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Encyclopedia > Invercargill


Invercargill
Waihōpai (Māori)
Population: 48,200
(urban)
50,800
(territorial)
Urban Area
Extent: Makarewa to Woodend;
west to Otatara
Territorial Authority
Name: Invercargill City
Mayor: Tim Shadbolt
Land area: 491km²
Extent: Makarewa to Bluff;
Oreti Beach to
Kennington
Website: http://www.icc.govt.nz
Regional Council
Name: Environment Southland
Website: http://www.es.govt.nz
Cnr of Esk and Dee Streets, looking up Esk st, one of the main shopping streets of Invercargill.

Invercargill (Waihōpai in Māori) is the southernmost and westernmost city in New Zealand, and one of the southernmost settlements in the world. It is the commercial centre of the Southland region. It lies in the heart of the wide expanse of the Southland Plains on the Oreti or New River some 18 km north of Bluff, which is the southernmost town in the South Island. It sits amid rich farmland that is bordered by large areas of conservation land and marine reserves, including Fiordland National Park covering the south-west corner of the South Island. Māori or Te Reo Māori, commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) is an official language of New Zealand. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Invercargill ... Tim Shadbolt - Mayor of Invercargill Timothy Richard Shadbolt (born February 19, 1947) is the mayor of the city of Invercargill, New Zealand, and former mayor of Waitemata city. ...   Categories: New Zealand-related stubs | Southland, New Zealand | Territorial Authorities of New Zealand ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 194 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 194 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Māori or Te Reo Māori, commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) is an official language of New Zealand. ...   Categories: New Zealand-related stubs | Southland, New Zealand | Territorial Authorities of New Zealand ... Regions is the formal term for the top tier of local government in New Zealand. ... The Southland Plains is a general name given to several areas of low-lying land in the South Island of New Zealand, separated by the rise of the Hokonui Hills in the north. ... The Oreti (or New) River is one of the main rivers of Southland, New Zealand, and is 170 kilometres in length. ... Bluff is a town and seaport in the Southland region, on the southern coast of the South Island of New Zealand. ... Milford Sound: Mitre Peak, the mountain at left, rises 1692 meters above the Sound. ...


Invercargill is home to the Southern Institute of Technology, which has introduced a free-fees scheme. The scheme was partly responsible for rejuvenating the city when it was in a steady state of population decline. The Southern Institute of Technology is the most well recognized Tertiary Education Institution of the province of Southland, New Zealand. ...


Invercargill is also the home to New Zealand's only indoor cycling velodrome. The indoor 250m wooden velodrome is home to Track Cycling in Southland and is currently the fastest track in the country. The Invercargill Licensing Trust supports the Velodrome which is situated at Stadium Southland. It promises to become the focal point of track cycling in New Zealand. It is also home of the SBS Invitational Amateur golf tournament which is held every year at the beginning of March. Another facility is Queen's Park, which is just north of the city centre, with botanical gardens, an aviary, sports grounds, and the Southland Museum and Art Gallery. Anderson Park, on the northern boundary of Invercargill, is a large Georgian-style residence set in 24 hectares of landscaped gardens. The house displays Invercargill's extensive collection of New Zealand art. Bicycle racing on a velodrome A velodrome is a sporting arena purpose-built for track cycling, i. ... Track cycling is a bicycle racing sport usually held on specially-built banked tracks or velodromes (but many events are held at older velodromes where the track banking is relatively shallow) using track bicycles. ... The SBS Invitational is a 72 hole Amateur stroke play teams championship played between the 15 golf associations of New Zealand. ... Queens Park is a tourist attraction in Invercargill and was part of the original planning when Invercargill was founded in 1856. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Inside the Rio de Janeiro Botanic Garden (Brazil), 1890 Botanical gardens (in Latin, hortus botanicus) grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes, but also for the enjoyment and education of visitors, a consideration that has become essential to... Anderson Park is a park in Invercargill, New Zealand. ...


Many streets in the city, especially in the centre and main shopping district, are named after rivers in the United Kingdom, mainly Scotland. These include Dee, Tyne, Esk, Don, Thames, Mersey, Ness, Yarrow, Spey, Tay, and Eye rivers. River Dee near Braemar The Linn of Dee, small gorge near Braemar The River Dee is a 90 mile (140 km) long river, that rises in the Cairngorms, Aberdeenshire, Scotland and flows into the North Sea at Aberdeen. ... The River Tyne can refer to two rivers in the United Kingdom: River Tyne, England River Tyne, Scotland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... River Esk is the name of several rivers. ... The article is about the Don River in Scotland. ... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... The River Mersey is a river in the north west of England. ... The River Ness is a river flowing from Loch Ness in Scotland, north to Inverness and the Moray Firth. ... The River Yarrow is a river in Selkirkshire in the south east of Scotland. ... The River Spey is a river in Scotland that runs 107 miles (172 km) to the Moray Firth at Spey Bay, making it the second longest river in Scotland. ... The River Tay looking eastwards from Perth The River Tay, in terms of flow (193 kilometres or 120 miles), is the longest river in Scotland. ... The River Eye is a river of the Scottish Borders flowing into the North Sea at the port of Eyemouth. ...

Contents

Transport

Road

Invercargill is the southernmost city on New Zealand's state highway network and is linked to Fiordland and the Catlins by the Southern Scenic Route. Fiordland is a region of New Zealand that is situated on the south-western corner of the South Island. ... The Catlins is an area in the south of the South Island of New Zealand and lies between Balclutha and Invercargill. ... Southern Scenic Route official logo On Lake Te Anau The Southern Scenic Route is a tourist highway in New Zealand linking Fiordland, Invercargill, The Catlins and Dunedin. ...

See also: Public transport in Invercargill

Public transport in Invercargill, New Zealand is mainly by bus. ...

Rail links

Invercargill is at the southern end of the Main South Line railway, which extends up the east coast to Christchurch and Lyttelton via Dunedin. Until the cancellation of the Southerner in 2002, Invercargill had the southernmost passenger railway station in the world. Passenger trains no longer call at Invercargill, except for occasional excursions. The Bluff Branch extends south from Invercargill and has been freight-only since 1967. The Wairio Branch extends northwest from Invercargill to the Solid Energy coalfields and continues to carry freight. The Main South Line is half of the South Island Main Trunk Railway in New Zealand and runs south from Lyttelton through Christchurch and down the east coast of the South Island to Invercargill via Dunedin. ... For other uses, see Christchurch (disambiguation). ... Lyttelton can be: One of the Barons Lyttelton. ... The Southerner was a famous passenger express train that ran in New Zealands South Island along the Main South Line between Christchurch and Invercargill via Dunedin. ... The Bluff Branch is a railway line in Southland, New Zealand that links Invercargill with the port of Bluff. ... The Wairio Branch is a branch line railway in Southland, New Zealand. ... Solid Energy is the largest coal mining company in New Zealand and is a state owned enterprise of the New Zealand Government. ...


Invercargill Airport

During the mid 1950s, Invercargill Airport was used for fuel top-up and final take off by Operation Deep Freeze. Twin-engine propeller-driven planes destined for McMurdo Sound in the Antarctic used the airport, assisted in takeoff by JATO rockets under their wings. Bigger aircraft flew from Christchurch where Deep Freeze had a base. Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Invercargill Airport (IATA: IVC, ICAO: NZNV) is a controlled aerodrome located 1 NM northwest of Invercargill at the south of the South Island of New Zealand. ... Operation Deep Freeze I was the codename for a series of scientific expeditions to Antarctica in 1955–56. ... Categories: Antarctica geography stubs | Geography of Antarctica | Ross Dependency ... Greek ἀνταρκτικός, opposite the arctic) is a continent surrounding the Earths South Pole. ... Take-off of Americas first rocket-assisted fixed-wing aircraft, an Ercoupe fitted with a GALCIT developed solid propellant JATO booster with a thrust of 28 pounds force (125 N). ... Christchurch (Māori: ) is the regional capital of Canterbury, New Zealand. ...


Invercargill Airport's primary traffic currently comprises Air New Zealand ATR 72 aircraft flying to and from Christchurch, and regular flights to and from Stewart Island. Invercargill Airport (IATA: IVC, ICAO: NZNV) is a controlled aerodrome located 1 NM northwest of Invercargill at the south of the South Island of New Zealand. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... The ATR 72 is a twin-turboprop short-haul regional airliner built in France by the ATR company (Avions de Transport gional). ...


History

Southland was a scene of early extended contact between Europeans and Maori, in this case sealers and whalers and missionaries - Wohlers at Ruapuke. From 1848, Otago, of which Southland was itself part, was the subject of planned settlement by the Free Church, an offshoot of the Presbyterian Church of Scotland. Settlement broadened with the discovery of gold in Central Otago in the 1860s. The Free Church of Scotland (1843-1900) was a Scottish denomination formed by the withdrawal of a large section of the established Church of Scotland in a schism known as the Disruption of 1843. ...


In 1856 a petition was put forward to Thomas Gore Browne, the Governor of New Zealand, for a port at Bluff. Browne agreed to the petition and gave the name Invercargill to the settlement north of the port. Inver comes from the Scots Gaelic word inbhir meaning a river's mouth and Cargill is in honour of Captain William Cargill, who was at the time the Superintendent of Otago, of which Southland was then a part. 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Thomas Robert Gore Browne (July 3, 1807- April 17, 1887) was a Governor of St Helena, Governor of New Zealand, Governor of Tasmania and Governor of Bermuda. ... The Governor-General of New Zealand is the representative of the Sovereign in right of New Zealand (currently, Queen Elizabeth II). ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... William Cargill was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 1784. ... Otago (help· info) is one of the regions of New Zealand and lies in the south-east of the South Island. ...


Even today, traces of Scottish speech persist in Southland voices, with R often pronounced with a rolling burr. This is more noticeable in country people.


In December 1905, Invercargill voted in local prohibition of alcohol sales. this lasted for 40 years until voted out by returning servicemen in World War 2. Drinking continued meanwhile, thanks to huge volumes of beer, often in kegs, brought to private homes, or sold by the glass by keggers at hiding spots round the City. When prohibition ended, a committee of citizens persuaded the Government to give the monopoly on liquor sales in Invercargill to the specially formed Invercargill Licensing Trust. Based on a scheme in Carlisle, England, it returns profits to city amenities. Even today, alcohol is not sold in supermarkets. An organisation in Invercargill covering important things to do with the welfare of Invercargill. ...


In recent years, publicity has been brought to the southern city by the election of Tim Shadbolt, a colourful and outspoken former student activist, as mayor. He once appeared on a cheese ad stating "I don't mind where, as long as I'm Mayor". His supporters like the colour he brings to the city. His opponents refer to his controversial mayoral career in Auckland suburbs and to his attitude to veterans during his opposition to the Vietnam War. Tim Shadbolt - Mayor of Invercargill Timothy Richard Shadbolt (born February 19, 1947) is the mayor of the city of Invercargill, New Zealand, and former mayor of Waitemata city. ...


Climate

A temperate oceanic climate similar to that of the British Isles (the rain is warmer in summer) prevails in Invercargill, where the mean daily temperature ranges from 5.2°C in July to 13.8°C in January. The yearly mean temperature is 9.9°C. Rainfall averages 1064 mm annually, and measurable snowfall is occasionally seen during the winter months of June to September. It is the cloudiest centre of New Zealand with 1580 hours of sunshine per annum. World map showing the oceanic climate zones. ... The British Isles in relation to mainland Europe The British Isles (French: , Irish: [1] or Oileáin Iarthair Eorpa,[2] Manx: Ellanyn Goaldagh, Scottish Gaelic: , Welsh: ), are a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ...


The average temperature high ranges from 18.4°C in January to 11.1°C in August. Due to the relatively high latitude (46° 42'), the city enjoys nearly 16 hours of daylight at the summer solstice in late December.-1...


Invercargill is "The city of Water and Light". This refers to the long summer twilights and the aurora australis (southern lights). The water reference, humorists suggest, comes from notorious horizontal, driving rain in high wind at the corner of the two main streets, Dee and Tay. A recent sign also states "Invercargill, where dreams can come true" with an image from the 2005 film The World's Fastest Indian. This article contains a trivia section. ...

Panorama of Invercargill from the city's historic watertower. Queen's Park can be seen toward the right of the image.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 71 pixel Image in higher resolution (11996 × 1060 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 71 pixel Image in higher resolution (11996 × 1060 pixel, file size: 3. ... Queens Park is a tourist attraction in Invercargill and was part of the original planning when Invercargill was founded in 1856. ...

The Invercargill March

Invercargill provided the inspiration for the Invercargill March, a stirring piece of military music written in 1900 by the composer Alex F. Lithgow, who lived in Invercargill from the age of six, although born in Scotland. The march was written for the City of Invercargill, which Alex Lithgow dearly missed while he was away. Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Alex Frame Lithgow (1870-1929) was born in Scotland, and then lived in Invercargill. ...


"Invercargill" rates alongside old favourites such as the Gladiator March, Liberty Bell, the Radetsky March, and other stirring Sousa marches. The Invercargill March is especially popular in the United States of America. It is a favorite of the US Marines, and was the Regimental March of the 56th Infantry Regiment of the New York Guard during World War 2. The Invercargill Caledonian Pipe Band continues the Scottish tradition today. Sousa may mean a number of different things: Sousa is a common surname in the Portuguese language, namely in Portugal and Brazil. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... New York Guard MPs on post in New York City. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Education

Tuatara at Southland Museum and Art Gallery

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ...

High schools

All High Schools in Invercargill are Year 7-13, following a Ministry of Education review in 2004 that made most of Invercargill's primary schools Year 1-6 and closed the Year 7-8 schools Rosedale Intermediate and Collingwood Intermediate.

  • Aurora College was established in 2005, after Mount Anglem College was closed in 2004.
  • Verdon College is a co-educational Catholic school with about 600 students.

James Hargest College is a large school of about 1800 students in Invercargill, New Zealand. ... Southland Girls High School Category: ... Southland Boys High School is the only all boys school in Invercargill, New Zealand, and also one of the two first schools in the country to be a single-sex year 7-13 school. ... Verdon College is a co-educational Roman Catholic high school in Invercargill, New Zealand, teaching students from year 7 to 13. ...

Primary Schools

Most primary schools are Year 1-6.

  • St Joseph's, a small Catholic school near St Mary's Basilica
  • St Theresa's, a Catholic Year 1-6 school in Windsor
  • St Patrick's, a Catholic Year 1-6 school in Newfield
  • Ascot Community School, the only public Year 1-8 school.
  • Fernworth Primary
  • Windsor North School, previously Invercargill North School.
  • Waverly Park School
  • Waihopai School, co-ed school for Years 1-6
  • St John's Girls' School, small school for Years 1-8.
  • Sacred Heart Primary School, North Road, Waikiwi. Years 1-6 Special Character Catholic family school serving the northern suburbs of Waikiwi, Grasmere and Makarewa.
  • Donovan Primary School

Famous Invercargillites

Invercargill Water Tower, taken from Leet St

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 1232 KB) Photographer: Willuknight 03:52, 11 November 2006 (UTC) Taken: Leet St, Invercargill, New Zealand Subject: Invercargill Water Tower File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 1232 KB) Photographer: Willuknight 03:52, 11 November 2006 (UTC) Taken: Leet St, Invercargill, New Zealand Subject: Invercargill Water Tower File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Peter Arnett (born November 13, 1934 in Riverton, New Zealand) is a New Zealand-American journalist. ... Wing Commander Johnnie Checketts DSO DFC (20 February 1912 - 24 April 2006) was a World War 2 Flying ace. ... Bill Crawford-Crompton was born in Invercargill, New Zealand on 2 March 1916. ... Marton Csokas as Celeborn in The Fellowship of the Ring. ... ... Daniel Marcus (Dan) Davin 1 September 1913 - 28 September 1990 was an author who wrote about New Zealand, although most of his career was in Oxford, England with the Oxford University Press. ... Ernest Godward was born in Marylebone, London on April 7, 1869. ... Joseph Hatch (1837 – 2 September 1928) was a New Zealand politician, but is now remembered for harvesting elephant seals and (mainly) penguins for their oil on the sub-antarctic Macquarie Island from 1890 to 1919. ... Rowena Othlie Jackson is a New Zealand prima ballerina, who was born in 1926 in Invercargill. ... Royal Ballet may refer to: Royal Ballet, London Birmingham Royal Ballet Royal Winnipeg Ballet Royal Danish Ballet There is also an article about the Royal Ballet School in London, England. ... A ballerina is a female ballet dancer. ... Chris Knox in the music video for Not Given Lightly Chris Knox (b. ... Bill Manhire (born in Invercargill in 1946) is an award-winning New Zealand poet and short story writer. ... The 1920 Indian (with half the exterior removed to show detail) that Burt Munro used to set his record in 1967 Herbert James Munro (25 March 1899 Invercargill, New Zealand – 6 January 1978 in Invercargill) had set the under-1000 cc world motorcycle land speed record, which still stands, in... Lesley Nicol is a New Zealand Netball player. ... The Silver Ferns are the national netball team of New Zealand, coached by Ruth Aitken. ... Harry Norris (23 Nov 1887 - 22 June 1979) was a conductor best remembered as musical director of the DOyly Carte Opera Company between 1919 and 1929. ... The DOyly Carte Opera Company staged performances of Gilbert and Sullivans Savoy operas in the UK, Europe, America, South Africa and elsewhere from the nineteenth century to the twenty first. ... The Man Herbert John Pither was an aviator and a cycle enthusiast. ... Young Volunteer from Southern NZ who fought in the British Army in World war one, he was unfairly executed for desertion by the British when obviously severely traumatised by Shellshock having fought and somehow survived several awful campaigns. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Honourable Rev Sir Garfield Todd (July 13, 1908 - October 13, 2002) was prime minister of Southern Rhodesia from 1953 to 1958 and later became an opponent of white minority rule in Rhodesia. ... Jeremy Waldron (born October 13, 1953) is a professor of law and philosophy at the New York University School of Law. ... Joseph George Ward (1856 - 1930) was Prime Minister of New Zealand on two occasions in the early 20th century. ... Jeffrey William Wilson (born October 24, 1973 in Invercargill) is a New Zealand sportsman who has represented his country in both rugby union and cricket—a so-called Double All Black, an increasingly rare achievement in the professional era. ...

Sister Cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Kumagaya (Japanese: 熊谷市; -shi) is a city located in Saitama, Japan and part of the Greater Tokyo Area. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other places and things named Hobart, see Hobart (disambiguation). ...

References

  • Reed, A. W. (2002). The Reed Dictionary of New Zealand Place Names. Auckland: Reed Books. ISBN 0-7900-0761-4. 

External links

Coordinates: 46°25.5′S, 168°18.6′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

  • City of Invercargill
  • Invercargill City Council
  • ICC Map page
  • Invercargill Information Center
  • Invercargill Student Forum
  • Invercargill Street Map
  • Photo Gallery
  • Southland Museum and Art Gallery

  Results from FactBites:
 
Southland New Zealand Invercargill Stewart Island Southland Tourism Information (1651 words)
Invercargill is an easy two hour drive to Fiordland and Queenstown, and two and a half hours to Dunedin, via State Highway 1.
Invercargill is known as The Friendly City - a reputation earned through the incredible friendliness and hospitality of the Southland people.
Following the Southern Scenic Route from Invercargill heading north to Dunedin you will view some of the magnificent bold landscape which these parts are known for.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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