FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Inductrack" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Inductrack

Inductrack is a completely passive, fail-safe magnetic levitation system, using only unpowered loops of wire in the track and permanent magnets (arranged into Halbach arrays) on the vehicle to achieve magnetic levitation. The track can be in one of two configurations, a "ladder track" and a "laminated track". The ladder track is made of unpowered Litz wire cables, and the laminated track is made out of stacked copper or aluminum sheets. A passive component is an electronic component that does not require a source of energy to perform its intended function. ... Fail Safe is an episode from Season 5 of the science fiction television series Stargate SG-1. ... Levitating pyrolytic carbon Magnetic levitation, maglev, or magnetic suspension is a method by which an object is suspended above another object with no support other than magnetic fields. ... A Halbach array is a special arrangement of permanent magnets which augments the magnetic field on one side of the device while cancelling the field to near zero on the other side. ... Levitating pyrolytic carbon Magnetic levitation, maglev, or magnetic suspension is a method by which an object is suspended above another object with no support other than magnetic fields. ... Litz wire is a special type of wire used in electronics. ...


There are two designs: the Inductrack I, which is optimized for high speed operation, and the Inductrack II, which is more efficient at lower speeds.

Contents

Description

Inductrack was invented by a team of scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, headed by physicist Richard F. Post, for use in maglev trains.[1] The only power required is to push the train forward against air and electromagnetic drag, with increasing levitation force generated as the velocity of the train increases over the loops of wire. Aerial view of the lab and surrounding area. ... Transrapid at the Emsland test facility in Germany JR-Maglev at Yamanasi, Japan; maximum speed 581 km/h (361 mph) Transrapid maglev train in Shanghai Inside the Shanghai Transrapid maglev Inside the Shanghai Transrapid maglev VIP section Magnetic levitation transport, or maglev, is a form of transportation that suspends, guides... An object falling through a gas or liquid experiences a force in direction opposite to its motion. ...


Its name comes from the word inductance or inductor; an electrical device made from loops of wire. As the magnet array (with alternating magnetic field orientations) passes over the loops of wire, it induces a current in them. The current creates its own magnetic field which repels the permanent magnets. Inductance (or electric inductance) is a measure of the amount of magnetic flux produced for a given electric current. ... An inductor is a passive electrical device employed in electrical circuits for its property of inductance. ...


When neodymium–iron–boron permanent magnets are used, levitation is achieved at low speeds, allowing it to lift 50 times the magnet weight. The test model levitated at speeds above 22 mph, but Richard Post believes that on real tracks, levitation could be achieved at "as little as 1 to 2 mph". Below the transition speed, the magnetic drag increases as the vehicle's speed increases and approaches the transition speed, but above this transition speed, the magnetic drag decreases as the vehicle's speed increases.[2] Neodymium magnet on a bracket from a hard drive A neodymium magnet (also, but less specifically, called a rare-earth magnet) is a powerful magnet made of a combination of neodymium, iron, and boron — Nd2Fe14B. They have replaced marginally weaker and significantly more heat-resistant samarium-cobalt magnets in most...


The Inductrack II variation uses two Halbach arrays, one above and one below the track to double the levitating magnetic field without substantially increasing the weight or footprint area of the Halbach arrays, while having lower drag forces at low speeds.[3]


Several maglev railroad proposals are based upon Inductrack technology. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is also considering Inductrack technology for launching rockets. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an agency of the United States Government, responsible for the nations public space program. ...


See also

UniModal or SkyTran is a proposal by Douglas Malewicki for a 160km/h (100mph) personal rapid transit system. ... Artists rendering of SkyTran, a proposed PRT design. ...

References

  1. ^ A New Approach for Magnetically Levitating Trains — and Rockets
  2. ^ Track To The Future: Maglev Trains On Permanent Magnets — Scott R. Gourley — Popular Mechanics
  3. ^ Toward More Efficient Transport: The Inductrack Maglev System — Presented by Richard F. Post, 10 October 2005

The adolescent Internet. ...

External links

Patents


  Results from FactBites:
 
Inductrak (1378 words)
Inductrack involves two main components: a special array of permanent, room-temperature magnets mounted on the vehicle and a track embedded with close-packed coils of insulated copper wire.
However, as soon as the train exceeds a transitional speed of 1 to 2 kilometers an hour (a slow walking speed), which is achieved by means of a low-energy auxiliary power source, the arrays induce sufficient currents in the track's inductive coils to levitate the train.
The study also found that Inductrack should be able to achieve speeds of 350 kilometers per hour and up and demonstrate lower energy costs, wheel and rail wear, propulsion maintenance, and noise levels.
askmar - Inductrack (743 words)
Inductrack is a completely passive magnetic levitation train system, using only unpowered loops of wire in the track and permanent magnets (in Halbach arrays) on the train to achieve levitation.
Inductrack was invented by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist Richard E Post.
The only power required is to push the train forward, with increasing levitation force generated as the velocity of the train increases over the loops of wire.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m