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Encyclopedia > Instamatic
The Instamatic 100, the first Instamatic sold in the US
The Instamatic 100, the first Instamatic sold in the US
Instamatic 404, with selenium meter and spring wind
Instamatic 404, with selenium meter and spring wind

The Instamatic is a series of inexpensive, easy-to-load 126 and 110 cameras made by Kodak beginning in 1963. The Instamatic was immensely successful, introducing a generation to low-cost photography and spawning numerous imitators. 126 is the number given to two different film formats used in still photography. ... 110 is a film format used for still photography. ... For other uses, see Camera (disambiguation). ... Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE: EK) is a large multinational public company producing photographic equipment. ... -1...


During its heyday, the range was so ubiquitous that the Instamatic name is still frequently used (erroneously) to refer to any inexpensive point and shoot camera. (It is also frequently used incorrectly to describe Kodak's line of instant-picture cameras.) A point and shoot camera with a zoom lens and built in flash A point and shoot camera, also called a compact camera, is a still camera designed primarily for simple operation. ... An instant camera is a type of camera with self-developing film. ...


The Instamatic name was also used by Kodak on some Super 8-based home-cine cameras.[1] This article is about a film format. ...

Contents

History

Early Instamatics

The first Instamatics went on sale early in 1963. They were the first cameras to utilize Kodak's new 126 format. The easy-load film cartridge made the cameras very inexpensive to produce, as it provided the film backing plate and exposure counter itself and thus saved considerable design complexity and manufacturing cost for the cameras. A wide variety of print and slide film was sold by Kodak in the 126 format. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The lead designer for the Instamatic program was Dean M. Peterson, also later known for most of the innovations in the point-and-shoot camera revolution of the 1980s. The first Instamatic to be released was the Instamatic 50, which appeared in the UK in February 1963, about a month before the 100. The first model released in the US was the basic Instamatic 100. With fixed shutter speed, aperture and focus, it continued in the tradition of Kodak's earlier Brownie cameras, providing a simple snapshot camera anyone could use. It also featured a built-in flashgun for AG-1 "peanut" bulbs, a feature lacking in the 50. A point-and-shoot camera, also called a compact camera, is a still camera designed primarily for simple operation. ... The Brownie No 2 The Kodak Brownie box camera, introduced in 1900, was a very simple camera that anyone could use. ... The snapshot is a concept in photography introduced by Eastman Kodak with their Brownie box camera in 1900: A casual photograph taken without any particular pre-arrangement, often of every day events. ... Running water frozen by flash. ... Running water frozen by flash. ...


The lineup was soon expanded to include a variety of models from the basic but popular 100/104 to the automatic exposure 800/804, which featured an aluminum chassis, rangefinder, selenium light meter, and clockwork spring wind. (The 100/104 designation refers to the type of flash: models ending in 0 had a built-in flashgun, while those ending in 4 used flashcubes.) The top-of-the-line model was the Instamatic Reflex SLR, which was made in Germany and could accept a variety of Retina S-mount lenses. Aluminum is a soft and lightweight metal with a dull silvery appearance, due to a thin layer of oxidation that forms quickly when it is exposed to air. ... A rangefinder is an optical device that allows distance to be estimated or measured using triangulation, laser, radar, or other method. ... For other uses, see Selenium (disambiguation). ... A light meter is a device used to measure the amount of light. ... Gear with escapment mechanism For other uses, see Clockwork (disambiguation). ... Running water frozen by flash. ... Kodak Retina I (Type 148), c. ... Photographic lens One of Canons most popular wide angle lenses - 17-40 f/4 L The zoom lens of the Canon Elph A photographic lens (or more correctly, objective) is an optical lens or assembly of lenses used in conjunction with a camera body and mechanism to make images...


Commercial success

The Instamatic was an instant success; more than 50 million Instamatic cameras were produced between 1963 and 1970. Kodak even gave away a considerable number in a joint promotion with Scott paper towels in the early 1970s in order to generate a large number of new photographers and stimulate lasting demand for its film business.


Many other manufacturers attempted to capitalize on the popularity of the Instamatic with their own 126 cameras, including Canon, Olympus, Minolta, Ricoh, and even Rollei. Some of these models were far more sophisticated and expensive than the Kodak cameras: the Rollei SL26, for instance, featured interchangeable lenses, TTL metering, and a rangefinder, and retailed for $300. Canon Inc. ... This article refers to a mountain in Greece. ... Minolta was a Japanese worldwide manufacturer of cameras, camera accessories, photo-copiers, fax machines and laser printers. ... Ricoh Company, Ltd. ... Rolleiflex medium format camera Rollei is a German manufacturer of optical goods, and maker of the well-known Rolleiflex and Rolleicord series of cameras. ...


A new series of Instamatics was introduced in 1970 to take advantage of the new Magicube flash technology. Magicubes used mechanically triggered pyrotechnic detonators for each bulb, an improvement over flashcubes in that the need for batteries was eliminated. Instamatics with Magicube sockets were denoted by an "X" in the model number (e.g. X-15 or 55X). Running water frozen by flash. ...


"Pocket Instamatic" (110-format)

In 1972, Kodak introduced the Pocket Instamatic series for its new 110 format. The 110 cartridge had the same easy-load design as the 126 format but was much smaller, allowing the cameras to be very compact (hence the "Pocket" designation). The top-of-the-line model was the Pocket Instamatic 60, which featured a stainless steel body, rangefinder, and automatic exposure. More than 25 million Pocket Instamatics were produced in under three years, and the 110 format remained popular into the 1990s. However, its tiny negative size severely limited print and slide quality. The 630 foot (192 m) high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ...


Mid-1970s to Late-1980s

In 1976, the Instamatic X line was updated for use with the new Flipflash system. These cameras were designated by the addition of the suffix "F" to the model number of the corresponding Magicube model. The basic X-15F was the last Instamatic sold in the United States, remaining on sale until 1988. Running water frozen by flash. ...


References

  1. ^ Kodak Movie Cameras, nwmangum.com. Article retrieved 2006-11-09.
Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
kodak classics - mischa koning (662 words)
Until the introduction of the "Kodapak" cartridge in 1963, with it's associated "Instamatic" brand-name, cameras aimed at the consumer market were almost universally roll-film models, with all the inherent problems of loading that that type of film incurs.
The first Instamatic to be marketed was the Instamatic 50, on sale in the UK some weeks before the Instamatic 100 was launched in the USA.
The term Instamatic went into general usage to describe any easy-to-use basic camera, which rather detracts from a range that included an interchangeable-lens SLR, several range-finder cameras, and many with top-quality lenses from the likes of Rodenstock and Schneider-Kreuznach, as well as Kodak's own renowned Ektar.
Instamatic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (704 words)
Instamatic was the name of a long-running series of inexpensive, easy-to-load 126 and 110 cameras made by Kodak beginning in 1963.
The Instamatic was immensely successful, introducing a generation to low-cost photography and spawning numerous imitators.
The first Instamatic to be released was the Instamatic 50, which appeared in the UK in February 1963, about a month before the 100.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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