protestant beliefs. A monument commemorating this event now stands in Christchurch Park. From 1611 to 1634 Ipswich was a major centre for emigration to New England. This was encouraged by the Town Lecturer, Samuel Ward. His brother Nathaniel Ward was first minister of Ipswich, Massachusetts, where a promontory was named 'Castle Hill' after the place of that name in north-west Ipswich, UK. Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... The Cornhill in Ipswich, Suffolk, fronted by the Town Hall, has been at the centre of the towns life since Anglo-Saxon Times, the focus for markets, public meetings, fairs and civic ceremonies. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Christchurch Park is a 70-acre area of rolling lawns, wooded areas, and delicately created arboreta in central Ipswich, Suffolk, England. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Samuel Ward (1577-1639) was an English academic and a master at the University of Cambridge. ... The Reverend Nathaniel Ward (1578 — October 1652) wrote the first constitution in North America in 1641. ... Ipswich is a coastal town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. ...


The painter Thomas Gainsborough lived and worked in Ipswich. In 1835, Charles Dickens stayed in Ipswich and used it as a setting for scenes in his novel The Pickwick Papers. The hotel where he resided first opened in 1518; it was then known as The Tavern and is now known as the Great White Horse Hotel. Dickens made the hotel famous in chapter XXI of The Pickwick Papers, vividly describing the hotel's meandering corridors and stairs. Thomas Gainsborough (christened 14 May 1727 – 2 August 1788) was one of the most famous portrait and landscape painters of 18th century Britain. ... Dickens redirects here. ... The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. ...


In 1797 Lord and Lady Nelson moved to Ipswich, and in 1800 Lord Nelson was appointed High Steward of Ipswich. Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, KB (29 September 1758 – 21 October 1805) was a British admiral famous for his participation in the Napoleonic Wars, most notably in the Battle of Trafalgar, a decisive British victory in the war, during which he lost his life. ...


In the mid-19th century Coprolite was discovered, the material was mined and then dissolved in acid, the resulting mixture forming the basis of Fisons fertilizer business.[21] Coprolite is the name given to the mineral that results when human or animal semen is fossilized. ... For other uses, see acid (disambiguation). ... Fisons Plc was a British pharmaceutical, scientific instrument and horticultural chemical maufacturer based in Ipswich, in the United Kingdom. ...


Modern Ipswich

Ipswich has undergone an extensive gentrification programme in recent years, principally centred around the waterfront. Though this has turned a deindustrialized dock area into an emerging residential and commercial centre, it is being completed at the expense of much of the town's industrial and maritime heritage and in spite of efforts made by a local civic group, The Ipswich Society. Much of this development is residential and is marketed at high net-worth individuals in the DINKY demographic. As such, some have considered it incompatible with Ipswich's existing socio-economic mix. It could therefore be considered to be aimed at encouraging economic migration to the town, particularly as a commutable satellite town of London. In San Francisco, during the mid-1960s, the bohemian center of the city shifted from the old Beat enclave of North Beach to Haight-Ashbury (pictured) as a response to gentrification. ... Deindustrialization is the process by which the manufacturing-based economy of a country or region declines. ... St Petersburg Docks in the early morning smog. ... Demolition of the former Penn Station concourse raised public awareness about preservation Historic preservation is the act of maintaining and repairing existing historic materials and the retention of a propertys form as it has evolved over time. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Yuppie. ... Socioeconomics is the study of the social and economic impacts of any product or service offering, market intervention or other activity on an economy as a whole and on the companies, organization and individuals who are its main economic actors. ... Immigration is the act of relocating to another country or region, whether temporarily or permanently. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with satellite city. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The Tolly Cobbold brewery, built in the 19th century and rebuilt 1894–1896, is one of the finest Victorian breweries in the United Kingdom. There was a Cobbold brewery in the town from 1746 until 2002 when Ridley's Breweries took Tolly Cobbold over.[22] Felix Thornley Cobbold presented Christchurch Mansion to the town in 1896. Tolly Cobbold is a former brewing company, with strong roots in Suffolk, England. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Kettles in a modern Trappist brewery A brewery can be a building or place that produces beer, or a business (brewing company) whose trade is the production and sale of beer. ... // [edit] Location and history The Ridleys Brewery was originally based in Hartford End, Essex. ... Felix Thornley Cobbold, MP, (8 September 1841 – 6 December 1909) was a Cambridge educated barrister, a senior fellow of Kings College, Cambridge and an English politician. ... Christchurch Mansion is a stately home in the centre of Ipswich, England. ...

Former stables,[23] reflected in the glass panels of the Willis Building

The town centre contains the glass-clad building owned by Willis Limited, properly called the Willis Building but still often called the "Willis-Faber building" by locals, as the company Willis Corroon themselves used to be called Willis Faber. Designed by Norman Foster, the building dates from 1974. It became the youngest Grade I listed building in Britain in 1991 and at the time one of only two buildings to be listed and be under 30 years of age.[24] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 603 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 603 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Willis Faber and Dumas Headquarters, Ipswich, was one of Norman Fosters earliest commissions after founding Foster Associates. ... Willis Faber and Dumas Headquarters, Ipswich, was one of Norman Fosters earliest commissions after founding Foster Associates. ... The restored Reichstag in Berlin, housing the German parliament. ... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ...


Ipswich is set to be the main hub for University Campus Suffolk, which will give Suffolk its first university, though it is essentially a collaborative project between Suffolk College and two other regional universities. It is hoped that within a decade, a University of Suffolk in its own right will become established out of UCS. University Campus Suffolk is an educational institution located in the county of Suffolk, United Kingdom that will welcome its first students in September 2007. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ...


On 13 March 2007 Ipswich was awarded the cleanest town award.[25] is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Ipswich remains a 'town' despite a few attempts at winning 'city' status.[26] It does not have a cathedral, so the Bishop of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich is based at Bury St Edmunds the former headquarters of West Suffolk. Seat of the Bishop of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich in the Cathedral Church of Saint James, Bury St Edmunds The Bishop of Saint Edmundsbury and Ipswich is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Saint Edmundsbury and Ipswich in the Province of Canterbury. ... , Bury St Edmunds is a town in the county of Suffolk, England, and was formerly the county town of West Suffolk. ... West Suffolk was created along with East Suffolk in 1888 as an administrative county of England in its own right. ...


Districts

The Docks is the area around the old commercial docks that are now devoted essentially to leisure use. The area includes extensive recent development of residential apartment blocks and includes the campus of the new University College.


Holywells is the area around Holywells Park, a 67 acre (27 ha) public park, situated near the docks, that was painted by Thomas Gainsborough. Holywells Park as portrayed by Thomas Gainsborough Holywells Park is a 67 acre public park in Ipswich, England situated between Nacton Road and Cliff Lane, near the docks. ... Thomas Gainsborough (christened 14 May 1727 – 2 August 1788) was one of the most famous portrait and landscape painters of 18th century Britain. ...


Chantry is the name of a housing estate and park to the South-West of Ipswich. Its schools include Chantry High School and the Chantry Infant and Junior Schools which have merged, and been renamed 'The Oaks'. Another school that can be found in the outskirts of Chantry is St Joseph's College.


Other districts outside the town centre include Bixley Farm, Broke Hall, California, Castle Hill, The Dales, Gainsborough, Greenwich, Kesgrave, Maidenhall, Pinebrook, Priory Heath, Racecourse, Ravenswood, Rose Hill, Rushmere, Springvale, St Margarets, Stoke, Warren Heath, Whitehouse and Whitton.


To the east of the town is Trinity Park near Bucklesham the home of the annual Suffolk Show one of the County shows in United Kingdom. The 'Trinity' is the name given to the three animals native to the county of Suffolk, namely Red Poll cattle, the powerful Suffolk Punch horse and the black faced Suffolk Sheep. Bucklesham is a village and civil parish in the Suffolk Coastal district of Suffolk, England, a few miles east of Ipswich. ... During the warmer months in the UK there has developed over the last two centuries what one can call County Shows. ... The Red Poll is a breed of cattle developed in England around the beginning of the of the 19th century . ... Suffolk draft horses The Suffolk Punch is one of the breeds of draft horses. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Culture

Willis Faber and Dumas Headquarters in Ipswich, was one of Norman Foster's earliest commissions.
Willis Faber and Dumas Headquarters in Ipswich, was one of Norman Foster's earliest commissions.

Like many other similar towns, Ipswich is home to many artists, with galleries at Christchurch Mansion, the Town Hall, a gallery in the Ancient House and the Artists Gallery in Electric House being the more prominent. The visual arts are further supported with many sites of sculpture with easy accessibility. The Borough Council promotes creation of new public works of art and has been known to make this a condition of planning permission.[27] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1252x790, 193 KB) Willis Faber and Dumas Headquarters, in Ipswich, England (also known as the Willis building). This building was one of Norman Fosters first major commissions. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1252x790, 193 KB) Willis Faber and Dumas Headquarters, in Ipswich, England (also known as the Willis building). This building was one of Norman Fosters first major commissions. ... The restored Reichstag in Berlin, housing the German parliament. ... Christchurch Mansion is a stately home in the centre of Ipswich, England. ... The Ancient House, Ipswich The Ancient House, Ipswich, also known as Sparrowes House, is a Grade I listed building dating from the 1400s located in the Buttermarket area. ...


The town houses Ipswich Museum and the Ipswich Transport Museum. IPSWICH MUSEUM Early History 1846-1945 Ipswich Museum was founded in 1846 and opened in 1847 in Museum Street, then newly laid-out, with the specific remit to educate the working classes in natural history. ... The Ipswich Transport Museum is a museum in Ipswich, Suffolk, England devoted principally to the history of road vehicles as represented by those used or built in its local area. ...


Performing arts are well represented with Ipswich being home to DanceEast which has the primary aim of advocating innovation and development of dance in the East of England.[28] They are building new premises as part of the waterfront development. These will be the first custom built dance facilities in the East of England at a cost of around £8million.


The Eastern Angles theatre group are based at the Sir John Mills Theatre [1] in Ipswich, named after the famous actor who lived in Felixstowe as a child. John Mills as Professor Bernard Quatermass in the Thames Television science-fiction serial Quatermass (1979). ...


Since 1991, there has been an annual arts festival called Ip-Art [2] which brings together many events across art disciplines and different venues, notably a free music day in Christchurch Park, which in 2006 had over 50 different acts performing over 7 stages. An arts festival (also art festival) or art fair is a festival that focuses on the visual arts. ... Christchurch Park is a 70-acre area of rolling lawns, wooded areas, and delicately created arboreta in central Ipswich, Suffolk, England. ...


Norwich remains the regional centre for TV broadcasting, but both BBC East and Anglia TV have presenters and offices in Ipswich. The town has three local radio stations, BBC Radio Suffolk covering the entire county, where the East Anglian Accent can be heard on its many phone-ins, the commercial SGR-FM which was founded in 1975 as Radio Orwell covering the A14 corridor in Suffolk and Town 102 which was founded in 2006 and is the first full time commercial station specific for Ipswich. The younger audience is catered for with Suffolk based Kiss 105-108. On 15 August 2007, Ipswich Community Radio launched full-time after successfully gaining a licence in early 2006. For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ... BBC East is the BBC English Region that produces local television and radio programming for Norfolk, Suffolk, northern Essex, Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, southern Northamptonshire andBuckinghamshire. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... BBC Radio Suffolk is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Suffolk, commencing broadcasts on 12 April 1990. ... The East Anglian Accent is the name generally given to the group of English accents used by the majority of people in the rural eastern part of England, popularly known as East Anglia. ... The Radio Orwell logo SGR FM evolved from Suffolk Group Radio which was the parent company for two Independent Local Radio stations serving the county of Suffolk in England. ... Town 102 is a radio station serving Ipswich, owned by Tindle Radio plc. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with KISS 105-108. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


The town's daily evening newspaper is the Evening Star (Ipswich) which is the sister title to the county's daily morning newspaper the East Anglian Daily Times. The main office of the Evening Star in Lower Brook Street, Ipswich. ... The East Anglian Daily Times is a daily newspaper for Suffolk and Essex. ...


Buildings

In addition to Christchurch Mansion and the Ancient House, Ipswich in the 21st century has some important cultural buildings including the New Wolsey Theatre and the Regent Theatre - the largest theatre venue in East Anglia where in the 1960's The Beatles performed under its former name the Gaumont. The Regent Theatre is a theatre in Ipswich, Suffolk, England. ... Norfolk and Suffolk, the core area of East Anglia. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Gaumont Pictures were founded in 1895 by the engineer-turned-inventor, Léon Gaumont (1864-1946). ...


There are several medieval[29] Ipswich churches but the grandest is the Victorian St Mary le Tower.


Modern buildings include the new Suffolk County Hall in the area known as Ipswich Village close to Ipswich Town's Portman Road stadium. The stadium has hosted England under 21, under 23 and full international matches in addition to an England hockey game. Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... Portman Road is the home ground of English Football club Ipswich Town. ...


On the north-west side of Ipswich lies Broomhill Pool, a Grade II listed Olympic-sized lido which opened in 1938 and closed in 2002, since which time a campaign to see it restored and re-opened has been run.


Politics

Ipswich Borough Council offices, on Russell Road
Ipswich Borough Council offices, on Russell Road

Ipswich is governed locally by a two-tier Council System. Ipswich Borough Council fulfils District Council functions such as refuse collection, housing and planning and Suffolk County Council provides the County Council services such as transport, education and social services. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 469 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1203 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 469 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1203 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... Suffolk County Council Is the administrative authority for the county of Suffolk, England, providing a range of services under the control of elected county councillors that include education, planning, transport and streets, social services, public safety and more. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ...


Between 1979 and September 2004 Ipswich Borough Council was under Labour control but the town is now governed by a coalition of Conservative and Liberal Democrat Councillors with Labour in opposition. The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative and Unionist Party, more commonly known as the Conservative Party, is currently the largest majortiy opposition party in the United Knigdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long...


Suffolk County Council was controlled by a Labour/Liberal Democrat administration between May 1993 and May 2005 but has since reverted to Conservative control, although 10 out of the 13 County Councillors representing Ipswich are Labour and only 1 is a Conservative.


The town is covered by two parliamentary constituencies – Ipswich (UK Parliament constituency), which covers about 75% and is represented by Labour MP Chris Mole, and Central Suffolk & North Ipswich, which covers the remaining 25% and is represented by Conservative MP Michael Lord. Ipswich is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Chris Mole Christopher David Mole (born March 16, 1958, Bromley) is the current member of Parliament for Ipswich in east England, and a member of the ruling Labour Party. ... Central Suffolk and North Ipswich is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Sir Michael Nicholson Lord (born October 17, 1938, Manchester) is a British politician, and Conservative Member of Parliament for Suffolk Central and Ipswich North. ...


In April 2006 the borough council initiated public discussions about the idea of turning the borough into a unitary authority[30] (Ipswich had constituted a county borough from 1889 to 1974, independent of the administrative county of East Suffolk, and this status was not restored by the Banham/Cooksey Commission in the 1990s). Ipswich, Norwich, Exeter and Oxford united to campaign for unitary authority status for the four towns, hoping to use the window of opportunity presented by the October 2006 Local Government White Paper. In March 2007, it was announced that Ipswich was one of sixteen shortlisted councils[31] and on the 2007-07-25, the Secretary of state announced that she was minded to implement the unitary proposal for Ipswich, but that there were 'a number of risks relating to the financial case set out in the proposal',[32] on which she invited Ipswich to undertake further work before a final decision is taken.[33] Early in December plans were thrown into doubt as the Government announced that it had 'delayed' the unitary bids for Ipswich and Exeter.[34] Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... Categories: Stub | Suffolk ... Map showing counties and unitary authorities from 1998. ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... There is no single system of local government in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Industry

4 Fairline Yachts outside Fairline's Ipswich testing facility
4 Fairline Yachts outside Fairline's Ipswich testing facility

Industry around Ipswich has had a strong agricultural bias with Ransomes, Sims & Jefferies Ltd, one of the most famous agricultural manufacturers, located in the town. It is notable that the world's first commercial motorised lawnmower was built by Ransomes in 1902. There was a sugar beet factory at Ipswich for many years; it was closed in 2001 as part of a rationalisation by British Sugar. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3648 × 2736 pixel, file size: 3. ... Ransomes, Sims and Jeffries Engineers of Ipswich were a major British agricultural machinery maker. ... A lawn mower (often spelled as one word—lawnmower) is a machine (electric or mechnical) used to cut grass to an even length. ... Two sugar beets - the one on the left has been cultivated to be smoother than the traditional beet, so that it traps less soil. ... In 1936 the United Kingdom parliament nationalised the entire UK sugar beet crop processing industry to form the British Sugar Corporation. ...


The British Telecom Research Laboratories were located to the east of the town in 1975 at Martlesham Heath. They are now a science park called Adastral Park. The area was originally RAF Martlesham Heath - a WW2 airfield from where Douglas Bader fought. BT Group plc (which trades as just BT, and is commonly known by its former name, British Telecom) is the privatised former British state telecommunications operator. ... Map sources for Martlesham Heath at grid reference TM2547 Martlesham Heath village is situated 6 miles east of Ipswich, in Suffolk, England. ... A science park is a property development designed for a concentration of high tech or science related businesses. ... Adastral Park is the name given to what was once the BT Research Laboratories based at Martlesham Heath near Ipswich in the English county of Suffolk. ... Martlesham Heath Airfield - 9 July 1946. ... Group Captain Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader, CBE, DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar, FRAeS, DL, RAF (21 February 1910–5 September 1982); surname pronounced IPA: ) was a successful fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. ...


Ipswich is one of the Haven ports and is still a working port, handling several million tonnes of cargo each year. Prior to decommissioning, HMS Grafton was a regular visitor to the port which as special links with the town and the county of Suffolk. HMS Orwell, named after the river, is also closely linked with the town. With the rise in popularity of the town around the Neptune Marina and the Wet Dock a number of ship and boatbuilders have become established, in particular Fairline Yachts are a significant employer. Major Ports The Haven Ports are a group of five docks on the East Coast of England, these are Felixstowe, Ipswich, Harwich International[1], Harwich Navyard and Mistley. ... This article is about transported goods. ... HMS Grafton (F80) is a Type 23 frigate of the Royal Navy. ... At least three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Orwell: The first Orwell was a B-class torpedo boat destroyer launched in 1901. ... Fairline Boats Ltd[1] are a English motor yacht builder, currently owned by 3i. ...


Transport infrastructure

Railway viaduct over Spring Road, Ipswich
Railway viaduct over Spring Road, Ipswich

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ...

Road

The A12 links Ipswich to London (84 miles), Lowestoft, Great Yarmouth and the M25. The A14 links the town with Cambridge (57 miles), the Midlands and Felixstowe. The A140(single carriageway) links the town with Norwich. The A12 is a major road in England, a trunk road for most of its length, running from London to Great Yarmouth in Norfolk. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... , Lowestoft (pronouned IPA: /loʊs tɔft, -tɒft, -təf/) is a town in Suffolk, East Anglia, England, lying between the eastern edge of The Broads National Park at Oulton Broad and the North Sea. ... Great Yarmouth, often known to locals simply as Yarmouth, is an English coastal town in the county of Norfolk. ... The M25 motorway looking south between junctions 14 and 15, near Heathrow Airport. ... The A14 is a major road in England, running from the Port of Felixstowe to the junction of the M1 and M6 motorways near Rugby. ... This article is about the city in England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... , For the Aircraft manufacturer, see Seaplane Experimental Station, Felixstowe Felixstowe is a North Sea seaport in Suffolk, England. ... // The A140 is a road in the United Kingdom running from the A14 near Ipswich northward to A149 south of Cromer. ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ...


A Roman road originally known as Pye Road and part of which is now the [A140], linked Colchester with Caistor St. Edmund near Norwich.[35] An old milestone in Ipswich shows London as 69 miles (111 km) and Gt Yarmouth 54 miles (87 km) north. Not to be confused with Romans road. ... For other places with the same name, see Colchester (disambiguation). ... Caistor St Edmund is a village (population 270) on the River Tas, near Norwich, Norfolk, England. ... A Spanish kilometre stone A milestone on the Boston Post Road in Harvard Square, Massachusetts, USA Slate milestone near Bangor, Wales A milestone or kilometre sign is one of a series of numbered markers placed along a road at regular intervals, typically at the side of the road or in...


Rail

Ipswich railway station is located on the Great Eastern Main Line from London Liverpool Street to Norwich. It is also the junction of railway lines to Felixstowe and Lowestoft. The station is served by National Express East Anglia. There is another railway station serving the Rose Hill area, called Derby Road which is on the line to Felixstowe. The front of Ipswich station Ipswich railway station is a railway station serving the town of Ipswich in Suffolk. ... The Great Eastern Main Line, or the GE, is a major railway line of the British railway system, which connects Liverpool Street station in the City of London with destinations in east London and the East of England, including Ipswich, Norwich and several coastal resorts. ... Liverpool Street station Liverpool Street station, also called London Liverpool Street, is a mainline railway station in the north eastern corner of the City of London, in the heart of the financial district, with entrances on Bishopsgate and Liverpool Street itself. ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ... , For the Aircraft manufacturer, see Seaplane Experimental Station, Felixstowe Felixstowe is a North Sea seaport in Suffolk, England. ... , Lowestoft (pronouned IPA: /loʊs tɔft, -tɒft, -təf/) is a town in Suffolk, East Anglia, England, lying between the eastern edge of The Broads National Park at Oulton Broad and the North Sea. ... One Railway (or simply One) is the brand name of London Eastern Railway Ltd, a British company which operates local, suburban and express services from London Liverpool Street in the City of London to East and North London, Essex, Hertfordshire, Cambridgeshire and East Anglia, otherwise known as the Greater Anglia... Derby Road railway station is a railway station serving the Rose Hill area of Ipswich in Suffolk. ...


Bus & tram

Bus services are operated by Ipswich Buses and First Eastern Counties. Route number 66 is a partially guided busway connecting Martlesham Heath and Kesgrave to the town and the railway station.[36] It also had a trolleybus system from 2 September 1923 until 23 August 1963.[37] Ipswich Buses is a bus company that operates in Ipswich, Suffolk, UK. It has been operating bus services in the town for 103 years. ... First Eastern Counties is a major bus operator in Norfolk and Suffolk in eastern England. ... Ipswich Rapid Transit is a high-quality bus system serving the town of Ipswich in south east England. ... Bus rapid transit (BRT) is a relatively new umbrella term for urban mass transportation services utilizing buses to perform premium services on existing roadways or dedicated rights-of-way. ... Map sources for Martlesham Heath at grid reference TM2547 Martlesham Heath village is situated 6 miles east of Ipswich, in Suffolk, England. ... Map sources for Kesgrave at grid reference TM2145 Kesgrave is a town in Suffolk, England, half way between Woodbridge and The gates of hell. ... A trolleybus (also known as trolley bus, trolley coach, trackless trolley, trackless tram or simply trolley) is an electric bus powered by two overhead wires, from which it draws electricity using two trolley poles. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ...


It is the last place in the area to have an independent bus company with the unusual practice of naming its buses.[citation needed]


Air

See also: Ipswich Airport

The town used to feature a small grass-runway airport (ICAO code: EGSE), opened by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales on 26 June 1930 with regular flights to Clacton, Southend and Jersey by Channel Airways and later to the Netherlands and Manchester by Suckling Airways. The airport was delicensed on 31 December 1996 Ipswich Airport[38] and the area was re-developed into the residential district of Ravenswood with the front of the Grade 2 listed control building, designed by Heining and Chitty in 1938, integrated into new scheme.[39] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), an agency of the United Nations, develops the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Town - Clacton-on-Sea Location - Essex, England Founded - 1871 Population (1991) - 45,065 Clacton-on-Sea is the largest town on the Tendring Peninsula, in Essex, England. ... Southend is the name of a number of locations: Southend-on-Sea is the name of a town in Essex, UK Southend, Kintyre is the name of a village in Kintyre, Scotland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Channel Airways was formed in 1946 as East Anglian Flying Services. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... ScotAirways is an airline based in Dundee, United Kingdom. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ravenswood is a new district within Ipswich, Suffolk, UK. It is sited on the old Ipswich Airport to the south-east of the town. ... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ...


The nearest international flights now are from Stansted Airport and Norwich International Airport, both approximately 47 miles (76 km) away. Other airports within a 2 hour drive are Gatwick and Luton Airport. Terminal building, designed by Sir Norman Foster Stansted Airport is a medium-sized passenger airport with a single runway, located in the English county of Essex about thirty miles north of London. ... The control tower at Norwich International Airport Norwich International Airport (IATA: NWI, ICAO: EGSH) also just Norwich Airport, is an airport 2. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA Airport Code: LGW, ICAO Airport Code: EGKK) is Londons second airport and the second largest airport in the UK after Heathrow. ... London Luton Airport (IATA Airport Code LTN, ICAO Airport Code EGGW, previously called Luton International Airport) is an airport about 30 miles to the north-west of London in the town of Luton, Beds. ...


Port

The Port of Ipswich, operated by Associated British Ports[40] offers a mix of facilities for handling containers, timber, dry bulk cargo oil as well as a Ro-Ro terminal. It is one of the Haven ports along with the Port of Felixstowe and Harwich International. Associated British Ports Holdings plc is a holding company that owns and operates 21 ports throughout the United Kingdom. ... Containers on the Port of Singapore. ... Loading a ro-ro passenger car ferry Roll-on/roll-off (RORO or ro-ro) ships are designed to carry wheeled cargo such as automobiles, trailers or railroad cars. ... Major Ports The Haven Ports are a group of five docks on the East Coast of England, these are Felixstowe, Ipswich, Harwich International[1], Harwich Navyard and Mistley. ... Felixstowe is a North Sea seaport in Suffolk, England. ...


Sport

Ipswich's sole professional football team are Ipswich Town Football Club, who were established in 1878 and play at the 30,300 capacity Portman Road Stadium. They have a strong rivalry with Norwich City F.C.. Ipswich Town was home to the two most successful England managers, Sir Alf Ramsey (who is buried in the Old Cemetery in the town) and Sir Bobby Robson. They won the League Championship in 1962 during Ramsey's reign and an FA Cup in 1978 and the UEFA Cup in 1981 under Robson. They currently play in English football's second-tier league, the Football Championship. Ipswich is also home to minor-lower league football team, Ipswich Wanderers and many others in the Suffolk and Ipswich Football League. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 209 pixel Image in higher resolution (1500 × 391 pixel, file size: 163 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ipswich Town F... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 209 pixel Image in higher resolution (1500 × 391 pixel, file size: 163 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ipswich Town F... Portman Road is the home ground of English Football club Ipswich Town. ... Ipswich Town Football Club (also known as Ipswich, The Blues, Town or The Tractor Boys) are an English professional football club based in Ipswich, Suffolk. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Ipswich Town Football Club (also known as Ipswich, The Blues, Town or The Tractor Boys) are an English professional football club based in Ipswich, Suffolk. ... Portman Road is the home ground of English Football club Ipswich Town. ... Norwich City Football Club (also known as The Canaries) is an English professional football club based in Norwich, Norfolk. ... Sir Alfred Ernest Alf Ramsey (born 22 January 1920 in Dagenham, England; died 28 April 1999). ... Sir Robert William Robson CBE (born February 18, 1933, in Sacriston, County Durham, England), commonly known as Bobby Robson (IPA: ), is an English football manager and former international football player. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... For the current season, see UEFA Cup 2007-08. ... Ipswich Wanderers F.C. are a football club based in Ipswich, England. ... The Suffolk and Ipswich Football League is a football competition based in Suffolk, England. ...


Ipswich also has a very successful Speedway team, the Ipswich Witches, who have ridden at their Foxhall Stadium home, on the outskirts of Ipswich, for over 50 years. Despite being one of the most successful teams in British Speedway history, crowds have dwindled to around 1,500 people per race meeting. The stadium is also regularly used for Stock car racing. Motorcycle speedway, normally referred to as Speedway, is a motorcycle sport that involves usually 4 and sometimes up to 6 riders competing over 4 laps of an oval circuit. ... The Ipswich Witches are a British Speedway club based at the Foxhall Stadium near Ipswich, Suffolk. ... Foxhall Stadium is a Speedway stadium located in Foxhall near Ipswich. ... This article is about the sport of stock car racing. ...


The town has representation in both codes of Rugby. It has two amateur Rugby Union teams, Ipswich RUFC who play in London 3 North East League, and Ipswich YM RUFC and an amateur rugby league side, Ipswich Rhinos, who play in the Rugby League Conference. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... The Ipswich Rhinos Rugby League Football Club is a British rugby league club based at Ipswich RUFC in Ipswich, in the county of Suffolk. ... The Rugby League Conference (RLC) (also known as the Co-operative Rugby League Conference as a result of sponsorship from United Co-operatives is a series of regionally based divisions of amateur rugby league teams spread throughout England, Scotland and Wales. ...


Ipswich had a racecourse which ran a mix of flat and National Hunt races from 1710 to 1911. The Ipswich Racecourse is an area of Ipswich that was formerly a racecourse. ...


For her services to swimming Karen Pickering was awarded an MBE in the 1994 New Years Honours List, although she is actually from Great Yarmouth. Karen Denise Pickering (born December 19, 1971 in Brighton) is a former freestyle swimmer from Great Britain, who made her international senior debut in 1986. ...


Ipswich 2006 serial murders

Main article: Ipswich 2006 serial murders

A serial killer or spree killer responsible for the murders of five women in Ipswich gained notoriety in late 2006, as the Ipswich Murderer. The five women were identified as sex workers; their bodies were found in December 2006.[41] Suffolk Constabulary formally linked the murders in their investigation. Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... A spree killer, also known as a rampage killer, is someone who embarks on a murderous assault on his victims in a short time in multiple locations. ... The bodies of victims were found at various locations around Ipswich. ... Whore redirects here. ... Suffolk Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing Suffolk in the East of England, United Kingdom. ...


Steven Gerald James Wright, who had previously worked at the Port of Felixstowe, was arrested at his house in Ipswich on December 19.[42] On December 21st, Wright was formally charged with the murders of Gemma Adams, 25, Anneli Alderton, 24, Tania Nicol, 19, Paula Clennell, 24, and Annette Nicholls, 29. He appeared in Ipswich Magistrates' Court on 22 December 2006 and was remanded in custody until 2 January 2007 to appear in Ipswich Crown Court where he was remanded in custody for a second court appearance, held on 1 May 2007.[43] At that hearing he pleaded not guilty to all five murders. His trial began in Ipswich on 14 January 2008.[44] The jury returned a guilty verdict on 21 February, [45] and the next day, Wright was sentenced to life imprisonment by Mr Justice Gross, who recommended that he should never be released from prison, on the basis that the murders resulted from a "substantial degree of pre-meditation and planning".[46] Steve Gerald James Wright (born 24 April 1958) of Ipswich, Suffolk, England, is a suspect in the 2006 Ipswich murder investigation. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about Magistrates Courts in England and Wales. ... Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 22 February) February 22 is the 53rd day of every year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Life imprisonment is a sentence of imprisonment for a serious crime, nominally for the entire remaining life of the prisoner, but in fact for a period which varies between jurisdictions: many countries have a maximum possible period of time (usually 50 years) a prisoner may be incarcerated, or require the... The whole life tariff is a mechanism in British law whereby a prisoner is sentenced to remain in prison until death. ...


Famous residents

See also People from Ipswich

Probably the most famous person born in the town is the Tudor Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. The artist Thomas Gainsborough and the cartoonist "Giles" worked here, Horatio, Lord Nelson became Steward of Ipswich, and Margaret Catchpole began her adventurous career here. Alf Ramsey and Bobby Robson were both successful managers of Ipswich Town F.C. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1920 × 2560 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1920 × 2560 pixel, file size: 1. ... Sir Alfred Ernest Alf Ramsey (born 22 January 1920 in Dagenham, England; died 28 April 1999). ... Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, (c. ... Thomas Gainsborough (christened 14 May 1727 – 2 August 1788) was one of the most famous portrait and landscape painters of 18th century Britain. ... Ronald Carl Giles (September 29, 1916 – August 28, 1995), often referred to simply as Giles, was a cartoonist most famous for his work for the British newspaper the Daily Express. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... Margaret Catchpole (14 March 1762–May 13, 1819), convict transportee to Australia, adventuress and chronicler. ... Sir Alfred Ernest Alf Ramsey (born 22 January 1920 in Dagenham, England; died 28 April 1999). ... Sir Robert William Robson CBE (born February 18, 1933, in Sacriston, County Durham, England), commonly known as Bobby Robson (IPA: ), is an English football manager and former international football player. ... Ipswich Town Football Club (also known as Ipswich, The Blues, Town or The Tractor Boys) are an English professional football club based in Ipswich, Suffolk. ...


References in popular culture

- A popular song in 1915 was Which Switch Is The Switch, Miss, For Ipswich? by David, Barnett & Darewski.
- The Dead Parrot sketch by the comedy troupe Monty Python involves one of the characters ending up in Ipswich instead of Bolton.
- Michael Palin's 1987 comedy about provincial English seaside holidays in the 1950s was entitled East of Ipswich.
- In 2006 The Jarvis Cocker Record contained the track From Auschwitz to Ipswich written and performed by Jarvis.
- A film staring Michael Caine and Pierce Brosnan, The Fourth Protocol shows a car chase taking place through the streets of Ipswich. One shot also shows helicopters flying beneath the Orwell Bridge.
Palin, Cleese and the dead parrot, from And Now For Something Completely Different. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons,[2][3] is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... For the larger local government district, see Metropolitan Borough of Bolton. ... Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943) is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ... Jarvis, also known as The Jarvis Cocker Record, is the debut solo album by Pulp vocalist and musician Jarvis Cocker, released in the UK on November 13, 2006. ... This article is about the English actor. ... Pierce Brendan Brosnan,The most gorgeous man on the planet OBE[1] (born May 16, 1953) is an Irish actor and producer best known for portraying James Bond in four films from 1995 to 2002: GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough and Die Another Day. ... The Fourth Protocol is a novel written by Frederick Forsyth and published in August 1984. ... The Orwell Bridge was opened to road traffic in 1982 and carried the then A45 (now A14) The main span is 190 metres which, at the time of its construction, was the longest pre-stressed concrete span in use. ...


External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ipswich

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Ipswich institutions

  • Ipswich Borough Council
  • The Ipswich Society

History

  • Ipswich Museum
  • Clifford Road Air Raid Shelter Museum, Ipswich
  • Medieval town plan of Ipswich Town
  • Ipswich Transport Museum

References

  1. ^ Ipswich - Resident Population Estimates by Ethnic Group. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  2. ^ List of English cities by population from Census 2001 figures
  3. ^ Quaternary Landscape Development I. Staffordshire University. Retrieved on 2007-12-29.
  4. ^ History of Medieval Ipswich. Retrieved on 2007-06-13.
  5. ^ "England's Oldest Town". Retrieved on 2007-06-27.
  6. ^ Gypiswic in Doomsday book. Retrieved on 2007-11-08.
  7. ^ K. Wade, 'Gipeswic - East Anglia's First Economic Capital 600-1066,' in N. P. Salmon and R. Malster (Eds), Ipswich Fron the First to the Third Millennium (Papers from an Ipswich Society Symposium), (Ipswich Society, Ipswich 2001), 1-6, at pp. 3-4.
  8. ^ S. J. Plunkett, Suffolk in Anglo-Saxon Times (Tempus, Stroud 2005), 130-133, 201.
  9. ^ Wade 2001.
  10. ^ Wade 2001, 5.
  11. ^ R. Malster, A History of Ipswich (Phillimore, Chichester 2000), 13.
  12. ^ J. J. North, English Hammered Coinage (Spink and Son, London 1980), Volume I: Early Anglo-Saxon to Henry III, 'Mint Towns' (page 194), Ipswich, Suffolk: Edgar to John. Example figure:Aethelred II first hand type, Plate X no. 23, Cat. 766 & p. 120.
  13. ^ Geoffrey Martin, 'The Medieval and Early Modern Borough' in N. P. Salmon and R. Malster (Eds), Ipswich From the First to the Third Millennium (Papers from an Ipswich Society Symposium), (Ipswich Society, Ipswich 2001), 7-17.
  14. ^ Text of charter (translated into English) and image of 1200 Town Seal, see J. Wodderspoon, Memorials of the Ancient Town of Ipswich (Pawsey (Ipswich): Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans (London) 1850), 'Ancient Incorporation of the Town', pp 75-130, at pp 75-85.
  15. ^ Malster 2000, 41-45.
  16. ^ B. Zimmerman, 1899, 'The White Friars at Ipswich', Proc. Suffolk Institute of Archaeology 10 Part 2, 196-204, at p. 199.
  17. ^ Wodderspoon 1850, 331-332.
  18. ^ Malster 2000, 43-47, 63-67.
  19. ^ Malster 2000, 67.
  20. ^ J. M. Blatchly, A Famous Antient Seed-Plot of Learning (Ipswich School 2003), 27-41.
  21. ^ Fisons at the root of modern agriculture. Retrieved on 2007-06-17.
  22. ^ Tolly Cobbold Heritage. Retrieved on 2006-06-18.
  23. ^ Borin Van Loon: Ipswich Historic Lettering. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
  24. ^ PIONEERING MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR MODERN LISTED BUILDINGS. Context (September 1995).
  25. ^ "Ipswich wins Clean Britain Award 2007", Evening Star, 2007-03-13. 
  26. ^ "Ipswich town competes for city status", BBC, 1999-08-07. 
  27. ^ Grant of Planning Permission. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  28. ^ About DanceEast. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  29. ^ The churches of Ipswich. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
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Ipswich Life, living in and visiting Ipswich Suffolk UK (521 words)
Ipswich Life, if you live in, or are visiting Ipswich then this is your tour guide, from hotels to shops pubs and restaurants, site updated hourly.
CHILDREN in Ipswich are today better equipped to deal with the problem of bullying after a week long campaign to get the right messages across.
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Ipswich, Queensland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (666 words)
Ipswich was proclaimed as a municipality on March 2, 1860, and became a city in 1904.
Ipswich was also originally nominated to become the State Capital of Queensland, as it was the most prominent city due to it's mining capabilities, however Brisbane was chosen instead due to it having an ocean port (Port of Brisbane), whereas Ipswich relied on barges coming up and downstream on the Bremer River.
Ipswich is also the location of The Workshops Railway Museum to commemorate the first trainline in Queensland from Ipswich to Grandchester, approximately 25km to the west.
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