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Encyclopedia > Industrial espionage

Industrial espionage or corporate espionage is espionage conducted for commercial purposes instead of national security purposes. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... // Competitive Intelligence (CI) is both a process and a product. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Security measures taken to protect the Houses of Parliament in London, England. ...


The term is distinct from legal and ethical activities such as examining corporate publications, websites, patent filings, and the like to determine the activities of a corporation (this is normally referred to as competitive intelligence). 'Instead, it describes activities such as theft of trade secrets, bribery, blackmail, and technological surveillance.' As well as spying on commercial organizations, governments can also be targets of commercial espionage—for example, to determine the terms of a tender for a government contract so that another tenderer can underbid. A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... // Competitive Intelligence (CI) is both a process and a product. ... A trade secret is a formula, practice, process, design, instrument, pattern, or compilation of information used by a business to obtain an advantage over competitors within the same industry or profession. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics in a variety of professions. ... For other uses, see Blackmail (disambiguation). ...


Industrial espionage is most commonly associated with technology-heavy industries, particularly the computer and automobile sectors. By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Computer industry is a collective term used to describe the whole range of businesses involved in developing computer software, designing computer hardware, the manufacture of computer components and the provision of information technology services. ... Automakers are companies that produce automobiles. ...

Contents

Information

Information can make the difference between success and failure; if a trade secret is stolen, the competitive playing field is levelled or even tipped in favor of a competitor. A trade secret is a formula, practice, process, design, instrument, pattern, or compilation of information used by a business to obtain an advantage over competitors within the same industry or profession. ...


Although a lot of information gathering is accomplished by combing through public records (public databases and patent filings), at times corporations feel the best way to get information is to take it. Corporate espionage is a threat to any business whose livelihood depends on information. The information competitors seek may be client lists, supplier agreements, personnel records, research documents, or prototype plans for a new product or service. The compilation of these crucial elements is called CIS or CRS, a Competitive Intelligence Solution or Competitive Response Solution. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... The supply and demand model describes how prices vary as a result of a balance between product availability at each price (supply) and the desires of those with purchasing power at each price (demand). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with prototyping. ...


Other

In recent years, corporate espionage has taken on an expanded definition. For instance, attempts to sabotage a corporation may be considered corporate espionage; in this sense, the term takes on the wider connotations of its parent word. In some cases, malware and spyware has even entered the arena of corporate espionage.[1] [2] Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... It has been suggested that Grayware be merged into this article or section. ... A large number of toolbars, some added by spyware, overwhelm an Internet Explorer session. ...


The government of France has been alleged to have conducted ongoing industrial espionage against American aerodynamics and satellite companies[3]and vice versa.


The development of the Tupolev Tu-144 supersonic aircraft, with its rapid design and similarity to Concorde, was one of the most prominent examples of industrial espionage in the 20th century. The Tupolev Tu-144 (NATO reporting name: Charger) was the first supersonic transport aircraft (SST), constructed under the direction of the Soviet Tupolev design bureau headed by Alexei Tupolev (1925–2001). ... A United States Navy F/A-18E/F Super Hornet in transonic flight. ... British Airways Concorde G-BOAB. Concorde G-BOAD on a barge beneath Verrazano Narrows Bridge in New York City in November 2003, bound for the Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum. ...


Further reading

  • Barry, Marc and Penenberg, Adam L. Spooked: Espionage in Corporate America. Perseus Books Group, December 5, 2000. ISBN 0-7382-0271-1
  • Fink, Steven. Sticky Fingers: Managing the Global Risk of Economic Espionage. Dearborn Trade, January 15, 2002. ISBN 0-7931-4827-8
  • Rustmann, F.W. Jr. CIA, INC.: Espionage and the Craft of Business Intelligence. Potomac Books, November 2002. ISBN 1-57488-520-0
  • Winker, Ira. Corporate Espionage: What It Is, Why It's Happening in Your Company, What You Must Do About It. Prima Lifestyles, April 9, 1997. ISBN 0-7615-0840-6

See also

Business intelligence (BI) is a business management term, which refers to applications and technologies that are used to gather, provide access to, and analyze data and information about company operations. ... // Competitive Intelligence (CI) is both a process and a product. ... A trade secret is a formula, practice, process, design, instrument, pattern, or compilation of information used by a business to obtain an advantage over competitors within the same industry or profession. ...

External links

  • ISRASEC Web Intelligence
  • Spyware as Corporate Espionage Threat. NewsFactor Network, July 19, 2005.
  • Directory of Corporate Espionage detectives at ExpertLaw

  Results from FactBites:
 
Industrial espionage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (293 words)
Industrial espionage is espionage conducted for commercial purposes instead of national security purposes.
A commission of the European Parliament suspects that ECHELON, a communications espionage system operated by the NSA and agencies of the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, is used for political espionage and occasionally to help American companies against European competitors.
The development of the Tupolev Tu-144 supersonic aircraft, with its rapid design and similarity to Concorde, was one of the most prominent examples of industrial espionage in the 20th century.
Industrial espionage - definition of Industrial espionage in Encyclopedia (340 words)
Industrial espionage is espionage conducted for commercial purposes instead of the usual national security purposes.
At the most innocuous level, the term is applied to the legal and mundane methods of examining corporate publications, web sites, patent filings, and the like to determine the activities of a corporation (though this is normally referred to as business intelligence), through to bribery, flmail, technological surveillance and even occasional violence.
A commission of the European Parliament suspects that ECHELON, a communications espionage system operated by the NSA and agencies of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, is used for political espionage and occasionally to help American companies against European competitors.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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