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Encyclopedia > Inner Temple
Combined coat of arms of the four Inns of Court. The Inner Temple's arms are at bottom-left
Combined coat of arms of the four Inns of Court. The Inner Temple's arms are at bottom-left
 Inner Temple Library, 1892, by Herbert Railton
Inner Temple Library, 1892, by Herbert Railton
Inner Temple Gardens
Inner Temple Gardens

The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple is one of the four Inns of Court around the Royal Courts of Justice in London, England, which may call members to the Bar and so entitle them to practise as barristers. (The other Inns are Middle Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn.) Image File history File linksMetadata London-Inns-of-Court. ... Image File history File linksMetadata London-Inns-of-Court. ... Image File history File links Inner-Temple-Library. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 5432 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Inner Temple Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 5432 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Inner Temple Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 4271 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Inner Temple Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3456x2304, 4271 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Inner Temple Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Combined arms of the four Inns of Court The Inns of Court, in London, are the professional associations to one of which every English barrister (and those judges who were formerly barristers) must belong. ... The main entrance The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a building in London, which houses the Court of Appeal and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... A bar association is a professional body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... English barrister A barrister is a lawyer found in many common law jurisdictions who employ a split profession (as opposed to a fused profession) in relation to legal representation. ... Part of Middle Temple c. ... Entrance to Grays Inn Grays Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in around the Royal Courts of Justice in London, England to which barristers belong and where they are called to the bar. ... Part of Lincolns Inn drawn by Thomas Shepherd c. ...


The Temple was occupied in the twelfth century by the Knights Templar, who gave the area its name, and built the Temple Church which survives as the parish church of the Inner Temple and Middle Temple. The Inner Temple was first recorded as being used for legal purposes when lawyers' residences were burned down in Wat Tyler's revolt. It is an independent extra-parochial area, historically not governed by the Corporation of London and equally outside the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Bishop of London. The Seal of the Knights Templar This article is about the medieval military order. ... The Temple Church. ... Wat Tylers Death Walter Tyler, commonly known as Wat Tyler (died June 15, 1381) was the leader of the English Peasants Revolt of 1381. ... In the United Kingdom, an extra-parochial area was an area considered to be outside any parish. ... Coat of arms of the City of London as shown on Blackfriars station. ...


The Inn suffered heavily from wartime bombing between September 1940 and May 1941, because of its proximity to the Thames. The buildings destroyed included the Library and the Hall although others, such as 2 King's Bench Walk, were fortunate to survive. Heinkel He 111 German bomber over the Surrey Docks, Southwark, London (German propaganda photomontage) The Blitz was the sustained bombing of the United Kingdom by Nazi Germany between 7 September 1940 and 16 May 1941. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... 2 Kings Bench Walk 2 Kings Bench Walk is a listed building used for housing barristers chambers within the Inner Temple, Central London. ...


The oldest surviving buildings in the Inner Temple date from the seventeenth century and are on King's Bench Walk (named after the King's Bench Office which was there until the nineteenth century), though the first storey of the Knights Templars' medieval buttery (where food was served) survives as part of the larger building that contains the new Hall. Many other parts of the Inn are Victorian. This article deals with a type of bread roll. ... hhi comm arts fiends!!! said ronnie and phil Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian Era of Great Britain marked the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the...


The Temple is often used as a location for both television and cinema, including in 2005 filming for The Da Vinci Code. This article is about the film. ...


Famous Members

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. ... This article is about the 15th century jurist; for the 18th century statesman, see Thomas Littleton. ... Sir William Catesby (1450-1485) was a prominent member of the group that supported Richard III of England during his brief reign. ... Sir Edward Coke Sir Edward Coke (pronounced cook) (1 February 1552 - 3 September 1634) was an early English colonial entrepreneur and jurist whose writings on the English common law were the definitive legal texts for some 300 years. ... Sir Francis Drake, c. ... At least two Robert Dudleys were prominent in history: Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester, and Robert Dudley, styled Earl of Warwick, his illegitimate son. ... Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (10 November 1566 – 25 February 1601), favourite of Queen Elizabeth I of England, is the best-known of the many holders of the title Earl of Essex. ... Portrait of Sir Christopher Hatton, Lord Chancellor of England during Elizabethan era Portrait by Nicholas Hilliard, 1588-1591 Sir Christopher Hatton (1540–November 20, 1591) was an English politician, the lord chancellor of England and, according to speculation, the lover of Queen Elizabeth I. His father was William Hatton (d. ... William Wycherley (c. ... George Jeffreys, 1st Baron Jeffreys (1648-1689), Baron Wem, better known as Hanging Judge Jeffreys, became notorious during the reign of King James II, rising to the position of Lord Chancellor. ... James Boswell James Boswell (October 29, 1740 - May 19, 1795) was a lawyer, diarist, and author born in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... William Paca portrait by Charles Willson Peale. ... Karl Pearson (pencil sketch in notebook; there is some see-through of writing on next page) Karl Pearson (March 27, 1857 – April 27, 1936) was a major contributor to the early development of statistics as a serious scientific discipline in its own right. ... A statue of Thomas Hughes at Rugby School For the recipient of the Victoria Cross see Thomas Hughes, VC Thomas Hughes (October 20, 1822 – March 22, 1896) was an English lawyer and author. ... Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (November 18, 1836 - May 29, 1911) was a British dramatist and librettist best known for his operatic collaborations with the composer Arthur Sullivan. ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847–April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी), called Mahatma Gandhi, was the charismatic leader who brought the cause of Indias independence from British colonial rule to... John Maynard Keynes (right) and Harry Dexter White at the Bretton Woods Conference John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes, CB (pronounced canes, IPA ) (5 June 1883 – 21 April 1946) was a British economist whose ideas, called Keynesian economics, had a major impact on modern economic and political theory as well... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, FRS (January 3, 1883 - October 8, 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... Jawaharlal Nehru (Hindi: , IPA: ) (November 14, 1889 – May 27, 1964) was a senior political leader of the Indian National Congress, was a pivotal figure during the Indian independence movement and served as the first Prime Minister of the Republic of India. ... Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah of Pakistan Mohammad Ali Jinnah (referred to in Pakistan as Quaid-e-Azam, or Great Leader, which is a legally defined title) (December 25, 1876 - September 11, 1948) was an Indian Muslim nationalist, who led the movement demanding a separate homeland for Muslims in... Cecil Rhodes. ... Dr. Ivy Williams (born 7 September 1877, Newton Abbot; died 18 February 1966) was the first woman to be called to the English bar. ... For others named John Taylor, see John Taylor. ... Sir Seretse Khama KBE (July 1, 1921 - July 13, 1980) was the first President of Botswana. ... Alexander Andrew Mackay Irvine, Lord Irvine of Lairg, QC, PC (born June 23, 1940), known as Derry Irvine, is a British lawyer and political figure who served as Lord Chancellor under his former pupil Tony Blair. ... Henry Kenneth Woolf, Baron Woolf, PC (born May 2, 1933), is the current Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, making him the second most senior judge in England and Wales after the Lord Chancellor. ... The Right Honourable Dame Elizabeth Butler-Sloss, GBE (b. ... John Whitaker Straw (born August 3, 1946) is a British Labour Party politician. ... The Rt Hon. ... Sir John Clifford Mortimer QC (born 21 April 1923) is an English barrister turned prolific writer and dramatist. ... Rumpole of the Bailey is a television series created and written by British writer John Mortimer, QC and starring Leo McKern as Horace Rumpole, an aging London barrister who defends any and all clients. ... Dr Richard Searby, QC BA (Hon) Oxon MA Oxon Dr Searby is a leading member of Australia’s legal fraternity and he has held a vast array of directorships of Australian and international corporations. ... Malcolm Bishop Q.C. is a distinguished criminal lawyer who belongs to 2 Paper Buildings, the Chambers of Desmond de Silva Q.C.. He was educated at Regents Park College, Oxford. ... Thomas Willing (December 19, 1731 - January 19, 1821) was a Delegate to the Continental Congress from Pennsylvania. ... London Conference, St. ...

External links

  • Inner Temple website


Greater London | London | City of London Flag of the City of London

London Portal Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The City of London is a geographically-small City within Greater London, England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_City_of_London. ...


London boroughs: Barking and Dagenham | Barnet | Bexley | Brent | Bromley | Camden | Croydon | Ealing | Enfield | Greenwich | Hackney | Hammersmith and Fulham | Haringey | Harrow | Havering | Hillingdon | Hounslow | Islington | Kensington and Chelsea | Kingston | Lambeth | Lewisham | Merton | Newham | Redbridge | Richmond | Southwark | Sutton | Tower Hamlets | Waltham Forest | Wandsworth | City of Westminster The administrative area of Greater London contains thirty-two London boroughs. ... The London Borough of Barking and Dagenham is a London borough in East London and forms part of Outer London. ... The London Borough of Barnet is a London borough in North London and forms part of Outer London. ... The London Borough of Bexley is a London borough in south east London, England and forms part of Outer London. ... The London Borough of Brent is a London borough in north west London and forms part of Outer London. ... The London Borough of Bromley is a London Borough of outer southeast London, England. ... The London Borough of Camden is an inner-London borough created in 1965 to replace the metropolitan boroughs of Hampstead, Holborn, St Pancras. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The London Borough of Ealing is a London borough in the west of the city. ... The London Borough of Enfield is the most northerly London borough and forms part of Outer London. ... The London Borough of Greenwich is a London borough in southeast London, England. ... Hackney Town Hall was built in the 1930s for the old Metropolitan Borough. ... The front of Hammersmith and Fulham town hall is a mixture of styles, with a modern block bolted on to, and obscuring, what would have once been an architecturally consistent red-brick portico. ... The London Borough of Haringey is a London borough in North London and forms part of Outer London. ... // The London Borough of Harrow is a London borough of outer northwest London. ... The London Borough of Havering is a London borough in East London, England and forms part of Outer London. ... The London Borough of Hillingdon is the westernmost borough in London, England and forms part of Outer London. ... The London Borough of Hounslow is a London borough in West London, England. ... Arms of Islington London Borough Council Islington Town Hall Islington is a borough of London to the north of the City of London, west of Hackney, east of Camden, and south of Haringey. ... The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (often abbreviated to RBKC) is a London borough in the west side of central London. ... The Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames is a London borough in south-west London. ... The London Borough of Lambeth is a London borough in South London, England and forms part of Inner London. ... now. ... The London Borough of Merton is a London borough in south west London. ... Newham Town Hall in East Ham (E6) Logo on the roadside at sunset The London Borough of Newham is a London borough in East London, England. ... The London Borough of Redbridge is a London borough in North East London, England. ... The London Borough of Richmond upon Thames is a London borough in South West London and part of Outer London. ... The London Borough of Southwark is a London borough in London, England. ... The London Borough of Sutton is a London borough in outer southwest London. ... The London Borough of Tower Hamlets is a London borough to the east of the City of London and north of the River Thames in East London. ... The London Borough of Waltham Forest is a London borough in East London, England and forms part of Outer London although it suffers from similar problems of crime, poor housing and over crowding like inner London It is a mainly built-up residential area located between part of Epping Forest... The London Borough of Wandsworth is a London borough in South West London, England and forms part of Inner London. ... The City of Westminster is a London borough with city status, situated to the west of the City of London and north of the River Thames. ...


Sui generis: City of London Sui generis (English pronunciation (IPA) or ) is a (post) Latin expression, literally meaning of its own kind/genus or unique in its characteristics. ... The City of London is a geographically-small City within Greater London, England. ...


Enclaves: Inner Temple | Middle Temple This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Part of Middle Temple c. ...


The Greater London Authority (GLA) administers the 1579 km² (610 sq. ... The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... Ken Livingstone, the current Mayor of London The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom. ...

Inns of Court
Gray's Inn | Lincoln's Inn | Inner Temple | Middle Temple

  Results from FactBites:
 
Inner Temple - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (284 words)
The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple is one of the four Inns of Court around the Royal Courts of Justice in London, England, to which barristers belong and where they are called to the Bar.
It is called the Inner Temple as the church lies within its boundary.
The Inner Temple was first recorded as being used for legal purposes when lawyers' residences were burned down by Wat Tyler's revolt.
Temple Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1606 words)
It was originally constructed as the church of a monastic complex known as the Temple, the headquarters in England of the Knights Templar.
After the destruction of the Templar order in the early 14th century, the Temple became Crown property and was let to two groups of lawyers that evolved into the Inner Temple and Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court.
The temple also served as an early depository bank, sometimes in defiance of the Crown's wishes to seize the funds of nobles who had entrusted their wealth there.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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