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Inns are establishments where travellers can procure food, drink, and lodging. Found in Europe, they first sprang up when the Romans built their famous system of highways two millennia ago. Some inns in Europe are centuries old. In addition to providing for the needs of travellers, inns traditionally acted as community gathering places. The term establishment has several meanings: An establishment is a place of business or residence, or the founding of such a place or business. ... A traveller (American English traveler) is a person or an object travelling between two or more locations. ... The word drink is primarily a verb, meaning to ingest liquids. ... People who travel and stay away from home for more than a day need lodging mainly for sleeping. ... A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that existed in Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East between 753 BC and its downfall in AD 476. ... Mitchell Freeway in Perth, Western Australia For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... ...


In today's automobile-ridden world, real inns are fast dying out. The few that are left function primarily as pubs. In North America, inns are usually alcohol-serving restaurants that have never provided lodging or serviced the needs of travellers. In Europe, it is the provision of accommodation, if anything, that now differentiates inns from taverns, alehouses and pubs. These later tended only to supply alcohol (although in the UK the conditions of their licence sometimes required them to have a nominal supply of food and soft drinks). Inns tend to be grander and more long-lived establishments. Famous London examples include the George and the Tabard. There is however no formal distinction between an inn and other kinds of establishment, and many pubs will use the name "inn", either simply because they are long established, or to summon up a particular kind of image. A small variety of cars, the most popular kind of automobile. ... The World in plate carrée projection The World In English, world is rooted in a compound of the obsolete words were, man, and eld, age; thus, its oldest meaning is age or life of man. Its primary modern meaning is the planet Earth, especially when capitalized: the World. ... An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere bordered on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west by the... In general usage, alcohol (from Arabic al-ghawl الغول) refers almost always to ethanol, also known as grain alcohol, and often to any beverage that contains ethanol (see alcoholic beverage). ... Toms Diner, a restaurant in New York made familiar by Suzanne Vega and the television sitcom Seinfeld Eating Out redirects here. ... A tavern is, loosely, a place of business where people gather to drink alcoholic beverages and, more than likely, also be served food, though not licenced to put up guests. ... A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the Great Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other countries influenced by British cultural heritage. ... The George is the name of many inns, hotels and public houses in the UK. It may also be a common shortening of The George and Dragon. ... The Tabard Inn, Southwark, around 1850 The Tabard was established in the medieval period on Borough High Street in Southwark. ...


The original functions of an inn are now usually split among separate establishments, such as hotels, lodges, motels, pubs, restaurants, and taverns. In North America, the lodging aspect of the word "inn" lives on in hotel brand names like Holiday Inn, and in some state laws that refer to lodging operators as innkeepers. A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging, usually on a short-term basis and especially for tourists. ... A typical gate keepers lodge at Mentmore, Buckinghamshire, England Lodge has several meanings that, in most cases, relates to a place of meeting: A place of residence A ski lodge within the snow fields; A hotel, especially with a rustic or wilderness theme and situated outside a city; A... The word motel originates from the Motel Inn of San Luis Obispo, first built in 1925 by Arthur Heinman. ... An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... Toms Diner, a restaurant in New York made familiar by Suzanne Vega and the television sitcom Seinfeld Eating Out redirects here. ... A tavern is, loosely, a place of business where people gather to drink alcoholic beverages and, more than likely, also be served food, though not licenced to put up guests. ... This article is about the concept in marketing. ... This article is about the hotel chain; for the film, please see Holiday Inn (film). ...


The German words for "inn", "innkeeper", and "inkeeping" illustrate the historical importance of inns. An innkeeper is Wirt (a host), the inn itself is a Wirtshaus (a host's house), and innkeeping is Wirtschaft. The last word literally means hosting or hospitality, but is also used to mean economy and business in general. In the Greek language, the word for economy (oikos "house" + nomos "law") is actually identical to housekeeping. The act or practice of being hospitable, that is, the reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers, with liberality and goodwill. ... External links The Rise of a Young Business Tycoon Business Articles Categories: ‪Business‬ | ‪Academic disciplines‬ | ‪School subjects‬ ... Greek (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of 3,500 years. ... Housekeeping is the maintenance of a clean environment, usually in a house, but it also applies to industrial, commercial, and institutional settings. ...


The Inns of Court were originally ordinary inns where lawyers met to do business, but have become institutions of the legal profession in London. The Inns of Court, in London, are where barristers train and practise. ... A lawyer is a person licensed by the state to advise clients in legal matters and represent them in courts of law and in other forms of dispute resolution. ... Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the most populous city in the European Union, with an estimated population on 1 January 2005 of 7,421,328 and a metropolitan area population of between 12 and 14 million. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
ISC INN (296 words)
INN separates hosts that feed you news from those that have users reading news.
INN was originally written by Rich Salz (grab the USENIX paper Rich wrote about it here).
ISC took over development of INN in 1996 after Rich was unable to continue supporting it and many variants of the software were forming.
Inn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (378 words)
There is however no formal distinction between an inn and other kinds of establishment, and many pubs will use the name "inn", either simply because they are long established, or to summon up a particular kind of image.
The original functions of an inn are now usually split among separate establishments, such as hotels, lodges, motels, pubs, restaurants, and taverns.
The Inns of Court were originally ordinary inns where lawyers met to do business, but have become institutions of the legal profession in London.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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