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Encyclopedia > International sanctions
Image:Split-arrows.gif It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. (Discuss)

International sanctions are actions taken by countries against others for political reasons, either unilaterally or multilaterally. Image File history File links Derived from public domain images featured at: http://commons. ... Look up country in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Unilateralism, (one+side-ism) is any doctrine or agenda that supports one-sided action. ... Multilateralism is an international relations term that refers to multiple countries working in concert. ...


There are three types of sanctions.

  • Diplomatic sanctions - the reduction or removal of diplomatic ties, such as embassies.
  • Economic sanctions - typically a ban on trade, possibly limited to certain sectors such as armaments, or with certain exceptions (such as food and medicine)
  • Military sanctions - military intervention

Economic sanctions are distinguished from trade sanctions, which are applied for purely economic reasons, and typically take the form of tariffs or similar measures, rather than bans on trade. A diplomatic mission is a group of people from one nation state present in another nation state to represent the sending state in the receiving State. ... Economic sanctions are economic penalties applied by one country (or group of countries) on another for a variety of reasons. ... A fruit stand at a market. ... The bayonet, still used in war as both knife and spearpoint. ... This article is about the field of medical practice and health care. ... Trade sanctions are trade penalties imposed by one or more countries on one or more other countries. ... A tariff is a tax on imported goods. ...

Contents


Diplomatic sanctions

As an example, the European Union imposed diplomatic sanctions on Cuba after the latter broke a moratorium on capital punishment in 2003. Measures included limitations on high-level government visits.[1] In law, a moratorium (from Latin morari, to delay) is a legal authorization postponing for a specified time the payment of debts or obligations. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the State as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ...


Economic sanctions

Main article: Economic sanctions

Economic sanctions can vary from imposing import duties on goods from, or blocking the export of certain goods to the target country, to a full naval blockade of its ports in an effort to verify, and curb or block specified imported goods. Economic sanctions are economic penalties applied by one country (or group of countries) on another for a variety of reasons. ... A blockade is any effort to prevent supplies, troops, information or aid from reaching an opposing force. ...


Well known examples of economic sanctions include the United Nations sanctions against South Africa, United Nations sanctions against Iraq (1990-2003) and the United States embargo against Cuba (1962-present). South Africa is the typical case study for giving sanctions credibility, though that is a contentious claim itself. See also: 1960 in South Africa, other events of 1961, 1962 in South Africa and the Timeline of South African history. ... United Nations sanctions against Iraq were imposed by the United Nations in 1991 following Iraqs invasion of Kuwait in 1990, and continued until the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. ... The United States embargo against Cuba (described in Cuba as el bloqueo, Spanish for the blockade) is an economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed on Cuba by the United States on February 7, 1962. ...


On May 13th 1998, the United States and Japan imposed economic sanctions on India, following its second round of nuclear tests. May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... A nuclear test explosion is an experiment involving the detonation of a nuclear weapon. ...


Military sanctions

Similarly, military sanctions can range from carefully-targeted airborne assaults by bombers and military forces (such as Israel's 1981 bombing of Iraq's Osirak nuclear reactor) to invasion and occupation. A less aggressive form of military sanctions could be the 15 year embargo on sales of F-16 fighter/bomber aircraft by the United States to Pakistan which ran from 1990 to 2005 in response to Pakistan's development of nuclear weapons[2]. (The latter is considered a military sanction, not an economic one.) The reactor after the Israeli raid. ... The 1944 Invasion of Normandy An invasion is a military action consisting of armed forces of one geo-political entity entering territory controlled by another such entity, often resulting in the invading power occupying the area, whether briefly or for a long period, and sometimes permanently. ... Belligerent military occupation occurs when one nations military occupy all or part of the territory of another nation or recognized belligerent during an invasion (during or after a war). ... This article is about the economic term. ... The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a modern multi-role jet fighter aircraft built in the United States and used by dozens of countries all over the world. ... This article is about the year. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
International sanctions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (338 words)
Economic sanctions are distinguished from trade sanctions, which are applied for purely economic reasons, and typically take the form of tariffs or similar measures, rather than bans on trade.
Economic sanctions can vary from imposing import duties on goods from, or blocking the export of on certain goods to, the target country, to a full naval blockade of its ports in effort to verify, and curb or block specified imported goods.
A less aggressive form of military sanctions could be the 15 year embargo on sales of F-16 fighter/bomber aircraft by the United States to Pakistan which ran from 1990 to 2005 in response to Pakistan's development of nuclear weapons[2].
Sanctions, by Kimberly Ann Elliott and Gary Clyde Hufbauer: The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics: Library of Economics ... (2582 words)
Sanctions often have taken the form of a naval blockade intended to weaken the enemy during wartime.
Students of international law frequently argue that only economic measures deployed against states that have violated international standards or obligations may properly be classified as "sanctions." According to this view sanctions should be distinguished from national uses of economic power in pursuit of narrow national interests.
Judging the effectiveness of sanctions requires sorting out the various goals sought, analyzing whether the type and scope of the sanction chosen was appropriate to the occasion, and determining the economic and political impact on the target country.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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