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Encyclopedia > Intrapersonal

Intrapersonal communication is language use or thought internal to the communicator. Intrapersonal communication is the active internal involvement of the individual in symbolic processing of messages. The individual becomes his or her own sender and receiver, providing feedback to him or herself in an ongoing internal process. It can be useful to envision intrapersonal communication occurring in the mind of the individual in a model which contains a sender, receiver, and feedback loop. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Personification of thought (Greek Εννοια) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Thought or thinking is a mental process which allows beings to model the world, and so to deal with it effectively according to their goals, plans, ends and desires. ...


Although successful communication is generally defined as being between two or more individuals, issues concerning the useful nature of communicating with oneself and problems concerning communication with non-sentient entities such as computers have made some argue that this definition is too narrow.


In Communication: The Social Matrix of Psychiatry, Jurgen Ruesch and Gregory Bateson argue that intrapersonal communication is indeed a special case of interpersonal communication, as "dialogue is the foundation for all discourse." Gregory Bateson (9 May 1904–4 July 1980) was a British anthropologist, social scientist, linguist and cyberneticist whose work intersected that of many other fields. ... Interpersonal communication is the process of sending and receiving information or communication with another person. ...


Intrapersonal communication can encompass:

  • Day-dreaming
  • Nocturnal dreaming, including and especially lucid dreaming
  • Speaking aloud (talking to oneself), reading aloud, repeating what one hears; the additional activities of speaking and hearing (in the third case of hearing again) what one thinks, reads or hears may increase concentration and retention. This is considered normal, and the extent to which it occurs varies from person to person. The time when there should be concern is when talking to oneself occurs outside of socially acceptable situations.[1]
  • Writing (by hand, or with a wordprocessor, etc.) one's thoughts or observations: the additional activities, on top of thinking, of writing and reading back may again increase self-understanding ("How do I know what I mean until I see what I say?"**) and concentration. It aids ordering one's thoughts; in addition it produces a record that can be used later again. Copying text to aid memorizing also falls in this category.
  • Making gestures while thinking: the additional activity, on top of thinking, of body motions, may again increase concentration, assist in problem solving, and assist memory.
  • Sense-making (see Karl Weick) e.g. interpreting maps, texts, signs, and symbols
  • Interpreting non-verbal communication (see Albert Mehrabian) e.g. gestures, eye contact
  • Communication between body parts; e.g. "My stomach is telling me it's time for lunch."

A daydream is a form of consciousness that involves a low level of conscious activity. ... Dreaming is a common term among Indigenous Australians for a personal, or group, creation story and for the mythological time of creation. ... Lucid dreaming (lucid from Latin, lux light) is the conscious perception of ones state while dreaming, resulting in a much clearer experience and sometimes enabling direct control over the content of the dream, a realistic world that is to some degree in the control of the dreamer. ... Speech: (n. ... Reading is a process of retrieving and comprehending some form of stored information or ideas. ... Hearing is one of the traditional five senses, and refers to the ability to detect sound. ... Personification of thought (Greek Εννοια) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Thought or thinking is a mental process which allows beings to model the world, and so to deal with it effectively according to their goals, plans, ends and desires. ... Reading is a process of retrieving and comprehending some form of stored information or ideas. ... Scribe Writing Writing, in its most common sense, is the preservation and the preserved text on a medium, with the use of signs or symbols. ... A word processor (also more formally known as a document preparation system) is a computer application used for the production (including composition, editing, formatting, and possibly printing) of any sort of viewable or printed material. ... Karl Weick is a noted organizational theorist who is famous for his loose coupling and sense-making theories in organizations. ... In general linguistics Ferdinand de Saussure described a sign as a combination of a concept and a sound-image. ... Albert Mehrabian (currently Professor Emeritus of Psychology, UCLA), has become known best by his publications on the relative importance of verbal and nonverbal messages. ...

Intrapersonal communication in dreams

A particularly interesting example is that of a recently designed technique of 'interviewing' one's dream characters, particularly during lucid dreaming. In the lucid state, the dreamer is aware that he or she is dreaming, and can proceed to question, in-depth, each dream character, whom are necessarily understood to be part of the 'self' in either a psychological sense or in the more scientific sense of each aspect of one's dream arising from one's own brain processes. Lucid dreaming (lucid from Latin, lux light) is the conscious perception of ones state while dreaming, resulting in a much clearer experience and sometimes enabling direct control over the content of the dream, a realistic world that is to some degree in the control of the dreamer. ...


References

  1. ^ "Self-talk", Christine Cauchon, Psychology Today, 2004

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Intrapersonal communication - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (339 words)
Intrapersonal communication is language use or thought internal to the communicator.
Intrapersonal communication is the active internal involvement of the individual in symbolic processing of messages.
In Communication: The Social Matrix of Psychiatry, Jurgen Ruesch and Gregory Bateson argue that intrapersonal communication is indeed a special case of interpersonal communication, as "dialogue is the foundation for all discourse."
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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