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Encyclopedia > Institutes of the Christian Religion
Calvinism
John Calvin

Background
Christianity
St. Augustine
The Reformation
Calvinism is a system of Christian theology and an approach to Christian life and thought within the Protestant tradition articulated by John Calvin, a Protestant Reformer in the 16th century, and subsequently by successors, associates, followers and admirers of Calvin, his interpretation of Scripture, and perspective on Christian life and... From [1], in the public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... This article is becoming very long. ... For the first Archbishop of Canterbury, see Saint Augustine of Canterbury. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement in the 16th century to reform the Catholic Church in Western Europe. ...

Distinctives
Calvin's Institutes
Five Solas
Five Points (TULIP)
Regulative principle
Confessions of faith The Five Solas are five Latin phrases (or slogans) that emerged during the Protestant Reformation and summarize the Reformers basic beliefs and emphasis in contradistinction to the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church of the day. ... Calvinist theology is often identified in the popular mind as the so-called five points of Calvinism (remembered in the English-speaking world with the mnemonic TULIP), which are a summation of the judgments (or canons) rendered by the Synod of Dordt and which were published in the Quinquarticular Controversy... The regulative principle of worship is a Christian theological doctrine teaching that the public worship of God should include those and only those elements that are instituted, commanded, or appointed by command or example in the Bible; that God institutes in Scripture everything he requires for worship in the Church... The Reformed churches express their consensus of faith in various creeds. ...

Influences
Theodore Beza
Synod of Dort
Puritan theology
Jonathan Edwards
Princeton theologians
Karl Barth
To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... xxx cciiiox The Synod of Dort was a National Synod held in Dordrecht in 1618/19, by the Dutch Reformed Church, in order to settle a serious controversy in the Dutch churches initiated by the rise of Arminianism. ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703 – March 22, 1758) was a colonial American Congregational preacher, theologian, and missionary to Native Americans. ... The Princeton theology is a tradition of conservative, Christian, Reformed and Presbyterian theology at Princeton Seminary, in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Karl Barth (May 10, 1886–December 10, 1968) (pronounced Bart) was an influential Swiss Reformed Christian theologian. ...

Churches
Reformed
Presbyterian
Congregationalist
Reformed Baptist
The Reformed churches are a group of Christian Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Calvinist system of doctrine, which first arose especially in the Swiss Reformation led by Huldrych Zwingli, but soon afterward appeared in nations throughout Western Europe. ... Presbyterianism is a form of Protestant Christianity, primarily in the Reformed branch of Western Christendom, as well as a particular form of church government. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practising congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The name Reformed Baptist does not refer to a distinct Christian denomination, but instead is a description of the churchs theological leaning. ...

Peoples
Afrikaner Calvinists
Huguenots
Pilgrims
Puritans
Afrikaner Calvinism is a unique cultural development that combined the Calvinist religion with the political aspirations of the white Afrikaans speaking people of South Africa. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... Pilgrims is the name commonly applied to early settlers of the Plymouth Colony. ... A Puritan of 16th and 17th century England was any person seeking purity of worship and doctrine, especially the parties that rejected the Laudian reform of the Church of England. ...

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Institutes of the Christian Religion is John Calvin's seminal work on Protestant theology. John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...

Contents

The Book's Title

In English, this work is known as Institutes of the Christian Religion or Calvin's Institutes. This title, however, is not the best and most clear way to translate the actual title from the Latin. In the original Latin, the title of this work is Institutio Christianae Religionis. The Latin word institutio can mean arrangement, custom, introduction, education, or in the plural, principles of education. In the title of this work, the word institutio is singular. The English word institute can mean elementary principle or a brief, intensive course of instruction devoted to technical fields. But because of the way this word is used in the title, perhaps a better rendering would be introduction or catechism. This is supported by something Calvin himself says in his prefatory address to King Francis: "My intention was only to furnish a kind of rudiments, by which those who feel some interest in religion might be trained to true godliness." The latter part of the title, Christianae Religionis, is correctly translated as of the Christian Religion. So, all of this taken into consideration, a more helpful English title would probably be something like Introduction of (to) the Christian Religion or Catechism of the Christian Religion. However, the current English title has been in use for so long that it will probably never be replaced with a different rendering of the title. Codex Manesse, fol. ...


Date and Purpose

The original Latin edition appeared in 1536 with a preface addressed to King Francis I of France, written on behalf of the French Protestants (Huguenots) who were being persecuted. Most often, references to the Institutes are to Calvin's final Latin edition of 1559, which was significantly expanded and revised from earlier editions. The Institutes are a primary historical reference for the system of doctrine adopted by the Reformed churches, usually called Calvinism. Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Events February 2 - Spaniard Pedro de Mendoza founds Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... Francis I (François Ier in French) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... Events January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Christian Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Calvinist system of doctrine, which first arose especially in the Swiss Reformation led by Huldrych Zwingli, but soon afterward appeared in nations throughout Western Europe. ... Calvinism is a system of Christian theology and an approach to Christian life and thought within the Protestant tradition articulated by John Calvin, a Protestant Reformer in the 16th century, and subsequently by successors, associates, followers and admirers of Calvin, his interpretation of Scripture, and perspective on Christian life and...


Plan of the Book

The opening chapter of the Institutes is perhaps the best known, in which Calvin presents the basic plan of the book. There are two general subjects to be examined: the creator, and his creatures. Above all, the book concerns the knowledge of God the Creator; but "as it is in the creation of man that the divine perfections are best displayed", there also is an examination of what can be known about humankind. After all, it is mankind's knowledge of God and of what he requires of his creatures, that is overall the issue of concern for a book of theology. In the first chapter, these two issues are considered together, to show what God has to do with mankind (and other creatures), and especially, how knowing God is connected with human knowledge.


To pursue that explanation of the relationship between God and man, Calvin adopts a traditional structure of Christian instruction used in Western Christianity, by arranging the material according to the plan of the Apostles' Creed. First the knowledge of God is considered as knowledge of the Father, the creator, provider and sustainer. Then it is examined how the Son reveals the Father, as only God is able to reveal God. And finally, the third section of the Institutes describes the work of the Holy Spirit, who raised Christ from the dead, and who comes from the Father and the Son to effect a union in the Church through faith in Jesus Christ, with God, forever. Codex Manesse, fol. ... The Apostles Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum), sometimes titled Symbol of the Apostles, is an early statement of Christian belief, a creed or symbol. ...


History of Revisions

The original Institutes were written in Latin. Calvin wrote five major Latin editions in his lifetime (1536, 1539, 1543, 1550, and 1559). He translated the first French edition of the Institutes in 1541, corresponding to his 1539 Latin edition, and supervised the translation of 3 later French translations. The French translations of Calvin's Institutes helped to shape the French language for generations, not unlike the influence of the King James Version for the English language. The final edition of the Institutes is about five times the length of the first edition. Events February 2 - Spaniard Pedro de Mendoza founds Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ... // Events February 21 - Battle of Wayna Daga - A combined army of Ethiopian and Portuguese troops defeat the armies of Adal led by Ahmed Gragn. ... Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ... Events January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Events The first official translation of the entire Bible in Swedish February 12 - Pedro de Valdivia founds Santiago de Chile. ... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ... H:For other uses of King James Version, see King James Version (disambiguation). ...


In English, four complete English translations have been published. The first was made in Calvin's lifetime (1561) by Thomas Norton, the son-in-law of the English Reformer Thomas Cranmer. In the nineteenth century there were two translations; one by John Allen (1813) and one by Henry Beveridge (1845). The most recent is the 1960 edition, translated by Ford Lewis Battles and edited by John T. McNeill, currently considered the most authoritative edition by scholars. Due to the length of the Institutes, several abridged versions have been made. The most recent is by Tony Lane and Hilary Osborne; the text is their own alteration and abridgement of the Beveridge translation. An oil painting of Thomas Cranmer by Gerlach Flicke (1545) - National Portrait Gallery, London Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books...


The best history of the Latin, French, and English versions of Calvin's Institutes was done by B. B. Warfield, "On the Literary History of Calvin's Institutes," published in the seventh American edition of the John Allen translation (Philadelphia, 1936). B. B. Warfield Benjamin Breckinridge (B.B.) Warfield (November 5, 1851 - February 16, 1921) was the principal of Princeton Seminary from 1887 to 1921. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Institutes of the Christian Religion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (498 words)
Institutes of the Christian Religion is John Calvin's seminal work on Protestant theology.
The Institutes are a primary historical reference for the system of doctrine adopted by the Reformed churches, usually called Calvinism.
An Epitome of the Institutions by Caspar Olevianus
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