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Encyclopedia > Internal jugular vein
Vein: Internal jugular vein
The fascia and middle thyroid veins. (Internal jugular visible at center left.)
Veins of the tongue. The hypoglossal nerve has been displaced downward in this preparation. (Internal jugular visible at bottom left.)
Latin vena jugularis interna
Gray's subject #168 648
Source anterior facial
Drains to brachiocephalic
Artery internal carotid, common carotid
MeSH Jugular+Veins
Dorlands/Elsevier v_05/12850757

The internal jugular vein collects the blood from the brain, from the superficial parts of the face, and from the neck. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 500 × 381 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 381 pixel, file size: 69 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Brachiocephalic vein Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy... Image File history File links Gray559. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The hypoglossal nerve is the twelfth cranial nerve. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The anterior facial vein (facial vein) commences at the side of the root of the nose, and is a direct continuation of the angular vein. ... The Brachiocephalic vein is also known as the innominate vein, the left and right brachiocephalic veins in the upper chest are formed by the union of each corresponding jugular vein and subclavian vein. ... The carotid artery is a major artery of the head and neck that supplies blood to the head and neck. ... Left Common Carotid Artery- One of three arteries that originate along the aortic arch. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Elseviers logo. ... In animals the brain, or encephalon (Greek for in the head), is the control center of the central nervous system, responsible for thought. ... The face is the front part of the bunny, in humans from the forehead to chin including the hair, forehead, eyebrow, eyes, nose, cheeks, mouth, lips, philtrum, hole, skin, and chin. ... A human neck. ...

Contents

Path

It is directly continuous with the sigmoid sinus, and begins in the posterior compartment of the jugular foramen, at the base of the skull. Each sigmoid sinus begins beneath the temporal bone and follows a tortuous course to the jugular foramen, at which point the sinus becomes continuous with the internal jugular vein. ... Behind the carotid canal is the jugular foramen, a large aperture, formed in front by the petrous portion of the temporal, and behind by the occipital; it is generally larger on the right than on the left side, and may be subdivided into three compartments. ... It has been suggested that temporal fenestra be merged into this article or section. ...


At its origin it is somewhat dilated, and this dilatation is called the superior bulb.


It runs down the side of the neck in a vertical direction, lying at first lateral to the internal carotid artery, and then lateral to the common carotid, and at the root of the neck unites with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein (innominate vein); a little above its termination is a second dilatation, the inferior bulb. The carotid artery is a major artery of the head and neck that supplies blood to the head and neck. ... In human anatomy, the common carotid artery is an artery that supplies the head and neck; it divides in the neck to form the external and internal carotid arteries. ... The subclavian vein is a continuation of the axillary vein and runs from the outer border of the first rib to the medial border of anterior scalene muscle. ... The Brachiocephalic vein is also known as the innominate vein, the left and right brachiocephalic veins in the upper chest are formed by the union of each corresponding jugular vein and subclavian vein. ...


Above, it lies upon the Rectus capitis lateralis, behind the internal carotid artery and the nerves passing through the jugular foramen; lower down, the vein and artery lie upon the same plane, the glossopharyngeal and hypoglossal nerves passing forward between them; the vagus descends between and behind the vein and the artery in the same sheath (the carotid sheath), and the accessory runs obliquely backward, superficial or deep to the vein. For the muscle of the eye, see Lateral rectus muscle The Rectus capitis lateralis, a short, flat muscle, arises from the upper surface of the transverse process of the atlas, and is inserted into the under surface of the jugular process of the occipital bone. ... Grays FIG. 791 - Plan of upper portions of glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves. ... The hypoglossal nerve is the twelfth cranial nerve. ... The vagus nerve is tenth of twelve paired cranial nerves and is the only nerve that starts in the brainstem (somewhere in the medulla oblongata) and extends all the way down past the head, right down to the abdomen. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The accessory nerve is the eleventh of twelve cranial nerves. ...


At the root of the neck the right internal jugular vein is placed at a little distance from the common carotid artery, and crosses the first part of the subclavian artery, while the left internal jugular vein usually overlaps the common carotid artery. Left Common Carotid Artery- One of three arteries that originate along the aortic arch. ... The subclavian artery is a major artery of the upper thorax that mainly supplies blood to the head and arms. ...


The left vein is generally smaller than the right, and each contains a pair of valves, which are placed about 2.5 cm. above the termination of the vessel.


Clinical Relevance

The jugular veins are relatively superficial and not protected by tissues such as bone or cartilage. This makes it susceptible to damage. Due to the large volumes of blood that flow though the jugular veins, damage to the jugulars can quickly cause significant blood loss which can lead to hypovolæmic shock and then death if not treated. Grays Anatomy illustration of a human femur. ... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ...


JVP

As there are no valves between the right atrium of the heart and the internal jugular, blood can flow back into the internal jugular when the pressure in the atrium is sufficiently high. This can be seen from the outside, and allows one to estimate the pressure in the atrium. The pulsation seen is called the jugular venous pressure, or JVP. This is normally viewed with the patient at 45 degrees turning their head slightly away from the observer. The JVP can be raised in a number of conditions:[1] This page is about the muscular organ, the Heart. ... The jugular venous pressure (JVP, sometimes referred to as jugular venous pulse) is the indirectly observed pressure over the venous system. ...

The JVP can also be artificially raised by applying pressure to the liver (the hepatojugular reflux). This method is used to locate the JVP and distiguish it from the carotid pulse. Unlike the carotid pulse, the JVP is impalpable. The right ventricle is one of four chambers (two atria and two ventricles) in the human heart. ... Tricuspid valve stenosis is a narrowing of the orifice of the tricuspid valve of the heart. ... Regurgitation is blood flow in the opposite direction from normal, as the backward flowing of blood into the heart or between heart chambers. ... Cardiac tamponade, also known as pericardial tamponade, is a medical emergency condition where liquid accumulates in the pericardium in a relatively short time. ... The abdominojugular test, also known as hepatojugular reflux, is used as an alternate test for measuring jugular venous pressure (JVP) through the distension or swelling of the jugular vein. ...


Catheterization

As the internal jugular is large, central and relatively superficial, it is often used to place venous lines. Such a line may be inserted for several reasons, such as to accurately measure the central venous pressure or to administer fluids when a line in a peripheral vein would be unsuitable (such as during resuscitation when peripheral veins are hard to locate). In medicine, a central venous catheter (CVC or central (venous) line) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the chest or groin. ...


Because the internal jugular rarely varies in its location, it is easier to find than other veins. However sometimes when a line is inserted the jugular is missed and other structures such as the carotid artery or the vagus nerve (CN X) are punctured, causing damage to those structures. In human anatomy, the carotid artery is a major artery of the head and neck. ... The vagus nerve (also called pneumogastric nerve or cranial nerve X) is the tenth of twelve paired cranial nerves, and is the only nerve that starts in the brainstem (within the medulla oblongata) and extends, through the jugular foramen, down below the head, to the abdomen. ...


Additional images

See also

The jugular veins are veins that bring deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart via the superior vena cava. ... In medicine, a central venous catheter (CVC or central (venous) line) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the chest or groin. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.clinicalexam.com/pda/c_ref_jvp.htm

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body (or Grays Anatomy as it has more commonly become known) is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jugular vein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (575 words)
The external and internal jugular veins are veins that bring deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart via the superior vena cava.
The internal jugular vein is formed by the anastomosis of blood from the sigmoid sinus of the dura mater and the common facial vein.
The jugular veins are relatively superficial and not protected by tissues such as bone or cartilage.
Brachiocephalic vein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (225 words)
The left and right brachiocephalic veins or innominate veins in the upper chest are formed by the union of each corresponding internal jugular vein and subclavian vein.
The brachiocephalic veins are the major veins returning blood to the superior vena cava.
Veins of the upper extremity and thorax in Gray's Anatomy
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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