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Encyclopedia > International Talk Like a Pirate Day

International Talk Like a Pirate Day (ITLAPD) is a parodic holiday invented in 1995 by John Baur ("Ol' Chumbucket") and Mark Summers ("Cap'n Slappy"), of the United States, who proclaimed September 19 each year as the day when everyone in the world should talk like a pirate.[1] For example, an observer of this holiday would greet friends not with "Hello," but with "Ahoy, me haarrty!" The date was selected because it was the birthday of Summers' ex-wife and consequently would be easy for him to remember.[1] Image File history File links Talk_Like_a_Pirate_Day. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... For other uses, see Holiday (disambiguation). ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Holiday (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Background

"Cap'n Slappy" & "Ol' Chumbucket," founders of Talk Like a Pirate Day.

At first an inside joke between two friends, the holiday gained exposure when John Baur and Mark Summers sent a letter about their invented holiday to the American syndicated humor columnist Dave Barry in 2002.[2] Dave Barry liked the idea and promoted the day.[2] Growing media coverage of the holiday after Dave Barry's column has ensured that this event is now celebrated internationally. Although it is harmless, the day is very much a money making exercise. For example, Baur and Summers use it to sell books and T shirts on their website related to the theme. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 555 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 833 pixel, file size: 155 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) According to the Talk Like a Pirate Day website, Press kit material, including photographs and PSAs, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 555 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 833 pixel, file size: 155 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) According to the Talk Like a Pirate Day website, Press kit material, including photographs and PSAs, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3. ... Look up Humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the English musician, see Dave Berry (musician). ...


Baur and Summers found new fame in the 2006 season premiere episode of ABC's Wife Swap, first aired September 18, 2006. They starred in the role of "a family of pirates" along with John's wife, Tori. Wife Swap is a reality television programme, produced by UK independent TV production company RDF Media. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Actor Robert Newton, who portrayed Long John Silver in the 1950 Disney film Treasure Island, is the patron saint of Talk Like A Pirate Day.[1] Newton was a native of Dorset, and it was his native West Country dialect, which he used in his portrayal of Long John Silver and Blackbeard, that has become the standard "pirate accent."[3] As the association of pirates with peg legs, parrots and treasure maps was popularized in Robert Louis Stevenson's novel Treasure Island (1883), the influence of Stevenson's book on parody pirate culture cannot be overstated.[4] Robert Newton as Long John Silver. ... Long John Silver is a fictional character in the novel Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson. ... Treasure Island is a 1950 Disney film based on Robert Louis Stevensons novel Treasure Island. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dɔ.sət], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... The West Country dialects and West Country accents are generic terms applied to any of several English dialects and accents used by much of the indigenous population of the southwestern part of England, the area popularly known as the West Country. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Systematics (but see below) Family Cacatuidae (cockatoos) Family Psittacidae (true parrots) Subfamily Loriinae (lories and lorikeets) Subfamily Psittacinae (typical parrots and allies) Tribe Arini (American psittacines) Tribe Cyclopsitticini (fig-parrots) Tribe Micropsittini (pygmy-parrots) Tribe Nestorini (kakas and Kea) Tribe Platycercini (broad-tailed parrots) Tribe Psittrichadini (Pesquets Parrot) Tribe... Map created by Robert Lewis Stevenson in Treasure Island A treasure map is a common device used in fictional stories. ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... For other uses, see Treasure Island (disambiguation). ...


Examples of pirate sayings

Patron Saint Robert Newton provides instruction.

Seamen in the days of sail spoke a language far apart from the norm. It was so full of technical jargon as to be nearly incomprehensible to a landsman. For example, few could follow these instructions: Image File history File links Robert. ... Image File history File links Robert. ... Robert Newton as Long John Silver. ...

Lift the skin up, and put into the bunt the slack of the clews (not too taut), the leech and foot-rope, and body of the sail; being careful not to let it get forward under or hang down abaft. Then haul your bunt well up on the yard, smoothing the skin and bringing it down well abaft, and make fast the bunt gasket round the mast, and the jigger, if there be one, to the tie. Abaft is a nautical expression indicating a point that is behind a given part of a ship. ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ...

Richard Henry Dana, Jr.The Seaman's Manual (1844)

Even more baffling are some of the phrases used by sailors in the 17th century: Richard Henry Dana Jr. ...

If the ship go before the wind, or as they term it, betwixt two sheets, then he who conds uses these terms to him at the helm: Starboard, larboard, the helm amidships... If the ship go by a wind, or a quarter winds, they say aloof, or keep your loof, or fall not off, wear no more, keep her to, touch the wind, have a care of the lee-latch. all these do imply the same in a manner, are to bid him at the helm to keep her near the wind. The piece of chain running diagonally up and right from the bottom-left of this picture to the upper of the two yards is the fore-lower-topsail sheet. ... A view of the Starboard side of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Ross Starboard is the nautical term that refers to the right side of a vessel as perceived by a person on board the ship and facing the bow (front). ... Wheel of the French carrier Clémenceau. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

former pirate Sir Henry Mainwaring (see Harland (1984) p.177
Use nautical talk and you just might get your mouth washed out with soap.
Use nautical talk and you just might get your mouth washed out with soap.

Image File history File links Piratey,_vector_version. ... Image File history File links Piratey,_vector_version. ... A list of nautical terms; some remain current, many date from the 17th-19th century. ...

Treasure Island

One of the most influential books on popular notions of pirates was Treasure Island, a novel by Robert Louis Stevenson, from which sample quotes include: For other uses, see Treasure Island (disambiguation). ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ...

  • "Bring me one noggin of rum, now, won't you, matey."[5]
  • "Avast, there!"
  • "Dead men don't bite."
  • "Shiver my timbers!" (often pronounced as "Shiver me timbers!")
  • "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest -- Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"[6]
  • "There! That's what I think of ye. Before an hour's out, I'll stove in your old block house like a rum puncheon. Laugh, by thunder, laugh! Before an hour's out, ye'll laugh upon the other side. Them that die'll be the lucky ones."

The archetypal pirate grunt "Arrr!" (alternatively "Rrrr!" or "Yarrr!") first appeared in the classic 1950 Disney film Treasure Island, according to research by Mark Liberman.[7] His article cites linguistic research that may locate the roots of this phrase much earlier. This article is about the beverage. ... Pray, Sir, is this the way to Stretchit? Shiver my top-sails, my Lass, if I know a better way. ... Note: this article is on the poem, for information on the film see Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Mans Chest Dead Mans Chest, also known as Fifteen men on a dead mans chest is a sailors work song or sea shanty that was made famous when... Mark Liberman is a linguist. ...


Peter Pan

Peter Pan (1904), with Captain Hook and his pirate ship Jolly Roger, contains numerous fictional pirate sayings: Statue of Peter Pan in Bowring Park, St. ... Captain James Hook is the villain of J. M. Barries play and novel Peter Pan. ... Wingdings version of the Jolly Roger (character N). Many pirates created their own individualized versions. ...

"Avast belay, yo ho, heave to,
A-pirating we go
And if we're parted by a shot
We're sure to meet below!"
"Yo ho, yo ho, the pirate life,
The flag o'skull and bones
A merry hour, a hempen rope,
And hey for Davy Jones."

Derivatives

  • The holiday is of particular importance to Pastafarians (those who follow the teachings of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster) who consider pirates to be absolute divine beings and the original Pastafarians.[8]
  • Tom Smith has written and recorded the song "Talk Like a Pirate Day," the quasi-official anthem of the holiday.[9]
  • In the Nintendo DS version of The Sims 2, in-game characters celebrate "Talk Like A Pirate Day" on September 19th, in which a special quest is released, involving a pirate quiz.
  • On Neopets's Neoboards, during the holiday, filters automatically changed words like "see" to "spy" and "n00b" to "landlubber."[10]
  • The virtual pet game Psypets also uses a forum filter, as well as changing in game dialog, and may also have pirate updates.
  • This holiday inspired the creation of the Day of the Ninja in 2003.[11]
  • In Sid Meier's Pirates! (2004), narration and character dialogue is altered to honor "Talk Like A Pirate Day" if the system's date is set to September 19.[12]
  • The multiplayer role-playing game Kingdom of Loathing celebrates Talk Like a Pirate Day, and a new item may drop in the game's pirate-themed zone, for that day only.
  • The role-playing game AdventureQuest celebrates Talk Like A Pirate Day by your character going to meet Captain Rhubarb to take a 20-question quiz on Pirate Talk. If you get all 20 questions right, you get access to a special Pirate Shop with new things added each year. You may also access this event via Warlic's Magic Shop.
  • Another role-playing game made by the creators of Adventure Quest called Dragonfable, also celebrates this holiday by changing many of the major character's greetings to pirate sayings and in 2007, during the pirates vs. ninjas war, the pirates team gained an additional boost to the amount of gold to be won for fighting against the ninjas starting on that day.
  • Canadian sketch comedy troupe LoadingReadyRun produced an educational video on How to Talk Like a Pirate in honor of the day.
  • Brian Phillips and Andy Triboletti have developed a Pirates application (game and forums for talking like a Pirate) for Facebook, and have offered a pirate t-shirt contest in honour of the International Talk Like a Pirate Day! [1]

Flying Spaghetti Monsterism (FSM) is a satirical parody religion created in 2005 to protest the decision by the Kansas State Board of Education to require the teaching of intelligent design as an alternative to biological evolution. ... “Bobby Henderson” redirects here. ... Tom Smith is a singer-songwriter from Ann Arbor, Michigan who got his start in the filk genre. ... “NDS” redirects here. ... This article is about the computer game. ... Neopets is an online virtual pet website launched by Adam Powell and Donna Williams on November 15, 1999. ... “Newcomer” redirects here. ... Day of the Ninja logo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... World of Warcraft. ... Kingdom of Loathing (KoL) is a humorous, browser-based, multiplayer role playing game designed and operated by Asymmetric Publications, including creator Zack Jick Johnson and writer Josh Mr. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... AdventureQuest (also referred to by its website name BattleOn or simply as AQ) is an online single-player RPG developed by Artix Entertainment in 2002. ... DragonFable (DF) is a free online browser-based single-player role-playing video game developed by Artix Entertainment. ...

See also

Pirates versus Ninjas (or vice versa) refers to a joke about a supposed debate in various Internet subcultures. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c The Original Talk Like A Pirate Day Web site, by John Baur and Mark Summers.
  2. ^ a b Dave Barry, "Arrrrr! Talk like a pirate—or prepare to be 'boarded'". 8 September 2002.
  3. ^ Bonanos, Chrstopher (2007-06-05). Did Pirates Really Say "Arrrr"? The origin of Hollywood's high-seas slang.. Slate. Washington Post Newsweek Interactive Co. Retrieved on 2007-09-16.
  4. ^ David Cordingly (1995). Under the Black Flag: The Romance and Reality of Life Among the Pirates. ISBN 0679425608
  5. ^ Excerpt from Treasure Island
  6. ^ Excerpt from Treasure Island
  7. ^ Mark Liberman, "R!?". Language log, 19 September 2005.
  8. ^ Open Letter to the Kansas School Board
  9. ^ * Talk Like A Pirate Day song (MP3), by Tom Smith
  10. ^ New Features on Neopets: 19th September
  11. ^ Day of the Ninja Site
  12. ^ GameSpot on Sid Meier's Pirates! (2004)

For the English musician, see Dave Berry (musician). ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... David Cordingly is an English naval historian who is considered one of the leading authorities on pirates. ... Mark Liberman is a linguist. ... Language Log is a popular collaborative language blog maintained by University of Pennsylvania phonetician Mark Liberman. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Further reading

  • Harland, John (1984). Seamanship in the Age of Sail. Provides a detailed account of the language used by seamen during the age of sail. ISBN 0-87021-955-3

External links

Support groups

Multimedia

Dedicated articles The Sound of Young America is a public radio program and podcast based in Los Angeles, Californiaand distributed nationally by Public Radio International. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
International Talk Like a Pirate Day - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (770 words)
International Talk Like a Pirate Day is a parodic holiday invented in 1995 by two Americans, John Baur ("Ol' Chum Bucket") and Mark Summers ("Cap'n Slappy"), who proclaimed September 19 each year as the day when everyone in the world should talk like pirates.
The day became "international" that same year when people in Australia learned of the holiday from Barry's column.
Seamen in the days of sail spoke a language far apart from the norm.
International Talk like a Pirate Day, Sept 19 (668 words)
International Talk like a Pirate Day, Sept 19
International Talk Like A Pirate Day is a parodic holiday invented in 1995 by two Americans, John Baur and Mark Summers, who proclaimed September 19 each year as the day when everyone in the world should talk like pirates.
It currently be 1:48 AM on the Day to be Talking like a Piiiiirate, and I be at work.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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