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Encyclopedia > Indianapolis, Indiana
City of Indianapolis
Flag of City of Indianapolis
Flag
Official seal of City of Indianapolis
Seal
Nickname: Indy, The Circle City, The Crossroads of America, The Racing Capital of the World, Naptown
Location in the state of Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Coordinates: 39°46′5.88″N 86°9′29.52″W / 39.7683, -86.1582
Country United States
State Indiana
County Marion
Founded 1821
Government
 - Type Mayor-Council
 - Mayor Greg Ballard (R)
 - Governing body City Council
Area
 - City 372 sq mi (963.5 km²)
 - Land 365.1 sq mi (945.6 km²)
 - Water 6.9 sq mi (17.9 km²)
Elevation 715 ft (218 m)
Population (2006)[1]
 - City 785,597
 - Density 2,152/sq mi (837/km²)
 - Urban 1,219,000
 - Metro 1,984,644 (2,006 CSA est.)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 317
FIPS code 18-36003[2]
Website: www.indygov.org

Indianapolis (pronounced /ˌɪndiəˈnæpəlɪs/) is the capital city of the U.S. state of Indiana, and the county seat of Marion County, Indiana. The 2000 Census counted the city's population (excluding included towns) at 781,870. It is Indiana's most populous city and is the 13th largest city in the U.S., the third largest city in the Midwest, and the second most populous Capital in the U.S., behind Phoenix, Arizona. Indianapolis is the name of three municipalities in the United States. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Indianapolis. ... The flag of Indianapolis, Indiana, ratio unknown The flag of the Indianapolis, Indiana was adopted on May 20, 1963. ... Image File history File links Seal of the City of Indianapolis, IN. This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Image File history File links Marion_County_Indiana_Incorporated_and_Unincorporated_areas_Indianapolis_Highlighted. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Listed are the 92 counties of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Marion County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... 1847 - 1849 Samuel Henderson 1849 - 1851 Horatio C. Newcomb 1851 - 1854 Caleb Scudder 1854 - 1856 James McCready 1856 - 1856 Henry F. West 1856 - 1856 Charles G. Coulon 1856 - 1858 William J. Wallace 1858 - 1863 Samuel D. Maxwell 1863 - 1867 John Caven (1st time) 1867 - 1873 Daniel McCauley 1873 - 1875 James... GOP redirects here. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... North American Area Code 317 serves the Indianapolis area in central Indiana. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Marion County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Indianapolis (balance) is a statistical entity defined by the United States Census Bureau to represent a portion of the consolidated Indianapolis-Marion County metropolitan government. ... Ten most populous cities in the United States Los Angeles San Jose San Diego Phoenix Chicago New York City Houston San Antonio Dallas Philadelphia The following is a list of the most populous incorporated places in the United States. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ...


Like many other Rust Belt cities, Indianapolis has diversified its economic base in order to avoid relying solely on manufacturing. A large part of this diversification includes the hosting of events, especially sporting events. The labels of The Amateur Sports Capital of the World, and The Racing Capital of the World, have both been applied to Indianapolis. The city has hosted the 1987 Pan American Games, both Men's and Women's NCAA Basketball Tournaments, the Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament, the Allstate 400 at the Brickyard, the United States Grand Prix (2000-2007), the 2002 World Basketball Championship, and is perhaps most famous for the annual Indianapolis 500, known as the "Greatest Spectacle in Racing." The attendance at the Indianapolis 500 and the Allstate 400 makes them the two largest single day sporting events in the world, with well over 250,000 fans in attendance at each. Indianapolis also hosts NHRA's US National Drags just west of the city in the town of Clermont. Indianapolis has the second most monuments inside city limits, behind only Washington D.C.[citation needed]. There have also been two United States Navy vessels named after Indianapolis, including the famous USS Indianapolis (CA-35) which suffered the worst single at-sea loss of life in the history of the U.S. Navy. Manufacturing Belt, highlighted in red The Rust Belt, a term coined from Manufacturing Belt, is an area in parts of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States of America. ... The 10th Pan American Games were held in Indianapolis, United States. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... The NCAA Womens Division I Championship is an annual basketball tournament for women. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The Big Ten Conference mens basketball tournament is held annually at the end of the mens college basketball regular season. ... The Allstate 400 at The Brickyard is an annual 400-mile (644 km) NASCAR Nextel Cup points race held each August at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... The United States Grand Prix is a motor racing event which has taken place at various times since 1959 in several locations, at first as a part of the American Grand Prize series and later as a race in the Formula One World Championship. ... The FIBA World Championship (also called the Basketball World Championship) is a world basketball tournament for mens national teams held quadrennially by the International Basketball Federation (FIBA). ... Indy 500 redirects here. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... USN redirects here. ... USS Indianapolis (CA-35) was a Portland-class heavy cruiser of the United States Navy. ...


The Indianapolis metropolitan area has seen modest and steady growth among U.S. cities.[3], with growth centered in the surrounding counties of Hamilton, Hendricks, and Johnson. Hamilton and Hendricks Counties are currently the fastest growing counties in Indiana and in the Midwest, although the state as a whole is only showing modest growth.[4] Currently, the Combined Statistical Area stands at 1,984,644, making it the 23rd largest in the U.S. The Indianapolis, IN, Metropolitan Statistical Area is the 33rd largest Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States. ... County seat building in downtown Noblesville. ... Hendricks County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Johnson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines micropolitan and metropolitan statistical areas. ...

Contents

History

For more details on this topic, see History of Indianapolis.

Indianapolis was selected as the site of the new state capital in 1820. Jeremiah Sullivan, a judge of the Indiana Supreme Court, invented the name Indianapolis by joining Indiana with polis, the Greek word for city; literally, Indianapolis means "Indiana City". The city was founded on the White River under the incorrect assumption that the river would serve as a major transportation artery; however, the waterway was too sandy for trade. The capital moved from Corydon on January 10, 1825 and the state commissioned Alexander Ralston to design the new capital city. Ralston was an apprentice to the French architect Pierre L'Enfant, and he helped L'Enfant plan Washington, DC. Ralston's original plan for Indianapolis called for a city of only one square mile (3 km²). At the center of the city sat the Governor's Circle, a large circular commons, which was to be the site of the Governor's mansion. Meridian and Market Streets converge at the Circle and continue north and south and east and west, respectively. The Governor's mansion was eventually demolished in 1857 and in its place stands a 284-foot (87 m) tall neoclassical limestone and bronze monument, the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument. The surrounding street is now known as Monument Circle. // [edit] Early years Indianapolis was founded as the state capital in 1821 by an act of the Indiana General Assembly. ... The Supreme Court of Indiana is the highest court in the state of Indiana. ... The forks of the White River are highlighted in blue. ... The plat, or plot design, for the city of Indianapolis as designed by Ralston. ... Pierre Charles LEnfant ( 2 August 1754 – 14 June 1825) designed the street plan of the Federal City in the United States, now known as Washington, DC. Born in France, he came to the American colonies as a military engineer with General Lafayette and became closely identified with the United... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Soldiers and Sailors Monument in 2005. ... Monument Circle is a traffic circle at the center of the city of Indianapolis, Indiana (and Marion County, Indiana). ...


The city lies on the original east-west National Road. The first railroad to service Indianapolis, the Madison & Indianapolis, began operation on October 1, 1847, and subsequent railroad connections made expansive growth possible. Indianapolis was the home of the first Union Station, or common rail passenger terminal, in the United States. By the turn of the century, Indianapolis had become a heavy automobile manufacturer, rivaling the likes of Detroit. With roads leading out of the city in all directions, Indianapolis was on its way to becoming a major hub of regional transport connecting to Chicago, Louisville, Cincinnati, Columbus, Detroit, Cleveland and St. Louis, as is befitting the capital of a state whose motto is "The Crossroads of America." This same network of roads would allow quick and easy access to suburban areas in future years. Natural gas and oil deposits in the surrounding area in the late 19th century helped the economy of Indianapolis prosper. City population grew rapidly throughout the first half of the 20th century. While rapid suburbanization began to take place in the second half of the century, racial relations deteriorated. Even so, on the night that the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated, Indianapolis was the only major city in which rioting did not occur. Many credit a speech by Robert F. Kennedy, who was in town campaigning for President that night, for helping to calm the tensions. Racial tensions heightened in 1970 with the passage of Unigov, which further isolated the middle class from Indianapolis' growing African American community. Court-ordered school desegregation busing by Judge S. Hugh Dillon was also a controversial change. The Cumberland Road, also called the Great National Pike and the National Road, was the first United States federal highway. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Old main entrance (during mall era) to Union Station The Indianapolis Union Station was the first union station in the world, opening on September 20, 1853, by the Indianapolis Union Railway within the Wholesale District of Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Car redirects here. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Louisville redirects here. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Cleveland redirects here. ... St. ... The Crossroads of America is a nickname given to the state of Indiana as it, and, more specifically, the city of Indianapolis is the hub for several major Interstate highways that criss-cross the state, connecting Hoosiers to the rest of the United States. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Kennedy giving his speech. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Unigov is the name adopted by the city of Indianapolis to describe a united city and county government, adopted in 1970 by act of the Indiana state legislature. ...

In the 1970s and 1980s Indianapolis suffered at the hands of urban decay and white flight. Major revitalization of the city's blighted areas, such as Fall Creek Place, and especially the downtown, occurred in the 1990s and led to an acceleration of growth on the fringes of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Area. The city's relative flat terrain allows for easy access to areas in and around the city. Image File history File links Soldiers_Sailors_Mon_IN_1898. ... Image File history File links Soldiers_Sailors_Mon_IN_1898. ... Soldiers and Sailors Monument in 2005. ... Urban decay and renewal in Cincinnati Urban decay is the popular term for both the physical and social degeneration of cities and large towns. ... White flight is a term for the demographic trend where working- and middle-class white people move away from increasingly racial-minority inner-city neighborhoods to white suburbs and exurbs. ... Fall Creek Place is one of many gentrified neighborhoods in inner Indianapolis. ... Downtown Indianapolis, looking east from the White River The term Downtown Indianapolis refers to the central business district, or CBD, of Indianapolis, Indiana. ...


The opening of Circle Centre Mall in downtown Indianapolis signaled that revitalization continued. Currently the city is experiencing growth in the hospitality industry with the Convention Center expansion and the construction of Lucas Oil Stadium. A new Conrad Hotel has been constructed in order to add more hotel rooms. This adds to the growing list of downtown accommodations and restaurants. Indianapolis International Airport is currently building a new midfield airport terminal. Both the stadium and airport are expected to open late in 2008 with the hotel and convention center sometime in 2010.[5] Outside of Circle Centre, by Nordstrom, Carson Pirie Scott and Bentleys Circle Centre is a large indoor shopping mall located in downtown Indianapolis (just around the corner from the Soldiers and Sailors Monument). ... The Indiana Convention Center is a very large convention center located in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Lucas Oil Stadium is a retractable roof sports facility currently under construction in Indianapolis. ... The swimming pool in Conrad Hong Kong Conrad Hotels is a luxury hotel brand controlled by Hilton Hotels Corporation and is based in Beverly Hills, California. ... Midfield Terminal Project Midfield Terminal Rendering Indianapolis International Airport (IATA: IND, ICAO: KIND, FAA LID: IND) is a public airport located seven miles (11 km) southwest of the central business district of Indianapolis, a city in Marion County, Indiana, United States. ...


Geography and climate

According to the United States Census Bureau, "the balance" (that part of Marion County not part of another municipality) has a total area of 368.2 square miles (953.5 km²)—361.5 square miles (936.2 km²) of it is land and 6.7 square miles (17.3 km²) of it is water. The total area is 1.81% water. These figures are slightly misleading because they do not represent the entire Consolidated City of Indianapolis (all of Marion County, except the four excluded communities). The total area of the Consolidated City of Indianapolis, not including the four excluded communities, covers approximately 373.1 square miles (966.3 km²). The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


At the center of Indianapolis is the One-Mile Square, bounded by four appropriately-named streets: East, West, North, and South Streets. Nearly all of the streets in the Mile Square are named after U.S. states. (The exceptions are Meridian Street, which numerically divides west from east; Market Street, which intersects Meridian Street at Monument Circle; Capitol and Senate Avenues, where many of the Indiana state government buildings are located; and Washington Street, which was named after President George Washington. The street-numbering system centers not on the Circle, but rather one block to the south, where Meridian Street intersects Washington Street — National Road.) George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Map showing the route of the National Road at its greatest completion in 1839, with historical state boundaries. ...


Indianapolis is situated in the Central Till Plains region of the United States. Two natural waterways dissect the city: the White River, and Fall Creek. The forks of the White River are highlighted in blue. ...


Physically, Indianapolis is similar to many other Midwestern cities. A mix of deciduous forests and prairie covered much of what is considered Indianapolis prior to the 19th century. Land within the city limits varies from flat to gently sloping; most of the changes in elevation are so gradual that they go unnoticed, and appears to be flat from close distances. The mean elevation for Indianapolis is 717 feet (219 m). The highest point in Indianapolis lies at Crown Hill Cemetery atop Strawberry Hill (the tomb of famed Hoosier writer James Whitcomb Riley) with an elevation of 842 feet (257 m), and the lowest point in Indianapolis lies at the Marion County/Johnson County line, with an elevation of about 680 feet (207 m). The highest hill in Indianapolis is Mann Hill, a bluff located along the White River in Southwestway Park that rises about 150 feet (46 m) above the surrounding land. Variations in elevation from 700-900 feet occur throughout the city limits. There are a few moderately-sized bluffs and valleys in the city, particularly along the shores of the White River, Fall Creek, Geist Reservoir, and Eagle Creek Reservoir, and especially on the city's Northeast and Northwest sides. For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Honorary statue of James Whitcomb Riley on courthouse lawn in Greenfield, Indiana James Whitcomb Riley (Greenfield, Indiana October 7, 1849 – July 22, 1916), American writer and poet called the Hoosier poet and Americas Childrens Poet made a start writing newspaper verse in Hoosier dialect for the Indianapolis Journal... Johnson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Hills redirects here. ... Fljótsdalur in East Iceland, a rather flat valley In geology, a valley (also called a vale or dale) is a depression with predominant extent in one direction. ...


Indianapolis has a humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfa). Like most cities in the Midwest, it has four distinct seasons. Summers are hot and humid, with high temperatures approaching 90 °F (32 °C), with some days approaching or exceeding 100 °F (38 °C). Spring and autumn are usually pleasant, with temperatures reaching around 65 °F (18 °C). Spring, however, is much less predictable than autumn; midday temperature drops exceeding 30 °F (17 °C) are common during March and April, and instances of very warm days (86 °F; 30 °C) followed within 36 hours by snowfall not unheard of during these months. Winters are cool to cold, with daily highs barely inching above freezing. Temperatures occasionally fall below 0 °F (-18 °C). The rainiest months are in the spring and summer, with average rainfalls of over four inches (102 mm) per month, but these averages fluctuate only slightly throughout the year. The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ...


The city's average annual precipitation is 41 inches (1,040 mm).


The average July high is 85.6 °F (29.8 °C), with the low being 65.2 °F (18.4 °C). January highs average 34.5 °F (1.4 °C), and lows 18.5 °F (-7.5 °C). The record high for Indianapolis is 107 °F (42 °C), on July 25th, 1954. The record low is -27 °F (-33 °C), on January 19th, 1994. Average annual snowfall is 27 inches [6]. For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ...

Month[7] Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Avg high °F (°C) 35 (2) 40 (5) 51 (11) 63 (17) 74 (23) 82 (28) 86 (30) 84 (29) 77 (25) 66 (19) 52 (11) 39 (5) 62 (17)
Avg low °F (°C) 19 (−7) 23 (−5) 32 (0) 41 (5) 52 (11) 61 (16) 65 (18) 63 (17) 55 (13) 44 (7) 34 (2) 24 (−4) 43 (7)

Cityscape

Indianapolis looking north
Indianapolis looking north

High rise construction in Indianapolis started in 1888 when the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument was completed. The 284-foot (87 m) tall monument sits at the center of Indianapolis and until 1962 it was still the tallest structure in the city. Image File history File links Indy-skyline. ... Image File history File links Indy-skyline. ... Soldiers and Sailors Monument in 2005. ...


In the 1970s the city center, like many other 'Rust Belt' cities of the United States, saw decreased economic activity, racial tension, and white flight to gentrified suburbs. As a result, Downtown Indianapolis saw little new construction. The city of Indianapolis dealt with these issues by developing plans, in the 1980s, to redefine the city's downtown. Downtown Indianapolis began to develop into the state that it is today. Neighborhoods in the downtown area were designated in relation to their proximity to the city center, and plans were initiated for them to be redeveloped. A series of modern skyscrapers were constructed, including what is currently the tallest building in the state; the newly renamed Chase Tower. The third tallest building in the city; One Indiana Square, is going through an exterior make over after being damaged by high winds in April 2006.[8] Downtown Indianapolis, looking east from the White River The term Downtown Indianapolis refers to the central business district, or CBD, of Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Taipei 101, the worlds tallest skyscraper by roof height on high rise. ...

For more details on this topic, see List of tallest buildings in Indianapolis.
Rank Name Street Address Height
feet / meters
Floors Year
1 Chase Tower 111 Monument Circle 830/253 48 1990
2 OneAmerica Tower One American Square 533/162 38 1982
3 One Indiana Square 211 North Pennsylvania Street 504/154 36 1970
4 Market Tower 10 W Market St 421/128 32 1988
5 300 North Meridian 300 North Meridian St 408/124 28 1989
6 M&I Plaza 135 N Pennsylvania St 401/122 31 1988
7 City-County Building 200 E. Washington St. 372/113 28 1962
8 101 West Ohio 101 West Ohio 360/110 22 1987

A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... Built in 1990 near Monument Circle in Indianapolis, the Chase Tower (formally known as the Bank One Tower) is the tallest skyscraper in Indiana. ...

Neighborhoods

Indianapolis in the 1910s
Main article: List of Indianapolis neighborhoods
See also: Indianapolis Cultural Districts

Indianapolis has several distinct neighborhoods and cultural districts throughout the city. Indianapolis, Indiana, 1910s, from period postcard. ... Indianapolis, Indiana, 1910s, from period postcard. ... Indianapolis has designated several areas as Cultural Districts: Broad Ripple Village, Massachusetts Avenue, Fountain Square, The Wholesale District, The Canal & White River State Park, and Indiana Avenue. ...

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1840 2,692
1860 18,611
1880 75,056
1900 169,164
1920 314,194
1940 386,972
1960 476,258
1970 744,624 56.3%
1980 700,807 -5.9%
1990 731,327 4.4%
2000 781,870 6.9%
Est. 2006 785,597 [9] 0.5%

The 2006 Census estimate for Indianapolis, Balance (an unofficial area which is only a portion of the Consolidated City of Indianapolis) is 785,597. (The population of the full Consolidated City of Indianapolis contains approximately another 9,974 people--derived by adding the 2006 Census estimates for areas left out of Indianapolis, Balance and using 2000 Census data for a portion of Cumberland, Indiana included in Consolidated City of Indianapolis). The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Cumberland is a town located in Hancock County, Indiana. ...


Greater Indianapolis is a rapidly growing region located at the center of Indiana and consists of Marion County, Indiana and several adjacent counties. The Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of Indianapolis will likely exceed 2 million people in the 2007 estimate, ranking 23rd in the United States and 7th in the midwest. As a unified labor and media market, the Indianapolis Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had a 2006 population of 1.66 million people, ranking 33rd in the United States. Indianapolis is the 7th largest MSA in the Midwest. Marion County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines micropolitan and metropolitan statistical areas. ...


As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 791,926 people, 320,107 households, and 192,704 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,163.0 people per square mile (835.1/km²). There were 352,429 housing units at an average density of 975.0 per square mile (376.4/km²). The racial makeup of the balance was 69.1% white, 25.50% black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 1.43% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2.04% from other races, and 1.64% from two or more races. 3.92% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. The top 5 largest ancestries include: German (16.6%), Irish (10.2%), American (9.3%), English(7.7%), and Italian (2.2%)[10]. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... European American is a term for an American of European descent, who are usually referred as White or Caucasian. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ...


From 2000 to 2004, the Hispanic population in Indianapolis increased by 43%.[11]The majority of the non-white population lives in the central and north portions of the inner-city area. Indianapolis has over 6000 immigrants from the former Yugoslavia[citation needed]. Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ...


The median income for a household in the balance is $41,964, and the median income for a family is $48,755. Males have a median income of $36,302 versus $27,738 for females. The per capita income is $21,640.[12] 14.8% of the population lives below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 16.2% of those under the age of 18 and 8.1% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


There are 320,107 households out of which 29.8% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.6% are married couples living together, 15.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% are non-families. 32.0% of all households are made up of individuals and 8.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.39 and the average family size is 3.04. Matrimony redirects here. ...


The age distribution is: 25.7% under the age of 18, 10.2% from 18 to 24, 32.9% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 34 years. For every 100 females there are 93.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 90.2 males.


Law and government

Main article: Government of Indianapolis
The Indiana State Capitol in Indianapolis.

Indianapolis has a consolidated city-county government known as Unigov. Under this system, many functions of the city and county governments are consolidated, though some remain separate. The city has a mayor-council form of government. The Indiana State House in Indianapolis Indiana State House and Market Street taken from Monument Circle The Indiana Statehouse is the state capitol building of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... Unigov is the name adopted by the city of Indianapolis to describe a united city and county government, adopted in 1970 by act of the Indiana state legislature. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments. ...


Mayor

The executive branch is headed by an elected mayor, who serves as the chief executive of both the city and Marion County. The current Mayor of Indianapolis is Republican Greg Ballard. The mayor appoints city department heads and members of various boards and commissions. GOP redirects here. ...


City-County Council

For more details on this topic, see Indianapolis City-County Council.

The legislative body for the city and county is the City-County Council. It is made up of 29 members, 25 of whom represent districts, with the remaining four elected at large. As of 2008, Republicans hold a 16-13 majority. The council passes ordinances for the city and county, and also makes appointments to certain boards and commissions.


Courts

All of the courts of law in Indianapolis are part of the Indiana state court system. The Marion Superior Court is the court of general jurisdiction. Its 35 judges hear all criminal, juvenile, probate, and traffic violation cases, as well as most civil cases. The Marion Circuit Court hears certain types of civil cases. Small claims cases are heard by Small Claims Courts in each of Marion County's nine townships.


Fire protection

Historically there was a fire department maintained by each suburban township, which provided service to the areas of the townships outside of the pre-Unigov city limits and the corporate limits of the excluded cities. In January 2007, by a resolution jointly passed by the Washington Township Board and by the Indianapolis City-County Council, the Washington Township Fire Department was merged into the City of Indianapolis Fire Department. In July 2007, by a similar resolution between the City-County Council and the Warren Township Board, the Warren Township Fire Department was also merged into the city fire department. All of the career fire-fighting personnel and emergency medical services personnel were absorbed into the city department.


Law enforcement

Indianapolis and Marion County historically maintained separate police agencies: the Indianapolis Police Department and Marion County Sheriff's Department. On January 1, 2007, a new agency, the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, was formed by merging the two departments. IMPD is a separate agency, as the Sheriff's Department maintains jail and court functions. IMPD has jurisdiction over those portions of Marion County not explicitly covered by the police of an excluded city or by a legacy pre-Unigov force. As of February 29, 2008, the IMPD is headed by the Public Safety Director who is appointed by the Mayor of Indianapolis; the Public Safety Director appoints the Police Chief. The IMPD was formely under the leadership of elected Sheriff of Marion County, Frank J. Anderson. The Sheriff remains in charge of the County Jail and security for the City-County Building, service of warrants, and certain other functions. Also, the Sheriff must be consulted, but does not have final say, on the appointment of the Public Safety Director and the Police Chief. [13]. Marion County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, or IMPD, is the law enforcement agency for Marion County in Indiana. ... The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, or IMPD, is the law enforcement agency for Marion County in Indiana. ... Unigov is the name adopted by the city of Indianapolis to describe a united city and county government, adopted in 1970 by act of the Indiana state legislature. ... Frank J. Anderson (born 1938?), is currently Sheriff of Marion County, Indiana, and is the first African-American to serve in that post. ...


Crime

For the past decade, crime rates within the Indianapolis city limits have fluctuated greatly. In the late 1990s, violent crimes in inner-city neighborhoods located within the old city limits (pre-consolidation) peaked. The former IPD police district, which serves about 37% of the county's total population and has a geographic area covering mostly the old pre-consolidation city limits, recorded 130 homicides in 1998 to average approximately 40.3 homicides per 100,000 people.[citation needed] This is over 6 times the 1998 national homicide average of 6.3 per 100,000 people.[citation needed] Meanwhile, the former Marion County Sheriff's Department district serving the remaining 63% of the county's population, which includes the majority of the residents in the Consolidated City, recorded only 32 homicides in 1998, averaging about 5.9 murders per 100,000 people, slightly less than the 1998 national homicide average.[citation needed] Homicides in the IPD police district dropped dramatically in 1999 and have remained lower through 2005. In 2005, the IPD police district recorded 88 homicides to average 27.3 homicides per 100,000 people; nonetheless, the murder rate in the IPD district is still almost 5 times the 2005 national average.[citation needed]


When considering the total Consolidated City of Indianapolis, the overall crime rate has historically been low compared to the national average. Nonetheless, crime in impoverished inner-city neighborhoods remains a problem. Areas of Indianapolis that were unincorporated or separate municipalities before the 1970 city-county consolidation generally have significantly lower crime rates although their aggregate population is higher than the old pre-consolidation Indianapolis city limits. Thus, crime figures for the Consolidated City and the entire Marion County average out to a low rate. However, according to FBI reports in 2006, for the first half of the year, Indianapolis saw one of the larger increases in homicides in the country for the first half of 2006 as compared to the same time period in 2005.[14] Overall violent crime in Indianapolis increased 8% for the first half of 2006 compared to the first half of 2005. [15] While Marion County has still not surpassed its record homicide number of 162 set in 1998, it is on pace to see one of the highest numbers of homicides since then, with 153 committed in 2006[16] as the year draws to a close. In one 2006 event, seven individuals from the same family were murdered in their home. In 2007, city leaders such as Sheriff Frank J. Anderson and former Mayor Bart Peterson have rallied in neighborhoods in effort to stop the violence in the city. Frank J. Anderson (born 1938?), is currently Sheriff of Marion County, Indiana, and is the first African-American to serve in that post. ... Mayor Bart Peterson Barton Bart Peterson (born June 15, 1958 to parents Howard and Lori) has been mayor of the U.S city of Indianapolis, Indiana, since 2000. ...


Largely, the immediate downtown area of the city around most main attractions, venues, and museums remain relatively safe. IMPD uses horseback officers and bicycle officers to patrol the downtown area or the city. Certain areas of Indianapolis, most notably portions of the city's East Side, remain a challenge for law enforcement officials.


Politics

Until the late 1990s, Indianapolis was considered to be one of the most conservative metropolitan areas in the country but this trend is reversing. Republicans had held the majority in the City-County Council for 36 years, and the city had a Republican mayor for 32 years from 1967 to 1999. In the 1999 municipal election, Democrat Bart Peterson defeated Indiana Secretary of State Sue Anne Gilroy by 52 percent to 41 percent. Four years later, Peterson was re-elected with 63 percent of the vote. Republicans narrowly lost control of the City-County Council that year. Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Mayor Bart Peterson Barton Bart Peterson (born June 15, 1958 to parents Howard and Lori) has been mayor of the U.S city of Indianapolis, Indiana, since 2000. ...


In 2004, Democrats won the Marion County offices of treasurer, surveyor and coroner. The county GOP lost further ground during the 2006 elections with Democrats winning the offices of county clerk, assessor, recorder and auditor. Only one GOP countywide office remained: Prosecutor Carl Brizzi, who defeated Democratic challenger Melina Kennedy with 51 percent of the vote in his bid for a second term, despite outspending her two-to-one. At the township level, Democrats picked up the trustee offices in Washington, Lawrence, Warren and Wayne townships, while holding on to Pike and Center townships.


In the 2007 municipal election, fueled by voter angst against increases in property and income taxes as well as a rise in crime, Republican challenger Greg Ballard narrowly defeated Peterson, 51 percent to 47 percent -- the first time an incumbent Indianapolis mayor was removed from office since 1967. Discontent among these issues also returned control of the City-County Council to the GOP with a 16-13 majority. [17]


John Kerry defeated George W. Bush in the 2004 presidential election by roughly 6,000 votes in Marion County, 51 percent to 49 percent.[18] John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004 to elect the president. ...


Most of Indianapolis is within the 7th District of Indiana Congressional boundaries. Indianapolis was represented by Democratic United States Congresswoman Julia Carson from 1997 until her death December 15, 2007.[19] André Carson, Julia Carson's grandson, won the special election on March 11, 2008. Indianas 7th congressional district is currently represented by Julia Carson. ... Julia M. Carson (born Julia May Porter on July 8, 1938) is Member of the United States House of Representatives for Indianas 7th congressional district. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Education

Main article: List of schools in Indianapolis
Image:Indianapolis school districts.png   Indianapolis Public Schools
  School Town of Speedway
  Beech Grove City Schools
  MSD Pike Township
  MSD Washington Township
  MSD Lawrence Township
  MSD Warren Township
  Franklin Township CSC
  MSD Perry Township
  MSD Decatur Township
  MSD Wayne Township
Indianapolis Public School Districts

Map of Indianapolis Public School Districts. ... Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) is the largest school district in Indianapolis as well as in the state of Indiana with nearly 40,000 students. ... The Metropolitan School District of Pike Township is a school district in the northwest corner Marion County, Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Metropolitan School District of Washington Township (MSDWT) is a public school district in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Metropolitan School District of Lawrence Township is a school district in northeast Marion County, Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Metropolitan School District of Warren Township is a school district on the east side of Marion County, Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Franklin Township Community School Corporation is a school district in Franklin Township, Marion County, Indiana, United States. ... The Metropolitan School District of Perry Township serves Perry Township, Indianapolis, Indiana. ... In Indiana, the Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township is a school district located in and around the Indianapolis area. ...

Higher education

Indianapolis is the home of the following colleges and universities (in alphabetical order): Butler University, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, Marian College, Martin University, Oakland City University Indianapolis campus, The Art Institute of Indianapolis, Brown Mackie College, and the University of Indianapolis. Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) is the university campus of Indiana University located in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana (usually shortened to Ivy Tech Community College or, colloquially, Ivy Tech) is the state of Indianas system of community colleges, formed in 2005, as a rechartering of a system of vocational technical schools. ... For other places with the same name, see Marian College (disambiguation). ... Martin University in Indianapolis, Indiana, was founded by Rev. ... Oakland City University is located in Southwestern Indiana, and is the only General Baptist affiliated college in the United States. ... Brown Mackie College is a system of schools operated by Education Management Corporation. ... The University of Indianapolis is a university located in Indianapolis, Indiana, and affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ...


Butler University was originally founded in 1855 as North Western Christian University. The school purchased land in the Irvington area in 1875. The school moved again in 1928 to its current location in at the edge of Butler-Tarkington. The school removed itself officially from religious affiliation, giving up the theological school to Christian Theological Seminary. A private institution, Butler's current student enrollment is approximately 4,400. Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... // Founded in 1870, Irvington was originally created as a suburban town of Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Butler-Tarkington is a neighborhood on the north side of Indianapolis with the following borders: 38th Street and Crown Hill Cemetery to the south, the Central Canal and Westfield Boulevard to the north, Michigan Road to the west, and Meridian Street to the east. ... Christian Theological Seminary is an ecumenical seminary of the Protestant denomination, Disciples of Christ. ...


IUPUI was originally an urban conglomeration of branch campuses of the two major state universities, Indiana University in Bloomington and Purdue University in West Lafayette, created by the state legislature. In 1969 a merged campus was created at the site of the Indiana University School of Medicine. IUPUI's student body is currently just under 30,000, making it the third-largest institute of higher learning in Indiana. This campus is also home to Herron School of Art and Design, which was established privately in 1902. During IUPUI's emergence, Herron School of Art and Design was then included with this state institution. A new building was built in 2005 under both private donation and state contribution enabling the school to move from its original location to campus. → Indiana University School of Medicine → Purdue University Indianapolis Extension Center → Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis → Indiana University School of Dentistry Type of institution Public Endowment $389. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Monroe Mayor Mark Kruzan Area    - City 51. ... Purdue redirects here. ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... The Indiana University School of Medicine is the medical school of Indiana University, based at the IUPUI campus of IU in Indianapolis, Indiana (the main campus of IU being in Bloomington). ...


Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, a state funded public school, was founded as Indiana Vocational Technical College in 1963. With 23 campuses across Indiana, Ivy Tech has a total enrollment of just over 70,300, with just over 12,000 attending campuses in the Indianapolis area. Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana (usually shortened to Ivy Tech Community College or, colloquially, Ivy Tech) is the state of Indianas system of community colleges, formed in 2005, as a rechartering of a system of vocational technical schools. ...


Marian College was founded in 1936 when St. Francis Normal and Immaculate Conception Junior College merged. The college moved to Indianapolis in 1937. Marian is currently a private Catholic school and has an enrollment of approximately 1,800 students. For other places with the same name, see Marian College (disambiguation). ...


University of Indianapolis is a private school affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Founded in 1902 as Indiana Central University, the school currently hosts almost 4,300 students. The University of Indianapolis is a university located in Indianapolis, Indiana, and affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ...


Brown Mackie College is new to the area. Brown Mackie College is a system of schools operated by Education Management Corporation. ...


Primary and secondary education

Indianapolis has eleven unified public school districts (eight township educational authorities and three legacy districts from before the unification of city and county government) each of which provides primary, secondary, and adult education services within its boundaries. The boundaries of these districts do not exactly correspond to township (or traditional) boundaries, but rather cover the areas of their townships that were outside the pre-consolidation city limits. Indianapolis Public Schools served all of Indianapolis prior to 1970, when almost all of Marion County was incorporated, and is still the city's largest school corporation today. Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) is the largest school district in Indianapolis as well as in the state of Indiana with nearly 40,000 students. ...


Libraries

Public library services are provided to the citizens of Indianapolis and Marion County by the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library (IMCPL). The educational and cultural institution, founded in 1873, now consists of a main library, Central Library, located in downtown Indianapolis and 22 branch locations spread throughout the city. Serving over 5.43 million visitors in 2006, IMCPL's mission is to provide "materials and programs in support of the lifelong learning, recreational and economic interests of all citizens of Marion County." A renovated Central Library building opened on December 9, 2007, ending a controversial multi-year rebuilding plan.[20] The Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library (IMCPL) is the public library system that serves the citizens of Marion County, Indiana and its largest city, Indianapolis. ...


Cultural features

The Central Canal in Indianapolis
The Central Canal in Indianapolis

Indianapolis prides itself on its rich cultural heritage. Several initiatives have been made by the Indianapolis government in recent years to increase Indianapolis's appeal as a destination for arts and culture.


Cultural Districts

For more details on this topic, see Indianapolis Cultural Districts.

Indianapolis has designated six official Cultural Districts. They are Broad Ripple Village, Massachusetts Avenue, Fountain Square, The Wholesale District, Canal and White River State Park, and Indiana Avenue. These areas have held historic and cultural importance to the city. In recent years they have been revitalized and are becoming major centers for tourism, commerce and residential living. Indianapolis has designated several areas as Cultural Districts: Broad Ripple Village, Massachusetts Avenue, Fountain Square, The Wholesale District, The Canal & White River State Park, and Indiana Avenue. ... Indianapolis has designated several areas as Cultural Districts: Broad Ripple Village, Massachusetts Avenue, Fountain Square, The Wholesale District, The Canal & White River State Park, and Indiana Avenue. ... Broad Ripple Avenue, 1949 Broad Ripple is a former incorporated town, annexed by Indianapolis, Indiana in 1922, that occupies a region of north central Marion County. ... Located just a few blocks northeast of Monument Circle, Massachusetts Avenue was designed in 1821 as one of the four original diagonal streets of downtown Indianapolis. ... The Wholesale District is one of six designated cultural districts in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Downtown Indianapolis from the Cetnral Canal Twilight Downtown Indianapolis Canal and White River State Park is an urban state park in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Indiana Avenue is a historical area in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana. ...


Monument Circle

At the center of Indianapolis is Monument Circle, a traffic circle at the intersection of Meridian and Market Streets, featuring the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument. (Monument Circle is depicted on the city’s flag, and is generally considered the city’s symbol). Monument Circle is in the shadow of Indiana's tallest skyscraper, the Chase Tower. Up until the early 1960s, Indianapolis zoning laws stated that no building could be taller than the Soldiers and Sailors Monument. Each Christmas season, local electricians string lights onto the monument. It is lit for the holiday season in a ceremony known as the "Circle of Lights," which attracts tens of thousands of Hoosiers to downtown Indianapolis on the day after Thanksgiving. Monument Circle is a traffic circle at the center of the city of Indianapolis, Indiana (and Marion County, Indiana). ... Columbus Circle, New York City, NY; site of the first traffic circle in the United States completed in 1905 DeSoto Fountain sits in the center of a traffic circle in the city of Coral Gables, Florida. ... Soldiers and Sailors Monument in 2005. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... Built in 1990 near Monument Circle in Indianapolis, the Chase Tower (formally known as the Bank One Tower) is the tallest skyscraper in Indiana. ...

The War Memorial
The War Memorial

Image File history File linksMetadata Indywarmem. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Indywarmem. ...

War Memorial Plaza

Main article: Indiana World War Memorial Plaza

A five-block plaza at the intersection of Meridian and Vermont surrounds a large memorial dedicated to Hoosiers who have fought in American wars. It was originally constructed to honor the Indiana soldiers who died in World War I, but construction was halted due to lack of funding during the Great Depression, and it was finished in 1951. The purpose of the memorial was altered to encompass all American wars in which Hoosiers fought. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


The monument is modeled after the Mausoleum of Maussollos. At 210 feet (64 m) tall it is approximately seventy-five feet taller than the original Mausoleum which was demolished to build a fort during the Crusades. The blue lights, which shine between columns on the side of the War Memorial, make the monument easy to spot. On the north end of the War Memorial Plaza is the national headquarters of the American Legion and the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library's Central Library. The Mausoleum site in ruins, as it stands today The Tomb of Maussollos, Mausoleum of Maussollos or Mausoleum at Halicarnassus (in Greek, ) was a tomb built between 353 and 350 BC at Halicarnassus (present Bodrum, Turkey) for Mausolus, a satrap in the Persian Empire, and Artemisia II of Caria, his... This article is about the unit of length. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library (IMCPL) is the public library system that serves the citizens of Marion County, Indiana and its largest city, Indianapolis. ...


Indiana Statehouse

For more details on this topic, see Indiana Statehouse.

The Statehouse houses the Indiana General Assembly, the Governor of Indiana, state courts, and other state officials. The Indiana State House in Indianapolis Indiana State House and Market Street taken from Monument Circle The Indiana Statehouse is the state capitol building of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Image:Indianapolis Capitol. ... List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ...


Festivals, conventions, and organizations

Beginning in 1999 the city became host to the annual Indy Jazz Festival. The festival is a three day event held in Military Park near the canal. Past stars include: B.B. King, Aretha Franklin, Bruce Hornsby, Bela Fleck & The Flecktones, Kool and the Gang, Ray Charles, The Temptations, Dave Brubeck, Emmylou Harris, Chris Isaak, Jonny Lang, Norah Jones and regional and local favorites. Riley B. King aka B. B. King (b. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Bruce Randall Hornsby (born November 23, 1954 in Williamsburg, Virginia) is an American singer, pianist, accordion player, and songwriter. ... Béla Fleck and the Flecktones is a primarily instrumental group that draws equally on bluegrass, fusion and jazz band, sometimes dubbed blue_bop. ... Kool & The Gang Kool & the Gang was a massively successful rhythm and blues and disco group. ... For Ray Charles, the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... “Temptations” redirects here. ... David Warren Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California[1]), better known as Dave Brubeck, is a U.S. jazz pianist. ... Emmylou Harris (born April 2, 1947, Birmingham, Alabama) is a country, folk, alternative rock, and alternative country musician. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Jonny Lang (born Jon Gordon Langseth, Jr. ... Norah Jones (born Geethali Norah Jones Shankar on March 30, 1979) is an American singer-songwriter, pianist, keyboardist, guitarist, and occasional actress of Anglo-American and Bengali descent. ...


Every May Indianapolis holds the 500 Festival, a month of events culminating in the Indianapolis 500 Festival Parade the day before the running of the Indianapolis 500. The Festival was begun in 1957 and the first Queen of the Festival was Ann Lawrie who was named in 1959. Indy 500 redirects here. ...


The Circle City Classic is one of America’s top historically African-American college football games. This annual football game, held during the first weekend of October, is the showcase event of an entire weekend. The weekend is a celebration of cultural excellence and educational achievement while showcasing the spirit, energy and tradition of America’s historically black colleges and universities. The Coca-Cola Circle City Classic is an annual American football game featuring two historically black colleges/universities (HBCUs) that play at the RCA Dome in Indianapolis, Indiana. ...


In 2003, Indianapolis began hosting Gen Con, the largest role-playing game convention in the nation (record attendance thus far being numbered in excess of 30,000), at the Indiana Convention Center. Future expansion of the convention space is expected by many to further increase attendance numbers in coming years. The convention center has also recently played host to such events as Star Wars Celebration II and III, which brought in Star Wars fans from around the world, including George Lucas. From October 25 to 28, 2006, the convention center was home to the 79th national Future Farmers of America convention, bringing around 50,000 visitors in from around the country. It will also host it every year up to 2012.[21] Gen Con is the one of the largest and most prominent gaming conventions in North America. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... The Indiana Convention Center is a very large convention center located in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Celebration is an Official Star Wars convention held during banner years of the franchise. ... This article is about the series. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... FFA was originally an acronym for Future Farmers of America, but in 1988 the association, in an effort to broaden its potential membership beyond youth working in modern American agriculture changed the name of the organization from Future Farmers of America to National FFA Organization and simply referred to as...


Indianapolis is also home to the Indiana State Fair, as well as the Heartland Film Festival, The Indianapolis International Film Festival, the Indianapolis Theatre Fringe Festival, the Indianapolis Alternative Media Festival, the Midwest Music Summit and the Indianapolis LGBT Film Festival. The Indiana State Fair is held in Indianapolis, the state capital, usually in August. ... The Heartland Film Festival is a film festival held each October in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... // Founded in 2004, the Indianapolis International Film Festivals mission is to present that inform, enlighten, and educate the community by providing a vivid reflection of the rich cultural diversity of Indianapolis and the world beyond our doors. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Midwest Music Summit is an annual music festival held in Indianapolis, Indiana which showcases musicians from the Midwest. ...


Indianapolis is home to Bands of America (BOA), a nationwide organization of high school marching, concert, and jazz bands, and hosts several BOA events annually. Indianapolis is now also the international headquarters of Drum Corps International, a professional drum and bugle corps association, and beginning in 2008 will host the DCI World Championships in the new Lucas Oil Stadium. Bands of America (BOA) is a nonprofit organization that promotes high school music education in the United States. ... Drum Corps International (DCI), formed in 1972, is the non-profit governing body operating the North American drum and bugle corps circuit for junior corps, whose members are between the ages of 14 and 22. ... Lucas Oil Stadium is a retractable roof sports facility currently under construction in Indianapolis. ...


Indianapolis has been the headquarters of the Kiwanis International organization since 1982. The organization and its youth-sponsored Kiwanis Family counterparts, Circle K International and Key Club International, administer all their international business and service initiatives from Indianapolis. Kiwanis International is a service organization whose mission is Serving the Children of the World. The organization was founded on January 21, 1915 in Detroit, Michigan by Joseph C. Prance (a tailor) and Allen S. Browne (a professional event organizer). ...


The Indy International Wine Competition which is the largest U.S. wine competition outside of California is held in Indianapolis every July at the Indiana State Fairgrounds.


The city has a vibrant arts community that includes many fairs celebrating a wide variety of arts and crafts during the summer months. They include the Broad Ripple Art Fair,Talbot Street Art Fair, Carmel Arts Festival and the Penrod Art Fair


Indianapolis contains the national headquarters for at least 26 fraternities and sororities. Many are congregated in the College Park area surrounding The Pyramids.


Indianapolis is the headquarters for all three international Jewish fraternities, Zeta Beta Tau, Alpha Epsilon Pi, and Sigma Alpha Mu. zbt.org, aepi.org, sam.org.


Ethnic and cultural heritage festivals

Perhaps the largest of Indianapolis's ethnic and cultural heritage festivals is the Summer Celebration held by Indiana Black Expo. This ten-day national event highlights the contributions of African Americans to U.S. society and culture and provides educational, entertainment, and networking opportunities to the over 300,000 participants from around the country. Indiana Black Expo is a non for-profit organization headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana that is responsible for overseeing the states two largest cultural events: the Indiana Black Expo Summer Celebration, and the Coca-Cola Circle City Classic. ...


Indy's International Festival is held annually in November at the Indiana State Fairgrounds. Local ethnic groups, vendors and performers are featured alongside national and international performers. The Indiana State Fair is held in Indianapolis, the state capital, usually in August. ...


Other local festivals include:

Greek Orthodox Church can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... The Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church of Indianapolis hosts the Indy Greek Festival annually the Friday and Saturday after Labor Day in September. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... The Indy Irish Festival is an annual event in the middle of every September. ... IndyPride Logo Indy pride is an annual Indianapolis Gay Pride festival that has been held for over a decade. ... The Italian Street Festival is held annually in early June at the Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Indianapolis. ... The Middle Eastern Festival of Indianapolis takes place annually in late September at St. ...

Sports

Main article: Sports in Indianapolis

Indianapolis is home to the Super Bowl XLI Champion Indianapolis Colts of the NFL, the Indiana Pacers of the NBA, the Indiana Fever of the WNBA, the Indianapolis Indians of the IL, and the Indiana Ice of the USHL. League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... NFL redirects here. ... The Indiana Pacers are a professional basketball team that plays in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... NBA redirects here. ... The Indiana Fever is a professional womens basketball team that plays in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... League International League Division West Division Year founded 1902 Major League affiliation Pittsburgh Pirates Home ballpark Victory Field Previous home ballparks Perry Stadium City Indianapolis, Indiana Current uniform colors red, black Previous uniform colors Logo design A Native American design in red with white and black details with a black... The International League (IL) is a minor league baseball league which operates in the eastern United States and Canada. ... The Indiana Ice is a Tier I ice hockey team formed in 2004 when it was purchased from the former Danville, Illinois, USA team. ... United States Hockey League (abbreviated USHL) is the top junior ice hockey league in United States. ...


In addition, the headquarters of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the main governing body for U.S. collegiate sports, is in Indianapolis, as is the National Federation of State High School Associations. Indianapolis is home to the national offices of USA Gymnastics, USA Diving, US Synchronized Swimming, and USA Track & Field. NCAA redirects here. ... The National Federation of State High School Associations (or NFHS) is the body which oversees and governs most high school interscholastic athletics and extracirriculars in the United States at the national level. ...


The city has hosted the Men's and Women's NCAA Final Fours (the semifinals and final of the NCAA basketball tournament) several times, and as of 2006 the NCAA is holding the Women's Final Four in Indianapolis at least once every five years. Also, Conseco Fieldhouse in Indianapolis, will host the Big Ten Tournament for 5 straight years starting in 2008 after it won the Big Ten bid over Chicago and the United Center The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... Conseco Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It is the home of the Indiana Pacers of the National Basketball Association and the Indiana Fever of the Womens National Basketball Association. ... The Big Ten Conference mens basketball tournament is held annually at the end of the mens college basketball regular season. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The United Center is an indoor sports arena located in the Near West Side community area of Chicago, Illinois, named after its corporate sponsor, United Airlines. ...


Indianapolis also hosts the Indianapolis Tennis Championships, one of the many tournaments which are part of the US Open series. The Indianapolis Tennis Championships (formerly known as the RCA Championships) is an annual mens tennis tournament played in Indianapolis as part of the ATP Tour. ...


Indianapolis is well known for its ability to host large events. IMS hosts 2 major races every year, the Indianapolis 500 and the Allstate 400 at the Brickyard. Starting in 2008, the MotoGP Motorcycle series will host a weekend at the speedway for the Red Bull Indianapolis Grand Prix. As previously mentioned Indy plays hosts to many Men's and Women's Final Fours and will continue with the opening of Lucas Oil Stadium. Lucas Oil Stadium and the city of Indianapolis also made a bid to host Super Bowl XLV in 2011 but lost to Dallas and the Dallas Cowboys New Stadium by only 2 NFL Owner votes. However, they bid again in trying to host Super Bowl XLVI.[22] The city was awarded the rights to host Super Bowl XLVI on May 20, 2008. Indianapolis also hosted the Pan American Games in 1987 and the 2002 World Basketball Championships. Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... Indy 500 redirects here. ... The Allstate 400 at The Brickyard is an annual 400-mile (644 km) NASCAR Nextel Cup points race held each August at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... Grand Prix motorcycle racing refers to the premier categories of motorcycle road racing. ... The Indianapolis motorcycle Grand Prix is a motorcycling event held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana, United States as part of the Grand Prix motorcycle racing season. ... Lucas Oil Stadium is a retractable roof sports facility currently under construction in Indianapolis. ... Super Bowl XLV will be the 45th Super Bowl, the annual championship game of the National Football League (NFL) between the National Football Conference (NFC) and American Football Conference (AFC) champions. ... Dallas redirects here. ... Dallas Cowboys New Stadium is the working title of a new stadium being built in Arlington, Texas for the NFLs Dallas Cowboys. ... The following is a list of current National Football League franchise owners. ... Super Bowl XLVI will be the 46th Super Bowl, the annual championship game of the National Football League (NFL) between the National Football Conference (NFC) and American Football Conference (AFC) champions. ... Super Bowl XLVI will be the 46th Super Bowl, the annual championship game of the National Football League (NFL) between the National Football Conference (NFC) and American Football Conference (AFC) champions. ... The 10th Pan American Games were held in Indianapolis, United States. ...


The Indianapolis Daredevils were a professional soccer team based in the city from 1978-79 and played in the ASL, the second tier of American soccer. The Indianapolis Daredevils was an American soccer club based in Indianapolis, Indiana that was a member of the American Soccer League. ... The acronym ASL OR a. ...

Club Sport League Venue
Indianapolis Colts Football National Football League (AFC) RCA Dome

Lucas Oil Stadium (starting 2008) League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... NFL redirects here. ... The American Football Conference (AFC) is one of the two conferences of the National Football League (NFL). ... The RCA Dome is a domed stadium located in Indianapolis, Indiana, which was the home of the Indianapolis Colts NFL franchise for 24 seasons (1984-2007). ... Lucas Oil Stadium is a retractable roof sports facility currently under construction in Indianapolis. ...

Indiana Pacers Basketball National Basketball Association Conseco Fieldhouse
Indiana Fever Basketball Women's National Basketball Association Conseco Fieldhouse
Indianapolis Indians Baseball International League (AAA - affiliated with the Pittsburgh Pirates) Victory Field
Indiana Ice Hockey United States Hockey League Pepsi Coliseum

Conseco Fieldhouse The Indiana Pacers are a professional basketball team that plays in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... This article is about the sport. ... NBA redirects here. ... Conseco Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It is the home of the Indiana Pacers of the National Basketball Association and the Indiana Fever of the Womens National Basketball Association. ... The Indiana Fever is a professional womens basketball team that plays in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... This article is about the sport. ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... Conseco Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It is the home of the Indiana Pacers of the National Basketball Association and the Indiana Fever of the Womens National Basketball Association. ... League International League Division West Division Year founded 1902 Major League affiliation Pittsburgh Pirates Home ballpark Victory Field Previous home ballparks Perry Stadium City Indianapolis, Indiana Current uniform colors red, black Previous uniform colors Logo design A Native American design in red with white and black details with a black... This article is about the sport. ... The International League (IL) is a minor league baseball league which operates in the eastern United States and Canada. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... This article is about the baseball team. ... Victory Field is the name of the current minor league baseballpark that is the home of the Indianapolis Indians of the International League. ... The Indiana Ice is a Tier I ice hockey team formed in 2004 when it was purchased from the former Danville, Illinois, USA team. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... United States Hockey League (abbreviated USHL) is the top junior ice hockey league in United States. ... The Pepsi Coliseum is a 8,200-seat multi-purpose arena in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Conseco Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It is the home of the Indiana Pacers of the National Basketball Association and the Indiana Fever of the Womens National Basketball Association. ...

Indianapolis Impalas[23] Rugby USA Rugby Lake Sullivan Sports Complex

For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... The sport of rugby in the United States has always had a close relationship with the sport of American football. ...

Indianapolis Colts

Lucas Oil Stadium under construction
Lucas Oil Stadium under construction
For more details on this topic, see Indianapolis Colts.

The Baltimore Colts moved to Indianapolis in 1984. During the early years the Colts struggled to win many games. After a playoff berth in 1987, the Colts drifted back to mediocrity and worse until the mid '90s. In 1995 the Colts made their 1st step towards success when they made AFC Championship Game but lost to the Pittsburgh Steelers on a last second play. Then in 1998 GM Bill Polian drafted Peyton Manning out of Tennessee turning the Colts around. Since drafting Manning the Colts have made the playoffs in 7 of 9 years and recently won Super Bowl XLI against the Chicago Bears, 29-17. Lucas Oil Stadium will open before the 2008 season, replacing the RCA Dome, as the new home of the Colts. Lucas Oil Stadium is a retractable roof sports facility currently under construction in Indianapolis. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... The AFC Championship Game is one of the two semi-final matches of the National Football League, the largest professional American football league in the United States. ... Steelers redirects here. ... Bill Polian is the President of the Indianapolis Colts NFL team. ... Peyton Williams Manning (born March 24, 1976 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American football quarterback who plays for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... Date February 4, 2007 Stadium Dolphin Stadium City Miami Gardens, Florida MVP Peyton Manning, Quarterback, Colts Favorite Colts by 6. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue and Orange Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National Football... Lucas Oil Stadium is a retractable roof sports facility currently under construction in Indianapolis. ... The RCA Dome is a domed stadium located in Indianapolis, Indiana, which was the home of the Indianapolis Colts NFL franchise for 24 seasons (1984-2007). ...

Conseco Fieldhouse, home of the Pacers & Fever
Conseco Fieldhouse, home of the Pacers & Fever

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1458x926, 706 KB) Conseco Fieldhouse in downtown Indianapolis. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1458x926, 706 KB) Conseco Fieldhouse in downtown Indianapolis. ...

Indiana Pacers

For more details on this topic, see Indiana Pacers.

The Indiana Pacers began play in the ABA in 1967 and winning 3 ABA Championships. Then in 1976 the Pacers received an invitation to join the NBA. In 1987 they drafted Reggie Miller out of UCLA and became an instant playoff perennial. In 1999 they opened their new arena, Conseco Fieldhouse, and demolished Market Square Arena where Elvis Presley performed his last concert on June 26, 1977. The Pacers also reached their first and only NBA Finals in 2000 but lost to the Lakers in 6 games. After the 2004-2005 season Reggie Miller retired and the team has struggled with their production on the court. After the infamous Pacers-Pistons brawl they have struggled with their off the court image with numerous incidents. The Indiana Pacers are a professional basketball team that plays in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The Indiana Pacers are a professional basketball team that plays in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... NBA redirects here. ... Reginald Wayne Miller (born August 24, 1965, in Riverside, California) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university situated in the neighborhood of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... Conseco Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It is the home of the Indiana Pacers of the National Basketball Association and the Indiana Fever of the Womens National Basketball Association. ... Market Square Arena was an indoor arena located in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. The arena, completed in 1974 at a cost of $23 million, sat 16,530 for basketball and 15,993 for ice hockey. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Logo of the NBA Finals. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... Ron Artest charging into the stands, about to punch the man (in the black shirt) whom he thought was responsible for throwing a cup at him. ...


Indiana Fever

For more details on this topic, see Indiana Fever.

The WNBA expanded to 4 new cities in 2000 including Indianapolis. The Indiana Fever was one of the 2000 expansion teams. The WNBA awarded Indianapolis a team with the opening of Conseco Fieldhouse. The Fever won their 1st game in Miami, against the Miami Sol, on national TV but finished the 2000 season in last place thus receiving a high draft pick. In the 2001 WNBA Draft the Fever drafted Tennessee superstar Tamika Catchings with the 3rd pick, although she was forced to sit out the 2001 season with a knee injury. Catchings won the 2002 WNBA Rookie of the Year and each season has led the Fever in points, rebounds, assists, and steals. The Indiana Fever is a professional womens basketball team that plays in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... The Indiana Fever is a professional womens basketball team that plays in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... Conseco Fieldhouse is a sports arena in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It is the home of the Indiana Pacers of the National Basketball Association and the Indiana Fever of the Womens National Basketball Association. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... The Miami Sol was a womens Basketball team which joined the Womens National Basketball Association in 2000. ... 2001 WNBA Draft - 20 April 2001 On April 20, 2001 the regular WNBA draft took place. ... The Tennessee Lady Volunteers basketball team is one of the most prominent teams in U.S. womens college basketball. ... Tamika Catchings (born on July 21, 1979) is an American Womens National Basketball Association player who plays for the Indiana Fever. ...


Indianapolis Indians

For more details on this topic, see Indianapolis Indians.

The Indianapolis Indians are a minor league baseball team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. The team, which plays in the International League, is the Triple-A affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates major-league club. The Indians play at Victory Field, located in downtown Indianapolis. League International League Division West Division Year founded 1902 Major League affiliation Pittsburgh Pirates Home ballpark Victory Field Previous home ballparks Perry Stadium City Indianapolis, Indiana Current uniform colors red, black Previous uniform colors Logo design A Native American design in red with white and black details with a black... This article is about the baseball team. ...


Founded in 1902, the Indianapolis Indians are the second-oldest minor league franchise in professional sports, behind only the International League's Rochester Red Wings. Class-Level Triple-A (1929-Present) Minor League affiliations International League North Division Major League affiliation Minnesota Twins (2003-Present) Baltimore Orioles (1961-2002) St. ...


The Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
For more details on this topic, see Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS), located in Speedway, Indiana, is the site of the Indianapolis 500-Mile Race (also known as the Indy 500), an open-wheel automobile race held each Memorial Day weekend on a 2.5 mile (4 km) oval track. The Indy 500 is the largest single-day sporting event in the world, hosting more than 257,000 permanent seats (not including the infield area). Image File history File links Ims_aerial. ... Image File history File links Ims_aerial. ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... Nickname: Home of the 500 Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Marion Government  - Town Council Area  - City  4. ... Indy 500 redirects here. ... Modern Formula One Renault 1993 Indy Car Open wheel car is a term for cars, usually purpose built racecars, with the wheels located outside the cars main body, as distinct from cars which have their wheels below the body or fenders, in the manner of most street cars, stock... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ...


The track is often referred to as the Brickyard, as it was paved with 3.2 million bricks shortly after its initial construction in 1909. Today the track is paved in asphalt although a section of bricks remains at the start/finish line.


The first 500-Mile Race (805 km), held in 1911, was won by driver Ray Harroun driving a Marmon Wasp. (Marmon, incidentally, was an Indianapolis manufacturer.) The "500" is currently part of the Indy Racing League IndyCar Series, with the 2007 Indianapolis 500 running seeing Scotsman Dario Franchitti triumph for Andretti-Green Racing. Cover of Speed Age magazine, claiming to show the start of first Indianapolis 500 race; the event depicted was in fact the start of a 5-mile race on August 19, 1909. ... Ray Harroun (January 12, 1879 - January 19, 1968) was an American racecar driver. ... The Indy Racing League, better known as IRL, is the sanctioning body of a predominantly American based open-wheel racing series. ... The IndyCar Series is the premier series of the Indy Racing League. ... The 91st Indianapolis 500 is scheduled to be run on Sunday, May 27, 2007 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. ... Dario Franchitti (b. ... Dario Franchittis car being pushed up to qualify for the 2006 Indianapolis 500 Andretti Green Racing is an auto racing team that competes in the IndyCar Series. ...


IMS also hosts the NASCAR Allstate 400 at the Brickyard (originally the "Brickyard 400"). The first running of the Brickyard 400 was in 1994, and is currently NASCAR's highest attended event. Driver Jeff Gordon was the first to cross the finish line in the 1994 Brickyard 400. Gordon has since added three more 400 wins, totaling four, tying Rick Mears, A. J. Foyt and Al Unser for number of track victories. Tony Stewart is the most recent winner of the 400 in 2007. Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... The Allstate 400 at The Brickyard is an annual 400-mile (644 km) NASCAR Nextel Cup points race held each August at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... Jeffery Michael Gordon (born August 4, 1971) is a professional American race car driver. ... Rick Ravon Mears (born December 3, 1951 in Wichita, Kansas) is an American race car driver. ... A. J. Foyt (born Anthony Joseph Foyt, Jr. ... Alfred Unser (born May 29, 1939 in Albuquerque, New Mexico) is a former U.S. automobile racer. ... For other persons named Tony Stewart, see Tony Stewart (disambiguation). ... The 2007 Allstate 400 at The Brickyard will be the twentieth race of the 2007 NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series season and the first race under the ESPN/ABC section of the TV coverage. ...


In 1998, IMS began expanding the original track to include a Formula One road course, utilizing the traditional brick start-finish line and adding a new infield road course inside the surrounding oval. Road racing can be a term involving road running, road bicycle races, or automobile races. ...


From 2000 to 2007, IMS hosted the Formula One United States Grand Prix (USGP). Driver Michael Schumacher took the first finish. The last US Grand Prix run at IMS, in 2007, was notable for firsts. Lewis Hamilton took the checkered flag, and in doing so became the first rookie to win a Grand Prix at Indianapolis, as well as the first black driver to win any Speedway race. During the summer of 2007, contract negotiations between the IMS and Formula One resulted in a discontinuation of the USGP at Indianapolis (at least for the foreseeable future). Formula One has currently not scheduled a USGP venue for the 2008 season. F1 redirects here. ... The United States Grand Prix is a motor racing event which has taken place at various times since 1959 in several locations, at first as a part of the American Grand Prize series and later as a race in the Formula One World Championship. ... Michael Schumacher (pronounced , (born January 3, 1969, in Hürth Hermülheim, Germany)[1] is a former Formula One driver, and seven-time world champion. ... Lewis Carl Hamilton (born January 7, 1985 in Stevenage, Hertfordshire) is a British Formula One (F1) racing driver, currently racing for the McLaren team. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ...


The Speedway is scheduled to host its first MotoGP. The Red Bull Indianapolis Grand Prix will take place in September of 2008. Grand Prix motorcycle racing refers to the premier categories of motorcycle road racing. ...


Other series host races at nearby O'Reilly Raceway Park at Indianapolis; it is also the site of the annual Mac Tools U.S. Nationals, the most prestigious drag-racing meet of the year for the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) . OReilly Raceway Park at Indianapolis is a multi purpose racing facility located in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) is a drag racing governing body, which sets rules in drag racing and host events all over the United States and Canada. ...


OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon

For more details on this topic, see OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon.

Indianapolis is home to the largest mini-marathon (and eighth largest running event) in America. This year (2007) is the 30th anniversary of the Mini and it is run the 1st weekend in May every year and includes one lap around the famous Indianapolis Motor Speedway. This event is part of the 500 Festival, now its 50th year running. The race starts on Washington Street just off Monument Circle and ends on New York Street back downtown. The Mini has been sold out every year, with well over 35,000 participating. The 2006 Men's winner was Kenyan Ben Kimondiu, the 11th straight year a Kenyan has won the race. On the women's side, an American won for the first time in 13 years. She was Hoosier Native Lucie Mays-Sulewski. 2007 Race results: Joseph Chirlee (Men's Winner), marking the 12 straight year a Kenyan has won the Men's division of the Mini, & Janet Kogo Cherobon (Women's Winner). Better known to Indianapolis residents simply as The Mini, the OneAmerica 500 Festival Mini-Marathon is the largest half-marathon in the United States, and the eighth largest running event overall. ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... Monument Circle is a traffic circle at the center of the city of Indianapolis, Indiana (and Marion County, Indiana). ...


Recreation

Parks

For more details on this topic, see List of parks in Indianapolis.

Indianapolis has an extensive municipal park system with nearly 200 parks occupying over 10,000 acres (40 km²). The flagship Eagle Creek Park is the largest municipal park in the city, and ranks among the largest urban parks in the United States. [24] Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Substubs ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Eagle Creek Park is one of the largest municipal parks in the United States. ...


Other major Indianapolis Regional parks include:

  • Garfield Park (established in 1881, according to the Indygov website, the oldest Park in Indianapolis. Located on the Near South Side)
  • Riverside Park (Near West Side)
  • Sahm Park (Northeast side)
  • Southeastway Park (Franklin Township, Marion County)
  • Southwestway Park (Decatur Township, Marion County)

Additionally, Indianapolis has an urban forestry program that has garnered several Tree City USA awards from the National Arbor Day Foundation. Arbor Day is an American holiday that encourages the planting and care of trees. ...


Indianapolis Zoo

For more details on this topic, see Indianapolis Zoo.

Opened in 1988 the Indianapolis Zoo is the largest zoo in the state and is just west of Downtown. It has 360 species of animals and is best known for its Dolphin exhibit which includes the only underwater viewing dome in the Midwest. The Indianapolis Zoo first opened to the public in 1964. ... The Indianapolis Zoo first opened to the public in 1964. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


Museums

The Childrens Museum of Indianapolis in Indianapolis, Indiana, was founded in 1925 and claims to be the fourth-oldest such institution in the world. ... The Indianapolis Museum of Art is an art museum in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. The museum is one of the largest general art museums in the United States. ... Colonel Eli Lilly Civil War Museum is a museum located in Indianapolis, Indiana and is located within the Soldiers and Sailors Monument. ... The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, located in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana, houses an extensive collection of Native American artifacts as well as Western American paintings and sculptures collected by buinessman and philanthropist Harrison Eiteljorg (1903-1997). ... The Indiana State Museum is a museum located within White River State Park in Indianapolis, IN. The museum houses many exhibits on the history of Indiana from prehistoric times upto today. ... NCAA Hall of Champions is a museum, exhibition center, and conference center located adjacent to the NCAA National Office in Indianapolis White River State Park. ... When famed Hoosier Poet James Whitcomb Riley died, a group of the poets friends created the Riley Memorial Association (now the Riley Childrens Foundation) to honor him. ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... 1886 base ball demonstration at Liberty Corner. ...

Other places of interest

Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) is the university campus of Indiana University located in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Indianapolis Zoo first opened to the public in 1964. ... The Garfield Park Conservatory and Sunken Gardens are a 7,500 square-foot conservatory and outdoor gardens (3 acres) located at 2450 South Shelby Street, Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Heslar Naval Armory located at 30th street and White River in Indianapolis, Indiana Heslar Naval Armory was constructed in 1936 in Indianapolis, Indiana on the shore of White River as a New Deal construction project. ... Holcomb Gardens (20 acres) are located on the Butler University campus at 4600 Sunset Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library (IMCPL) is the public library system that serves the citizens of Marion County, Indiana and its largest city, Indianapolis. ... // Founded in 1870, Irvington was originally created as a suburban town of Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Slippery Noodle Inn is a large blues bar and restaurant with two performance stages in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The White River Gardens (3. ...

Local media

Indianapolis is served by local, regional, and national media. Indianapolis, Indiana is served by local media, as well as regional and national media. ...


Economy

Companies

Indianapolis is the international headquarters of the pharmaceutical corporation Eli Lilly and Company, wireless distribution & logistics provider Brightpoint, health insurance provider Wellpoint, insurance company American United Life, airline Republic Airways,consisting of Republic Airlines, Chautauqua Airlines and Shuttle America real estate companies Simon Property Group & Hunt Construction Group, Finish Line, Inc., Duke Realty Corp. and Teleservices Direct. The U.S. headquarters of Roche Diagnostics, Thomson SA, Conseco, Interactive Intelligence, First Internet Bank of Indiana, Peerless Pump Company, CP Morgan and Dow AgroSciences are also located in Indianapolis. Other major Indianapolis area employers include Clarian Health, Sallie Mae, Cook Group, Rolls Royce, and General Motors. Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) is a global pharmaceutical company and one of the worlds largest corporations. ... Brightpoint, Inc. ... This building in Woodland Hills, California is home to Blue Cross of Californias services for large employers WellPoint, Inc. ... This article is about the Republic Airlines that is currently operating. ... Chautauqua Airlines is an airline based in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It operates scheduled passenger services on more than 670 flights daily to cities in 30 states, Canada and the Bahamas, through feeder services under the names Delta Connection for Delta Air Lines, AmericanConnection for American Airlines, Continental Express for Continental... Shuttle America is a major airline based in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It feeds United Airlines flights at Chicago, Denver, and Washington as United Express, and feeds Delta Air Lines flights at Atlanta and New York as Delta Connection. ... Simon Property Group, Inc. ... Finish Line, Inc. ... Roche Diagnostics Division is a subsidiary of Hoffmann-La Roche which manufactures equipment and reagents for research and medical diagnostic applications. ... This article is about the media and entertainment company. ... Conseco NYSE: CNO is a financial services organization based in Carmel, Indiana, which had its origin as Security Life of Indiana. ... First Internet Bank of Indiana, sometimes called First Internet Bank or First IB, is one of the first state-chartered, FDIC-insured institution to operate solely via the Internet. ... Peerless Pump Company is an independent manufacturer of centrifugal pumps and systems. ... Dow AgroSciences is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Dow Chemical Company specializing in not only agricultural chemicals such as pesticides, but also seeds and biotechnology solutions. ... SLM Corporation (NYSE: SLM), commonly known as Sallie Mae, (formerly named the Student Loan Marketing Association) is the largest provider of educational loans in the United States. ... The Cook Group, founded in 1963 in the spare bedroom of William and Gayle Cook, is a supplier of medical devices and equipment. ... Rolls-Royce North America is a subsidiary of Rolls-Royce plc involved principally in the manufacture of gas turbine engines and other propulsion systems. ... General Motors Corporation, also known as GM, is a multinational corporation headquartered in the United States and has been the worlds largest and most dominant automaker since 1931 till the second half of 2007, surpassed by Toyota; as well as the global industry sales leader for 77 years. ...


Before Detroit came to dominate the American automobile industry, Indianapolis was also home to a number of carmakers, including American Motor Car Company, Parry Auto Company,[25] and Premier Motor Manufacturing.[26] In addition, Indianapolis hosted auto parts companies such as Prest-O-Lite, which provided acetylene generators for brass era headlights and acetylene gas starters.[27] Detroit redirects here. ... Automakers are companies that produce automobiles. ... The American Motor Car Company was a short-lived automotive company founded in 1906, lasting until 1913. ... Premier Motor Manufacturing Company was a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Acetylene (systematic name: ethyne) is a hydrocarbon belonging to the group of alkynes. ...


Business climate and real estate

Recently, the National Association of Home Builders and Wells Fargo ranked Indianapolis the most affordable major housing market in the U.S. for the fourth quarter of 2006,[28] and Forbes magazine ranked it the sixth best city for jobs in 2008, based on a combined graded balance of perceived median household incomes, lack of unemployment, income growth, cost of living and job growth.[29] The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) is one of the largest trade associations in the United States. ... An older Wells Fargo branch, located in Berkeley, California Wells Fargos corporate headquarters and main branch Wells Fargo & Co. ... Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ...


Transportation

See also: Indianapolis (Amtrak station)
New Midfield Terminal under construction
New Midfield Terminal under construction

Other information Passengers (2006) 31,446 31% Code IND Indianapolis is an Amtrak station in Indianapolis, Indiana, served by the Cardinal and Hoosier State. ...

Airports

Indianapolis International Airport, identified as IND, is the largest airport in Indiana and serves Indianapolis Metropolitan Area. In addition to a recently completed air traffic control tower, the airport is currently undertaking the building of two large concourses, a new airfield, two new parking garages, and apron improvements. The new terminal is being built with the intent of easing passenger access, and is being constructed between the two existing runways. The old terminal will be demolished after the new terminal opens. The current project is slated for completion in late 2008. Midfield Terminal Project Midfield Terminal Rendering Indianapolis International Airport (IATA: IND, ICAO: KIND, FAA LID: IND) is a public airport located seven miles (11 km) southwest of the central business district of Indianapolis, a city in Marion County, Indiana, United States. ...


Many air services utilize Indianapolis International. FedEx, an Air Freight company, is currently expanding its largest hub in the country located at Indianapolis International. Indianapolis is also a focus city for Northwest Airlines. Federal Express redirects here. ... FedEx DC-10 Cargo airlines (or airfreight carriers, and derivatives of these names) are airlines dedicated to the transport of cargo. ... In the airline industry, a focus city is a location that is not a hub, but from which the airline has flights to at least several destinations other than its hubs. ... Northwest Airlines, Inc. ...


Highways

Interstates around Indianapolis
Interstates around Indianapolis

Five major Interstates serve the Indianapolis area including I-70 with transportation to St. Louis and Columbus, Ohio; I-74 to Cincinnati and Danville, Illinois, I-65 to Chicago and Louisville, I-69 to Fort Wayne, and the I-465 Beltway. The I-865 Connector contains part of U.S. Route 52 and connects I-65 to I-465, on the northwest side of Indianapolis. Future interstate plans include possibly extending I-69 southwest to Evansville, Indiana. I-70 looking westbound near Mile 326, Wabaunsee County, Kansas Interstate 70 is a long interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 74 is an interstate highway in the midwestern United States. ... Interstate 65 is an interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 69 is an interstate highway in the midwestern United States. ... Interstate 465 (or I-465) is the beltway circling Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Northwest section of I-465 in Indianapolis, Indiana was renamed to I-865 in approximately 2001 to prevent I-465 from intersecting with itself. This section was previously known as the dog leg, and the mile markers ran from 900 to 905. ... U.S. Highway 52 is an unusual United States highway. ... Interstate 65 is an interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 465 (or I-465) is the beltway circling Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Interstate 69 is an interstate highway in the midwestern United States. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Vanderburgh Townships Center, German, Knight, Perry, Pigeon Government  - Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel (D) Area  - City 40. ...


Major U.S. highways serving the region include U.S. Routes 31, 40, 52, 36, 136, and 421. This U.S. Highway article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject U.S. Highways. ... U.S. Route 40 is an east-west United States highway. ... U.S. Highway 52 is an unusual United States highway. ... U.S. Highway 36 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 1,414 miles (2,276 km) from east-central Ohio to Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. ... U.S. Highway 136 is a spur of U.S. Highway 36. ... U.S. Highway 421 is a spur of U.S. Highway 21. ...


Mass transit

Indianapolis's transit provider is the Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation, also known as IndyGo. The Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation was established in 1975 after the city of Indianapolis took over the city's transit system. Before 1997, IndyGo was called Metro. Central Indiana Commuter Services (CICS), funded by IndyGo to reduce pollution, serves Indianapolis and surrounding counties. The Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation, commonly known as IndyGo, operates the public transit system for the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. ...


In 1953, the last streetcars ran in Indianapolis. Trolleybuses made their last run in the city four years later in 1957. Since 1957 Indianapolis has had an all-bus transit system. However, an impressive collection of area business leaders have formed Downtown Indianapolis Streetcar Corp., a not-for-profit organization, to investigate whether to build a streetcar line in Downtown Indianapolis. Possible destinations include among others: IUPUI, White River State Park, Indianapolis Zoo, Conseco Fieldhouse, Lucas Oil Stadium, Circle Centre Mall, the Indiana State House and a future development at the MSA site.[30] The streetcar line would provide a convenient way for locals as well as tourists in Downtown for conventions and sports events to move around the various destinations.


People mover

The Clarian people mover connects the Indiana University School of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Wishard Hospital and IUPUI & Indiana University School of Medicine facilities at the north end of the Downtown Canal with Methodist Hospital. The Clarian People Mover is available for public use. Plans for a more expansive system are being considered that would operate throughout downtown Indianapolis. The existing people mover is sometimes inaccurately described as a monorail, but in fact rides on dual concrete beams with the guideway being as wide as the vehicle. A people mover is a fully-automated light rail or tram system. ... The Indiana University School of Medicine is the medical school of Indiana University, based at the IUPUI campus of IU in Indianapolis, Indiana (the main campus of IU being in Bloomington). ... James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children is a childrens hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It is named for James Whitcomb Riley, a writer and poet who lived in Indiana. ... Wishard Memorial Hospital, located in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the citys oldest hospitals, founded in 1855 in response to a smallpox epidemic in the city. ... White River State Park covers 250 acres (1 km²) in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States, just west of the downtown area at 801 W. Washington Street. ... The KL Monorail in Kuala Lumpur, a colorful straddle-beam monorail A monorail is a single rail serving as a track for a wheeled vehicle; also, a vehicle traveling on such a track. ...


Intercity Rail Transportation

Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service to Indianapolis.


Amtrak Train 51, the westbound Cardinal, is scheduled to depart Indianapolis at 6:30am on Monday, Thursday, and Saturday; Amtrak Train 851, the westbound Hoosier State, is scheduled to depart Indianapolis at 6:30am on Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday. Both trains go to Crawfordsville, Lafayette, Rensselaer, Dyer and Chicago Union Station to connect with other trains. The Cardinal is a 1,147-mile (1,844 km) passenger train route operated by Amtrak, connecting New York Penn Station with Chicago Union Station three days a week via Washington, D.C., Charlottesville, Virginia, Cincinnati, Ohio and Indianapolis, Indiana. ... The Hoosier State is a passenger train that provides service on a 196-mile (315 km) route from Chicago to Indianapolis. ... Crawfordsville is a city in Montgomery County, Indiana, United States. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Tippecanoe Townships Fairfield, Wea Platted 1825 Incorporated 1853 Government  - Mayor Tony Roswarski Area  - City 20. ... Rensselaer is a city located in Jasper County, Indiana. ... Dyer is a town located in Lake County, Indiana. ... Union Station is a Chicago train station that opened in 1925, replacing an earlier 1881 station, and is now the only intercity rail terminal in Chicago. ...


Amtrak Train 50, the eastbound Cardinal, is scheduled to depart Indianapolis at 11:59pm on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday with service to Connersville, Cincinnati, Maysville, South Portsmouth, Ashland, Huntington, Charleston, Montgomery, Thurmond, Prince, Hinton, Alderson, White Sulphur Springs, Clifton Forge, Staunton, Charlottesville, Culpeper, Manassas, Alexandria, and Washington, DC and continuing on to New York City. Connersville is a city in Fayette County, Indiana, United States. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Russell Theater, Maysville Maysville is a city located in Mason County, Kentucky, along the Ohio River. ... South Shore is a city located in Greenup County, Kentucky. ... Motto: A proud past. ... Huntington is a city located in the U.S. State of West Virginia along the Ohio River. ... Nickname: Home of Hospitality, The most northern city of the South and the most southern city of the North, Chemicalville, The Capitol City C-Town Location of Charleston in West Virginia. ... Montgomery is a city located in West Virginia. ... Thurmond is a town located in Fayette County, West Virginia on the New River. ... Hinton is a city located in Summers County, West Virginia. ... Alderson is a town located in West Virginia. ... Clifton Forge is a town in Alleghany County in the state of Virginia. ... West Beverley Street in downtown Staunton Staunton (IPA: or STAN-tehn or STANT-en) is an independent city within the confines of Augusta County in the commonwealth of Virginia. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. ... Culpeper is an incorporated town in Culpeper County, Virginia, United States. ... Manassas redirects here. ... Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Founded 1749 Government  - Mayor William D. Euille Area  - Total 15. ... Burnhams Union Station: the central block of the immense front façade of Union Station Union Station is the grand ceremonial train station designed to be the entrance to Washington, DC when it opened in 1907. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ...


Transportation issues

Although Indianapolis has managed to sustain a relatively low amount of traffic congestion for a city of its population, this is mostly due to the fact that the city covers 365 square miles,[31] an area much larger than most cities with roughly 785,000 people. This is an area larger than both New York City or Chicago, cities with millions of people. Indianapolis' sprawled out low density rate might also be the reason the city has yet to further develop its mass transit bus system or a heavy or light rail network. As the 13th largest city in the U.S., Indianapolis has repeatedly been ranked below 40th in mass transit availability. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... In the United States of America, transit describes local area common carrier passenger transportation configured to provide scheduled service on fixed routes on a non-reservation basis. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ...


Some complaints include[32]:

  • the bus-only city mass transit system; the absence of rapid transit and light rail.
  • the undue emphasis on automobile travel in city planning; the lack of sidewalks and bike paths.
  • excessive automobile usage resulting in environmental degradation (specifically air pollution), as evidenced in the city's often poor air quality
  • the lack of cross-town bus routes, forcing bus riders to travel downtown to cross from one side of the city to another, often doubling or tripling what the trip distance would have been with a direct route.
  • the "lack of vision" in building a transportation network based entirely on non-renewable resources and old technology
  • the paucity of scheduled bus routes, often forcing riders to choose between arriving at a destination extremely early, or late.
  • the lack of night bus services, which forces those who work late shifts to find other ways to get around. These can be much more expensive.
  • the fiscal costs of building (for instance liens), repairing, and replacing roads

There are other concerns over a lack of safe walking paths in many areas of the city. Many suburbs which were incorporated in the 1960s and 1970s are now relatively near the center of the city, and don’t have sidewalks. This often forces pedestrians to navigate a narrow road shoulder near high-speed automobile traffic. Autobus redirects here. ... “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Car redirects here. ... For the former Microsoft owned website see: Sidewalk. ... This article or section should include material from Cycle path debate Segregated cycle facilities may consist of a separate road, track, path or lane that is designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is generally excluded. ... Environmental degradation is the deterioration of the environment through depletion of resources such as air, water and soil; the destruction of ecosystems and the extinction of wildlife. ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ... The Air Quality Index (AQI) is a standardized index of the air quality in a given location, given in parts per billion. ... A renewable resource is a natural resource that is not depleted when used by human beings. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Fiscal municipality in Huesca, Spain The term fiscal refers to government debt, expenditures and revenues, or to finance (particularly financial revenue) in general. ... In law, lien is the broadest term for any sort of charge or encumbrance against an item of property that secures the payment of a debt or performance of some other obligation. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... In local government, incorporation occurs when municipalities such as cities, towns, townships, villages, and boroughs become self-governing entities under the laws of the state or province in which they are located. ... A pedestrian at the intersection of Alinga Street and Northbourne Avenue, Canberra, Australia A pedestrian is a person travelling on foot, whether walking or running. ... A hard shoulder or simply shoulder is a reserved area alongside the verge of a road or motorway. ...


Indianapolis in popular media

The city of Indianapolis is referred to 12 times in the hit movie, Uncle Buck. The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...


Television sitcom One Day at a Time was set in Indianapolis. The opening credits of the show include a shot of the Pyramids, a set of three distinctive office buildings located near the north-western edge of the city. The first seasons of Good Morning Miss Bliss (later to become Saved by the Bell) and Thunder Alley were set in Indianapolis. The U.S. version of Men Behaving Badly, and CBS's 2005 drama Close to Home were also set in Indianapolis. Also, in a darker view, in the television show Jericho, Indianapolis is one of 23 American cities destroyed by nuclear weapons, a fate which also befalls the city in the Worldwar series of novels by Harry Turtledove. This article is about a genre of comedy. ... One Day at a Time is a long-running American situation comedy that portrayed a divorced mother, played by Bonnie Franklin, her two teenage daughters (Mackenzie Phillips and Valerie Bertinelli and their building superintendent (Pat Harrington, Jr. ... Saved by the Bell is also a 1969 solo single by Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees Saved by the Bell, initially known as Good Morning, Miss Bliss was a popular teen sitcom which ran from 1987–1993. ... Saved by the Bell is an American sitcom that originally aired between 1989 and 1993. ... Thunder Alley was an American television program, a situation comedy which ran for a season and a half (from 9 March 1994 until 4 July 1995) on the ABC Television Network. ... Men Behaving Badly is a British comedy, which first broadcasted in 1992 on the ITV network, however moved to BBC One (and a later timeslot) from the third series onwards. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Close to Home was an American crime-drama television series co-produced by Warner Bros. ... This article is about the CBS television drama. ... Worldwar is a series of four alternate history science fiction novels by Harry Turtledove. ... Harry Norman Turtledove (born June 14, 1949) is an American historian and prolific novelist who has written historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction works. ...


See also

Indianapolis Portal
Indiana Portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Indianapolis. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Indiana. ... // [edit] Early years Indianapolis was founded as the state capital in 1821 by an act of the Indiana General Assembly. ... Downtown Indianapolis, looking east from the White River The term Downtown Indianapolis refers to the central business district, or CBD, of Indianapolis, Indiana. ...

Gallery

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1815x1119, 374 KB) I am the author =D File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 600 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this photo from Crown Hill Cemetary which is approximately 4 miles north of downtown Indianapolis. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 597 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This photo was taken from the top of a IU Hospital parking garage in spring 2007. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 583 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This photo was also taken from the top floor of an IU Hospital parking garage in spring 2007. ... A photo of the downtown Indianapolis, IN skyline. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 2009 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Indianapolis, Indiana Marion County, Indiana ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x3072, 2882 KB) Alexander Nevsky Cathedral Sofia, Bulgaria Source: Photo Pascal Reusch File links The following pages link to this file: Alexander Nevsky Cathedral, Sofia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File links Indianapolis_USA2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 604 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (747 × 741 pixel, file size: 89 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 611 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (747 × 733 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Sister cities

Indianapolis has five sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI): Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Cologne (German: , IPA: ; local dialect: Kölle ) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Lambro River runs through Monza. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Area: 44,6 km² Population  - males  - females 16. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... This article is about the city. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Country Canada Province Ontario Established 1 January 1850 (township)   1 January 1967 (borough) Incorporated Amalgamation June 1983 (city) 1 January 1998 Government  - Mayor David Miller (Toronto Mayor)  - Governing Body Toronto City Council  - MPs John Cannis, Jim Karygiannis, Derek Lee, John McKay, Dan McTeague, Tom Wappel  - MPPs Bas Balkissoon, Lorenzo Berardinetti...

References

  1. ^ Population Estimates for the 25 Largest U.S. Cities based on July 1, 2006 Population Estimates (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-06-28.
  2. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ U.S. Census Figures. United States Census (2006). Retrieved on 2008-01-16.
  4. ^ Counties in Indiana
  5. ^ Indiana Convention Center Expansion Revealed. WISH-TV (2007-06-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-16.
  6. ^ NWS Indianapolis, IN
  7. ^ Indianapolis, Indiana: Averages. National Weather Service.
  8. ^ Indianapolis Building Makeover
  9. ^ Data for Indianapolis, Indiana, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 17, 2007.
  10. ^ Indianapolis, Indiana (IN) Detailed Profile - relocation, real estate, travel, jobs, hospitals, schools, crime, news, sex offenders
  11. ^ New face for business growth in Indy: Hispanic Business Council at forefront with its first meeting. Indianapolis Star (2006-04-03). Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  12. ^ Metro and State. Indianapolis Star (2007-12-22). Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  13. ^ Council vote gives Ballard IMPD control. Indianapolis Star (2008-04-03). Retrieved on 2008-02-15.
  14. ^ Table 4, Illinois-Missouri
  15. ^ http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061219/LOCAL/612190411/-1/ZONES04
  16. ^ No comfort zone | IndyStar.com | The Indianapolis Star
  17. ^ City-County Council Party Switch
  18. ^ 2004 Presidential Election in Indianapolis
  19. ^ Rep. Julia Carson dies at age 69
  20. ^ Storybook Ending?, Indianapolis Star. Accessed December 22, 2007.
  21. ^ http://www.ffa.org/indymove/index.htm accessed on October 23, 2006
  22. ^ Ballard says it's a go: Indy will seek 2012 Super Bowl. The Indianapolis Star (2008-02-18). Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  23. ^ Indianapolis Impalas Rugby Football Club
  24. ^ Indianapolis Parks
  25. ^ Clymer, Floyd. Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (New York: Bonanza, 1950), p.102.
  26. ^ Clymer, p.36.
  27. ^ Clymer, p.128-9.
  28. ^ Indianapolis Housing Market
  29. ^ Best Cities For Jobs In 2008 - Forbes.com
  30. ^ IBJ.com Story Detail
  31. ^ The 2005 Urban Mobility Report
  32. ^ Indianapolis Transportation Woes

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census is a decennial census mandated by the United States Constitution. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... WISH-TV channel 8 is the CBS affiliate in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Indianapolis Star began publishing on June 6, 1903 and celebrated its 100th anniversary on June 6, 2003. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Indianapolis Star began publishing on June 6, 1903 and celebrated its 100th anniversary on June 6, 2003. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Indianapolis Star began publishing on June 6, 1903 and celebrated its 100th anniversary on June 6, 2003. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Indianapolis Star is a daily newspaper which began publishing on June 6, 1903. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  • Indianapolis, Indiana is at coordinates 39°47′27″N 86°08′52″W / 39.790942, -86.147685 (Indianapolis, Indiana)Coordinates: 39°47′27″N 86°08′52″W / 39.790942, -86.147685 (Indianapolis, Indiana)

  Results from FactBites:
 
About Indianapolis, Indiana (1074 words)
Indianapolis lives up to its title, "Crossroads of America." Indy is served by 13 interstate highways and 12 major airlines and one can reach 65% of the nation's population in a day's drive.
Indianapolis was considered one of the most conservative metros in the nation until the 1990's.
The Indianapolis government has tried to emphasize this diverse culture by designating specific areas known as "Cultural Districts." These districts are Broad Ripple Village, The Canal and White River State Park, Fountain Square, Indiana Avenue, Massachusetts Avenue, Monument Circle, the War Memorial Plaza, and the Wholesale District.
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