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Encyclopedia > Internet Archive
Internet Archive


Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Formation 1996
Type on-line library
Website www.archive.org
Internet Archive headquarters is in the Presidio, a former US military base in San Francisco.

The Internet Archive (IA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining an on-line library and archive of Web and multimedia resources. Located at the Presidio in San Francisco, California, this archive includes "snapshots of the World Wide Web" (archived copies of pages, taken at various points in time), software, movies, books, and audio recordings. To ensure the stability and endurance of the archive, IA is mirrored at XS4ALL in Amsterdam and the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt, the only library in the world with a mirror.[1] The IA makes the collections available at no cost to researchers, historians, and scholars. It is a member of the American Library Association and is officially recognized by the State of California as a library.[2] The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Library (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Internet Archive San Francisco Copyright and permission by: http://web. ... The Parade Grounds at the Presidio of San Francisco. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... For other uses, see Library (disambiguation). ... An archive site is a type of website that stores information on, or the actual, webpages from the past for anyone to view. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... Look up Multimedia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Parade Grounds at the Presidio of San Francisco. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... Archive of the AMVC An archive refers to a collection of historical records, and also refers to the location in which these records are kept. ... In computer file systems, a snapshot is a copy of a set of files and directories as they were at a particular point in the past. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... Web archiving is the process of collecting the Web or particular portions of the Web and ensuring the collection is preserved in an archive, such as an archive site, for future researchers, historians, and the public. ... Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Book (disambiguation). ... Methods and media for sound recording are varied and have undergone significant changes between the first time sound was actually recorded for later playback until now. ... XS4ALL (pronounced access for all) is the second-oldest ISP in the Netherlands, after NLnet (But xs4all was the first company offering internet for individuals). ... Bibliotheca Alexandrina The Bibliotheca Alexandrina is a major library and cultural center located on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea in the Egyptian city of Alexandria. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...

Contents

History

The Internet Archive was founded by Brewster Kahle in 1996. Brewster Kahle speaking 20 November 2002 Brewster Kahle (last name pronounced kale, like the vegetable) was an early member of the Thinking Machines team and later went on to found WAIS (sold to AOL) and later Alexa Internet (sold to Amazon. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


According to its website:

Most societies place importance on preserving artifacts of their culture and heritage. Without such artifacts, civilization has no memory and no mechanism to learn from its successes and failures. Our culture now produces more and more artifacts in digital form. The Archive's mission is to help preserve those artifacts and create an Internet library for researchers, historians, and scholars. The Archive collaborates with institutions including the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian.

Because of its goal of preserving human knowledge and artifacts, and making its collection available to all, proponents of the Internet Archive have likened it to the Library of Alexandria. Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... Inscription regarding Tiberius Claudius Balbilus of Rome (d. ...


Wayback Machine

Examples from the Wayback
Machine's archives: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

The Wayback Machine is the Internet Archive's archive of snapshots of the Web, and is maintained with content from Alexa Internet. This service allows users to see archived versions of web pages across time—what the Archive calls a "three dimensional index." Alexa Internet, Inc. ... A screenshot of a web page. ...


Snapshots become available 6 to 12 months after they are archived. Users who want to permanently archive material and immediately cite an archived version can use the Archive-It system instead.


As of 2006 the Wayback Machine contained almost 2 petabytes of data and was growing at a rate of 20 terabytes per month, a two-thirds increase over the 12 terabytes/month growth rate reported in 2003. Its growth rate eclipses the amount of text contained in the world's largest libraries, including the Library of Congress. The data is stored on Petabox rack systems manufactured by Capricorn Technologies.[3] 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A petabyte (derived from the SI prefix peta- ) is a unit of information or computer storage equal to one quadrillion bytes. ... This article is about a measurement term for data storage capacity. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... Capricorn Technologies is an IT company focused on storage system. ...


The name Wayback Machine is a reference to a segment from The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show in which Mr. Peabody, a bow tie-wearing dog with a professorial air, and his human "pet boy" assistant Sherman use a time machine called the "WABAC machine" to witness famous events in history.[4] Internet Archive headquarters, San Francisco The Internet Archive (archive. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sherman (left) and Mr. ... One option to tie a bowtie The bowtie is a mens fashion accessory, popularly worn with other formal attire, such as suits. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ...


Media collections

In addition to web archives, the Internet Archive maintains extensive collections of digital media that are either public domain or licensed under a license that allows redistribution, such as the Creative Commons License. The media are organized into collections by media type (moving images, audio, text, etc.), and into sub-collections by various criteria. Each of main collection includes an "Open Source" sub-collection where general contributions by the public can be stored. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Creative Commons, some rights reserved. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ...


Moving image collection

Aside from feature films, IA's Moving Image collection includes: newsreels; classic cartoons; pro- and anti-war propaganda; Skip Elsheimer's "A.V. Geeks" collection; and ephemeral material from Prelinger Archives, such as advertising, educational and industrial films and amateur and home movie collections. A newsreel is a documentary film that is regularly released in a public presentation place containing filmed news stories. ... For the band, see Cartoons (band). ... For other uses, see Propaganda (disambiguation). ... The Prelinger Archives are a collection of films, mostly shorts made for industrial or educational markets. ... Advert redirects here. ...


IA's Brick Films collection contains stop-motion animation filmed with LEGO bricks, some of which are 'remakes' of feature films. The Election 2004 collection is a non-partisan public resource for sharing video materials related to the 2004 United States Presidential Election. The Independent News collection includes sub-collections such as the Internet Archive's World At War competition from 2001, in which contestants created short films demonstrating "why access to history matters." Among their most-downloaded video files are eyewitness recordings of the devastating 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. A brickfilm is any film made using LEGO bricks, Mega Bloks bricks, or other similar plastic construction toys. ... A stop motion animation of a moving coin. ... For other uses, see Lego (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake,[1] was a great undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) December 26, 2004 with an epicentre off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. ...


Some of the films available on the Internet Archive are:

The Battleship Potemkin (Russian: , ), sometimes rendered as The Battleship Potyomkin, is a 1925 silent film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and produced by Mosfilm. ... Columbia Revolt is a 50 minute, Black-and-white documentary film about the Columbia University protests of 1968. ... D.O.A. is a 1950 movie considered a classic of the film noir genre. ... See also: 1949 in film 1950 1951 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events February 15 - Walt Disney Studios animated film Cinderella debuts. ... Danger Lights is a 1930 movie starring Louis Wolheim, Robert Armstrong, and Jean Arthur. ... Dating Dos and Donts1 is a 1949 instructional film designed for high schools, to teach adolescents basic dating skills, produced by Coronet Instructional Films and directed by Gilbert Altschul with the assistance of Reuben Hill, Research Professor of Family Life at the University of North Carolina. ... Detour is a 1945 film noir cult classic that stars Tom Neal, Ann Savage, Claudia Drake and Edmund MacDonald. ... The title screen from the film. ... Hemp for Victory is a black-and-white United States government film made during the Second World War, explaining the uses of hemp. ... Lying Lips is a 1939 movie by Oscar Micheaux, starring Edna Mae Harris. ... This article is about the 1968 film directed by George A. Romero. ... This article is about the 1922 silent film. ... The Power of Nightmares, subtitled The Rise of the Politics of Fear, is a BBC documentary film series, written and produced by Adam Curtis. ... Reefer Madness is a 1936 drama film revolving around the tragic events that follow when high school students are lured by pushers to try marihuana: a hit and run accident, manslaughter, suicide, rape, and descent into madness all ensue. ... Sex Madness, directed by Dwain Esper, is a 1938 sexploitation film (along the lines of Reefer Madness) supposedly to deal with venereal diseases, specifically syphilis. ... Spoiler warning: Design for Dreaming is a 1956 musical Ephemeral film about a woman (played by Tad Tadlock) who dreams about a masked man taking her to the the 1956 General Motors Motorama and Frigidaires Kitchen of the Future. It starts off with her in her bedroom, with the... Un Chien Andalou (English: An Andalusian Dog) is a 16-minute[1] surrealist film made in France in 1928 by Spanish writer/directors Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí, and released in 1929 in Paris. ... Prelude to War depicts the Nazi propaganda machine. ... The Negro Soldier was a 1944 propaganda film produced by the US War Department encouraging African Americans to join the armed forces and otherwise help the war effort. ... The year 1943 in film involved some significant events. ...

Audio collection

The audio collection includes music, audio books, news broadcasts, old time radio shows and a wide variety of other audio files. The Live Music Archive sub-collection includes 40,000 concert recordings from independent artists, as well as more established artists and musical ensembles with permissive rules about recording their concerts. For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Old-Time Radio (OTR) or The Golden Age of Radio is a term used to refer to radio programs that were broadcast during the 1920s through the late 1950s (with some outlying programs produced earlier and later) in the United States, as well as the United Kingdom and Canada and... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ...


Texts collection

The texts collection includes texts from Project Gutenberg as well as texts from various libraries around the world and a collection of papers and memoranda from the Arpanet. Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... ARPANET logical map, March 1977. ...


Open Library

The Internet Archive is a member of the Open Content Alliance, and operates the Open Library where more than 200,000 scanned public domain books are made available in an easily browsable and printable format.[5][6] Their "Scribe" book imaging system was used to digitize most of these books.[7] The software that runs it is free/open source softwareScribe Software. The Open Content Alliance is a consortium of non-profit and for-profit groups which is dedicated to building a free archive of digital text and multimedia. ... Free software is software that can be used, studied, and modified without restriction, and which can be copied and redistributed in modified or unmodified form either without restriction, or with restrictions only to ensure that further recipients can also do these things. ... ...


Controversies

Scientology sites

See also: Scientology versus the Internet

In late 2002, the Internet Archive removed various sites critical of Scientology from the Wayback Machine.[8] The error message stated that this was in response to a "request by the site owner."[9] It was later clarified that lawyers from the Church of Scientology had demanded the removal, on unknown legal grounds, and that the actual site owners did not want their material removed.[10] Scientology versus the Internet is a colloquial term for a long-running online dispute between the Church of Scientology and a number of the Churchs online critics. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology is a body of beliefs and related practices created by American pulp fiction author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as an outgrowth of his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. ... Scientology cross Symbol Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The Church of Scientology is the largest religious organization devoted to the practice and the promotion of the Scientology belief system. ...


Archived web pages as evidence

United States civil litigation

In an October 2004 case called "Telewizja Polska SA v. Echostar Satellite", a litigant attempted to use the Wayback Machine archives as a source of admissible evidence, perhaps for the first time. Telewizja Polska is the provider of TVP Polonia and EchoStar operates the Dish Network. Prior to the trial proceedings, EchoStar indicated that it intended to offer Wayback Machine snapshots as proof of the past content of Telewizja Polska’s website. Telewizja Polska brought a motion in limine to suppress the snapshots on the grounds of hearsay and unauthenticated source, but Magistrate Judge Arlander Keys rejected Telewizja Polska’s assertion of hearsay and denied TVP's motion in limine to exclude the evidence at trial.[11] However, at the actual trial, district Court Judge Ronald Guzman, the trial judge, overruled Magistrate Keys' findings, and held that neither the affidavit of the Internet Archive employee nor the underlying pages (i.e., the Telewizja Polska website) were admissible as evidence. Judge Guzman reasoned that the employee's affidavit contained both hearsay and inconclusive supporting statements, and the purported webpage printouts themselves were not self-authenticating.[12] Telewizja Polska Spółka Akcyjna (TVP S.A., Polish Television) is Polands public television network broadcasting corporation. ... TVP Polonia (commonly known also as TV Polonia or Telewizja Polonia) is the international channel of the Telewizja Polska (TVP) , Polish public TV broadcaster. ... EchoStar Communications Corporation (NASDAQ: DISH) is the parent company of DISH Network and the maintainer of the satellite fleet that provides the signal that DISH Network markets. ... DISH Network is a direct broadcast satellite (DBS) service that provides satellite television and audio programming to households and businesses in the United States, owned by parent company EchoStar Communications Corporation. ... Motion in limine (Latin: at the outset) is a motion, raised before or during trial, to exclude the presentation of certain evidence to the jury. ... Hearsay may refer to: Hearsay in English Law and Hearsay in United States law, a legal principle concerning the admission of evidence through repetition of out-of-court statements HearSay, a British pop group Category: ...


Patent law

Main article: Internet as a source of prior art

The United States patent office and, provided some additional requirements are met (e.g. providing an authoritative statement of the archivist), the European Patent Office will accept date stamps from the Internet Archive as evidence of when a given web page was accessible to the public. These dates are used to determine if a web page is available as prior art for instance in examining a patent application. Graphic representation of less than 0. ... The United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO or USPTO) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides patent and trademark protection to inventors and businesses for their inventions and corporate and product identification. ... The European Patent Organisation (EPO or EPOrg in order to distinguish it from the European Patent Office, which is the main organ of the organisation) is an international organisation set up by the European Patent Convention. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...


Grateful Dead

In November 2005, free downloads of Grateful Dead concerts were removed from the site. John Perry Barlow identified Bob Weir, Mickey Hart, and Bill Kreutzmann as the instigators of the change, according to a New York Times article.[13] Phil Lesh commented on the change in a November 30, 2005, posting to his personal website: This article is about the band. ... John Perry Barlow (born Jackson Hole, Wyoming, October 3, 1947) is an American poet, essayist, retired Wyoming cattle rancher, and former lyricist for the Grateful Dead. ... Robert Hall Weir (October 16, 1947–) is an American guitar player, most recognized as a founding member of the Grateful Dead. ... Mickey Hart (born September 11, 1943) is a percussionist and musicologist. ... Bill Kreutzmann (born May 7, 1946 in Palo Alto, California) was the drummer for legendary rock band the Grateful Dead for their entire 30-year career. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Phillip Chapman Lesh (born March 15, 1940 in Berkeley, California) is a musician and founding member of the rock band, Grateful Dead; he played bass guitar in that group throughout their entire 30-year career. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

It was brought to my attention that all of the Grateful Dead shows were taken down from Archive.org right before Thanksgiving. I was not part of this decision making process and was not notified that the shows were to be pulled. I do feel that the music is the Grateful Dead's legacy and I hope that one way or another all of it is available for those who want it.[14]

A November 30 forum post from Brewster Kahle summarized what appeared to be the compromise reached among the band members. Audience recordings could be downloaded or streamed, but soundboard recordings were to be available for streaming only. Concerts have since been re-added.[15] is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Brewster Kahle speaking 20 November 2002 Brewster Kahle (last name pronounced kale, like the vegetable) was an early member of the Thinking Machines team and later went on to found WAIS (sold to AOL) and later Alexa Internet (sold to Amazon. ... Streaming media is multimedia that is continuously received by, and normally displayed to, the end-user while it is being delivered by the provider. ... In professional audio, a mixing console, digital mixing console, mixing desk (Brit. ...


Issues with change of domain owners

Due to the nature of the Internet Archive's policy of removing sites that disallow bots to index pages (through the use of robots.txt) a number of websites over the years have now become inaccessible through the Wayback Machine. This is generally due to a new domain owner placing a robots.txt file that disallows indexing of the site. This practice would appear to be detrimental to researchers looking for information that was available in the past. The administrators claim to be working on a system that will allow access to that previous material while excluding after the point the domain switched hands.[citation needed] Currently, the Internet Archive applies robots.txt rules retroactively; if a site blocks the Internet Archive, any previously archived pages from the domain are also removed. In cases of blocked sites, only the robots.txt file is archived. The robots exclusion standard or robots. ...


However, IA also states that, "sometimes a web site owner will contact us directly and ask us to stop crawling or archiving a site. We comply with these requests." [1] They also say, "The Internet Archive is not interested in preserving or offering access to Web sites or other Internet documents of persons who do not want their materials in the collection." [2]


Automatically entered contracts

On December 12, 2005, activist Suzanne Shell demanded Internet Archive pay her US$100,000 for archiving her website profane-justice.org between 1999 and 2004.[16] Internet Archive filed a declaratory judgment action in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California on January 20, 2006, seeking a judicial determination that Internet Archive did not violate Shell’s copyright. Shell responded and brought a countersuit against Internet Archive for archiving her site, which she alleges is in violation of her terms of service.[17] On February 13, 2007, a judge for the United States District Court for the District of Colorado dismissed all counterclaims except breach of contract.[16] The Internet Archive did not move to dismiss copyright infringement claims Shell asserted arising out of its copying activities, which will also go forward.[18] On April 25, 2007, Internet Archive and Suzanne Shell jointly announced the settlement of their lawsuit. The Internet Archive said, “Internet Archive has no interest in including materials in the Wayback Machine of persons who do not wish to have their Web content archived. We recognize that Ms. Shell has a valid and enforceable copyright in her Web site and we regret that the inclusion of her Web site in the Wayback Machine resulted in this litigation. We are happy to have this case behind us.” Ms. Shell said, “I respect the historical value of Internet Archive’s goal. I never intended to interfere with that goal nor cause it any harm.”[19] is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Donna Suzanne Shell (born circa 1957) is an American activist critical of child protective services. ... A declaratory judgment is a judgment of a court which declares what rights each party in a dispute should have, but does not order any action or result in any legal damages. ... The United States District Court for the Northern District of California is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction comprises following counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Monterey, Napa, San Benito, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and Sonoma. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with copywriting. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... Terms of Service (often abbreviated as ToS) are rules by which one must agree to abide by in order to use a service. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The United States District Court for the District of Colorado is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the state of Colorado. ... Breach of contract is a legal concept in which a binding agreement or bargained-for exchange is not honored by one or more of the parties to the contract by non-performance or interference with the other partys performance. ... The Cathach of St. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


See also

Similar projects

The Library of Congress National Digital Library Program (NDLP) is assembling a digital library of reproductions of primary source materials to support the study of the history and culture of the United States. ... The National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program is a national strategic program being led by the Library of Congress to preserve digital content. ... Ourmedia logo Ourmedia is a media archive, supported by the Internet Archive, which freely hosts any images, text, and video or audio files which do not violate copyright laws and do not include pornography. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... WebCite is a free non-profit tool supported by a consortium of publishers and editors, designed for scholarly authors to cite webpages which have previously been archived by WebCite, thereby preventing linkrot. ...

Other

Digital preservation refers to the management of digital information over time. ... Heritrix is the Internet Archive’s web crawler which was specially designed for web archiving. ... Link rot is the process by which links on a website gradually become irrelevant or broken as time goes on, because websites that they link to disappear, change their content or redirect to new locations. ... Web archiving is the process of collecting the Web or particular portions of the Web and ensuring the collection is preserved in an archive, such as an archive site, for future researchers, historians, and the public. ... For the search engine of the same name, see WebCrawler. ...

References

  1. ^ The Internet Archive at the New Library of Alexandria
  2. ^ " Internet Archive officially a library", May 2, 2007.
  3. ^ Kanellos, Michael. "Big storage on the cheap", CNET News.com, July 29, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-07-29. 
  4. ^ Green, Heather. "A Library as Big as the World", BusinessWeek, February 28, 2002. Retrieved on 2007-07-29. 
  5. ^ Gonsalves, Antone. "Internet Archive Claims Progress Against Google Library Initiative", InformationWeek, December 20, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. 
  6. ^ "The Open Library Makes Its Online Debut", Chronicle of Higher Education, The Wired Campus, July 19, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-30. 
  7. ^ Olsen, Stefanie. "An open-source rival to Google's book project", CNET News.com, October 26, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-07-29. 
  8. ^ Bowman, Lisa M. "Net archive silences Scientology critic", CNET News.com, September 24, 2002. Retrieved on 2007-01-04. 
  9. ^ Jeff (23 September 2002). exclusions from the Wayback Machine (Blog). Wayback Machine Forum. Internet Archive. Retrieved on 2007-01-04. Author and Date indicate initiation of forum thread
  10. ^ Miller, Ernest (24 September). Sherman, Set the Wayback Machine for Scientology (Blog). LawMeme. Yale Law School. Retrieved on 2007-01-04. The posting is billed as a 'feature' and lacks an associated year designation; comments by other contributors appear after the 'feature'
  11. ^ Gelman, Lauren (17 November 2004). "Internet Archive’s Web Page Snapshots Held Admissible as Evidence". Packets 2 (3). Retrieved on 2007-01-04. 
  12. ^ Howell, Beryl A. (February 2006). "Proving Web History: How to use the Internet Archive" (PDF). Journal of Internet Law: 3–9. Retrieved on 2007-01-04. 
  13. ^ Jeff Leeds; Jesse Fox Mayshark. "Wrath of Deadheads stalls a Web crackdown", International Herald Tribune (republication of article from New York Times), December 1, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-01-04. 
  14. ^ Phil Lesh (30 November 2005). An Announcement from Phil Lesh (Blog). Hotline. PhilLesh.net. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  15. ^ Brewster Kahle; Matt Vernon (1 December 2005). Good News and an Apology: GD on the Internet Archive (Blog). Live Music Archive Forum. Internet Archive. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. Authors and date indicate the first posting in the forum thread
  16. ^ a b Lewis T. Babcock (13 February 2007). Internet Archive v. Shell (PDF), Civil Action No. 06cv01726LTBCBS.
  17. ^ Claburn, Thomas. "Colorado Woman Sues To Hold Web Crawlers To Contracts", InformationWeek, March 16, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-29. 
  18. ^ Samson, Martin. Internet Archive v. Suzanne Shell. via Phillips Nizer LLP
  19. ^ Internet Archive and Suzanne Shell Settle Lawsuit, April 25, 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Herald Tribune is a widely read English language international newspaper. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Phillip Chapman Lesh (born March 15, 1940 in Berkeley, California) is a musician and founding member of the rock band, Grateful Dead; he played bass guitar in that group throughout their entire 30-year career. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Brewster Kahle speaking 20 November 2002 Brewster Kahle (last name pronounced kale, like the vegetable) was an early member of the Thinking Machines team and later went on to found WAIS (sold to AOL) and later Alexa Internet (sold to Amazon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InformationWeek is a weekly technology magazine published by CMP Media. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • The Internet Archive
  • The International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC)
  • BLOG - What's New at the Internet Archive
  • Library of Congress, Web Capture
  • National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program
  • The Open Library
  • Wayback Machine
  • Pictures and descriptions of the Wayback Machine hardware in 2003 (prior to the Petabox), with cost information
  • Form 990-PF for Internet Archive (2003)
  • Archive-It 1.5 Press Release and Archive-It FAQ
  • Warrick – a tool for recovering websites from the Internet Archive and search engine caches
  • Video interview with Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle (short intro in German language, the interview is in English with German subtitles)
  • The European Archive in Amsterdam
* Wikipedia:Using the Wayback Machine - A guide to the Internet Archive's Wayback machine.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Internet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4688 words)
Internet users can watch animals around an African waterhole, ships in the Panama Canal, the traffic at a local roundabout or their own premises, live and in real time.
The internet and the advent of blogs has given employees a forum from which to voice their opinions about their jobs, employers and co-workers, creating a massive amount of information and data on work that is currently being collected by the Worklifewizard.org project run by Harvard Law School's Labor and Worklife Program.
Internet Explained Seven part article explaining the origins to the present and a summary for future of the Internet.
Internet Archive - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1019 words)
The Internet Archive, located at the Presidio in San Francisco, California, is dedicated to maintaining an archive of multimedia resources.
This archive includes "snapshots of the World Wide Web" (archived copies of pages, taken at various points in time), software, movies, books, and audio recordings (including recordings of live concerts from bands that allow it).
The Independent News collection includes sub-collections such as the Internet Archive's World At War competition from 2001, in which contestants created short films demonstrating "why access to history matters." Among their most-downloaded video files are eyewitness recordings of the devastating 2004 tsunami.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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