FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > International Harvester
International Harvester Company
Type
Founded Chicago, Illinois (1902)
Headquarters Chicago, Illinois
Industry Agricultural, Automotive
Products Farm Machinery

International Harvester Company (IHC or IH; now Navistar International Corporation) was an agricultural machinery, construction equipment, vehicle, commercial truck, and household and commercial products manufacturer. It was the result of a 1902 merger between the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company and Deering Harvester Company, along with three smaller agricultural equipment firms: Milwaukee; Plano; and Warder, Bushnell, and Glessner (manufacturers of Champion brand). International Harvester sold off the Ag division in 1984 and later renamed the company. International Harvester is a single by American country music singer Craig Morgan. ... Image File history File links IH_Logo. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Car redirects here. ... Agricultural machinery is one of the most revolutionary and impactful applications of modern technology. ... It has been suggested that International Harvester be merged into this article or section. ... Cyrus Hall McCormick (February 15, 1809 - May 13, 1884) of Virginia was an Irish American farmer, inventor, businessman, marketer, and newspaper editor. ... An early International Harvester tractor from 1920 William Deering founded the company Deering Harvester Company. ...

Contents

History

Foundation

The roots of International Harvester can be traced back to the 1830s, when Cyrus Hall McCormick, an inventor from Virginia, finalized his version of a horse-drawn reaper. The reaper was demonstrated in tests in 1831 and was patented by Cyrus in 1834. Together with his brother, McCormick moved to Chicago in 1847 and started the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company. The McCormick reaper sold well, partially as a result of savvy and innovative business practices. Their products came onto the market just as the development of railroads offered wide distribution to distant market areas. He developed marketing and sales techniques, developing a vast network of trained salesmen able to demonstrate operation of the machines in the field. Cyrus Hall McCormick (February 15, 1809 - May 13, 1884) was famous as the inventor of the mechanical reaper in 1831. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


McCormick died in Chicago, with his company passing on to his son, Cyrus McCormick, Jr. In 1902, the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company and Deering Harvester Company, along with three smaller agricultural equipment firms (Milwaukee; Plano; and Warder, Bushnell, and Glessner (manufacturers of Champion brand)) merged together to create the International Harvester Company. Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Cyrus Hall McCormick (February 15, 1809 - May 13, 1884) of Virginia was an Irish American farmer, inventor, businessman, marketer, and newspaper editor. ... An early International Harvester tractor from 1920 William Deering founded the company Deering Harvester Company. ...

An International Harvester tractor built in 1920.
An International Harvester tractor built in 1920.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (831x600, 166 KB) An early w:International Harvester tractor from 1920, on display at the Badger Steam and Gas Engine Club annual tractor show. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (831x600, 166 KB) An early w:International Harvester tractor from 1920, on display at the Badger Steam and Gas Engine Club annual tractor show. ...

Downfall and ending

By the end of 1979, IH profits were at their highest in 10 years. Yet, the company was still strapped for cash. In the spring and summer of that year, IH began short-term planning for a strike that seemed inevitable. Then on November 1, IH announced figures showing that president and chairman Archie McCardell received a $1.8 million (in 1979 values) bonus. This, along with the fact that the UAW union had been asking for changes, amounted to a strike on November 2, 1979. Soon after, the economy turned unfavorably against IH, and they became entangled in a financial crisis. The strike lasted approximately six months. When it ended, IH had lost almost $600 million (in 1979 value; over $2 billion today).[1] The United Auto Workers (UAW), officially the United Automobile, Aerospace & Agricultural Implement Workers of America International Union, is one of the largest labor unions in North America, with more than 700,000 members in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico organized into approximately 950 union locals. ...


By 1981, the company was in trouble. The strike, accompanied by the economy and several internal corporate problems, had placed IH in a hole that had only a slim way out. Things only got worse until 1984, when the bitter end came.


International Harvester, following many hours of negotiations, agreed to sell the Ag division to Tenneco, Inc. on November 26, 1984. Tenneco already had the subsidiary company, J.I. Case, that manufactured tractors, but lacked the full line of farm implements that IH produced (combines, cotton pickers, tillage equipment, etc.)


Following the merger, production of tractors at Harvester's Rock Island, Illinois Farmall Works was ceased in May of 1985 when the last IH tractor came off of the assembly line. Production of all of the new Case IH tractors was moved to the J.I. Case Tractor Works in Racine, Wisconsin. Production of IH Axial-Flow combines continued at the East Moline, Illinois combine factory. Harvester's Memphis Works in Memphis, Tennessee was closed and cotton picker production was moved. Case IH (for International Harvester) is an international manufacturer and marketer of agriculture, or farm equipment products. ...


The truck and engine divisions remained and in 1986 Harvester changed their corporate name to Navistar International Corporation (Harvester had sold the International Harvester name and the IH symbol to Tenneco Inc. as part of the sale of its Ag division). Navistar International Corporation continues to manufacture medium- and heavy-duty trucks, school buses, and engines under the International brand name. [1] It has been suggested that International Harvester be merged into this article or section. ...


Divisions and products

Agriculture

The International Harvester Agricultural Division was by far the biggest and best known IH subsidiary. When IH sold their ag division to Tenneco in 1985, the International Harvester name and "IH" logo, went with it.


One of the first early products (besides the harvesting equipment that McCormick and Deering had been making prior to the merger) from the newly created International Harvester Company was the Traction Truck: a truck frame manufactured by Morton Traction Truck Company (later bought IHC) with an IHC engine mounted on it.


From 1902 when IH was formed to the early 1920's, the McCormick and Deering dealerships kept their original brands unique, with Mogul tractors sold at McCormick dealers, and Titan tractors at Deering dealerships, due to the still present competitiveness of the former rivals.


IH produced a range of massive gas-powered farm tractors under the Mogul and Titan brands. These tractors had varied success but the trend going into the mid-teens of the 1900s was "small" and "cheap".


The first important tractors from IH were the model 10-20 and 15-30. Introduced in 1915, the tractors (which were comparatively smaller than their predecessors) were primarily used as traction engines to pull plows and for belt work on threshing machines. The 10-20 and 15-30 both had separate, but similar, Mogul and Titan versions. Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the constellation known as The Plough see Ursa Major. ... The thrashing machine, or, in modern spelling, threshing machine (or simply thresher), was a machine first invented by Scottish mechanical engineer Andrew Meikle for use in agriculture. ...


In 1924, IH introduced the Farmall tractor, a smaller general-purpose tractor, to fend off competition from the Ford Motor Company's Fordson tractors. The Farmall was the first tractor in the United States to incorporate a tricycle-like design (or row-crop front axle), which could be used on tall crops such as cotton and corn. For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... The Farmall was the first general purpose tractor with narrowly spaced front wheels. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... Fordson Model F The Fordson tractor by the Ford Motor Company was the first agricultural tractor to be mass produced. ... Antique tricycle 19th century tricycle used in Iran A tricycle (often abbreviated to trike) is a three-wheeled vehicle. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... This article is about the maize plant. ...

1954 IH Farmall Super C
1954 IH Farmall Super C

Following the introduction of the Farmall, IH introduced several similar looking "F Series" models that offered improvements over the original design (the original model became known as the "Regular"). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1792 × 1200 pixel, file size: 682 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1792 × 1200 pixel, file size: 682 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ...


In 1932 IH produced their first diesel engine, introduced in the McCormick-Deering TD-40 crawler. This engine started on gasoline, then switched over to diesel fuel. Diesel engines of this era were difficult to start in cold weather, and the gasoline allowed the engine to start easily and thoroughly warm up before making the switch to diesel in all weather conditions. In 1935 this engine was put in the International Harvester WD-40, becoming the world's first diesel tractor on wheels.[2]


For model year 1939, industrial designer Raymond Loewy was hired to design a new line of tractors. The sleek look, combined with other new features, created what is known as the Farmall "letter series" (A, B, BN, C, H and M) and the McCormick-Deering "standard series" (W-4, W-6 and W-9). The tractors were updated to the "super" series in the early fifties (with the exception of the A, which became a "super" in 1947, and the B and BN, which were discontinued in 1948) and received several improvements. Many of these tractors (especially the largest: the H, M and W models) are still in operation on farms today. Especially desirable are the diesel-powered MD, WD-6 and WD-9. These tractors carried forward the unique gasoline start diesel concept of the WD-40. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The letter and standard series of tractors was produced until 1954, and was a defining product in IH history.


For 1955 in IH tractors, the numbered "hundred-series" was offered. Although given slightly different looks and few new features, they were still updates to the models introduced in 1939. The only new tractor in the 1955 lineup is the 300 Utility. In 1957 IH gave the tractor lineup another update by increasing power in some models, adding a new 230 Utility model, and adding new white paint to the grill and sides and new number designations were given. This improved sales at the time, but IH's inability to change and update was already showing.[3]


In July of 1958, IH started a major campaign to introduce a new line of tractors that many dealers hoped would turn around slumping sales. At the Hinsdale, Illinois Testing Farm, IH entertained over 12,000 dealers from over 25 countries. IH showed off their new "60" series of tractors: including the big, first of their kind, six-cylinder 460 and 560 tractors. But the joy of the new line of tractors was short lived. One of the first events that would eventually lead to the downfall of IH presented itself in 1959. In June of that year, IH recalled the 460, 560, and 660 tractors: final drive components had failed. IH, who wanted to be the first big-power manufacturer, had failed to drastically update the final drives on the new six-cylinder tractors. These final drives were essentially unchanged from 1939 and would fail rapidly under the stress of the more powerful 60-series engines. IH's competitors took advantage of the recall, and IH would lose customers in the ensuing months[3], with many customers moving to John Deere's New Generation of Power tractors introduced in 1960. Jan. ... Deere & Company (usually known by its brand name John Deere) (NYSE: DE) is an American corporation based in Moline, Illinois, and the leading manufacturer of agricultural machinery in the world. ...


Throughout the 1960s IH would introduce new tractors and new methods of selling them. As producing tractors was the lifeblood of the company, IH would have to remain competitive in this field. They both succeed and failed at his goal. But farming was about to change, and IH, along with competitors, were in for a bumpy ride.


1973 would see some important milestones for IH. On February 1, 1974 at 9A.M., the 5 millionth tractor came off the assembly line at the Farmall Plant in Illinois. IH was the first tractor manufacturer to accomplish this.[3] Also in 1973, IH officially dropped the "Farmall" name from its tractor. This ended an era that began with the first Farmall "Regular" back in 1924. For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


In 1977, IH introduced the first Axial-Flow rotary combine. This machine, produced at East Moline, IL, was the first generation of over 30 years of Axial-Flow combines.


As the 1980s began, IH was ready to climb from its own depression and become a leader once more. IH would face a stable economy, yet it would face an unknown fate. In September of 1981, IH announced at a dealership meeting the new "50 Series" of tractors. These new tractors would prove once again that IH had the innovation to come out on top. Penned by industrial designer Gregg Montgomery, whose firm later designed the Case IH "Magnum" series tractors, the new stylish design of the "50 Series" would change the look of tractors forever. IH spent over $29 million to develop this new series, and the result was the last great lineup of tractors from IH.


There were many technology-related innovations put into the new series. A computer monitoring system called a Sentry was developed, and IH became the first manufacturer to add a computer to a farm tractor. Other new innovations included a "z" shift pattern, an 18 speed synchronized transmission, a forward air flow cooling system, "Power Priority" 3-pump hydraulic system, color-coded hydraulic lines and controls, and a new rear-hitch system. The 50 Series had an unprecedented three-year or 2,500-hour engine and drive-train warranty, which would later become an industry standard. Although no new sales records were set, IH sold a respectable amount of these tractors during its short production time.


IH was well into the development of a new line of tractors that would revolutionize the ways of farming when the sale of the Ag division was announced. Many of these new features would find their way into the new series of MAGNUM tractors introduced by Case IH in 1987.[3] Case IH (for International Harvester) is an international manufacturer and marketer of agriculture, or farm equipment products. ...


Brand names of the Ag division

IH over the years used a number of brand names to market their tractor and harvesting products:

  • Titan (1910-1924)
  • Mogul (1911-1924)
  • McCormick-Deering (1923-1947)
  • McCormick (1947-1958)
  • Farmall (1924-1973)
  • Fairway (1924-1938)
  • Electrall (1954-1956)
  • International (1902-1985)

Other agricultural products

Along with the prominent tractor division, IH also sold several different types of farm related equipment. These included: balers, cultivators, combines (self-propelled and pull behind), combine heads, corn shellers, cotton pickers, manure spreaders, hay rakes, crop dusters, disk harrows, elevators, feed grinders, hammer mills, hay conditioners, milking machines, planters, mills, discs, plows and various miscellaneous equipment.[4] A round baler A baler is a piece of farm machinery that is used to compress a cut, raked, crop (such as hay or straw) into bales and bind the bales with twine. ... A CLAAS Caterpillar LEXION Combine. ...


Also produced were twine, stationary engines, loaders, and wagons.[4] A Volvo L120E front loader. ...


In 1954, the Electrall system was introduced. It was a short-lived attempt to market electrically-operated farm equipment and accessories. The system, co-developed with General Electric, consisted of a 208V three phase alternating current generator that is connected with electric cables to the device to be powered. The generator could even power a household. A 10KW Electrall generator was an option on the Farmall 400 tractor, and there also was a 12.5KW PTO-driven version. The possible applications of Electrall power were many, but few made it to market. The marketing materials showed a haybaler being Electrall powered. One of the more novel applications of the Electrall was a device to electrocute insects in the field at night (basically like a modern-day bug zapper, but on a larger scale).[5] “GE” redirects here. ... In electrical engineering, three-phase electric power systems have at least three conductors carrying voltage waveforms that are 2π/3 radians (120°,1/3 of a cycle) offset in time. ... City lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ... A tractor PTO A power take-off (PTO) is a splined driveshaft, usually on a tractor or truck that can be used to provide power to an attachment or separate machine. ... A Bug Zapper A bug zapper is a device that attracts and kills insects that are attracted by light. ...


Vehicles

Light duty

1911 International Harvester wagon
1911 International Harvester wagon

IH is often remembered as a maker of relatively successful and innovative “light” lines of vehicles, competing directly against the Big 3. The most common were pickup trucks. IH made light trucks from 1907 to 1975. The final light line truck was made on May 5, 1975. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x880, 255 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): International Harvester Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x880, 255 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): International Harvester Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... The Big Three automobile manufactures may refer to: The three major American (USA) automakers: Ford, General Motors, and the ex Chrysler Corporation operations of DaimlerChrysler. ... For other uses, see Truck (disambiguation). ...


IH had early success with the "Auto Buggy", which started production in February, 1907. IHC later introduced the Auto Wagon, which would be renamed the Motor Truck, forerunner to the successful pickup truck.

'56 pickup
'56 pickup

One of the company's light duty vehicles was the Travelall, which was similar to a Chevrolet Suburban. The Travelette was a crew cab, available in 2 or 4 wheel drive. It was available starting in 1957, and was the first 6 passenger, 4 door truck of its time. The Scout was a small, 2 door SUV, similar to a Jeep. In 1972 the Scout became the Scout II, and in 1974 Dana 4x4 axles, power steering and power disk brakes became standard. After the trucks and Travelall were discontinued in 1975, the Scout Traveler and Terra became available, both longer than a standard Scout II. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,072 × 2,304 pixels, file size: 1. ... The Travelall was an early full-size pickup truck based wagon / SUV. It was similar to the Chevy Suburban, and made by International Harvester from 1953 until 1975. ... This article is about a type of vehicle. ... A two-wheel drive configuration has only two wheels-- either the front two or the back two-- providing propulsion. ... Four wheel drive or 4x4, is a type of four wheeled vehicle drivetrain configuration that enables all four wheels to receive power from the engine simultaneously in order to provide maximum traction. ... The International Harvester Scout was one of the first production American civilian off-road sport utility vehicles. ... For other uses, see Jeep (disambiguation). ... Dana Corporation is an auto parts and systems company currently being reorganized under Chapter 11 bankruptcy law. ...


IH would abandon sales of passenger vehicles in 1980 to concentrate on commercial trucks and school buses. Today the pickups and Scouts are minor cult orphaned vehicles. All were available as rugged four-wheel drive off-road vehicles. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the class of vehicles. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


The Scout & Light Truck Parts Business was sold to Scout/Light Line Distributors,Inc. in 1991.


Medium/Heavy duty

IH was an early manufacturer of medium/heavy duty trucks. Although based upon truck chassis, IH also became the leading manufacturer of the chassis portion of body-on-chassis conventional (type C) school buses. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


With the truck and engine divisions remaining following the 1985 sale of the agricultural division, International Harvester Company changed their corporate name to Navistar International in 1986. Today Navistar International's subsidiary, International Truck and Engine Corporation, manufactures and markets trucks and engines under the International brand name. It has been suggested that International Harvester be merged into this article or section. ... Navistar International Corporation (NYSE: NAV) is the parent company of International Truck and Engine Corporation, a leading producer of mid-range diesel engines, medium trucks, heavy trucks, severe service vehicles, and parts and service sold under the International® brand. ...


The Power Stroke diesel engine, which is a trade name of Ford Motors, is manufactured by International Truck and Engine Corporation, for use in Ford heavy-duty trucks, vans and SUVs. A diesel engine built by MAN AG in 1906 Rudolf Diesels 1893 patent on his engine design A Diesel engine is an internal combustion engine which operates using the Diesel cycle. ... A trade name, also known as a trading name or a business name, is the legal name of a business, or the name which a business trades under for commercial purposes. ... 2002 Ford Fiesta in the UK. The Ford Motor Company (sometimes nicknamed Fords or FoMoCo, (NYSE: F) is an automobile maker founded by Henry Ford in Detroit, Michigan, and incorporated on June 16, 1903. ...


Heavy vehicles manufactured by International Harvester for military use include the 1942 M5 Tractor. The M5 High-Speed Tractor was an artillery tractor used by the US Army from 1942. ...

Military

In early 1951 the United States Army through the Springfield Armory contracted International Harvester to produce US Caliber .30 M-1 Garand rifles, and between 1953 and 1956 produced 337,623 rifles in total, according to the Army Ordinance Department. The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... This is an article about the US Government Arsenal. ... The M1 Garand (more formally the United States Rifle, Caliber . ...


Home

Lawn and garden

IH branched out into the home lawn and garden business in the 1960s with its line of Cub Cadet equipment, which included riding and walk-behind lawn mowers and snow blowers. Also produced were compost shredders, rotary tillers, Cadet garden tractors, and power washers. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Cub Cadet is a premium line of outdoor power equipment, established in 1961 as part of International Harvester During the 1960s IH initiated an entirely new line of lawn and garden equipment aimed at the owners of increasingly popular rural homes with large yards and private gardens. ... A typical modern gasoline-powered mower. ... A heavy duty walk-behind two-stage snow blower. ...


The Cub Cadet line was sold to MTD Products in 1981 [6].


Home appliances

Although best known for farm equipment, IH produced home appliances for farmers and non-farmers alike. This included refrigeration equipment such as refrigerators, air conditioners, and freezers. These products were introduced in 1947 and the division was sold to Whirlpool Corporation in 1955. Since the time of production was short, these appliances are rare today.[4][7] Refrigeration is the process of removing heat from an enclosed space, or from a substance, and rejecting it elsewhere for the primary purpose of lowering the temperature of the enclosed space or substance and then maintaining that lower temperature. ... Fridge redirects here. ... Whirlpool Corporation (NYSE: WHR) is the worlds leading manufacturer and marketer of major home appliances,with annual sales of approximately $18 billion, more than 73,000 employees, and more than 70 manufacturing and technology research centers around the world. ...


In popular culture

  • In 2007, country music artist Craig Morgan has released a song titled "International Harvester", about a farmer who drives an International Harvester-branded combine.
  • An IH Farmall Cub tractor appeared in an Old Navy television commercial that aired from 2002 to 2003.
  • On a television commercial for birth control pills, a stereotypical

"surfer dude" is seen getting out of a blue, 1960s International Harvester pickup truck. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... International Harvester is a single by American country music singer Craig Morgan. ... Old Navy is a brand of clothing and chain of stores that is owned by Gap Inc. ...


See also

The Farmall was the first general purpose tractor with narrowly spaced front wheels. ... . ...

References

  1. ^ a b Leffingwell, Randy (2005). Farmall Eight Decades of Innovation. St. Paul, MN: MBI Publishing. ISBN 0-7603-2136-1. 
  2. ^ A History of John Deere Model R Tractors. Retrieved on 2007-11-02.
  3. ^ a b c d Updike, Kenneth (2000). International Harvester Tractors 1955-1985. Osceola, WI: MBI Publishing. ISBN 0-7603-0682-6. 
  4. ^ a b c Wendel, Charles (2004). 150 Years of International Harvester. Lola, WI: Krause Publications. ISBN 0-87349-928-X. 
  5. ^ (1954-07-07) "Insect Electrocution". Ag and Food Newsletter 2 (14): 711. Retrieved on 2007-10-23. 
  6. ^ http://www.farmallcub.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=23258&sid=0ab7827c53e25b6b0c1f19a00b781243
  7. ^ Wisconsin Historical Society Frequently Asked Questions.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
International Harvester vehicles

  Results from FactBites:
 
International Harvester Co. (722 words)
Hostile toward labor unions and their demands for an eight-hour workday, the McCormicks faced strikes by their workers in 1885 and 1886; the second of these, often regarded as one of the more important events in American labor history, was associated with the explosion of a bomb at Haymarket Square in Chicago.
For most of the twentieth century, International Harvester (IH) was one of the leading industrial corporations in the United States; its operations were concentrated in Chicago and its suburbs.
By 1986, most of what had been International Harvester became Navistar International Corp. By the end of the 1990s, Navistar, headquartered in suburban Warrenville, had become the nation's leading manufacturer of large trucks.
International Harvester 15 series combines (1030 words)
When International Harvester introduced the 15 series combines in 1968 the company had been building self-propelled combines for 26 years and had over a half century of experience in the combine business.
The 715 was equipped to handle grain heads from 10 to 20ft and several variations of 2, 3 and 4 row corn heads with 28 to 40 inch settings.
The International Harvester 815 combine was announced in 1968.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m