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Encyclopedia > Indosphere
Dark blue: the Indian subcontinent, Light Blue: Other countries culturally linked to India, notably Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Indonesia and Malaysia, Purple: Regions not included in Indosphere, but with significant current or historical Indian cultural influence, notably Afghanistan, Tibet, Yunnan and Baluchistan region.

Indosphere, as defined by linguist James Matisoff, refers to areas of Indian linguistic and cultural influence in Southeast Asia.[1] It is commonly used in areal linguistics to contrast with Sinosphere, which refers to the cultures and languages influenced by proximity to China. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Map of South Asia (see note) This article deals with the geophysical region in Asia. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... Yunan redirects here. ... Major ethnic groups in Pakistan and surrounding areas, in 1980. ... James A. Matisoff (born July 14, 1937) is a professor emeritus of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley and noted authority on Tibeto-Burman languages and other languages of mainland Southeast Asia. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... In linguistics, an areal feature is any typological feature shared by languages within the same geographical area. ... Greater China, Singapore, and countries culturally linked to Chinese culture. ...

Contents

Definition and context

Indosphere languages covers most of India and Pakistan, as well as Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and much of Mainland Southeast Asia (MSEA) (defined as the region encompassing Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, and Thailand, and parts of Burma, Peninsular Malaysia and Yunnan). Related scripts are also found in South East Asian islands ramging from Sumatra, Java, Bali, south Sulawesi and parts of the Philippines.[2] Cultures and languages in MESA have long been in contact with adjoining cultures of India and China and thus influenced by them. Depending upon the dominant political, religious and cultural influence, linguists and anthropologists divide MSEA into the two distinct classes, Indosphere and Sinosphere.[3]. Thus Indosphere is defined as: Yunan redirects here. ... For other uses, see Sumatra (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Java island. ... This article is about the Indonesian island. ... Sulawesi (formerly more commonly known as Celebes, IPA: a Portuguese-originated form of the name) is one of the four larger Sunda Islands of Indonesia and is situated between Borneo and the Maluku Islands. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Greater China, Singapore, and countries culturally linked to Chinese culture. ...

a socio-political sphere of MSEA, subsuming those countries, cultures, and languages that have historically come under influence from the politics, culture, religion, and languages of India (notably, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma)

N. J. Enfield[3]

According to Enfield, long term lexical diffusion between languages belonging to five major language families, in addition to genealogical inheritance, has resulted in extensive parallels in linguistic structures of the languages of the region. [3] In historical linguistics, lexical diffusion is both a phenomenon and a theory. ... Inheritance may refer to: Inheritance, the practice of passing on property, titles, debts, and obligations after death. ...


See also

A Sprachbund (German for language bond, also known as a linguistic area, convergence area, diffusion area) is a group of languages that have become similar in some way because of geographical proximity. ...

References

  1. ^ Matisoff, James (1990), "On Megalocomparison", Language 66 (1): 106-120, <http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0097-8507%28199003%2966%3A1%3C106%3AOM%3E2.0.CO%3B2-H>
  2. ^ Martin Haspelmath, The World Atlas of Language Structures, page 569, Oxford University Press, 2005, ISBN 0199255911
  3. ^ a b c Enfield, N. J. (2005), "Areal Linguistics and Mainland Southeast Asia", Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 34: 181–206, <http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev.anthro.34.081804.120406>

James A. Matisoff (born July 14, 1937) is a professor emeritus of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley and noted authority on Tibeto-Burman languages and other languages of mainland Southeast Asia. ...

Further reading

  • Language variation: Papers on variation and change in the Sinosphere and in the Indosphere in honor of James A. Matisoff, David Bradley, Randy J. LaPolla and Boyd Michailovsky eds., pp. 113–144. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Ankerl, Guy: Coexisting Contemporary Civilizations: Arabo-Muslim, Bharati, Chinese, and Western. Geneva: INUPRESS, (2000), ISBN 2881550045

External links


 
 

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