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Encyclopedia > Into the Woods
Into the Woods
Original Cast Recording
Music Stephen Sondheim
Lyrics Stephen Sondheim
Book James Lapine
Based upon Inspired by Bruno Bettelheim's The Uses of Enchantment
Productions 1987 Broadway
1990 West End
2002 Broadway revival
Awards Tony Award for Best Score
Tony Award for Best Book
Drama Desk for Best Musical
Tony Award for Best Revival

Into the Woods is an award-winning musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. It debuted in San Diego at the Old Globe Theatre in 1986, and premiered on Broadway in 1987. Bernadette Peters' performance as the Witch, and Joanna Gleason's portrayal of the Baker's Wife, brought acclaim to the production during its original Broadway run. Into the Woods won several Tony Awards, including Best Score, Best Book, and Best Actress in a Musical (Joanna Gleason), in a year dominated by The Phantom of the Opera. The musical has been produced many times, with a 1988 national tour, a 1990 West End production, a 1991 television production, a 1997 tenth anniversary concert, a 2002 Los Angeles production and a 2002 Broadway revival.[1] Into the Woods may refer to: In theatre and television: Into the Woods, a musical production written by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine Into the Woods (Buffy episode), an episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer Into the Woods (Desperate Housewives episode), an episode of Desperate Housewives In music: Into The... Image File history File links Into_The_Woods_CD_Cover. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... Bruno Bettelheim (August 28, 1903 - March 13, 1990) was an Austrian-born American writer and child psychologist. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article is about the year. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... The Tony Award for Best Revival (Musical) has been awarded since 1994. ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... aundrea loves chauncey ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Bernadette Peters (born February 28, 1948) is an American actress and singer. ... Joanna Gleason (born Joanne Halprin on June 2, 1950 in Winnipeg, Manitoba), is a Canadian-born actress, who has been a successful character actor in film, television and on stage. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Phantom of the Opera is a musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on the novel by French novelist Gaston Leroux. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre...


Inspired by Bruno Bettelheim's 1976 book, The Uses of Enchantment, the musical intertwines the plots of several Brothers Grimm fairy tales and follows them further to explore the consequences of the characters' wishes and quests. The main characters are taken from the stories of Little Red Riding Hood, Jack and the Beanstalk, Rapunzel, and Cinderella, tied together by an original story involving a Baker and his wife and their quest to begin a family, and including references to several other well-known tales. Bruno Bettelheim (August 28, 1903 - March 13, 1990) was an Austrian-born American writer and child psychologist. ... For other uses, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... A depiction by Gustave Doré. Little Red Riding Hood is a famous fairytale about a young girls encounter with a wolf. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel Jack and the Beanstalk is an English fairy tale, closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant Killer. ... For other uses, see Rapunzel (disambiguation). ... Gustave Dorés illustration for Cendrillon Cinderella (French: Cendrillon) is a popular fairy tale embodying a classic folk tale myth-element of unjust oppression/triumphant reward. ... A baker prepares fresh rolls A baker is someone who primarily bakes and sells bread. ...

Contents

Plot summary

Act I

A narrator introduces the major characters: Cinderella, who wishes to attend the King's Festival; Jack, a lonely and impoverished young man who wishes that his beloved cow, Milky-White, would give milk; the Baker and his Wife, who wish they could have a child and Little Red Riding Hood who buys some bread from the Baker to take to her grandmother in the woods. An ugly old Witch visits the Baker and his Wife, revealing that the Baker's father had stolen from the Witch's garden to feed his pregnant wife, taking some of her magic beans. The Witch cursed the family, making them barren, and imprisoned their daughter Rapunzel, the Baker's sister. The Witch explains that the spell may be reversed if the Baker and his Wife can find the four ingredients she needs for a certain potion: a milk-white cow, a blood-red cape, corn-yellow hair and a gold slipper, all within the next three days ("Prologue"). Gustave Dorés illustration for Cendrillon Cinderella (French: Cendrillon) is a popular fairy tale embodying a classic folk tale myth-element of unjust oppression/triumphant reward. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel Jack and the Beanstalk is an English fairy tale, closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant Killer. ... A depiction by Gustave Doré. Little Red Riding Hood is a famous fairytale about a young girls encounter with a wolf. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Witchcraft. ... For other uses, see Rapunzel (disambiguation). ...


All begin journeys into the woods: Jack's mother sends a reluctant Jack to the market to sell his beloved Milky-White; and Cinderella decides to escape to the festival, first visiting her mother's grave and receiving a beautiful dress and shoes ("Cinderella at the Grave"). Little Red Riding Hood goes to her grandmother's house and is stalked by a hungry wolf along the way ("Hello, Little Girl"). The Baker's Wife helps him con the sad Jack into selling Milky-White ("I Guess This Is Goodbye") for five beans, telling Jack that they're magic. The Baker, feeling guilty about the lie, sends his Wife home with the cow ("Maybe They're Magic"). The Witch has locked Rapunzel, who has hair "as yellow as corn", in a tower to shield her from the outside world ("Our Little World"). When Little Red Riding Hood arrives at her grandmother's house, she is swallowed by the Wolf, who has also feasted on her grandmother. The Baker (who has been following her) slays the Wolf, saving Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother, and she rewards him with the red cape ("I Know Things Now"). Jack's mother is angry that he was duped, returning only with the beans, and tosses them aside, not knowing they really are magic and will grow into a beanstalk that will reach the heavens. Cinderella leaves the festival before the "First Midnight." Confidence Man redirects here. ...


The Baker's Wife spots Cinderella's pure gold slippers, but she is also taken with Cinderella's Prince ("A Very Nice Prince"). Milky-White runs away, with the Wife in pursuit. Jack, meanwhile, returns from the giant's home with five gold coins, hoping to repurchase Milky-White ("Giants in the Sky"). The Wife confesses that she has lost the cow – a setback. The two Princes sing of their endless longing ("Agony"). The Wife fools Rapunzel into letting down her hair and steals a piece. The Mysterious Man appears and gives Milky-White back to the Baker. The Baker realizes that his Wife has helped considerably, and admits the need to join together in their quest ("It Takes Two").


Jack then arrives with a hen that lays golden eggs and attempts to buy Milky-White, but she has died. The Baker's Wife meets Cinderella again, and almost succeeds in getting one of her shoes. As the second midnight begins, the Witch discovers that the Prince is visiting Rapunzel and begs Rapunzel to return to her ("Stay with Me"). The Witch angrily cuts off Rapunzel's hair and banishes her to a desert, and her Prince is blinded while trying to escape from the Witch. The Mysterious Man gives the Baker money to buy another cow, and Jack, sarcastically convinced by Little Red Riding Hood, who now has her new wolfskin cape and a knife for protection, returns once again to the Giant's home to steal a magical harp.


Cinderella's Prince is giving another festival and spreads pitch on the stairs to try to capture and identify her ("On the Steps of the Palace"). The Baker's Wife arrives and attempts to trade her remaining bean for Cinderella's one remaining slipper; Cinderella throws the bean aside but, needing two shoes, trades shoes with the Wife and flees. The Baker arrives, and they have now met all of the Witch's demands before the end of the third day. Jack's mother reports that a dead Giant has fallen from the beanstalk. As the third midnight approaches, the Witch discovers the cow is not pure white – it has only been covered with flour. However, the Witch revives Milky-White, and the items are fed to her by the Baker and Wife. Jack milks her, and the Witch drinks the magic potion but it does not work because the Witch had touched the hair of Rapunzel they had used in the potion (which explains why she needed the Baker to get the ingredients for her, instead of getting them herself). The Mysterious Man appears and tells the Baker to use the hair-like strands on the husk of corn he had used to compare with one of the step-sister's hair. The new potion works. The curse is reversed, also breaking a spell that had afflicted the Witch, and she becomes youthful and beautiful, although she loses her magical powers.


Cinderella's Prince searches for the maiden whose foot will fit the golden slipper. The step-sisters mutilate their feet trying to cram them into the slipper, but Cinderella appears and becomes the Prince's bride ("Ever After"). The Witch explains that the Mysterious Man is the Baker's father, who abandoned him but the Man dies before the Baker can talk to him. Rapunzel finds her Prince and restores his vision with her tears. Another beanstalk grows from the final bean Cinderella threw away. They all live happily "Ever After."


Act II

Once upon a time, later, in the same far-off kingdom, everyone is living happily despite some minor inconveniences: the Baker and his Wife have their precious baby boy, Jack and his mother are rich and well-fed, and Cinderella is living with her Prince in the Palace ("So Happy").


Suddenly, everyone in the Kingdom is knocked over by an enormous crash, and enormous footprints have destroyed the Baker's Home and the Witch's Garden, leaving her only a few beans spared. The Baker and his Wife decide that they must tell the Royal Family, despite the Witch's insistence that the Royal Family can't do anything about it, and safely escort Little Red Riding Hood to her grandmother's house after her mother was killed by the giant. Jack decides that he must slay the Giant (as he knows how from his previous experiences) and Cinderella learns that her mother's grave was disturbed by her bird friends and decides to investigate. While everyone else is drawn back into the woods for various reasons, the two Princes have grown bored with their marriages and now lust after two new princesses: Snow White and Sleeping Beauty ("Agony" Reprise). This article is about the Snow White character. ... Sir Edward Burne-Jones painted The Sleeping Beauty. ...


The Baker, his Wife, and Little Red get lost in the Woods and find the Witch, and the Royal Family and the Steward, who reveal that the castle was destroyed by the Giant. The Giant then appears, and everyone is shocked: the Giant's a woman! The Giantess is the Widow of the Giant that Jack killed by chopping down the beanstalk, and she wants to kill him in revenge of her husband. To satisfy the widow's thirst for vengeance, everyone offers her the narrator as a sacrifice, until they realize how lost they would be without him. Nevertheless, the Witch throws him into the Giant's arms and he is killed. Jack's mother finds the group and aggressively defends her son, angering the Giant's widow, and Cinderella's Prince's steward clubs Jack's mother to make her be quiet, inadvertently killing her. The widow leaves to search for Jack, and Rapunzel runs underneath her and is trampled, to the horror of the Witch and her Prince. The fourth wall is the imaginary invisible wall at the front of the stage in a proscenium theater, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. ...


The Royal Family leaves to hide in a Hidden Kingdom, the Witch decides to sacrifice Jack to the Widow, and the Baker and his Wife decide they must find him first and split up to search. While Cinderella's Prince seduces the Baker's Wife ("Any Moment"), the Baker finds Cinderella and convinces her to join their group for safety. The Baker's Wife realizes her error and decides to return to her happy life with the Baker and their son ("Moments in the Woods") just moments before being accidentally crushed by the angry giant. The Witch finds Jack, who had found the Baker's Wife's body, and wants to give him to the Giant's widow, causing an argument – the characters blame each other for their predicament before they all blame the Witch ("Your Fault"). Disgusted, the Witch throws away the rest of her magic beans on the ground causing her mother's curse to reactivate and make her vanish to parts unknown ("Last Midnight"). The Baker, grieving after his Wife's death, leaves his child with the others. He is then visited by his father's spirit, which convinces him to face his responsibilities ("No More") because the alternative of leaving them behind is worse than his current problems.


The Baker returns to the group and helps them plan to kill the giant, using Cinderella's bird friends to peck out the Giant's eyes at an area smeared with pitch, where Jack and the Baker can finally deliver a fatal blow. Cinderella, after leaving her unfaithful Prince, helps comfort Little Red Riding Hood upon realizing that her grandmother has succumbed to the giant's reign as well, while the Baker explains to Jack his inability to say what is really morally correct ("No One Is Alone").


Everyone helps to slay the Giant's widow, and each of the previously deceased characters returns to describe the lesson they learned. The Baker's Wife returns to give him one final lesson: tell their Child the story of the Woods, and the Baker becomes the Narrator of the tale. All the characters seem satisfied, except for a final "I wish" from Cinderella ("Finale: Children Will Listen").


Productions

San Diego production


Into the Woods started at the Old Globe Theatre, San Diego, where it opened on December 4, 1986 and ran for 50 performances. Many of the performers from that production were in the Broadway cast. John Cunningham, who played the Narrator, Wolf and Steward was replaced by Tom Aldredge, who played the Narrator and Mysterious Man. LuAnne Ponce, Little Red Ridinghood, was replaced by Danielle Ferland. Ellen Foley as the Witch was replaced by Bernadette Peters. aundrea loves chauncey ... ... Danielle Ferland (b. ... Ellen Foley (born 1951, St. ... Bernadette Peters (born February 28, 1948) is an American actress and singer. ...


Original 1987 Broadway production


Into the Woods opened on Broadway at the Martin Beck Theatre on November 5, 1987, closed on September 3, 1989, and played 764 performances. It starred Bernadette Peters, Joanna Gleason, Chip Zien, Kim Crosby, Ben Wright, Danielle Ferland, Chuck Wagner, Merle Louise, and Robert Westenberg. The original production won the 1988 New York Drama Critics' Circle Award and the Drama Desk Award for Best Musical, and the original cast recording won a Grammy Award. Joanna Gleason won the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical, and James Lapine (book) and Stephen Sondheim (original score) also won the Tony Award. is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Bernadette Peters (born February 28, 1948) is an American actress and singer. ... Joanna Gleason (born Joanne Halprin on June 2, 1950 in Winnipeg, Manitoba), is a Canadian-born actress, who has been a successful character actor in film, television and on stage. ... Chip Zien (born March 20, 1947 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American actor. ... Kim Crosby (born July 11, 1960 is an American singer and actress. ... Danielle Ferland (b. ... Chuck Wagner (born June 20, 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee, USA) is an American actor who has starred on television. ... Merle Louise (b. ... Robert Westenberg (also commonly called Bob Westenberg) is a musical theatre actor who has appeared in such shows as Sunday in the Park with George, Into the Woods and The Secret Garden. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Drama Critics Circle is comprised of nineteen drama critics from daily newspapers, magazines, and wire services based in the New York City metropolitan area. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... A cast recording or original cast recording is a recording of a musical that is intended to document the songs as they were performed in the show and experienced by the audience. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ...


Peters left the show after 5 months due to prior commitments and was replaced by Phylicia Rashad, who was later replaced by Nancy Dussault. In 1989, Betsy Joslyn took over for Ms. Dussault, then left to join the national tour, and Ellen Foley returned to the role of the Witch at the end of the run. In a Mothers Day survey, Rashads character on The Cosby Show, Claire Huxtable, was named, TV mom closest to your own mom in spirit. ... Nancy Dussault (born June 30, 1936 in Pensacola, Florida) is an American singer and actress. ... Betsy Joslyn (born April 19, 1954 in Staten Island, New York) is a Broadway musical and dramatic actress and soprano. ... Ellen Foley (born 1951, St. ...


Tenth Anniversary benefit performances of this production were held on November 9, 1997 at The Broadway Theatre (New York), with the original cast. [2] The Broadway Theatre, showing The Color Purple, May 2007 Entrance The Broadway Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1681 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan. ...


1988 National United States Tour


The national tour began on November 22, 1988 with Cleo Laine playing the Witch, replaced by Betsy Joslyn in May 1989. Rex Robbins played the Narrator and Mysterious Man, Charlotte Rae Jack's Mother, and the Princes were played by Chuck Wagner and Douglas Sills. The tour played cities around the country, such as Fort Lauderdale, FL, Los Angeles, Atlanta, and the Kennedy Center. [3][4] is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Dame Cleo Laine, Lady Dankworth DBE, (born Clementina Dinah Campbell on October 28, 1927 in Middlesex, England) is a scat and jazz singer and an actor. ... Betsy Joslyn (born April 19, 1954 in Staten Island, New York) is a Broadway musical and dramatic actress and soprano. ... Charlotte Rae (born April 22, 1926) is an American actress and singer known for her portrayal of Edna Garrett in the sitcoms Diffrent Strokes and The Facts of Life, in which she appeared from 1979 until 1986. ... Chuck Wagner (born June 20, 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee, USA) is an American actor who has starred on television. ... Douglas Sills (born July 5, 1960) is an American actor. ... Fort Lauderdale, known as the Venice of America, is a city located in Broward County, Florida. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ...


1990 London production


The original London Production opened on September 25, 1990 at the Phoenix Theatre and played until February 23, 1991. It was directed by Richard Jones, choreographed by Anthony Van Laast, and produced by David Mirvish, with costumes by Sue Blane and orchestrations by Jonathan Tunick. It starred Clive Carter, who was nominated for a Laurence Olivier Award. Some story aspects and one song that were cut from the original production were added to the London production. The song "Our Little World" was added. This song was a duet sung between the Witch and Rapunzel giving further insight into the care the Witch has for her self-proclaimed daughter and the desire Rapunzel has to see the world outside of her tower. is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Phoenix Theatre is a West End theatre in London, England, located on Charing Cross Road (at the corner with Flitcroft Street). ... Richard Jones (born 7 June 1953) is a British freelance opera and theatre director. ... David Mirvish wearing his Order of Ontario. ... Sue Blane is most well known for her costume designs for both The Rocky Horror Show and The Rocky Horror Picture Show. ... Orchestration is the study or practice of writing music for orchestra (or, more loosely, for any musical ensemble) or of adapting for orchestra music composed for another medium. ... Jonathan Tunick (born 19 April 1938) is an orchestrator, musical director and composer, who is a member of that small group of artists who have won all four major American performing awards: the Tony, Oscar, Emmy and Grammy. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ...


1991 television production


Into the Woods was taped for video and aired on U.S. public television on March 20, 1991. The taping was done in May 1989 with the original Broadway cast. It is available on DVD. Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


2002 Broadway revival


The 2002 Broadway revival, directed by James Lapine and choreographed by John Carrafa, began previews on April 13, 2002 and opened April 30, 2002 at the Broadhurst Theatre, closing on December 29, 2002 after a run of 18 previews and 279 regular performances. It starred Vanessa L. Williams as the Witch, the recorded voice of Judi Dench as the Giant, and cast including John McMartin (Narrator), Stephen DeRosa (the Baker), Gregg Edelman (Prince/Wolf), Christopher Sieber (Prince/Wolf), and Laura Benanti (Cinderella). James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Broadhurst Theatre, 2006. ... For other persons of the same name, see Vanessa Williams. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... John McMartin is an American actor, born in Warsaw, Indiana and raised in Minnesota. ... Stephen DeRosa (b. ... Gregg Edelman (born on 12 September 1958 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an American movie, television and theatre actor who was trained at Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois). ... Christopher Sieber (born February 18, 1969 in St. ... Laura Benanti (born July 15, 1979 in Kinnelon, New Jersey) is an American musical theatre actress who has appeared in numerous Broadway theatre productions. ...


The plot was retooled, with a subplot added involving The Three Little Pigs restored from the earlier San Diego production. Other changes included the addition of the song "Our Little World," a duet between the Witch and Rapunzel that was part of the London production; Jack's cow was a puppet with a live performer inside who dances; "The Last Midnight" was sung by the Witch as a menacing lullaby to an infant held hostage.[5] There were two Wolves rather than only one, sung by the two performers who also play the Princes. Three Little Pigs is a fairy tale featuring talking animals. ...


The revival won the Tony Awards for the Best Revival of a Musical and Best Lighting Design.[6] The Tony Award for Best Revival (Musical) has been awarded since 1994. ...


2007 London Revival


A revival at the Royal Opera House's Linbury Studio in Covent Garden had a limited run from June 14 - June 30, 2007.[7] and [8]. This is the second Sondheim musical to be staged by the company, following 2003's Sweeney Todd. The Floral Hall of the Royal Opera House The Royal Opera House is a performing arts venue in London. ... Covent Garden is a district in London, located on the easternmost parts of the City of Westminster and the southwest corner of the London Borough of Camden. ... For other uses, see Sweeney Todd (disambiguation). ...


Other productions and adaptations


The musical has been adapted into a child-friendly "Junior" version for use in middle schools. Act II is completely edited out, as well as the not-so-child-friendly elements from Act I. In addition, the show is shortened to fit in a 60-80 minute range.[9]


Cancelled film version

With the success of the fantasy epic The Princess Bride, director Rob Reiner was slated to bring this fantasy musical to the big screen.[citation needed] This article is about the novel. ... Robert Rob Reiner (born March 6, 1945) is an American actor, director, producer, writer, childrens advocate and political activist. ...


In October 1994, a reading of a script (written by Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel) was held at the home of director Penny Marshall, with a cast that included Robin Williams as The Baker, Goldie Hawn as The Baker's Wife, Cher as The Witch, Danny DeVito as The Giant, and Roseanne Barr as Jack's Mother. In late 1995, Daily Variety reported that Jim Henson Prods. and Storyline Entertainment (Craig Zadan and Neil Meron), with Columbia Pictures, would be producing the movie, with director Rob Minkoff; there was no cast named. In January 1997, Daily Variety reported that the projected film was put in "turnaround" by Columbia Pictures, still with director Rob Minkoff; two new songs were written by Sondheim for the film; and Billy Crystal, Meg Ryan and Susan Sarandon were in talks to star.[10] However, Playbill reported that Storyline executives Craig Zadan and Neil Meron said that the head of Columbia Pictures "greenlit the movie musical on a Friday but was subsequently fired the following Monday." Zadan and Meron currently have no plans for this project. [11][12] Lowell Ganz (born August 31, 1948 in New York, New York) is an American screenwriter, television writer, and television producer. ... Marc Babaloo Mandel (born: October 13, 1949 in New York City) is an American writer. ... Penny Marshall at the 1988 Emmy Awards Penny Marshall (born October 15, 1942) is an American actress, producer and director. ... This article is about the American actor and comedian; for other people named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Goldie Jeanne Hawn (born November 21, 1945) is an Academy Award-winning American actress, director and producer. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... Daniel Michael DeVito Jr. ... This article is about the actress. ... Craig Zadan (born October 3, 1947) is an American executive producer, director, and writer. ... Robert Minkoff is an animator, writer, film producer and director. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... The cover of the Playbill issue about The Producers. ...


Casting history

The following table shows the casts of the principal productions of Into the Woods

Role Original Broadway production
1987
London production
1990
Broadway revival
2002
London revival
2007(Royal Opera House)
Witch Bernadette Peters Julia McKenzie Vanessa L. Williams Beverly Klein
Narrator Tom Aldredge Nicholas Parsons John McMartin Gary Waldhorn
Cinderella Kim Crosby Jacqueline Dankworth Laura Benanti Gillian Kirkpatrick
Baker Chip Zien Ian Bartholomew Stephen DeRosa Clive Rowe
Baker's Wife Joanna Gleason Imelda Staunton Kerry O'Malley Anna Francolini
Jack Ben Wright Richard Dempsey Adam Wylie Peter Caulfield
Jack's Mother Barbara Bryne Patsy Rowlands Marylouise Burke Anne Reid
Little Red Riding Hood Danielle Ferland Tessa Burbridge Molly Ephraim Suzanne Toase
Cinderella's Stepmother Joy Franz Ann Howard Pamela Myers Elizabeth Brice
Florinda Kay McClelland Elizabeth Brice Tracy Nicole Chapman Louise Bowden
Lucinda Lauren Mitchell Liza Sadovy Amanda Naughton Lara Pulver
Cinderella's Father Edmund Lyndeck John Rogan Dennis Kelly Martin Nelson
Cinderella's Mother Merle Louise Laura Benanti[13]
Mysterious Man Tom Aldredge John Rogan John McMartin Martin Nelson
Wolf Robert Westenberg Clive Carter Gregg Edelman &
Christopher Sieber
Nicholas Garrett
Rapunzel Pamela Winslow Mary Lincoln Melissa Dye Christina Haldane
Rapunzel's Prince Chuck Wagner Mark Tinkler Christopher Sieber Nic Greenshields
Grandmother Merle Louise Eunice Gayson Pamela Myers Linda Hibberd
Cinderella's Prince Robert Westenberg Clive Carter Gregg Edelman Nicholas Garrett
Steward Philip Hoffman Peter Ledbury Trent Armand Kendall Byron Watson
Giant Merle Louise Eunice Gayson Judi Dench (voice) Linda Hibberd
Snow White Jean Louisa Kelly Megan Kelly
Sleeping Beauty Maureen Davis Kate Arneil Jennifer Malenke
Milky White Chad Kimball

Bernadette Peters (born February 28, 1948) is an American actress and singer. ... Julia McKenzie (born 17 February 1941, Enfield, Middlesex, England) is a British actor and theatre director. ... For other persons of the same name, see Vanessa Williams. ... ... Christopher Nicholas Parsons OBE, normally known as Nicholas Parsons (born October 10, 1923) is a British actor, radio and television presenter. ... John McMartin is an American actor, born in Warsaw, Indiana and raised in Minnesota. ... Gary Waldhorn (born 3 July 1943 in London) is an English actor best known for his role as David Horton in the sitcom The Vicar of Dibley. ... Kim Crosby (born July 11, 1960 is an American singer and actress. ... Laura Benanti (born July 15, 1979 in Kinnelon, New Jersey) is an American musical theatre actress who has appeared in numerous Broadway theatre productions. ... Chip Zien (born March 20, 1947 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an American actor. ... Ian Bartholomew is an English actor who has appeared in acclaimed productions of Mirandolina, Assassins (both 2006) and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (2005). ... Stephen DeRosa (b. ... Joanna Gleason (born Joanne Halprin on June 2, 1950 in Winnipeg, Manitoba), is a Canadian-born actress, who has been a successful character actor in film, television and on stage. ... Imelda Mary Philomena Bernadette Staunton OBE (born on January 9, 1956) is an Academy Award-nominated English actress. ... Richard Dempsey (born May 16, 1974 in Hertfordshire, England) is an English actor. ... Adam Wylie, born 23 May 1984, in San Dimas, California, is a television and motion picture actor, as well as a Broadway musical performer, and a former Crayola spokesman. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Patsy Rowlands (born 19 January 1934, died 22 January 2005) was a British actress. ... Anne Reid (born 28 May 1935) is an accomplished British actress with a lengthy career on TV, stage and film. ... Danielle Ferland (b. ... Molly Ephraim is an American musical theatre actress who has appeared in a number of Broadway productions. ... Pamela Myers (b. ... Edmund Lyndeck (born October 4, 1925) is an actor who originally started out in Broadway. ... John Rogan is a British actor who has appeared in many films and TV programmes over the past thirty years. ... Merle Louise (b. ... Laura Benanti (born July 15, 1979 in Kinnelon, New Jersey) is an American musical theatre actress who has appeared in numerous Broadway theatre productions. ... ... John Rogan is a British actor who has appeared in many films and TV programmes over the past thirty years. ... John McMartin is an American actor, born in Warsaw, Indiana and raised in Minnesota. ... Robert Westenberg (also commonly called Bob Westenberg) is a musical theatre actor who has appeared in such shows as Sunday in the Park with George, Into the Woods and The Secret Garden. ... Gregg Edelman (born on 12 September 1958 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an American movie, television and theatre actor who was trained at Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois). ... Christopher Sieber (born February 18, 1969 in St. ... Nick Garrett may refer to: Nick Garrett (bass baritone), songwriter, pianist, composer and arranger Charles Nick Garrett, Jr. ... Pamela Winslow is an actress who appeared in film and television roles in the early 1990s. ... Chuck Wagner (born June 20, 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee, USA) is an American actor who has starred on television. ... Christopher Sieber (born February 18, 1969 in St. ... Merle Louise (b. ... Eunice Gayson as Sylvia Trench in Dr. No. ... Pamela Myers (b. ... Robert Westenberg (also commonly called Bob Westenberg) is a musical theatre actor who has appeared in such shows as Sunday in the Park with George, Into the Woods and The Secret Garden. ... Gregg Edelman (born on 12 September 1958 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an American movie, television and theatre actor who was trained at Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois). ... Nick Garrett may refer to: Nick Garrett (bass baritone), songwriter, pianist, composer and arranger Charles Nick Garrett, Jr. ... Philip Seymour Hoffman Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Merle Louise (b. ... Eunice Gayson as Sylvia Trench in Dr. No. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... Jean Louisa Kelly (born on March 9, 1972 in Worcester, Massachusetts, USA) is an American actress and singer. ... Chad Kimball is an American Theater Actor. ...

Musical numbers

Act I
  • Prologue: Into the Woods - Narrator & Company
  • Cinderella at the Grave - Cinderella & Cinderella's Mother
  • Hello, Little Girl - Wolf & Little Red Riding Hood
  • I Guess this Is Goodbye - Jack
  • Maybe They're Magic - Baker's Wife
  • Our Little World - Witch & Rapunzel (added during the Original London Production)
  • I Know Things Now - Little Red Riding Hood
  • A Very Nice Prince - Cinderella & The Baker's Wife
  • First Midnight - Company
  • Giants in the Sky - Jack
  • Agony - Cinderella's Prince & Rapunzel's Prince
  • It Takes Two - Baker & Baker's Wife
  • Stay with Me - Rapunzel & Witch
  • On the Steps of the Palace - Cinderella (with Jack & Little Red Riding Hood in 2002 Revival)
  • Ever After - Narrator, Witch, Florinda, Lucinda & Company
Act II
  • Prologue: So Happy - Narrator & Company
  • Agony (Reprise) - Cinderella's Prince & Rapunzel's Prince
  • Lament - Witch
  • Any Moment - Cinderella's Prince & Baker's Wife
  • Moments in the Woods - Baker's Wife
  • Your Fault - Jack, Baker, Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood & Witch
  • Last Midnight - Witch
  • No More - Baker & Mysterious Man
  • No One Is Alone - Cinderella, Baker, Little Red Riding Hood & Jack
  • Finale: Children Will Listen - Witch & Company

Analysis of book and music

In most productions of Into the Woods, including the original Broadway production, several parts are doubled. Cinderella's Prince and the Wolf, who share the characteristic of being unable to control their appetites, are played by the same actor. Similarly, the Narrator and the Mysterious Man, who share the characteristic of commenting on the story while avoiding any personal involvement or responsibility, are played by the same actor. Granny and Cinderella's Mother, whose characters are both matriarchal characters in the story, are also typically played by the same person.


Stephen Holden writes that the themes of the show include parent-child relationships and the individual's responsibility to the community. The witch isn't just a scowling old hag but a key symbol of moral ambivalence. She is also the only character in the show who always tells the truth. James Lapine said that the most unpleasant person (the witch) would have the truest things to say and the "nicer" people would be less honest. In her words, "I'm not good; I'm not nice; I'm just right."[14]


The show covers multiple themes: growing up, parents and children, accepting responsibility, morality, and finally, wish fulfillment and its consequences.[15]


William A. Henry III wrote that the play's "basic insight... is at heart, most fairy tales are about the loving yet embattled relationship between parents and children. Almost everything that goes wrong — which is to say, almost everything that can — arises from a failure of parental or filial duty, despite the best intentions."[16]


The musical makes heavy use of syncopated speech. In many instances, the characters' lines are delivered with a fixed beat that follows natural speech rhythms, but is also purposely composed in eighth, sixteenth, and quarter note rhythms as part of a spoken song. Like many Sondheim/Lapine productions, the songs contain thought-process narrative, where characters converse or think aloud. In music, syncopation is when a stressing of a normally unstressed beat in a bar or failure to sound a tone on an accented beat occurs. ...


The score is also notable in Sondheim's output because of its intricate reworking and development of small musical motifs. In particular, the opening words, "I wish", are set to the interval of a rising major second and this small unit is both repeated and developed throughout the show, just as Lapine's book explores the consequences of self-interest and "wishing." Sondheim also wrote the first act almost completely in iambic meter. This specific meter is completely dropped in the second act, a symbol of the straying from the typical fairy tale storyline. Sondheim drew on parts of his troubled childhood when writing the show; in 1987, he told Time magazine that the "father uncomfortable with babies [was] his father, and [the] mother who regrets having had children [was] his mother."[17] “TIME” redirects here. ...


Awards and nominations

1987 Broadway production (all awards for 1988)

  • Tony Award Best Musical (Nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Book of a Musical (Lapine-Winner)
  • Tony Award Best Original Score (Sondheim-Winner)
  • Tony Award Best Actress in a Musical (Gleason-Winner)
  • Tony Award Best Featured Actor in a Musical (Westenberg-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Scenic Design (Straiges-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Costume Design (Hould-Ward-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Lighting Design (Nelson-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Choreography (Lubovitch-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Direction of a Musical (Lapine-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Musical (WINNER)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Book of a Musical (Lapine-WINNER)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Actress in a Musical (Peters-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical (Westenberg-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical- (Gleason-WINNER); (Ferland-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Director of a Musical (Lapine-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Orchestration (Tunick-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Lyrics (Sondheim-WINNER)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Music (Sondheim-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Costume Design (Hould-Ward-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Lighting Design (Nelson-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Set Design (Straiges-nominee)
Best Musical Cast Show Album (WINNER)[18]

Other Awards: What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... The Drama Desk Awards are awards given by the organization Drama Desk to honor New York City theater performers, both in Broadway shows but also off-Broadway as well. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Theatre World Award (Ferland-WINNER)

Broadway 2002 revival Tony Awards: The Theatre World Award is an American honor given annually to an actor or an actress in recognition of an outstanding breakout performance in their New York City stage debut. ...

  • Tony Award Best Revival of a Musical (WINNER)
  • Tony Award Best Actor in a Musical (McMartin-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Actress in a Musical (Williams-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Featured Actor in a Musical (Edelman-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Featured Actress in a Musical (Benanti-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Scenic Design (Schmidt-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Costume Design (Hilferty-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Lighting Design (MacDevitt-WINNER)
  • Tony Award Best Choreography (Carrafa-nominee)
  • Tony Award Best Direction of a Musical (Lapine-nominee)

Drama Desk Awards:

  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Revival of a Musical (WINNER)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Actress in a Musical (Benanti and Williams-nominees)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical (Edelman- nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical (O'Malley-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Director of a Musical (Lapine-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Set Design of a Musical (Schmidt-WINNER)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Costume Design (Hilferty-nominee)
  • Drama Desk Award Outstanding Sound Design (Schreier-WINNER)
  • Best Director of a Musical (Richard Jones)
  • Best Actress in a Musical (Imelda Staunton)

The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ...

References

  1. ^ Production summary and links
  2. ^ Sondheim Guide / Special Events (Part 2)
  3. ^ Sondheim Guide / Into the Woods
  4. ^ USA TODAY, David Patrick Stearns, January 26, 1989, pg. 4D
  5. ^ The Washington Post, Nelson Pressley, May 1, 2002, page C1.
  6. ^ 2002 revival production information
  7. ^ Into the Woods at the Royal Opera House
  8. ^ Into the Woods | Theatre story | Guardian Unlimited Arts
  9. ^ Into the Woods Junior: Show Information
  10. ^ Michael Fleming, January 23, 1997, Daily Variety
  11. ^ Sondheim Guide / Unproduced Projects
  12. ^ [http://www.playbill.com/news/article/110095.html "Zadan and Meron Projects Include Peter Pan TV Movie and New Stage Musical", Aug. 6, 2007
  13. ^ Playbill News: Cinderella and Her Mother: Benanti Does Double Duty in Into the Woods ; Prepares Solo CD
  14. ^ New York Times, Stephen Holden, November 1, 1987
  15. ^ Liner Notes, Into the Woods CD, Sheryl Flatow, 1988, RCA Victor 6796-2-RC
  16. ^ Time Magazine, November 16, 1987.
  17. ^ Henry, William A, III. "Master of the Musical; Stephen Sondheim Applies a Relentless", Time, 1987-12-07. Retrieved on 2007-03-19. 
  18. ^ LA Times awards database

(Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

  • Muppetwikia article on details of the unproduced film

External links

Samples

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Into the Woods
  • Download sample of "Ever After"
Awards
Preceded by
Les Misérables
by Claude-Michel Schönberg
and Herbert Kretzmer
Tony Award for Best Original Score
1988
by Stephen Sondheim
Succeeded by
No Award Given
Preceded by
Les Misérables
by Alain Boublil and Herbert Kretzmer
Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical
1988
by James Lapine
Succeeded by
No Award Given
Preceded by
42nd Street
Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical
2002
Succeeded by
Nine
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Les Misérables (pronunciation ), colloquially known as Les Mis, is a musical composed in 1980 by French composer Claude-Michel Schönberg on a libretto by Alain Boublil. ... Claude-Michel Schönberg (born July 6, 1944 in Vannes, France) is a French record producer, actor, singer, popular songwriter, and musical theatre composer, best known for his collaborations with the librettist Alain Boublil. ... Herbert Kretzmer (born October 5, 1925) is an English songwriter and journalist, best known for the English lyrics of the hit musical Les Misérables. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... Les Misérables (pronunciation ), colloquially known as Les Mis, is a musical composed in 1980 by French composer Claude-Michel Schönberg on a libretto by Alain Boublil. ... Alain Boublil is a librettist, best known for his collaborations with the composer Claude-Michel Schönberg. ... Herbert Kretzmer (born October 5, 1925) is an English songwriter and journalist, best known for the English lyrics of the hit musical Les Misérables. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... 42nd Street was a hugely successful Broadway stage musical, loosely based on the movie of the same name. ... The Tony Award for Best Revival (Musical) has been awarded since 1994. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Nine is a musical with music and lyrics by American composer Maury Yeston. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... This article is about the musical. ... Gypsy: A Musical Fable is a musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Hi! Youre car can speak <a href=http://immobilizer. ... Anyone Can Whistle is a musical with a book by Arthur Laurents and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Do I Hear A Waltz? is a musical play with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Arthur Laurents. ... Evening Primrose was a television musical written in 1966 by Stephen Sondheim and James Goldman for ABC Televisions Stage 67. ... The Race to Urga started out as a 1968 Stephen Sondheim adaptation of the Bertolt Brecht play The Exception and the Rule. ... Company is a musical with a book by George Furth and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... This article is about the musical. ... A Little Night Music is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Hugh Wheeler. ... Theatrical poster for the 2004 Broadway production of The Frogs. ... Pacific Overtures was an ambitious 1976 musical by Stephen Sondheim, with a libretto by John Weidman, and additional material by Hugh Wheeler, set in 1853 Japan. ... Poster for the original Broadway production Side by Side by Sondheim is a musical revue featuring the songs of prolific Broadway and film composer Stephen Sondheim. ... Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street is a musical (also considered by many to be an English language opera due to the form and the construct of the show) with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Hugh Wheeler. ... Marry Me A Little is a musical with lyrics and music by Stephen Sondheim. ... Merrily We Roll Along is a musical with a book by George Furth and lyrics and music by Stephen Sondheim. ... Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... Assassins is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by John Weidman and was based on an idea by Charles Gilbert, Jr. ... Putting it Together is a medley of Stephen Sondheims work including songs cut fom shows. ... Pasión es una obra musical que se estreno en Broadway en 1994, adaptada de la película de Ettore Scola Passione dAmore que, a su vez , se basa en la novela de Igino Tarchetti Fosca. Con libreto de James Lapine y música y letras de Stephen Sondheim. ... Saturday Night is a 1950s Broadway musical by Stephen Sondheim. ... Bounce is a musical by Stephen Sondheim with a libretto by John Weidman. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Into the Woods - Lyrics (7043 words)
Baker, Wife: Into the woods to lift the spell-- Cinderella: Into the woods to visit Mother-- Wife: Into the woods to fetch the things-- Baker: To make the potion-- Cinderella: To go to the Festival-- Baker, Wife, Cinderella, Jack, Jack's Mother: Into the woods Without regret, The choice is made, The task is set.
Into the woods, but not to stray, Or tempt the wolf, or steal from the giant-- The way is dark, The light is dim, But now there's you, me, her, and him.
Into the woods, but not too slow-- Into the woods, it's nearing midnight-- Into the woods to mind the wolf, To heed the witch, to honor the giant, To mind, to heed, to find, to think, to teach, to join, To go to the Festival!
Into the Woods - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2362 words)
Into the Woods is an award-winning musical featuring a score by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine.
Into the Woods won several Tony awards, including Best Score, in a year dominated by The Phantom of the Opera.
Into the Woods opened on Broadway at the Martin Beck Theatre on November 5, 1987, and played 804 performances.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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