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Encyclopedia > Inner city

An inner city is the central area of a major city. In the United States and United Kingdom, the term is often applied to the poorer parts of the city centre and is sometimes used as a euphemism with the connotation of being an area, perhaps a ghetto, where people are less educated and wealthy and where there is more crime. These connotations are less common in other Western countries, where deprived areas may be located in outlying parts of cities. In fact, with the gentrification of some formerly run-down central city areas a reverse connotation can apply – in Australia the term "outer suburban" applied to a person implies a lack of sophistication. For instance, in Paris or Vienna the inner city is the richest part of the metropolitan area, where housing is the most expensive, and where elites and high-income individuals dwell. The suburbs, on the other hand, are known for poverty and crime. The French word for "suburb" ("banlieue"), as well as the Swedish word for suburb ("förort") often has a negative connotation especially when used in the plural. A euphemism is an expression intended by the speaker to be less offensive, disturbing, or troubling to the listener than the word or phrase it replaces, or in the case of doublespeak to make it less troublesome for the speaker. ... A ghetto is an area where people from a specific racial or ethnic background or united in a given culture or religion live as a group, voluntarily or involuntarily, in milder or stricter seclusion. ... The term Western World or the West can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ... The Embarcadero in downtown San Francisco was once the site of a double-decker freeway with cardboard boxes housing the homeless underneath. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Inhabitants according to official census figures: 1800 to 2005 Vienna in 1858 Vienna (German: Wien ) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... Banlieue is the French word for outskirts. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The United States has had what has been described as a culture of "anti-urbanism" that may date back to the early days of the Union, as Thomas Jefferson wrote that "The mobs of great cities add just so much to the support of pure government as sores do to the strength of the human body." On the businessmen who brought manufacturing industry into cities and hence increased the population density necessary to supply the workforce, he wrote that "the manufactures of the great cities ... have begotten a depravity of morals, a dependence and corruption, which renders them an undesirable accession to a country whose morals are sound." Modern anti-urban attitudes are to be found in America in the form of the housing development profession that continues to develop land on a low-density suburban basis, where access to amenities, work and shopping is provided almost exclusively by car rather than on foot. There is usually significant opposition to expanding mass transit, typically on financial grounds. This article is becoming very long. ... In the United States of America, transit describes local area common carrier passenger transportation configured to provide scheduled service on fixed routes on a non-reservation basis. ...


Some feel that contemporary anti-urban attitudes in the United States may be linked to racism. In the United States, large numbers of African Americans migrated from the rural South to the industrial cities of the North during the 20th century, in what became known as the Great Migration. Meanwhile, the development of interstate highways allowed for easy access to suburban areas, helping to spur "white flight" to suburban areas. By the late 20th century, many large American cities were largely black or Hispanic (or a mixture of both), while suburban areas were often heavily white. Patterns of white flight have also taken place in parts of large British cities as immigrants from South Asia, the Caribbean and elsewhere have moved in. Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling Hate speech · Hate crime Lynching · Gay bashing Genocide · Holocaust Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing Pogrom · Race war Religious persecution Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism White/Black supremacy Hate groups · Kahanism Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism Womens/Universal suffrage Civil rights · Gay rights Childrens rights · Youth rights Groups NAACP... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The Great Migration was the movement of millions African Americans out of the rural Southern United States from 1914 to 1950. ... Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ... White flight is a colloquial term for the demographic trend of upper and middle class Americans (predominantly white) moving away from inner cities (predominantly non-white), finding new homes in nearby suburbs or even moving to new locales entirely. ... The Hispanic world. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... UN Subregion of South Asia. ... West Indian redirects here. ...


There is, nevertheless, a growing movement in North America called "New Urbanism" that calls for a return to traditional city planning methods where mixed-use zoning allows people to walk from one type of land-use to another. The idea is that housing, shopping, office space, and leisure facilities are all provided within walking distance of each other, thus reducing the demand for road-space and also improving the efficiency and effectiveness of mass transit. Much of this is covered in the weekly reports of the Inner City Press, which uses the South Bronx as its example and laboratory. New urbanism is an urban design movement whose popularity increased from the beginning of the 1980s onwards. ... In the United States of America, transit describes local area common carrier passenger transportation configured to provide scheduled service on fixed routes on a non-reservation basis. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2663 words)
A city is an urban area that is differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status.
Although city can refer to an agglomeration including suburban and satellite areas, the term is not usually applied to a conurbation (cluster) of distinct urban places, nor for a wider metropolitan area including more than one city, each acting as a focus for parts of the area.
In Paris, the inner city is the richest part of the metropolitan area, where housing is the most expensive, and where elites and high-income individuals dwell.
Inner city - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (424 words)
An inner city is the central area of a major city.
In the United States and United Kingdom, the term is often applied to the poorer parts of the city centre and is sometimes used as a euphemism with the connotation of being an area, perhaps a ghetto, where people are less educated and wealthy and where there is more crime.
For instance, in Paris the inner city is the richest part of the metropolitan area, where housing is the most expensive, and where elites and high-income individuals dwell.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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