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Encyclopedia > International Development Association

The International Development Association (IDA) created on September 24, 1960, is the part of the World Bank that helps the world’s poorest countries. It complements the World Bank's other lending arm—the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD)—which serves middle-income countries with capital investment and advisory services. September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ...


The International Development Association (IDA) is responsible for providing long-term interest-free loans to the world's 81 poorest countries, 40 of which are in Africa. IDA provides grants and credits, with repayment periods of 35 to 40 years and no interest. Since its inception, IDA credits and grants have totaled $161 billion, averaging $7–$9 billion a year in recent years and directing the largest share, about 50 percent, to Africa. IDA is part of the World Bank Group based in Washington, D.C. World Bank Group logo The World Bank Group is a group of five international organizations responsible for providing finance and advice to countries for the purposes of economic development and eliminating poverty. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Federal District District of Columbia  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack Evans...


While the IBRD raises most of its funds on the world's financial markets, IDA is funded largely by contributions from the governments of the richer member countries. Additional funds come from IBRD's income and from borrowers' repayments of earlier IDA credits.


IDA loans address primary education, basic health services, clean water and sanitation, environmental safeguards, business climate improvements, infrastructure and institutional reforms. These projects pave the way toward economic growth, job creation, higher incomes and better living conditions.


Criticisms include the improper use of financial resources as well as its structure of voting power, based on financial contributions (the largest being from the USA).


Mission Statement: The International Development Association (IDA) is the part of the World Bank that helps the earth’s poorest countries reduce poverty by providing interest-free loans and grants for programs aimed at boosting economic growth and improving living conditions. IDA funds help these countries deal with the complex challenges they face in striving to meet the Millennium Development Goals. They must, for example, respond to the competitive pressures as well as the opportunities of globalization; arrest the spread of HIV/AIDS; and prevent conflict or deal with its aftermath.


IDA’s long-term, no-interest loans pay for programs that build the policies, institutions, infrastructure and human capital needed for equitable and environmentally sustainable development. IDA’s goal is to reduce inequalities both across and within countries by allowing more people to participate in the mainstream economy, reducing poverty and promoting more equal access to the opportunities created by economic growth.


History: The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), better known as the World Bank, was established in 1944 to help Europe recover from the devastation of World War II. The success of that enterprise led the Bank, within a few years, to turn its attention to the developing countries. By the 1950s, it became clear that the poorest developing countries needed softer terms than those that could be offered by the Bank, so they could afford to borrow the capital they needed to grow.


With the United States taking the initiative, a group of the Bank’s member countries decided to set up an agency that could lend to the poorest countries on the most favourable terms possible. They called the agency the "International Development Association." Its founders saw IDA as a way for the "haves" of the world to help the "have-nots." But they also wanted IDA to be run with the discipline of a bank. For this reason, US President Dwight D. Eisenhower proposed, and other countries agreed, that IDA should be part of the World Bank (IBRD).


IDA's Articles of Agreement became effective in 1960. The first IDA loans, known as credits, were approved in 1961 to Chile, Honduras, India and Sudan.


IBRD and IDA are run on the same lines. They share the same staff and headquarters, report to the same president and evaluate projects with the same rigorous standards. But IDA and IBRD draw on different resources for their lending, and because IDA’s loans are deeply concessional, IDA’s resources must be periodically replenished (see "IDA Funding" below). A country must be a member of IBRD before it can join IDA; 165 countries are IDA members.


External link

  • IDA website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dáil Debate - 11 (15838 words)
The IDA is a significant player in many of the most worthwhile programmes and I am sure it is a useful influence in terms of the way policy is developed.
As on previous occasions, the Bill amends the International Development Association Acts 1960 to 1999 to allow payments to be made to the IDA. As many are aware, the IDA is the soft loan arm of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, or the World Bank, which was established in 1960.
Development aid must be based on the principles outlined by Deputy Burton such as access to common resources, including water, food and shelter, and it should not be linked to geopolitical issues that have caused the conflicts in such countries.
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