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Encyclopedia > Inverness
Inverness
Gaelic - Inbhir Nis
Population 55,000[1]
OS grid reference NH665445
Council area Highland
Lieutenancy area Inverness
Constituent country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town INVERNESS
Postcode district IV1-IV3, IV5, IV13, IV63
Dialling code 01463
Vehicle code SX-SY (Inverness)
Police Northern
Fire Highlands and Islands
Ambulance Scottish
UK Parliament Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey
Scottish Parliament Highlands and Islands
Inverness East, Nairn and Lochaber
Ross, Skye and Inverness West
European Parliament Scotland
Website: www.inverness-scotland.com

Scotland Inverness is a city in the Highlands of Scotland. ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 355 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (553 × 933 pixel, file size: 178 KB, MIME type: image/png) Template image for Scottish location maps, high resolution (not for use in infobox). ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... Location Geography Area Ranked 1st  - Total 30,659 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Inverness ISO 3166-2 GB-HLD ONS code 00QT Demographics Population Ranked 7th  - Total (2005) 213,590  - Density 8 / km² Politics The Highland Council http://www. ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... This article is about the country. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The IV postcode area, also known as the Inverness postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Achnasheen, Alness, Ardgay, Avoch, Beauly, Cromarty, Dingwall, Dornoch, Elgin, Fochabers, Forres, Fortrose, Gairloch, Garve, Invergordon, Inverness, Isle of Skye, Kyle, Lairg, Lossiemouth, Muir of Ord, Munlochy, Nairn, Plockton, Portree, Rogart, Strathcarron... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... British car number plates are vehicle registration plates (more commonly known as number plates) which have existed in the United Kingdom since 1904. ... The following are the vehicle number plate identifiers used in Great Britain since the 2001 changes to British vehicle number plates. ... Map showing the council areas of Scotland, with the ones in the police area highlighted. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The Highlands and Islands Fire and Rescue Service (previously Highland and Islands Fire Brigade) is the fire service for Northern Scotland, covering the council areas of Highland, Orkney, Shetland, and the Western Isles, and so covering a major part of the Highlands and Islands area. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Two Mercedes-Benz Sprinter-based ambulances of the Scottish Ambulance Service The Scottish Ambulance Service serves all of Scotland and is a special health board funded directly by the health department of the Scottish Executive. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The Highlands and Islands is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... Inverness East, Nairn and Lochaber is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... Ross, Skye and Inverness West is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ...

List of places: UKScotland

Coordinates: 57°28′18″N 4°13′32″W / 57.471767, -4.225466 List of burghs in Scotland List of cities in the United Kingdom Lists of places within Scottish regions List of places in Orkney List of places in Shetland List of places in the Borders region of Scotland List of places in the Central region of Scotland List of places in... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Inverness (Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Nis) is a city[2] in northern Scotland. The city is the administrative centre for the the Highland council area,[3] and it is promoted as the capital of the Highlands of Scotland.[4] Inverness is unusual in that although there are letters patent, dating from 2001, the city has no statutory boundaries. Tourism is important to the city's economy, as are service industries and healthcare.[citation needed] // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... This article is about the country. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 1st  - Total 30,659 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Inverness ISO 3166-2 GB-HLD ONS code 00QT Demographics Population Ranked 7th  - Total (2005) 213,590  - Density 8 / km² Politics The Highland Council http://www. ... The council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The Statute of Grand Duchy of Lithuania A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ... The ruins of Melrose Abbey, Scottish Borders Scotland is a well-developed tourist destination, with tourism generally being responsible for sustaining 200,000 jobs mainly in the service sector, with tourist spending averaging at £4bn per year [1]. Tourists from the United Kingdom make up the bulk of visitors to... Health care or healthcare is one of the worlds largest and fastest growing professions. ...


The city lies where the River Ness enters the Moray Firth and is a natural hub for various transport links. A settlement was established by sixth century AD, the first royal charter being granted in the thirteenth century. It lies near the site of the eighteenth century Battle of Culloden. The Moray Firth is a roughly triangular area of the North Sea, north and east of Inverness. ... Combatants British Army Jacobites Commanders William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender Strength 8,000 ca. ...


Inverness has a population of 55,000 and is represented in both the Holyrood and Westminster parliaments and is also twinned with three other European cities. The city is home to numerous sporting and cultural groups and events, including the annual Highland Games and football club Inverness Caledonian Thistle F.C., who play in the Scottish Premier League as well as Clachnacuddin F.C. who play in the Highland League. Inverness College is the hub campus for the UHI Millennium Institute. City status was granted in 2001. For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... Opening ceremonies of 2004 Canmore Highland games Highland games are events held throughout the year in Scotland and other countries as a way of celebrating Scottish and Celtic culture and heritage, especially that of the Scottish Highlands. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... Inverness Caledonian Thistle Football Club is a Scottish football team based in the city of Inverness. ... The Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League commonly known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system - above the Scottish Football League. ... Clachnacuddin F.C. are a semi-professional senior football club from the city of Inverness who currently play in Scotlands Highland Football League. ... The Highland Football League (HFL) is a league of football (soccer) clubs operating not in just the Scottish highlands as the name may suggest, but across all of the North of Scotland. ... UHI Millennium Institute (UHI) is a federation of 15 colleges and research institutions, in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland delivering higher education. ...

Contents

History

Inverness at the end of the 17th century
Inverness at the end of the 17th century

Inverness was one of the chief strongholds of the Picts, and in AD 565 was visited by St Columba with the intention of converting the Pictish king Brude, who is supposed to have resided in the vitrified fort on Craig Phadrig[5] (168 m), 2.4 km west of the city. A church or a monk's cell is thought to have been established by early Celtic monks on St Michael's Mount, a mound close to the river, now the site of the Old High Church[6] and graveyard. The castle is said to have been built by Máel Coluim III of Scotland, after he had razed to the ground the castle in which Mac Bethad mac Findláich had, according to much later tradition, murdered Máel Coluim's father Donnchad, and which stood on a hill around 1 km to the north-east. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A replica of the Hilton of Cadboll Stone. ... A separate article is titled Columba (constellation). ... Bridei (or Brude), called MacMaelchon, was king of the Picts from 556 to 586 after the abdication of his cousin, Galam II. He was baptised by St Columba about 564. ... Vitrified fort is the name given to certain rude stone enclosures whose walls have been subjected in a greater or less degree to the action of fire. ... Old High St Stephens Church is a parish church of the Church of Scotland in Inverness, the capital city of the Highlands of Scotland. ... Máel Coluim mac Donnchada (anglicised Malcolm III) (1030x1038–13 November 1093) was King of Scots. ... For other uses, see Macbeth (disambiguation). ... Donnchad mac Crínáin (Anglicised Duncan) (died 15 August 1040) was king of Alba. ...


Inverness had four traditional fairs, one of them being Legavrik (leth-gheamradh). There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


William the Lion (d. 1214) granted Inverness four charters, by one of which it was created a royal burgh. Of the Dominican friary founded by Alexander III in 1233, only one pillar and a worn knight's effigy survive in a secluded graveyard near the town centre. On his way to the Battle of Harlaw in 1411, Donald, Lord of the Isles, harried the city, and sixteen years later James I held a parliament in the castle to which the northern chieftains were summoned, of whom three were executed for asserting an independent sovereignty. William I the Lion ( known in Gaelic as Uilliam Garm1 or William the Rough), (1142/1143 - December 4, 1214) reigned as King of Scots from 1165 to 1214. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... Coronation of King Alexander on Moot Hill, Scone. ... The Battle of Harlaw was fought near Inverurie in Aberdeenshire on 24 July 1411. ... MacDonald, Lord of the Isles For the series of fantasy novels by David Drake, see Lord of the Isles (David Drake). ... James I (December 10, 1394 – February 21, 1437) reigned as King of Scots from April 4, 1406 until February 21, 1437. ...


In 1562, during the progress undertaken to suppress Huntly's insurrection, Queen Mary was denied admittance into Inverness Castle by the governor, who belonged to the earl's faction, and whom she afterwards therefore caused to be hanged. The Clan Fraser and Clan Munro took the castle for her. The house in which she lived meanwhile stood in Bridge Street until the 1970s, when it was demolished to make way for the second Bridge Street development. The city's Marymass Fair, on the Saturday nearest August 15th, (a tradition revived in 1986) is said to commemorate Queen Mary as well as the Virgin Mary. Mary I (popularly known as Mary, Queen of Scots: French: ); (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587) was Queen of Scots (the monarch of the Kingdom of Scotland) from December 14, 1542, to July 24, 1567. ... Inverness Castle Inverness Castle Inverness Castle Today Inverness Castle sits on a cliff overlooking the River Ness, in Inverness, Scotland. ... The Clan Fraser (Gaelic - Clann Frisealach, French Clan Frasier) is a Scottish clan of French origin. ... Munro Crest: Dread God (Fear God) and a Golden Eagle Clan Munro is a Highland Scottish clan. ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... Roundabouts (or carousels) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairs. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ...


Beyond the then northern limits of the town, Oliver Cromwell built a citadel capable of accommodating 1000 men, but with the exception of a portion of the ramparts it was demolished at the Restoration. The only surviving modern remnant is a clock tower. In 1715 the Jacobites occupied the royal fortress as a barracks. In 1727 the government built the first Fort George here, but in 1746 it surrendered to the Jacobites and they blew it up. Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England, Scotland and Ireland into a republican Commonwealth and for the brutal war exercised in his conquest of Ireland. ... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... There is also a later Fort George in Canada. ...


Culloden Moor lies nearby, and was the site of the Battle of Culloden in 1746, which ended the Jacobite Rising of 1745-1746. Culloden (from Gaelic Cul loden, back of the pond) is the name of a village five miles east of Inverness, Scotland and the surrounding area. ... Combatants British Army Jacobites Commanders William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender Strength 8,000 ca. ... The Jacobite Risings were a series of uprisings, rebellions, and wars in the British Isles occurring between 1688 and 1746. ...


On September 7, 1921, the only UK Cabinet meeting to be held outside London took place in the Town House, when David Lloyd George, on holiday in Gairloch, called an emergency meeting to discuss the situation in Ireland. The Inverness Formula composed at this meeting was the basis of the Anglo-Irish Treaty.
is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who guided Britain and the British Empire through World War I and the postwar settlement as the Liberal Party Prime Minister, 1916-1922. ... Gairloch is a small village on the shores of Loch Gairloch on the northwest coast of Scotland. ... Signature page of the Anglo-Irish Treaty The Anglo-Irish Treaty, officially called the Articles of Agreement for a Treaty Between Great Britain and Ireland, was a treaty between the Government of the United Kingdom and representatives of the extra-judicial Irish Republic that concluded the Irish War of Independence. ...


Geography

River Ness and Inverness Castle
River Ness and Inverness Castle

Inverness lies at the mouth of the River Ness, and it is from this that the city derives its name: Inbhir Nis is Scots Gaelic for "mouth (or confluence) of the Ness". In nominal terms, the river mouth is at the southwestern and most inland extremity of the Moray Firth (grid reference NH661472). The Beauly Firth may be seen, however, as a westward and more inland extension of the Moray Firth. Also, Inverness Firth has some currency as a name for the section of the Moray Firth between the mouth of the River Ness and the more eastward promontory of Fort George (NH758566). Download high resolution version (1280x960, 592 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 592 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The River Ness is a river flowing from Loch Ness in Scotland, north to Inverness and the Moray Firth. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... The Moray Firth is a roughly triangular area of the North Sea, north and east of Inverness. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Beauly Firth is an estuary in northern Scotland. ... Fort George, Ardersier, Highland, Scotland, is a large 18th century fortress near Inverness with perhaps the mightiest artillery fortifications in Europe. ...


The river flows from nearby Loch Ness and the Caledonian Canal and connects Loch Ness, Loch Oich, and Loch Lochy. This article is about the body of water in Scotland. ... The Caledonian Canal in Scotland connects the Scottish east coast at Inverness with the west coast near Fort William. ... Loch Oich is a freshwater loch in the Highlands of Scotland which forms part of the Caledonian Canal. ... Loch Lochy as viewed from the A82 Loch Lochy is a large body of fresh water in the Highlands of Scotland. ...


Islands in the River Ness, the Bught and the river banks form a pleasant series of walks, as do the forested hills of Craig Phadraig and Craig Dunain. The city is well served with shops, as it is the main shopping centre for an area of nearly 26,000 km². The River Ness is a river flowing from Loch Ness in Scotland, north to Inverness and the Moray Firth. ... The Bught is an area of the Scottish city of Inverness. ...


Economy

Most of the traditional industries such as distilling have been replaced by high-tech businesses, including the design and manufacture of diabetes diagnostic kits. Retailing is another big sector. It has recently gained the unwelcome soubriquet of "Tescotown" since the city boasts three branches of Tesco. Its importance as a retail centre outweighs the city's size since it acts as a retail centre for most of the Highlands. Distillation is a means of separating liquids through differences in their boiling points. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... Drawing of a self-service store. ... For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ... The Highland council area (Roinn na Gàidhealtachd[1] in Gaelic) is a local government area in the Scottish Highlands and the largest local government area in Scotland. ...


Inverness is the new home for Scottish Natural Heritage following that body's relocation from Edinburgh under the auspices of the Scottish Executive's decentralisation strategy. The body provides a large number of jobs in the area. Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) is a Scottish public body . ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ...


Transport

Inverness is linked to the Black Isle across the Moray Firth by the Kessock Bridge. It has a railway station[7] with services to Perth, Edinburgh, Glasgow, London, Aberdeen, Thurso, Wick and to Kyle of Lochalsh. Inverness is connected to London by the Caledonian Sleeper, which departs six times a week. Inverness Airport[8] is located 15 km east of the city and has scheduled flights to airports across the UK and Republic of Ireland including London, Manchester, Edinburgh, Belfast, Dublin and the islands to the north and west of Scotland. Some local controversy arose when British Airways sold off the landing slots at Heathrow for the three daily flights to and from Inverness as part of the proposed link up with American Airlines which eventually failed. Three trunk roads (the A9, A82 and A96) provide access to Aberdeen, Perth, Elgin, Thurso, Edinburgh and Glasgow. Plans are being drafted to convert the A96 between Inverness and Nairn to a dual carriageway. The Black Isle (Scottish Gaelic: an t-Eilean Dubh) is an eastern area of Ross and Cromarty. ... Kessock Bridge Evening at Kessock Bridge The Kessock Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge across the Inverness Firth, an inlet of the Moray Firth, between the village of North Kessock and the city of Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. ... Inverness railway station is the only railway station in the Scottish city of Inverness. ... Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... , Aberdeen (IPA: ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is Scotlands third largest city with an official population of 202,370. ... This article refers to the town in Scotland. ... Wick is a coastal town on the main highway linking John O Groats with southern Britain, a royal burgh and the county town of Caithness, in the far north of Scotland. ... Kyle of Lochalsh (from the Scottish Gaelic Caol Loch Aillse) is a small village on the North-West coast of Scotland, which developed in the late 19th century with the arrival of the railway. ... Map of the routes of the Caledonian Sleepers Caledonian Sleeper coaches at Fort William The Caledonian Sleeper is a sleeper train service operated by First ScotRail and one of only two remaining sleeper services running on the railways of Great Britain – the other being the Night Riviera. ... Inverness Airport (IATA: INV, ICAO: EGPE) is situated at Dalcross, 9 miles (15 km) east of the city of Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... For the 1930s airline of similar name, see British Airways Ltd. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA airport code: LHR, ICAO airport code: EGLL, and often simply Heathrow) is the United Kingdoms busiest and best-connected airport. ... American Airlines, Inc. ... The A9 north of Brora The A9 is a major road running from the Falkirk area in the south of Scotland to Thurso in the far north, via Stirling, Bridge of Allan, Perth and Inverness. ... The A82 is the major road to the western Scottish Highlands, running from Glasgow to Inverness. ... The A96 is a major road in Scotland. ... For people named Nairn, see Nairn (surname). ...


Politics

Local Government

See also Politics of the Highland council area

Inverness was an autonomous royal burgh, and county town for the county of Inverness (also known as Inverness-shire) until 1975, when local government counties and burghs were abolished, under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, in favour of two-tier regions and districts and unitary islands council areas. The royal burgh was then absorbed into a new district of Inverness, which was one of eight districts within the Highland region. The new district combined in one area the royal burgh, the Inverness district of the county and the Aird district of the county. The rest of the county was divided between other new districts within the Highland region and the Western Isles. Therefore, although much larger than the royal burgh, the new Inverness district was much smaller than the county. Politics of the Highland council area in Scotland are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the Highland Council, in elections to the council, and in elections to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster) and the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Inverness-shire or the County of Inverness (Siorrachd Inbhir Nis in Gaelic) is one of the registration counties of Scotland. ... Inverness-shire (Siorrachd Inbhir Nis in Gaelic) is one of the traditional counties of Scotland. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A sign in Linlithgow, Scotland. ... The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (1973 c. ... The local government regions and districts of Scotland were established under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 as a two-tier system of local government in Scotland. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority that has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... There are three islands council areas of Scotland: Orkney Shetland Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles) The islands council areas are unitary council areas dating from 1975, created under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 and notably the only unitary authorities created by the local government reforms of the 1970s... Location Geography Area Ranked 1st  - Total 30,659 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Inverness ISO 3166-2 GB-HLD ONS code 00QT Demographics Population Ranked 7th  - Total (2005) 213,590  - Density 8 / km² Politics The Highland Council http://www. ... Aird is a district of the Count of Inverness, around the City of Inverness. ... The Western Isles are an archipelago in Scotland. ...


In 1996, under the Local Government etc (Scotland) Act 1994,[9] the districts were abolished and the region became a unitary council area. The new unitary Highland Council, however, adopted the areas of the former districts as council management areas, and created area committees to represent each. The Inverness committee represents 23 out of the 80 Highland Council wards, with each ward electing one councillor by the first past the post system of election. However, management area and committee area boundaries have been out of alignment since 1999, as a result of changes to ward boundaries. Also, ward boundaries are changing again this year, 2007, and the council management areas are being replaced with three new corporate management areas. The Local Government etc. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority that has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The Highland area (Roinn na Gàidhealtachd in Gaelic) is a unitary authority area in the Scottish Highlands and the largest administrative region in Scotland. ... Many large British councils have a system of area committees, with responsibility for services in particular part of the area covered by the council. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... The plurality voting system, also known as first past the post, is a voting system used to elect a single winner in a given election. ...


Ward boundary changes this year, 2007, under the Local Governance (Scotland) Act 2004,[10] create 22 new Highland Council wards, each electing three or four councillors by the single transferable vote system of election, a system designed to produce a form of proportional representation. The total number of councillors remains the same. Also, the Inverness management area is being merged into the new Inverness, Nairn and Badenoch and Strathspey corporate management area, covering nine of the new wards and electing 34 of the 80 councillors. As well as the Inverness area, the new area includes the former Nairn management area and the former Badenoch and Strathspey management area. The corporate area name is also that of a constituency, but boundaries are different. This is an Act of the Scottish Parliament which provided, inter alia, for the election of local Councillors by the Single Transferable Vote system. ... This STV ballot for the Australian Senate illustrates group voting tickets. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... The Highland area (Roinn na Gàidhealtachd in Gaelic) is a unitary authority area in the Scottish Highlands and the largest administrative region in Scotland. ... For people named Nairn, see Nairn (surname). ... Badenoch and Strathspey was created in 1975 as a one of the eight council disricts of the Highland local government region of Scotland. ... In the United Kingdom each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one or more members to a parliament or assembly. ...


Within the corporate area there is a city management area covering seven of the nine wards, the Aird and Loch Ness ward, the Culloden and Ardersier ward, the Inverness Central ward, the Inverness Millburn ward, the Inverness Ness-side ward, the Inverness South ward and the Inverness West ward. The Nairn ward and the Badenoch and Strathspey ward complete the corporate area. Wards in the city management area are to be represented on a city committee as well as corporate area committees. 22 new Highland Council wards[1][2] have been created for the third general election to the Highland Council, in Scotland, polling on Thursday 3 May 2007. ... 22 new Highland Council wards[1][2] have been created for the third general election to the Highland Council, in Scotland, polling on Thursday 3 May 2007. ... 22 new Highland Council wards[1][2] have been created for the third general election to the Highland Council, in Scotland, polling on Thursday 3 May 2007. ... 22 new Highland Council wards[1][2] have been created for the third general election to the Highland Council, in Scotland, polling on Thursday 3 May 2007. ... 22 new Highland Council wards[1][2] have been created for the third general election to the Highland Council, in Scotland, polling on Thursday 3 May 2007. ... 22 new Highland Council wards[1][2] have been created for the third general election to the Highland Council, in Scotland, polling on Thursday 3 May 2007. ... 22 new Highland Council wards[1][2] have been created for the third general election to the Highland Council, in Scotland, polling on Thursday 3 May 2007. ... 22 new Highland Council wards[1][2] have been created for the third general election to the Highland Council, in Scotland, polling on Thursday 3 May 2007. ... 22 new Highland Council wards[1][2] have been created for the third general election to the Highland Council, in Scotland, polling on Thursday 3 May 2007. ...


City Status

In 2001 city status was granted to the Town of Inverness, and letters patent were taken into the possession of the Highland Council by the convener of the Inverness area committee.[11] These letters patent, which were sealed in March 2001 and are held by Inverness Museum and Art Gallery,[12] create a city of Inverness, but do not refer to anywhere with defined boundaries, except that Town of Inverness may be taken as a reference to the burgh of Inverness. As a local government area the burgh was abolished 26 years earlier, in 1975, and so was the county of Inverness for which the burgh was the county town. Nor do they refer to the former district or to the royal burgh. Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... A sign in Linlithgow, Scotland. ... Inverness-shire or the County of Inverness (Siorrachd Inbhir Nis in Gaelic) is one of the registration counties of Scotland. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ...


The Highland area was created as a two-tier local government region in 1975, and became a unitary local government area in 1996. The region consisted of eight districts, of which one was called Inverness. The districts were all merged into the unitary area. As the new local government authority, the Highland Council then adopted the areas of the districts as council management areas. The management areas were abolished this year, 2007, in favour of three new corporate management areas, and the council has defined a large part of the Inverness, Nairn and Badenoch and Strathspey corporate area as the Inverness city management area.[13] This council-defined city area includes Loch Ness and numerous towns and villages apart from the former burgh of Inverness. The local government regions and districts of Scotland were established under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 as a two-tier system of local government in Scotland. ... The Highland area (Roinn na Gàidhealtachd in Gaelic) is a unitary authority area in the Scottish Highlands and the largest administrative region in Scotland. ... The Highland area (Roinn na Gàidhealtachd in Gaelic) is a unitary authority area in the Scottish Highlands and the largest administrative region in Scotland. ... This article is about the body of water in Scotland. ...


Parliamentary representation

There are three existing parliamentary constituencies with Inverness as an element in their names: A parliament is a legislature, especially in those countries whose system of government is based on the Westminster system modelled after that of the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one member to a parliament or assembly by the first past the post system of elction. ...

These existing constituencies are effectively subdivisions of the Highland council area, but boundaries for Westminster elections are now very different from those for Holyrood elections. The Holyrood constituencies are also subdivisions of the Highlands and Islands electoral region. A County constituency is a constituency in the United Kingdom that covers a predominantly rural area. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons The Right Honourable Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups (as of May 5, 2005 elections) Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament. ... Daniel Grian Alexander (born 15 May 1972) is a politician in the United Kingdom and Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament for Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The new Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood designed by the Catalan architect Enric Miralles and opened in October 2004. ... Inverness East, Nairn and Lochaber is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... Fergus Ewing, born September 23, 1957 is a Scottish National Party (SNP) MSP. He is the son of veteran Scottish Nationalist Winnie Ewing (his father was also a SNP councillor) and has long been active in the SNP. He studied law at the University of Glasgow where he was a... Ross, Skye and Inverness West is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... John Farquhar Munro, born 26 August 1934 in Glen Shiel, is a Scottish Liberal Democrat politician, and Member of the Scottish Parliament for Ross, Skye and Inverness West. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 1st  - Total 30,659 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Inverness ISO 3166-2 GB-HLD ONS code 00QT Demographics Population Ranked 7th  - Total (2005) 213,590  - Density 8 / km² Politics The Highland Council http://www. ... The council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... The Highlands and Islands is one of the eight electoral areas for the Scottish Parliament through which 7 of the 56 Additional Members System MSPs are elected. ... The Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) has 73 constituencies, each electing one Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) by the first past the post system of election, and eight additional member regions, each electing seven additional member MSPs. ...


Historically there have been six Westminster constituencies:

Inverness Burghs was a district of burghs constituency, covering the parliamentary burghs of Inverness, Fortrose, Forres and Nairn. Inverness-shire covered, at least nominally, the county of Inverness minus the Inverness parliamentary burgh. As created in 1918, Inverness covered the county minus Outer Hebridean areas, which were merged into the Western Isles constituency. The Inverness constituency included the former parliamentary burgh of Inverness. As created in 1983, Inverness, Nairn and Lochaber was one of three constituencies covering the Highland region, which had been created in 1975. As first used in 1997, the Inverness East, Nairn and Lochaber, and Ross, Skye and Inverness West constituencies were effectively two of three constituencies covering the Highland unitary council area, which had been created in 1996. A burgh constituency is a type of parliamentary constituency in Scotland. ... Inverness Burghs was a district of burghs constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1708 to 1801 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801. ... Inverness was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1708 until 1918, when it was divided or merged into Inverness, Ross and Cromarty and Western Isles. ... Inverness was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1708. ... Inverness Burghs was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1708. ... Inverness was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1708. ... Ross and Cromarty was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1832 to 1983. ... The Act of Union 1707 and pre-Union Scottish legislation provided for 14 Members of Parliament (MPs) from Scotland to be elected from districts of burghs. ... A burgh constituency is a type of parliamentary constituency in Scotland. ... Fortrose is a burgh in the Scottish Highlands, located on the Moray Firth, approximately ten kilometres north east of Inverness. ... Suenos Stone in Forres The Royal Burgh of Forres (Gaelic: Farrais), an ancient burgh, is situated in the north of Scotland on the Moray coast. ... For people named Nairn, see Nairn (surname). ... Inverness-shire or the County of Inverness (Siorrachd Inbhir Nis in Gaelic) is one of the registration counties of Scotland. ... Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles) redirects here. ... Na h-Eileanan an Iar is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, created in 1918. ... The local government regions and districts of Scotland were established under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 as a two-tier system of local government in Scotland. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority that has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ...


Town twinning

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Augsburg is a city in south-central Germany. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... La Baule-Escoublac, commonly referred to as La Baule, is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique département of France. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Saint-Valery-en-Caux is a seaside town and commune of the Seine Maritime département, Haute-Normandie région, Normandy, France, located 30 km west of Dieppe and 30 km east of Fécamp. ...

Health Services

The main hospital serving Inverness is Raigmore Hospital. This hospital comes under NHS Highland which controls many hospitals in the Highlands and Islands. There are however several other hospitals in the general area, notably New Craigs hospital which deals which mental health care. The current building occupied by New Craigs were opened in 2000. Raigmore Hospital is a hospital in Inverness, Scotland. ... For the record label, see Hospital Records. ... NHS Highland is one of the fourteen regions of the Scottish National Health Service. ... The Highlands and Islands is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Culture & sports

Inverness is an important centre for bagpipe players and lovers, since every September the city hosts the Northern Meeting, the most prestigious solo piping competition in the world. The Inverness cape, a garment worn by pipers the world over in the rain, is not necessarily made in Inverness. A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... Established in 1788 in Inverness, today the Northern Meeting is best known for its bagpiping competition in September. ... Although a wide variety of coats, overcoats, and rain gear are worn with Highland Dress to deal with inclement weather, the Inverness cape has come to be almost universally adopted for rainy weather by pipe bands the world over and many other kilt wearers also find it to be the...


Another major event in calendar is the annual City of Inverness Highland Games. In 2006 Inverness hosted Scotland's biggest ever Highland Games over two days in July, featuring the Masters' World Championships, the showcase event for heavies aged over 40 years. 2006 was the first year that the Masters' World Championships had been held outside the United States, and it attracted many top heavies from around the world to the Inverness area. Opening ceremonies of 2004 Canmore Highland games Highland games are events held throughout the year in Scotland and other countries as a way of celebrating Scottish and Celtic culture and heritage, especially that of the Scottish Highlands. ... Opening ceremonies of 2004 Canmore Highland games Highland games are events held throughout the year in Scotland and other countries as a way of celebrating Scottish and Celtic culture and heritage, especially that of the Scottish Highlands. ...


Inverness has a blossoming music scene which offers lots of young, new bands exciting opportunities. The current music scene within Inverness generally leans towards an emo/punk style, but there are also bands who show features of different genres such as rock, metal, pop, classical, grunge, industrial and traditional Scottish music. There is also a small Hip Hop scene featuring unsigned artists. Inverness is currently celebrating its Highland Year of Culture, in which Inverness is displaying the wide range of talent around.


The city is home to two football clubs. Inverness Caledonian Thistle F.C. was formed in 1994 from the merger of two Highland League clubs, Caledonian F.C. and Inverness Thistle. 'Caley Thistle' play at The Tulloch Caledonian Stadium, and are currently in the Scottish Premier League and lay claim to have the longest name for any football club in the world. The other football club Clachnacuddin F.C., play in the Highland League. Inverness Citadel F.C. was another popular side which are now unfortunately defunct. Bught Park, located in the centre of Inverness is the finishing point of the annual Loch Ness Marathon and home of Inverness Shinty Club. “Soccer” redirects here. ... Inverness Caledonian Thistle Football Club is a Scottish football team based in the city of Inverness. ... Caledonian Football Club (Caledonian F.C.) were a football club from the city of Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. ... Inverness Thistle Football Club (Inverness Thistle F.C.) were a football club playing in the city of Inverness in northern Scotland. ... The Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League commonly known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system - above the Scottish Football League. ... Clachnacuddin F.C. are a semi-professional senior football club from the city of Inverness who currently play in Scotlands Highland Football League. ... The Highland Football League (HFL) is a league of football (soccer) clubs operating not in just the Scottish highlands as the name may suggest, but across all of the North of Scotland. ... Inverness Citadel Football Club were a football (soccer) club based at Shore Street Park in Inverness, Scotland. ... The Loch Ness Marathon is an annual marathon race held along the famous Scottish lake, Loch Ness, near Inverness. ... Inverness Shinty Club is a shinty club from Inverness, Scotland. ...


In 2007, the city is set to play host to Highland 2007, a celebration of the culture of the Highlands, and will also host the World Highland Games Heavy Championships (21 & 22 July) and European Pipe Band Championships (28 July).[17] There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ...


Buildings

St. Andrew's Cathedral on the banks of the River Ness
St. Andrew's Cathedral on the banks of the River Ness

Important buildings in Inverness include Inverness Castle, Inverness College and various churches. Download high resolution version (1280x960, 566 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 566 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Inverness Castle Inverness Castle Inverness Castle Today Inverness Castle sits on a cliff overlooking the River Ness, in Inverness, Scotland. ... UHI Millennium Institute (UHI) is a federation of 15 colleges and research institutions, in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland delivering higher education. ...


The castle was built in 1835 on the site of its medieval predecessor. It is now a sheriff court. The Sheriff Courts are the local Court system in Scotland. ...


Inverness Cathedral, dedicated to St Andrew, is a cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church and seat of the ordinary of the Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness. The cathedral has a curiously square-topped look to its spires, as funds ran out before they could be completed. Inverness Cathedral, also known as the Cathedral Church of Saint Andrew is a cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church situated in the city of Inverness in Scotland. ... Saint Andrew (Greek: Andreas, manly), the Christian Apostle, brother of Saint Peter, was born at Bethsaida on the Lake of Galilee. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Pope Pius XI, depicted in this window at Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace, Honolulu, was ordinary of the universal Roman Catholic Church and local ordinary of Rome. ... The Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness is one of the seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church. ...


The oldest church is the Old High Church,[18] on St Michael's Mount by the riverside, a site perhaps used for worship since Celtic times. The church tower dates from mediaeval times, making it the oldest surviving building in Inverness. It is used by the Church of Scotland congregation of Old High St Stephen's, Inverness,[19] and it is the venue for the annual Kirking of the Council, which is attended by local councillors. Old High St Stephens Church is a parish church of the Church of Scotland in Inverness, the capital city of the Highlands of Scotland. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... Old High St Stephens Church is a parish church of the Church of Scotland in Inverness, the capital city of the Highlands of Scotland. ...


Inverness College is the hub campus for the UHI Millennium Institute.[20] UHI Millennium Institute (UHI) is a federation of 15 colleges and research institutions, in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland delivering higher education. ...


Porterfield Prison, officially HMP Inverness, serves the courts of the Highlands, Western Isles, Orkney Isles and Moray, providing secure custody for all remand prisoners and short term adult prisoners, both male and female (segregated).[21] A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... A prisoner who is denied, refused or unable to meet the conditions of bail, or who is unable to post bail, may be held in a prison on remand until their criminal trial. ...


Famous people

The former leader of the Liberal Democrats, Charles Kennedy, was born in Inverness. The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... Charles Peter Kennedy (born 25 November 1959), is a British politician who was the leader of the Liberal Democrats, the third largest political party in the United Kingdom, from 9 August 1999 until 7 January 2006. ...


Yvette Cooper, the Minister of State for Housing in the Brown Cabinet was also born in Inverness. Yvette Cooper (born 20 March 1969) British politician. ...


Areas of the city

Towns and Villages

Apart from the former burgh of Inverness, the Highland Council's city management area includes Ardersier, Beauly, Culloden, Drumnadrochit, Fort Augustus, Invermoriston and Tomatin. Ardersier is a small former fishing village in the Scottish Highlands, on the Moray Firth, east of Inverness, near Fort George, and Nairn. ... Beauly (pronounced Bewley; a corruption of Beaulieu), is a town of the Scottish county of Inverness-shire, on the River Beauly, 10 miles West of Inverness by the Far North railway line. ... Culloden (from Gaelic Cul loden, back of the pond) is the name of a village five miles east of Inverness, Scotland and the surrounding area. ... Drumnadrochit is a village in the Scottish Highlands, on the West shore of Loch Ness. ... Fort Augustus is a settlement in the Scottish Highlands, at the south west end of Loch Ness. ... Invermoriston ( Inbhir Moireasdan in Gaelic) (Ordnance Survey NH420167) is a small village 7 miles north of Fort Augustus, Highland, Scotland. ... Tomatin is a village on the River Findhorn in Strath Dearn in the Scottish Highlands. ...


Footnotes

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  1. ^ Building Better Cities: Delivering Growth and Opportunities Scottish Executive website (retrieved 9 July 2007) offers statistics about Inverness as a city within the Highland region
    However, unlike other cities recognised by the Scottish Executive (Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow), Inverness does not have statutory boundaries, and the webpage does not specify any sense of boundaries
    Region is a term by which the Highland Council often refers to the Highland council area
  2. ^ Letters patent, seemingly granting city status, were sealed in 2001 and are now held in Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
    These letters patent are unusual, however, in that they do not refer to anywhere with defined boundaries
  3. ^ The Highland Council website Retrieved 7 July 2007
  4. ^ The Internet Guide to Scotland, Joanne Mackenzie-Winters website Retrieved 7 July 2007
  5. ^ Craig Phadrig, Inverness, Walk in Scotland, Visitscotland
  6. ^ Inverness churches
  7. ^ The Highland Main Line, the Aberdeen-Inverness Line and the Far North Line meet at Inverness (Ordnance Survey grid reference NH667454). Also, Kyle of Lochalsh services run to and from Inverness via the Far North Line to Dingwall.
  8. ^ Ordnance Survey grid reference for Inverness Airport (access from A96 road): NH776508.
  9. ^ Local Government etc (Scotland) Act 1994, Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI) website
  10. ^ Local Governance (Scotland) Act 2004, Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI) website
  11. ^ Helen Liddell joins Inverness celebrations as Scotland’s Millennium City, Scotland Office press release 19 Mar 2001
  12. ^ Ordnance Survey grid reference for Inverness Museum and Art Gallery: NH666451
  13. ^ Key Decisions Taken on Council Post 2007, Highland Council news release, 15 December 2006, includes a list of wards within the Inverness management area
  14. ^ List of MPs, Parliament of the United Kingdom website, retrieved 11 July 2007
    Website of Danny Alexander MP, retrieved 10 July 2007
  15. ^ Fergus Ewing MSP, Scottish Parliament website, retrieved 10 July 2007
  16. ^ John Farquhar Munro MSP, Scottish Parliament website, retrieved 11 July 2007
  17. ^ Highland 2007, Information on the European Pipe Band Championships
  18. ^ OLD HIGH CHURCH, Riverside Churches Clergy Fraternal website
  19. ^ Old High St Stephen’s website
  20. ^ UHI Millennium Institute website
  21. ^ HMP Inverness, Scottish Prison Service website
    Ordnance Survey grid reference: NH668449

Location Geography Area Ranked 1st  - Total 30,659 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Inverness ISO 3166-2 GB-HLD ONS code 00QT Demographics Population Ranked 7th  - Total (2005) 213,590  - Density 8 / km² Politics The Highland Council http://www. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... , Aberdeen (IPA: ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is Scotlands third largest city with an official population of 202,370. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... The Statute of Grand Duchy of Lithuania A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ... The Highland area (Roinn na Gàidhealtachd in Gaelic) is a unitary authority area in the Scottish Highlands and the largest administrative region in Scotland. ... The council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The Highland Main Line is a railway line in Scotland. ... The Aberdeen to Inverness Line is a railway line in Scotland linking Aberdeen and Inverness. ... The Far North Line is a rural railway line entirely within the Highland area of Scotland, extending from Inverness to Thurso and Wick. ... Part of an Ordnance Survey map at 1 inch to the mile scale from 1945 Ordnance Survey (OS) is an executive agency of the United Kingdom government. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Kyle of Lochalsh Line is a railway line in the Scottish Highlands, running from Dingwall to Kyle of Lochalsh. ... See Dingwall (name) for the Scottish family name. ... Inverness Airport (IATA: INV, ICAO: EGPE) is situated at Dalcross, 9 miles (15 km) east of the city of Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. ... The A96 is a major road in Scotland. ... The Scottish Prison Service (SPS) is the executive agency reporting to the Scottish Executive tasked with managing prisons within Scotland. ...

External links

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Welcome to Inverness Airport | Inverness Airport (291 words)
Situated in the Highlands, Inverness Airport (INV) operates as the main entryway to air travel in the North of Scotland.
Inverness Airport offers a host of popular flight routes and is the largest amongst the 10 airports in the Highlands and Islands area.
The City of Inverness - around eight miles west of the airport - is one of the fastest growing business and social centres in the UK.
Inverness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1423 words)
Inverness was granted city status by the Queen in December 2000, and celebrated its new status officially in March 2001.
Inverness was one of the chief strongholds of the Picts, and in 565 was visited by Saint Columba with the intention of converting the Pictish king Brude, who is supposed to have resided in the vitrified fort on Craig Phadrig (168 m), 2.4 km west of the city.
As a component of Inverness District of Burghs Inverness was a parliamentary burgh from 1708 to 1918.
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