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Encyclopedia > Interview
An interview
An interview

An interview is a conversation between two or more people (the interviewer and the interviewee) where questions are asked by the interviewer to obtain information from the interviewee. Interviews can be divided into two basic types, interviews of assessment and interviews for information. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... interview Downloaded from : [[1]] Credits : Dennis Mojado File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... interview Downloaded from : [[1]] Credits : Dennis Mojado File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Question (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Assessment

The most common type of interview for assessment is a job interview between an employer and an applicant. The goal of such an interview is to assess a potential employee to see if he/she has the social skills and intelligence suitable for the workplace. Similar interviews are also used for admissions to schools, allotment of grants, and other areas. Job Interview is a process in which a potential employee is evaluated by an employer for prospective employment in their company, organization, or firm. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ...


In most developed countries, rules and regulations govern what can be asked in these interviews. Highly personal questions and those unrelated to the job at hand are forbidden, as are questions which invite discrimination. However some interviewers tend to ask such questions in order to see how the interviewee reacts and if (s)he is able to elegantly avert the question....


non-structured.


Information

The second class of interviews are those seeking to gather information about a subject. These types of interviews are central to the practices of journalism and instructional design. Such interviews are also important to any non-fiction writer or researcher. In general the quotes and information gathered in these interviews are used in a publication or edited for broadcast. Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Instructional design is the practice of arranging media (communication technology) and content to help learners and teachers transfer knowledge most effectively. ...


Such interviews occur only because the subjects have some interest in being interviewed. There are four main reasons why subjects agree to be interviewed:

  • Ego - The desire to be on television and to have one's opinions aired is a strong one-to-many. Many people enjoy talking about themselves and their lives.
  • Publicity - Politicians and celebrities are dependent on publicity for their success and an interview is free advertising. As such many subjects insist upon prominent mentions of their latest book or movie in the interview. Such promotional interviews are frequently required by contracts.
  • Money - The issue of whether reporters should pay for interviews is a controversial one. Pundits and experts are almost always paid, and this is often an important source of income to them. Most media outlets have rules against paying eyewitnesses for interviews, in part because this only encourages the fabrication of fraudulent stories in the hopes of being paid. A major exception to this are some tabloids, especially British tabloids. Other media outlets often wine and dine sought after subjects and give them other such perks.
  • Helpfulness - many subjects agree to an interview simply to help the reporter. This is true of most eyewitnesses and help explain why many famous individuals agree to grant interviews for items such as school papers.

Even after an interview has been granted the subject normally imposes conditions. Almost all interviews have a time limit. The greater the fame and importance of a subject the more limitations they demand. These includes subject matters that are off limits, a veto over the final piece, or even a full list of questions provided in advance. Some politicians, notably Helmut Kohl (Germany), have avoided giving interviews to the press, whereas many others consider this a necessary aspect of political campaigning. eGO is a company that builds electric motor scooters which are becoming popular for urban transportation and vacation use. ... ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up publicity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Money (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Helmut Josef Michael Kohl (born April 3, 1930) is a German conservative politician and statesman. ...


There are several other rules to interviews. If a subject declares that what they say is "off the record" a reporter is not supposed to use such information. If material is "Background" the material can be used but its source cannot be mentioned, if it is "deep background" then the information cannot be used on its own, and can only confirm information already obtained from another source. A subject may also declare that their comments should have no "attribution." In such cases the name of the subject cannot be mentioned, but they should simply be referred to as "a source in ...". It has been suggested that Attribution (journalism) be merged into this article or section. ... In journalism, background is a term used by some journalists to describe a communication between a source and a journalist, where the journalist does not identify the source, but repeats the information the source has provided. ...


These rules are unwritten and in the past reporters have broken them. However if a journalist published material that was off the record they are unlikely to be able to use that source again. They are known as a "burnt source." Moreover news of such betrayals spreads and a reporter may have trouble with other sources.


The tone of an interviewer is also important. Tough interviewers that are honest and forthrightly pose important and difficult questions are appealing to audiences, but not to subjects. An interviewer that develops a reputation for such aggressiveness may soon find it difficult to convince subjects to sit for an interview. A subject that is offended during an interview may put an early halt to the discussion. Politicians, celebrities, and experts on certain subjects are frequently interviewed. Sometimes interviews are ended early (usually by the interviewee); one famous example is the interview of Charlton Heston by Michael Moore in the film Bowling for Columbine. Well known investigative journalists can often get interviews only under false pretenses. Conversely, an interviewer that asks only "soft" questions will lose the respect of audiences and colleagues. Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ... Bowling for Columbine is a controversial documentary film written, directed, produced by, and starring Michael Moore. ... Investigative journalism is a kind of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a topic of interest, often involving crime, political corruption, or some other scandal. ...


The ideal interview is considered to be a face to face one. Most newspapers order reporters to specifically mention that an interview was conducted by telephone or e-mail. For other uses, see Telephone (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Research interviews

A research interview is a structured social interaction between a researcher and a subject who is identified as a potential source of information.


Research interviews are a well established research methods that can take a variety of forms. There are many type of interview methods which can be used, but the most commonly used are structured, semi structured and unstructured interviews. Increasingly researchers are exploring how these methods can be utilised online in the form of an online interview


Structured interviews

A structured interview is essentially a questionnaire which is mediated or administered by a researcher. This type of interview is used for a variety of reasons but can often be used to increase response rates and the quality of answers for questionnaire style research. These kinds of interviews can be challenging as they require a personal sensitivity and adaptability as well as the ability to stay within the bounds of the designed protocol...


Semi-structured interviews

Semi Structured Interviews is perhaps the most commonly used interview technique in qualitative social research , the researcher will want to know certain information which can be compared and contrasted with information from other interviews, the researcher may produce an interview schedule which is a list of questions the researcher will want to find out from the interviewee.


Unstructured interviews

An Unstructured Interview is where the researcher asks as few questions as possible, permitting the interviewee talk freely, intervening only to refocus the discussion or probe for additional insights into a key area. This technique enables to interviewee to reestablish the parameters of the discussion, a process which itself reveals what is important to the interviewee. This type of interview is also known as Life History Interview see oral history for more information on this kind of interview. It attempts to achieve a holistic understanding of the interviewees perspective and understanding of events and is the favoured approach in historical research, especially oral histories. Oral history is an account of something passed down by word of mouth from one generation to another. ...


Police

See also: Interrogation

In a police setting, interviewing can be used to obtain information from a suspect, witness, or victim. Interviews can be conducted in a formal police station setting, or they can be conducted on the street or at someone's home. An interview turns into an interrogation only once someone is taken into custody and there is suspicion that they have committed an offense (including the offense of withholding information). The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Recruitment

See also: Recruitment

In Human Resources and Recruitment, an interview is commonly shortened to "IV" for faster communications within an office workplace. Communications may include E-mail (eg. Outlook, LotusNotes, Mozilla Thunderbird). Occasionally it is used in Text messaging from one recruiter to another. Recruitment refers to the process of finding possible candidates for a job or function, usually undertaken by recruiters. ... This article is about human resources as it applies to business, labor, and economies. ... Recruitment refers to the process of finding possible candidates for a job or function, usually undertaken by recruiters. ...


Selling

A Selling interview usually follows several precise steps. It starts with questions to the prospective buyer's about its situation and its needs. It is followed by a precise offer that is supposed to fit the motivations the prospect has expressed. Then the seller stresses the advantages of the offer, handles objections, and - if need be and when possible -adjust the offer. It ends with an attempt to close the deal, that might entail some negotiation. Selling technique is the body of methods used in the profession of sales, also often called personal selling. ... Motivation is a word used to refer to the reason or reasons for engaging in a particular behavior, especially human behavior. ... For other uses, see Negotiation (disambiguation). ...


Famous interviews

The Saddam interview refers to a famous television interview that occurred between President of Iraq Saddam Hussein and American news anchor Dan Rather on February 24, 2003, very shortly before the 2003 Invasion of Iraq. ... Daniel Irvin Rather, Jr. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... The Rolling Stone Interview is a feature article in the American magazine Rolling Stone that sheds light on notable figures from the worlds of music, popular culture, or politics. ... The Microsoft interview is usually divided into three phases. ... Living with Michael Jackson was a Granada Television documentary, in which British journalist Martin Bashir interviewed Michael Jackson over a period of 8 months, from the middle of 2002 to January 2003. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered film-makers of the 20th century. ... // The Paris Review is an English-language literary magazine based in New York City. ...

See also

Look up Interview in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... Repertory Grid is an interviewing technique to complement the [Theory of Personal Constructs], both devised by [George Kelly] around 1955. ... Job Interview is a process in which a potential employee is evaluated by an employer for prospective employment in their company, organization, or firm. ...

External links

  • Church of England: How to face a radio or television interview.
  • Interview Questions and Answers Wiki for all career streams
  • 30 of the most common job interview questions
  • Tips on CVs, Resume, Cover letters and Interviews

  Results from FactBites:
 
Interview Stuff • All You Need To Know About Job Interviews (912 words)
If the interview is in the next few days, you probably don't have time to keep surfing the web for job interview advice.
There are job interview techniques and strategies you can use before, during and after the interview to tip the odds in your favour.
There are subtle, yet effective, job interview follow-up techniques you can use afterwards, to increase your chances of success and address anything you think didn't go so well.
Interview - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1145 words)
The most common type of interview for assessment is a job interview between an employer and an applicant.
Sometimes interviews are ended early (usually by the interviewee); one famous example is the interview of Charlton Heston by Michael Moore in the film Bowling for Columbine.
A research interview is a structured social interaction between a researcher and a subject who is identified as a potential source of information, in which the interviewer initiates and controls the exchange to obtain quantifiable and comparable information relevant to an emerging or previously stated hypothesis.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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