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Encyclopedia > Indra
Indra

A bronze statue of Indra
God of weather and war, king of the gods
Devanagari: इन्द्र or इंद्र
Affiliation: Deva
Abode: Amarāvati in Svarga
Weapon: Vajra
Consort: Sachi/Indrāṇi
Mount: Airavata

Indra (Sanskrit: इन्द्र or इंद्र, indra) is the god of weather and war, and King of the Gods or Devas and Lord of Heaven or Svargaloka in Hinduism. Mentioned first as the chief deity in the sacred Hindu text of Rig Veda, Indra is bestowed with a heroic and almost brash and amorous character. He has always remained significant in Indian mythology, from Vedic to Puranic times, as the primary ruler of all the deities, even as his reputation and role diminished in later Hinduism with the rise of the Trimurti. Indra may refer to (among other things): The chief deity, Indra, of the Rigveda and the Hindu religion; or The company Indra, a Spanish Information Technologies and Defense Systems company. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (577x750, 73 KB) Summary An ancient Indian Bronze image of Indra. ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... In Hinduism, (Sanskrit: स्वर्ग) Svarga (or Swarga) is set of nether worlds located on Mt. ... Vajrasattva holds the vajra in his right hand and a bell in his left hand. ... Indra (alias Sakra) and Sachi Riding the Divine Elephant Airavata, Folio from a Jain text, Panchakalyanaka (Five Auspicious Events in the Life of Jina Rishabhanatha [Adinatha]), circa 1670-1680, Painting in LACMA museum, originally from Amber, Rajasthan In Hinduism (specifically, early Vedic accounts), Sachi (also known as Indrani (queen of... In Hinduism, Airavata (ऐरावत) is a white elephant who carries Lord Indra. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... A Deva, in Hinduism, is a deity, controlling forces of nature such as fire, air, etc. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... In Hinduism, Svarga (or Swarga) is an underworld, located on Mt. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... The Rig Veda ऋग्वेद (Sanskrit ṛc praise + veda knowledge) is the earliest of the four Hindu religious scriptures known as the Vedas. ... Vedic may refer to: Ancient India the Vedic civilization the Vedas, the oldest preserved Indo-Aryan texts Vedic Sanskrit, their language (see also Vedic meter, Vedic accent, Vedic chant and Shrauta) the historical Vedic religion traditional Hindu culture: Vedic astrology the Ayurveda (Vedic medicine) Ancient Vedic weights and measures modern... ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... This article is about the Hindu gods. ...

Contents

Origins

Indra is attested as a god of the Mitanni. If Indra as a deity is cognate to other Indo-European gods, either thunder gods such as Thor or Perun, or heroic gods, or gods of intoxicating drinks, his name has either not been preserved in any other branch, or else it is itself an Indo-Iranian innovation. Janda (1998:221) suggests that the Proto-Indo-European (or Graeco-Aryan) predecessor of Indra had the epitheta *trigw-welumos "smasher of the enclosure" (of Vritra, Vala) and diye-snūtyos "impeller of streams" (the liberated rivers, corresponding to Vedic apam ajas "agitator of the waters"), which resulted in the Greek gods Triptolemos and Dionysos. Kingdom of Mitanni Mitanni (cuneiform KUR URUMi-it-ta-ni, also Mittani Mi-ta-an-ni, in Assyrian sources Hanigalbat, Khanigalbat cuneiform Ḫa-ni-gal-bat ) was a Hurrian kingdom in northern Mesopotamia from ca. ... For other uses, see God of Thunder (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... In Slavic mythology, Perun (with many spelling and pronunciation variants among modern Slavic languages) is the highest god of the pantheon and the god of thunder and lightning. ... Ancient anthropomorphic Ukrainian stone stela (Kernosovka stela), possibly depicting a late Proto-Indo-European god, most likely Dyeus The existence of similarities among the deities and religious practices of the Indo-European peoples allows glimpses of a common Proto-Indo-European religion and mythology. ... Graeco-Aryan refers to a hypothesis that the Proto-Greek and the Proto-Indo-Iranian languages share a common history separate from the remaining Indo-European languages. ... In the early Vedic religion, Vritra (Sanskrit: वृत्र (DevanāgarÄ«) or (IAST)) the enveloper, was an Asura and also a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra. ... Vala can refer to: Völva, a priestess in Norse mythology a Scandinavian earth spirit a poem, Vala, or the Four Zoas, by William Blake Vala (Vedic), a demon or a stone cavern in the Rigveda Vala is a place on the island of Aegina Vala, a former princely state... Triptolemus (threefold warrior; also Buzyges), in Greek mythology always connected with Demeter of the Eleusinian Mysteries, might be accounted the son of King Celeus of Eleusis in Attica, or, according to Apollodorus (Library I.v. ... Bacchus by Caravaggio Dionysus, the name of a god, is occasionally confused with one of several historical figures named Dionysius. ...


In the religious practices of the foundation of Hinduism, i.e. Vedic civilization, Indra has prominence over the continuation of chief god of the Indo-European pantheon Dyēus (Dyēus appears in the Vedas as Dyaus Pita, a relatively minor deity who, interestingly, is the father of Indra). Compare to this the relatively low status of Tyr compared to Odin or Thor in Norse paganism. The battle between Indra and Vritra is reflected in the Avesta[citation needed], but only among the Indo-Aryans does Indra appear to have risen to the head of the pantheon. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... *DyÄ“us is the reconstructed chief god of the Proto-Indo-European pantheon. ... Veda redirects here. ... In the Vedic religion is Akasha, the Sky Father, husband of Prithvi and father of Agni and Indra (RV 4. ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... For other meanings of Odin,Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... Norse paganism or Nordic religion is a termed used to abbreviate the religion preferably amongst the Germanic tribes living in Nordic countries under pre-Christian period that are supported by archaeology findings and early written materials. ... In the early Vedic religion, Vritra (Sanskrit: वृत्र (DevanāgarÄ«) or (IAST)) the enveloper, was an Asura and also a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra. ... See Avesta Municipality for the Swedish town Yasna 28. ...


Indra in the Rig Veda

The Rig-Veda states, The Rig Veda ऋग्वेद (Sanskrit ṛgveda from ṛc praise + veda knowledge) is a collection of hymns(each hymn is called a Rucha.) counted among the four Hindu religious scriptures known as the Vedas, and contains the oldest texts preserved in any Indo-Iranian language. ...

He under whose supreme control are horses, all chariots, the villages, and cattle;
He who gave being to the Sun and Morning, who leads the waters, He, O men, is Indra. (2.12.7, trans. Griffith) Ralph Thomas Hotchkin Griffith (1826-1906), scholar of indology, translated the vedic scriptures into English. ...

It further states,

Indra, you lifted up the outcast who was oppressed, you glorified the blind and the lame.” (Rg-Veda 2:13:12)[1]

Indra is the chief god of the Rigveda (besides Agni). He delights in drinking Soma, and the central Vedic myth is his heroic defeat of Vritra, liberating the rivers, or alternatively, his smashing of the Vala, a stone enclosure where the Panis had imprisoned the cows, and Ushas (dawn). He is the god of war, smashing the stone fortresses of the Dasyu, and invoked by combatants on both sides in the Battle of the Ten Kings. Rig veda is the oldest text in the world. ... Chinese (Wu Xing) Japanese (Godai) Earth (地) | Water (æ°´) | Fire (火) | Air / Wind (風) | Void / Sky / Heaven (空) Hinduism (Tattva) and Buddhism (MahābhÅ«ta) Vayu / Pavan — Air / Wind Agni / Tejas — Fire Akasha — Aether Prithvi / Bhumi — Earth Ap / Jala — Water Bön New Zealand Agni is a Hindu and Vedic deity. ... This article is about the Vedic plant and ritual. ... Vedic mythology that occupies a pivotal position in the history of religions, is a significant aspect of Hindu mythology and has directly contributed to the evolution and development of Hinduism. ... In the early Vedic religion, Vritra (Sanskrit: वृत्र (DevanāgarÄ«) or (IAST)) the enveloper, was an Asura and also a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra. ... Rivers play a prominent part in the hymns of the Rigveda, and consequently in early Vedic religion. ... Vala (), meaning enclosure in Vedic Sanskrit, is an Asura of the Rigveda and the Atharvaveda, the brother of Vrtra. ... The Panis are a class of demons in the Rigveda, from paṇi-, a term for bargainer, miser, niggard, especially applied to one who is sparing of sacrificial oblations. ... Ushas (उषः úṣas-), Sanskrit for dawn, is the chief goddess (sometimes imagined as several goddesses, Dawns) exalted in the Rigveda. ... The Dasa are a tribe identified as the enemies of the Aryans in the Rig-Veda. ... Combatants Trtsu (Indo-Aryans) Alinas (Nuristanis?) Anu (Kashmiris) Bhrigus (Indo-Aryans) Bhalanas (Khorasans) Dasa (Dahae?) Druhyus (Ghandaris) Matsya (Indo-Aryans) Parsu (Persians?) Purus (Indo-Aryans) Panis (Parni?) Commanders King Sudas Vasishtha The Ten Kings Vishvamitra Strength Unknown but less More than 6,666 Casualties Unknown but less 6,666 (Mandala...

Indra as depicted in Yakshagana, popular folk art of Karnataka
Indra as depicted in Yakshagana, popular folk art of Karnataka

The Rig-Veda frequently refers to him as Śakra - the mighty-one. In the Vedic period, the number of gods was assumed to be thirty-three and Indra was their lord. (The slightly later Brihad-aranyaka Upanishad enumerates the gods as the eight Vasus, the eleven Rudras, the twelve Adityas, Indra and Prajapati). As lord of the Vasus, Indra was also referred to as Vāsava. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A Yakshagana artist wearing pagaDe, one type of head-wear. ... , Karnataka (Kannada: , IPA:  ) is a state in the southern part of India. ...


By the age of the Vedanta, Indra became the prototype for all lords and thus a king could be called Mānavendra (Indra or lord of men) and Rama, the hero of the Ramayana, was referred to as Rāghavendra (Indra of the clan of Raghu). Hence the original Indra was also referred to as Devendra (Indra of the Devas). However, Sakra and Vasava were used exclusively for the original Indra. Though, modern texts usually adhere to the name Indra, the traditional Hindu texts (the Vedas, epics and Puranas) use Indra, Sakra and Vasava interchangeably and with the same frequency. This article is about the Hindu philosophy. ... Rama ( in IAST, in DevanāgarÄ«) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ...


"Of the Vedas I am the Sama Veda; of the demigods I am Indra, the king of heaven; of the senses I am the mind; and in living beings I am the living force [consciousness]." (Bhagavad Gita 10.22) [1]


Status and function

Indra is an important god in many Hindu mythological tales. He leads the Devas (the gods who form and maintain Heaven and the elements, such as Agni (Fire), Varuna (Water) and Surya (Sun)), and constantly wages war against the demonic Asuras of the netherworlds, or Patala, who oppose morality and dharma. He thus fights in the timeless battle between good and evil. As the God of War, he is also regarded as one of the Guardians of the directions, representing the east. For other uses, see Deva (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... Chinese (Wu Xing) Japanese (Godai) Earth (地) | Water (水) | Fire (火) | Air / Wind (風) | Void / Sky / Heaven (空) Hinduism (Tattva) and Buddhism (Mahābhūta) Vayu / Pavan — Air / Wind Agni / Tejas — Fire Akasha — Aether Prithvi / Bhumi — Earth Ap / Jala — Water Bön New Zealand Agni is a Hindu and Vedic deity. ... In Vedic religion, Varuna (Devanagari:वरुण, IAST:) is a god of the sky, of rain and of the celestial ocean, as well as a god of law and of the underworld. ... In Hinduism, Surya (Devanagari: सूर्य, sūrya) is the chief solar deity,one of the Adityas, son of Kasyapa and one of his wife Aditi[1] ,in Nordics Tyr he is said to be the son of Dyaus Pitar. ... // In Hinduism In Hindu mythology, the Asura (Sanskrit: असुर) are a group of power-seeking deities, sometimes misleadingly referred to as demons. ... Patala is a town and a nagar panchayat in Ghaziabad district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... The Guardians of the Directions (Sanskrit Aṣṭa-Dikpālas) are the deities who rule the eight directions of space according to Hinduism and Vajrayāna Buddhism - especially Kālacakra. ...


Modern Hindus, however tend to see Indra as minor deity in comparison to others in the Hindu pathenon, such as Shiva, Vishnu or Devi. A Puranic story illustrating the subjugation of Indra's pride is illustrated in the story of Govardhan hill where Krishna, avatar or incarnation of Vishnu carried the hill and protected his devotees when Indra, angered by non-worship of him, launched rains over the village. For other uses, see Siva (disambiguation). ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... It has been suggested that Shri Vidya be merged into this article or section. ... Krishna holding Govardhan hill from Smithsonian Institute’s collections Govardhan hill, literal meaning the increasing cattle, was the name of a mythical hill near Vrindavan. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... The ten avatars of Vishnu, copyright BBT In Hindu philosophy, an avatar (also spelt as avatara) (Sanskrit: , ), most commonly refers to the incarnation (bodily manifestation) of a higher being (deva), or the Supreme Being (God) onto planet Earth. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ...


Characteristics

Detail of the Phra Prang, the central tower of the Wat Arun ("Temple of Dawn") in Bangkok, Thailand - showing Indra on his three-headed elephant Erawan (Airavata).
Detail of the Phra Prang, the central tower of the Wat Arun ("Temple of Dawn") in Bangkok, Thailand - showing Indra on his three-headed elephant Erawan (Airavata).

In RigVeda, Indra is repeatedly described as a fair skinned person: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 390 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (564 × 867 pixel, file size: 189 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Detail of the Phra Prang, the central tower, of the Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn) in Bangkok, Thailand - showing god en:Indra and... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 390 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (564 × 867 pixel, file size: 189 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Detail of the Phra Prang, the central tower, of the Wat Arun (Temple of Dawn) in Bangkok, Thailand - showing god en:Indra and... Wat Arun at Chao Phraya River Wat Arun (Thai: , Temple of the Dawn) is a buddhist temple (wat) in Bangkok, Thailand. ... Location within in Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governer Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ... In Hinduism, Airavata (ऐरावत) is a white elephant who carries Lord Indra. ... Rig veda is the oldest text in the world. ...


"Fair cheeks hath Indra, Maghavan, the Victor, Lord of a great host, Stormer, strong in action. What once thou didst in might when mortals vexed thee, where now, O Bull, are those thy hero exploits?" (RigVeda, Book 3, Hymn XXX: Griffith)[2]


"May the strong Heaven make thee the Strong wax stronger: Strong, for thou art borne by thy two strong Bay Horses. So, fair of cheek, with mighty chariot, mighty, uphold us, strong-willed, thunderarmed, in battle." (RigVeda, Book 5, Hymn XXXVI: Grffith)[3]


Indra's weapon, which he used to kill Vritra, (with the help of other gods), is the thunderbolt (Vajra), though he also uses a bow, a net and a hook. He rides a large, four-tusked white elephant called Airavata. When portrayed having four arms, he has lances in two of his hands which resemble elephant goads. When he is shown to have two, he holds the Vajra and a bow .[4] In the early Vedic religion, Vritra (Sanskrit: वृत्र (Devanāgarī) or (IAST)) the enveloper, was an Asura and also a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra. ... Vajrasattva holds the vajra in his right hand and a bell in his left hand. ... This article is about the projectile weapon bow. ... Indras net (also called Indras jewels or Indras pearls) is a metaphor used to illustrate the concepts of emptiness,[1] dependent origination[2], and interpenetration[3] in Buddhist philosophy. ... In Hinduism, Airavata (ऐरावत) is a white elephant who carries Lord Indra. ...


Indra lives in Svarga in the clouds around Mt. Meru. Deceased warriors go to his hall after death, where they live without sadness, pain or fear. They watch the Apsaras and the Gandharvas dance, and play games. The gods of the elements, celestial sages, great kings and warriors enrich his court. In Hinduism, (Sanskrit: स्वर्ग) Svarga (or Swarga) is set of nether worlds located on Mt. ... Mount Meru is a sacred mountain in Hindu mythology which is believed to be the abode of Brahma and other gods. ... An apsaras from the Longmen Grottoes in Luoyang, China. ... In Hinduism, the Gandharvas are male nature spirits, husbands of the Apsaras. ...


Relations with other gods

He is married to Indrani (whose father, Puloman, Indra killed), and is the father of Arjuna (by Kunti), Jayanta, Midhusa, Nilambara, Khamla, Rbhus, Rsabha. Indra is also the father of Vali and brother to Surya. He is attended to by the Maruts (and the Vasus), children of Diti (mother of demons) and Rudra. Indra had slayed Diti's previous wicked children, so she hoped her son would be more powerful than him and kept herself pregnant for a century, practicing magic to aid her fetal son. When Indra discovered this, he threw a thunderbolt at her and shattered the fetus into 7 or 49 parts; each part regenerated into a complete individual, and the parts grew into the Maruts, a group of storm gods, who are less powerful than Indra. In Hinduism (specifically, early Vedic accounts), Sachi (also known as Indrani (queen of Indra), Aindri, Mahendri and Paulomi) is the goddess of wrath and jealousy, and a daughter of Puloman, a demon who was killed by Indranis future husband, Indra. ... According to the Hindu religion, the demon Puloman is the father of Indrani (Indras wife) and Sivasri, who ruled the kingdom for seven years. ... For other uses, please see Arjun. ... In Hinduism, Princess Kunti is the mother of the Pandavas. ... In Hinduism, the Rbhus (singular Rbhu) are the gods of crafts, artisans, horses and also solar deities. ... Rsabha, the bull, a Hindu god mentioned in epic and Puranic literature, is an unusual avatar of Vishnu. ... In Hindu mythology, Vali was the monkey-King of Kishkindha, a son of Indra and the elder brother of Sugriva. ... In Hinduism, Surya (Devanagari: सूर्य, sūrya) is the chief solar deity,one of the Adityas, son of Kasyapa and one of his wife Aditi[1] ,in Nordics Tyr he is said to be the son of Dyaus Pitar. ... In Hinduism the Maruts, also known as the Marutgana and the Rudras, are storm deities and sons of Rudra and Diti and attendants of Indra. ... In Hinduism, the Vasus are attendant deities of Indra, and later Vishnu. ... In Hinduism, Diti is an earth goddess and mother of the Maruts with Rudra. ... Rudra (Sanskrit: रुद्रः) (Howler) is a Rigvedic God of the storm, the hunt, death, Nature and the Wind. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ...


Stories about Indra

Indra is not a perfect being, and is ascribed with more human characteristics and vices than any other Vedic deity. Perhaps consequently, he also has the most hymns dedicated to him: 250 (Masson-Oursel and Morin, 326). A well-known story about Indra tells of a sin that he committed and how he was punished for it.


Indra and Vritra

Vritra, an asura, stole all the water in the world and Indra drank much Soma to prepare himself for the battle with the huge serpent. He passed through Vritra's ninety-nine fortresses, slew the monster and brought water back to Earth. In the early Vedic religion, Vritra (Sanskrit: वृत्र (Devanāgarī) or (IAST)) the enveloper, was an Asura and also a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra. ... // In Hinduism In Hindu mythology, the Asura (Sanskrit: असुर) are a group of power-seeking deities, sometimes misleadingly referred to as demons. ... This article is about the Vedic plant and ritual. ...


In a later version of the story, Vritra was created by Tvashtri to get revenge for Indra's murder of his son, Trisiras, a pious Brahmin whose increase of power worried Indra. Vritra won the battle and swallowed Indra, but the other gods forced him to vomit Indra out. The battle continued and Indra fled. Vishnu and the Rishis brokered a truce, and Indra swore he would not attack Vritra with anything made of metal, wood or stone, nor anything that was dry or wet, or during the day or the night. Indra used the foam from the waves of the ocean to kill him at twilight. In Hinduism, Tvashtri is the god of craftsmen and a son of Surya and Adita (however, according to village sources, Tvashtri has no father nor does he have a mother, and that he is the father of Vishnu). ... In Hinduism, Trisiras is the three-headed son of Tvashtri. ... The term Brahmin denotes both a member of the priestly class in the Hindu varna system, and a member of the highest caste in the caste system of Hindu society. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... A rishi (Sanskrit ऋषि: ) is a Hindu saint or sage. ...


In yet another version, recounted in the Mahabharata, Vritra was a Brahmin who got hold of supernatural powers, went rogue and became a danger to the gods. Indra had to intervene, and slew him after a hard fight. A horrible goddess named Brāhmanahatya (the personified sin of Brahmin murder) came from the dead corpse of Vritra and pursued Indra, who hid inside a lotus flower. Indra went to Brahma and begged forgiveness for having killed a Brahmin. "Vajrayudha" which Indra possessed is believed to be prepared from backbone of a sage Dadhichi to kill Asuras. For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... In the early Vedic religion, Vritra (Sanskrit: वृत्र (DevanāgarÄ«) or (IAST)) the enveloper, was an Asura and also a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra. ... For the 1934 film, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... Brāhmanahatya is Sanskrit for the act of killing a Brahmin. Hindus consider this act to be a major sin, even more then ordinary murder. ... In the early Vedic religion, Vritra (Sanskrit: वृत्र (DevanāgarÄ«) or (IAST)) the enveloper, was an Asura and also a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra. ... This article concerns the Hindu creator god, Brahma. ...


Ahalya's curse

Indra had an affair with Ahalya, wife of Gautama Maharishi. He was punished by Gautama with a curse that one thousand vaginas would cover his body in a grotesque and vulgar display, and that his reign as king of the gods would meet with disaster and catastrophe.[2] Gautama later commuted the curse, upon the pleading of Brahma, to one thousand eyes instead. Ahalya (Sanskrit: अहल्या, ahalyā) was the wife of Rishi Gautama. ... // Great Seer Gautama Maharishi was one of the Maharishis of Vedic times, known to have been the discoverer of Mantras -- Mantra-drashtaa, in Sanskrit. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with saptarshi. ... The vagina, (from Latin, literally sheath or scabbard ) is the tubular tract leading from the uterus to the exterior of the body in female placental mammals and marsupials, or to the cloaca in female birds, monotremes, and some reptiles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Due to this sin Indra's throne remains insecure forever. He is repeatedly humiliated by demonic kings like Ravana of Lanka, whose son Indrajit (whose name means victor over Indra) bound Indra in serpent nooses and dragged him across Lanka in a humiliating display. Indrajit released Indra when Brahma convinced him to do so in exchange for celestial weapons, but Indra, as the defeated, had to pay tribute and accept Ravana's supremacy. Indra realized the consequences of his sin, and was later avenged by the Avatara of Vishnu, Rama, who slew Ravana to deliver the three worlds from evil, as described in the epic Ramayana. A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka A great tamil king. ... Victory of Meghanada. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... See Avatar (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... Rama ( in IAST, in Devanāgarī) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka A great tamil king. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ...

See also: Rukmangada, Tulsi

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Ocimum tenuiflorum L. Synonyms Ocimum sanctum L. The Tulsi (also known as Tulasi) plant or Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) is an important symbol in many Hindu religious traditions. ...

Indra and the Ants

In a story from the Brahmavaivarta Purana[5][6], Indra defeats Vritra and releases the waters. Elevated to the rank of King of the Gods, Indra orders the heavenly craftsman, Vishvakarma, to build him a grand palace. Full of pride, Indra continues to demand more and more improvements for the palace. At last, exhausted, Vishvakarma asks Brahma the Creator for help. Brahman in turn appeals to Vishnu, the Supreme Being. Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ...


Vishnu visits Indra's palace in the form of a brahmin boy; Indra welcomes him in. Vishnu praises Indra's palace, casually adding that no former Indra had succeeded in building such a palace. At first, Indra is amused by the brahmin boy's claim to know of former Indras. But the amusement turns to horror as the boy tells about Indra's ancestors, about the great cycles of creation and destruction, and even about the infinite number of worlds scattered through the void, each with its own Indra. The boy claims to have seen them all. During the boy's speech, a procession of ants had entered the hall. The boy saw the ants and laughed. Finally humbled, Indra asks the boy why he laughed. The boy reveals that the ants are all former Indras.


Another visitor enters the hall. He is Shiva, in the form of a hermit. On his chest lies a circular cluster of hairs, intact at the circumference but with a gap in the middle. Shiva reveals that each of these chest hairs corresponds to the life of one Indra. Each time a hair falls, one Indra dies and another replaces him.


No longer interested in wealth and honor, Indra rewards Vishvakarma and releases him from any further work on the palace. Indra himself decides to leave his life of luxury to become a hermit and seek wisdom. Horrified, Indra's wife Shachi asks the priest Brihaspati to change her husband's mind. He teaches Indra to see the virtues of both the spiritual life and the worldly life. Thus, at the end of the story, Indra learns how to pursue wisdom while still fulfilling his kingly duties.


The 14 Indras

Each Manu rules during an eon called a Manvantara. 14 Manvantaras make up a Kalpa, a period corresponding to a day in the life of Brahma. Every Manvantara has a different Indra. The list is according to Vishnu Purana(Chapters 3.1 and 3.2): In Hinduism, Manu is a title accorded the progenitor of humankind, first king to rule this earth, who saves mankind from the universal flood. ...

Manvatara/Manu Indra
Svayambhuva Yajna (Avatar of Vishnu)
Swarochish Vipaschit
Uttam Sushaanti
Taamas Shibi
Raivat Vibhu
Chaakshush Manojav
Shraaddhdev Purandar (the present Indra)
Savarni Bali
Daksha Saavarni Adbhut
Brahma Saavarni Shanti
Dharma Saavarni Vish
Rudraputra Saavarni Ritudhaama
Ruchi (Deva Saavarni) Devaspati
Bhaum (Indra Saavarni) Suchi

In Hinduism, Yajna (Devanagari यज्ञ IAST ; also anglicized as Yagna or Yagya) is a ritual of sacrifice (Monier-Williams gives the meanings worship, prayer, praise; offering, oblation, sacrifice) more commonly practised during Vedic times. ... The ten avatars of Vishnu, copyright BBT In Hindu philosophy, an avatar (also spelt as avatara) (Sanskrit: , ), most commonly refers to the incarnation (bodily manifestation) of a higher being (deva), or the Supreme Being (God) onto planet Earth. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... King Shibi Chakravati was a famous Hindu mythological king. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

In Zoroastrianism

Indra does not occur in the Zoroastrian texts composed before the 3th century BCE. In the Vendidad, the youngest texts of the Avesta, Indra is one of the six chief demons that are seen to stand opposite the six Amesha Spentas. In this sextet, Indra is the direct enemy of Asha Vahishta, and so the opponent of asha (Vedic rta), order, truth, and righteousness. (Vd. 10.9) Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... See Avesta Municipality for the Swedish town Faravahar, believed to be a depiction of a Farvashi, as mentioned in the Yasna, Yashts and Vendidad The Avesta is a collection of the sacred texts of the Mazdaist (Zoroastrian) religion. ... See Avesta Municipality for the Swedish town Yasna 28. ... In Zoroastrianism, Amesha Spentas are the Holy Immortals, the equivalent of Archangels in Christian theology. ... In Vedic Sanskrit, Rta literally means the course of things. ... RTA is a TLA that could mean: Chicagos Regional Transportation Authority (AAR reporting mark RTA) Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority Road Traffic Accident, see car accident Roads and Traffic Authority, in New South Wales, Australia Renal Tubular Acidosis Riverside Transit Agency, in Riverside County, California Rewriting Techniques and Applications...


Similarly, in the Denkard, a 9th century CE Middle Persian text, Indra is the arch-demon that "is the spirit of apostasy and further deceives the worldly existence of mankind" (9.3). In the Bundahishn, a Zoroastrian account of creation completed in the 12th century CE, Indra "freezes the minds of the creatures from practicing righteousness just like much frozen snow. He instills this into the minds of men that they ought not to have the sacred shirt and thread girdle" (Gbd. 27.6). At the renovation of the universe Indra will be defeated by Asha Vahishta (Gbd. 34.27) The Denkard is the largest encyclopedia of Zoroastrianism written in 9th century. ... Pahlavi is a term that refers: (1) to a script used in Iran derived from the Aramaic script, and (2) more broadly, to Middle Persian, the Middle Iranian language written in this script. ...


In Buddhism, Jainism and Chinese religion

Indra (alias Sakra) and Sachi Riding the Divine Elephant Airavata, Folio from a Jain text, Panchakalyanaka (Five Auspicious Events in the Life of Jina Rishabhanatha [Adinatha]), circa 1670-1680, Painting in LACMA museum, originally from Amber, Rajasthan
Indra (alias Sakra) and Sachi Riding the Divine Elephant Airavata, Folio from a Jain text, Panchakalyanaka (Five Auspicious Events in the Life of Jina Rishabhanatha [Adinatha]), circa 1670-1680, Painting in LACMA museum, originally from Amber, Rajasthan
Main article: Sakra

In Buddhist and Jain texts, Indra is commonly called by his other name Śakra, ruler of the Trāyastriṃśa heaven. Śakra is, however, sometimes given the title Indra, or, more commonly, Devānām Indra, "Lord of the Devas". In East Asian Buddhist countries such as China, Korea and Japan, he is known as 帝釈天 (Jp: Taishakuten). Some Buddhists have also even interpreted that the Jade Emperor is another interpretation of Indra. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... In Hinduism, Airavata (ऐरावत) is a white elephant who carries Lord Indra. ... In Jainism, Rishabha Dev (ऋषभदेव) or Adinatha (other names used: Riá¹£habh, Riá¹£habhanāth, Rushabh, Rushabhdev, Adinath or Adishwar; Sanskrit ṛṣabha meaning best, most excellent besides bull) was the first of the 24 Tirthankara. ... The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, also known as LACMA, is the official art museum of the County of Los Angeles, California. ... Amber Fort Interior of one of the palaces in Amber Fort Amber is a ruined city of Rajasthan state, India. ... , Rājasthān (DevanāgarÄ«: राजस्थान, IPA: )   is the largest state of the Republic of India in terms of area. ... Åšakra (Sanskrit) or Sakka (Pāli) (zh: 帝釋天尊) is a name of a deity mentioned in Vedic religion, Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism. ... Åšakra (Sanskrit) or Sakka Pāli is the ruler of the Heaven of the Thirty-three gods in Buddhist cosmology. ... The (Sanskrit; Pāli ) heaven is an important world of the devas in Buddhist cosmology. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... The Jade Emperor (Chinese: ; pinyin: or 玉帝 Yù Dì), are known by many names including Heavenly Grandfather (天公 Tiān Gōng), the Pure August Jade Emperor, August Personage of Jade (玉皇上帝 Yu Huang Shangdi or 玉皇大帝 Yu Huang Dadi), is formally known as Peace-Absolving Central-August-Spirit Exalted-Ancient-Buddha-Most-Pious...


In Jainism, Indra awards a golden robe to Mahavira, and later welcomes him into heaven. Jain and Jaina redirect here. ... Idol of Lord Mahavira at Shri Mahaveerji (the holy town in Rajasthan named after Mahavira. ...


The ceremonial name of Bangkok claims that the city was "given by Indra and built by Vishnukam." The provincial seal of Surin province in Thailand, is an image of Indra atop Airavata. Location within in Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governer Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... Surin (Thai: ) is one of the north-eastern provinces (changwat) of Thailand. ... In Hinduism, Airavata (ऐरावत) is a white elephant who carries Lord Indra. ...


See also

There are 1028 hymns in the Rigveda, most of them dedicated to specific deities. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as murtis. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Le roi de Lahore is an opera in five acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Louis Gallet. ... Jules Massenet Jules (Émile Frédéric) Massenet (May 12, 1842 – August 13, 1912) was a French composer. ... Victory of Meghanada. ...

References

  1. ^ "Indra and Shiva" by KOENRAAD ELST
  2. ^ http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/rigveda/rv03030.htm
  3. ^ http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/rigveda/rv05036.htm
  4. ^ (Masson-Oursel and Morin, 326).
  5. ^ Zimmer, Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization, ed. Joseph Campbell (New York: Harper Torchbooks, 1962), p. 3-11
  6. ^ webadept-ga, "Re: Religion and Suffering," 07 Jan 2003 21:26 PST, Google Answers, 28 March 2007 <http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=138918>
  1. Masson-Oursel, P.; Morin, Louise (1976). "Indian Mythology." In New Larousse Encyclopedia of Mythology, pp. 325-359. New York: The Hamlyn Pulishing Group.
  • Janda, M., Eleusis, das indogermanische Erbe der Mysterien (1998).

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Indra (1415 words)
Indra is mentioned as having a wife, and the name of Indrani or Aindri is invoked among the goddesses.
Indra was greatly enraged at this, and sent a deluge of rain to overwhelm them; but Krishna lifted up the mountain Govardhana on his finger to shelter them, and so held it for seven days, till Indra was baffled and rendered homage to Krishna.
Among the deeds of Indra recorded in the Puranas is that of the destruction of the offspring of Diti in her womb, and the production therefrom of the Maruts (see Diti); and there is a story of his cutting off the wings of the mountains with his thunderbolts, because they were refractory and troublesome.
Indra (764 words)
Indra held court at Svarga, his heaven in the clouds surrounding the highest peak of the sacred mountain Meru.
Indra also suffered such indignities as Krishna showing himself to be immune to Indra's storm and supplanted himself onto Indra's worshipers.
Indra eventually was given the role of weather god and lord of the lesser gods.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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