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Encyclopedia > Instrument amplifier

An instrument amplifier is an electronic amplifier designed for use with an electric or electronic musical instrument, such as an electric guitar. The term amplifier as used in this article can mean either a circuit (or stage) using a single active device or a complete system such as a packaged audio hi-fi amplifier. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Left: Rosa Hurricane, a heavy metal-style solid body guitar. ...


A wide range of instrument amplifiers is now available, some general purpose and some designed for specific instruments and even for particular sounds. These include:

  • "Traditional" guitar amplifiers, with a clean, warm sound, a sharp treble roll-off at 5 kHz or less and bass roll off at 60–100 Hz, and often built-in reverb and "vibrato" units. These amplifiers, such as the Fender "Tweed"-style amps, are often used by traditional rock, blues, and country musicians.
  • Hard rock-style guitar amplifiers, which often include preamplification controls, tone filters, and distortion effects that provide the amplifier's characteristic tone. Users of these amplifiers use the amplifier's tone to add "drive", intensity, and "edge" to their guitar sound. Amplifiers of this type, such as Marshall amplifiers, are used in a range of genres, including hard rock, metal, and punk.
  • Bass amplifiers, with extended bass response and tone controls optimised for bass guitars (or more rarely, for upright bass). Higher-end bass amplifiers sometimes include compressor or limiter features, which help to keep the amplifier from distorting at high volume levels, and an XLR DI output for patching the bass signal directly into a mixing board. Bass amplifiers are often provided with external metal heat sinks or fans to help keep the amplifier cool.
  • Keyboard amplifiers, with very low distortion and extended, flat frequency response in both directions. Keyboard amplifiers often have a simple onboard mixer, so that keyboardists can control the tone and level of several keyboards.
  • Acoustic amplifiers, similar in many ways to keyboard amplifiers but designed specifically to produce a "clean," transparent, "acoustic" sound when used with acoustic instruments with built-in transducer pickups and/or microphones. (Note that there was once also a brand of guitar and bass amplifier called Acoustic, still seen second-hand.)

Contents

... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A picku device acts as a transducer that captures mechanical vibrations (usually from suitably equipped stringed instruments such as the electric guitar, electric bass guitar or electric violin) and converts them to an electronic signal which can be amplified and recorded. ... Acoustic Control Corporation was a manufacturer of instrument amplifiers, based at Van Nuys, California. ...

Role of Amplifier

Instrument amplifiers are designed for a different purpose than 'Hi-Fi' (high fidelity) stereo amplifiers used for radios and home stereo systems. Hi-fi home stereo amplifiers are designed to accurately reproduce the source sound signals from pre-recorded music, with as little harmonic distortion as possible. This article is about the spacecraft and the mission. ...


In contrast, instrument amplifiers are often designed to add additional tonal coloration to the original signal or emphasize certain frequencies. For electric instruments such as electric guitar, the amplifier helps to create the instrument's tone by boosting the input signal gain and distorting the signal, and by emphasizing frequencies deemed to be desirable (e.g., low frequencies) and de-emphasizing frequencies deemed to be undesirable (e.g., very high frequencies).


The two exceptions are keyboard amplifiers and acoustic amplifiers which are used for amplifying acoustic instruments such as acoustic guitar, violin, and mandolin. Acoustic amplifiers typically aim for a relatively flat response.


Size and Power Rating

In the 1960s and 1970s, high output power amplifiers were preferred for instrument amplifiers, especially for large concerts, because public address systems were generally only used to amplify the vocals. However, by the 1980s and 1990s, as public address systems became more powerful, the electric guitars, basses, and keyboards were also amplified through the public address system. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


As a result, musicians were able to use smaller instrument amplifiers with lower wattage ratings. The switch to smaller instrument amplifiers makes it easier for musicians to transport their equipment to performances. As well, it makes concert stage management easier at large clubs and festivals where several bands are performing in sequence, because the bands can be moved on and off the stage more quickly.


See also

Valve sound is the sound either from a valve amplifier or a specially designed transistor amplifier. ... An amplifier head A guitar amplifier is an electronic amplifier designed for use with an electric or electronic musical instrument, such as an electric guitar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In the world of guitar music and guitar amplification, distortion is actively sought, evaluated, and appreciatively discussed in its endless flavors. ... In electric Rock guitar, attenuators are used as a dummy load by sending all of the power to the power attenuators built-in, mostly resistive dummy load and none to the speaker, in order to silence or reduce the output volume of an audio amplifier (for example, a guitar... The term amplifier as used in this article can mean either a circuit (or stage) using a single active device or a complete system such as a packaged audio hi-fi amplifier. ... A guitar speaker is a loudspeaker, usually 12 in diameter, which produces less than full frequency response. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with public address. ... Generally, an amplifier is any device that uses a small amount of energy to control a larger amount of energy. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Amplifier - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1852 words)
The relationship of the input to the output of an amplifier — usually expressed as a function of the input frequency — is called the transfer function of the amplifier, and the magnitude of the transfer function is termed the gain.
One common type of amplifier is the electronic amplifier, commonly used in radio and television transmitters and receivers, high-fidelity ("hi-fi") stereo equipment, microcomputers and other electronic digital equipment, and guitar and other instrument amplifiers.
Amplifiers are commonly classified by the conduction angle (sometimes known as 'angle of flow') of the input signal through the amplifying device; see electronic amplifier.
Instrument amplifier - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2460 words)
Despite the drawbacks of vacuum tube amplifiers, such as their heavy weight and higher likelihood of breakdown, some musicians prefer the "vintage" sound of vacuum tube amplifiers, particularly in the genres of blues and rock.
In the 1960s and 1970s, high output power amplifiers were preferred for instrument amplifiers, especially for large concerts, because public address systems were generally only used to amplify the vocals.
The switch to smaller instrument amplifiers makes it easier for musicians to transport their equipment to performances; as well, it makes concert stage mangement easier at large clubs and festivals where several bands are performing in sequence.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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