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Encyclopedia > Indiana
The State of Indiana
Flag of Indiana State seal of Indiana
Flag of Indiana Seal
Nickname(s): The Hoosier State
Motto(s): The Crossroads of America
Official language(s) English
Demonym Hoosier
Capital Indianapolis
Largest city Indianapolis
Largest metro area Indianapolis-Carmel MSA
Area  Ranked 38th in the US
 - Total 36,418 sq mi
(94,321 km²)
 - Width 140 miles (225 km)
 - Length 270 miles (435 km)
 - % water 1.5
 - Latitude 37° 46′ N to 41° 46′ N
 - Longitude 84° 47′ W to 88° 6′ W
Population  Ranked 15th in the US
 - Total 6,080,485
 - Density 169.5/sq mi 
65.46/km² (16th in the US)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Hoosier Hill
Wayne County [1]
1,257 ft  (383 m)
 - Mean 689 ft  (210 m)
 - Lowest point Ohio River and mouth of Wabash River
Posey County [1]
320 ft  (98 m)
Admission to Union  December 11, 1816 (19th)
Governor Mitch Daniels (R)
Lieutenant Governor Becky Skillman (R)
U.S. Senators Richard Lugar (R)
Evan Bayh (D)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zones  
 - 80 counties Eastern UTC-5/-4
 - 12 counties in
Evansville and
Gary Metro Areas
Central: UTC-6/-5
Abbreviations IN US-IN
Website www.in.gov

The State of Indiana (IPA: /ˌɪndiˈænə/) is the 19th U.S. state and is located in the midwestern region of the United States of America. With about 6.3 million residents, it is ranked 15th in population and 17th in population density.[2] Indiana is ranked 38th in land area. Look up Indiana in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Indiana. ... State seal of Indiana. ... Categories: Stub | U.S. state flags | Indiana ... The seal of Indiana has gone through several revisions since the region was a part of the Northwest Territory. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... A Hoosier is a resident or native of the U.S. state of Indiana, but used as a slang term for redneck in other parts of the country, especially in Missouri, Illinois and Arkansas. ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_IN.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Indiana ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... A Hoosier is a resident or native of the U.S. state of Indiana, but used as a slang term for redneck in other parts of the country, especially in Missouri, Illinois and Arkansas. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... The Indianapolis, IN, Metropolitan Statistical Area is the 33rd largest Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2006) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2006, according to the 2005 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Hoosier Hill is the highest point in the state of Indiana at 1257 feet. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ... Posey County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Mitchell Elias Mitch Daniels, Jr. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Becky Skillman Rebecca Becky Skillman is the 50th and current Lieutenant Governor of the State of Indiana. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Richard Green Dick Lugar (born April 4, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Indiana. ... Birch Evans Bayh III (commonly known as Evan Bayh) (pronounced like bye; IPA pronunciation: ) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Indiana to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Evansville is a city located in Vanderburgh County, Indiana. ... // Place name Several places in the United States of America are called Gary (in decreasing population order): Gary, Indiana Gary, West Virginia Gary, Minnesota Gary, South Dakota There are other similarly-named towns: Gary City, Texas Garysburg, North Carolina Garyville, Louisiana GNIS also lists the following tiny (or uninhabited) towns...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized...


Indiana is a diverse state with a few large urban areas and a number of smaller industrial cities. It is known nationally for its professional sports teams, the Indianapolis Colts, champions of the 2006 NFL season's Super Bowl, the NBA Indiana Pacers and for the Indianapolis 500 motorsports race, the largest single-day sporting event in the world that is held annually over the Memorial Day weekend, and for a strong basketball tradition, often called Hoosier Hysteria. League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... The 2006 season of the National Football League (NFL) was the 87th one played by the major professional American football league in the United States. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Indiana Pacers are a professional basketball team that plays in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... “Indy 500” redirects here. ... Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... A Peugeot 206 World Rally Car Motor racing and Motorsports redirect here. ... Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ... Hoosier Hysteria. ...


Residents of Indiana are called Hoosiers. Although many stories are told, the origin of the term is unknown. The state's name means "Land of the Indians", or simply "Indian Land". The name dates back to at least 1800, when Indiana Territory was created, at which time the territory was unceded Indian land.[3] Angel Mounds State Historic Site, one of the best preserved prehistoric Native American sites in the United States, can be found in south-western Indiana near Evansville.[4] A Hoosier is a resident or native of the U.S. state of Indiana, but used as a slang term for redneck in other parts of the country, especially in Missouri, Illinois and Arkansas. ... Map of the Indiana Territory Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... Angel Mounds State Historic Site is located on the Ohio River in Vanderburgh County, Indiana adjacent to Evansville. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Indiana Country State County Vanderburgh Government  - Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel (D) Area  - City 40. ...

Contents

Geography

See also: Geography of Indiana, List of Indiana rivers, and Watersheds of Indiana
Indiana state welcome sign
Indiana state welcome sign

Indiana is bounded on the north by Lake Michigan and the state of Michigan; on the east by Ohio; on the south by Kentucky, with which it shares the Ohio River as a border; and on the west by Illinois. Indiana is one of the Great Lakes states. The geography of the U.S. State of Indiana is both diverse and fascinating. ... This is a list of rivers in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... The Watersheds of Indiana consist of six distinct Indiana watershed regions that drain in to five major bodies of water. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ...


The northern boundary of the states of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois was originally defined to be a latitudinal line drawn through the southernmost tip of Lake Michigan. Since such a line would not provide Indiana with usable frontage on the lake, its northern border was shifted ten miles (16 km) north. The northern borders of Ohio and Illinois were also shifted from this original plan.[5]


The 475 mile (764 km) long Wabash River bisects the state from northeast to southwest before flowing south, mostly along the Indiana-Illinois border. The river has given Indiana a few theme songs, such as On the Banks of the Wabash, The Wabash Cannonball and Back Home Again, In Indiana.[6][7] The Wabash is also the longest free-flowing river east of the Mississippi; 400 miles (640 km) from the Huntington dam to the Ohio River. The White River (a tributary of the Wabash, which is a tributary of the Ohio) zigzags through central Indiana. The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ... On the Banks of the Wabash, Far Away is the state of Indianas official state song. ... The Wabash Cannonball is an American folk song that is thought to have originated sometime in the late nineteenth century. ... Back Home Again in Indiana was originally composed by Ballard MacDonald and James Hanley in 1917. ...


There are 24 Indiana state parks, nine man-made reservoirs, and hundreds of lakes in the state. Areas under the control and protection of the National Park Service or the United States Forest Service include:[8] The U.S. state of Indiana has 24 state parks maintained and operated by Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR). ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Logo of the U.S. Forest Service. ...

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article is about the United States city, Vincennes. ... Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, a U.S. national lakeshore authorized by Congress in 1966, is located in Northwest Indiana. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial preserves the southern Indiana farm where Abraham Lincoln lived from 1816 to 1830. ... Lincoln City is a settlement in Spencer County, southwestern Indiana, located five minutes south of I-64, northeast of Evansville, approximately twenty miles north of the Ohio River. ... The Hoosier National Forest, in the hills of south central Indiana, provides a wide mix of opportunities and resources for people to enjoy. ... Bedford is a city in Lawrence County, Indiana, United States. ...

Northern Indiana

The northwest corner of the state is part of the Chicago metropolitan area and has nearly one million residents.[9] Gary, and the cities and towns that make up the northern half of Lake, Porter, and La Porte Counties bordering on Lake Michigan, are effectively commuter suburbs of Chicago. Porter and Lake counties are commonly referred to as "The Calumet Region", or "The Region" for short. The name comes from the fact that the Grand Calumet and Little Calumet rivers run through the area. These counties are all in the Central Time Zone along with Chicago. NICTD owns and operates the South Shore Line, a commuter rail line that runs electric-powered trains between South Bend and Chicago.[10] Sand dunes and heavy industry share the shoreline of Lake Michigan in northern Indiana. Along the shoreline of Lake Michigan in Northern Indiana one can find many parks between the industrial areas. The Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore and the Indiana Dunes State Park are two natural wonders of the area. Chicagoland redirects here. ... This article is about the city. ... Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Porter County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... LaPorte County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The South Shore Line is an electrically powered interurban streetcar line operated by the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District (NICTD) between Randolph Street Terminal in downtown Chicago, Illinois and the South Bend Regional Airport in South Bend, Indiana. ... The South Shore Line is an electrically powered interurban streetcar line operated by the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District (NICTD) between Randolph Street Terminal in downtown Chicago, Illinois and the South Bend Regional Airport in South Bend, Indiana. ... South Bend is the name of the following places in the United States of America: South Bend, Indiana South Bend Township, Kansas South Bend Township, Minnesota South Bend, Nebraska South Bend Township, Pennsylvania South Bend, Washington This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, a U.S. national lakeshore authorized by Congress in 1966, is located in Northwest Indiana. ... Indiana Dunes State Park is a 2,182 acre (8. ...


The area is marked with swell and swale topography as it retreats South from Lake Michigan. The ecology can change dramatically between swells, or on opposite sides of the same swell. Plants and animals adapted to marshes are generally found in the swales, while forests or even prickly pear cactus are found in the dryer swells.[11] A swale is low tract of land, especially when moist or marshy. ... Species Some 250, see also Example species. ...

Most of northern and central Indiana is flat farmland dotted with small cities and towns, such as North Manchester.
Most of northern and central Indiana is flat farmland dotted with small cities and towns, such as North Manchester.

The Kankakee River, which winds through northern Indiana, serves somewhat as a demarcating line between suburban northwest Indiana and the rest of the state.[12] Before it was drained and developed for agriculture, the Kankakee Marsh was one of the largest freshwater marshes in the country.[13] Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1344 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1344 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... North Manchester, Indiana from the air looking northeast. ... The Kankakee River is a tributary of the Illinois River, approximately 90 mi (144 km) long, in northwestern Indiana and northeastern Illinois in the United States. ...


The South Bend metropolitan area, in north central Indiana, is the center of commerce in the region better known as Michiana. Fort Wayne, the state's second largest city, is located in the northeastern part of the state where it serves the state as a transportation hub. Michiana is a region in northern Indiana and southwest Michigan centered around the city of South Bend, Indiana. ... Nickname: Motto: Ke Ki On Ga Location in the state of Indiana, USA Coordinates: , Country State County Allen Founded October 22, 1794 Incorporated February 22, 1840 Government  - Mayor Graham Richard (D)  - City Clerk Sandra Kennedy (D)  - City Council John N. Crawford (R) Samuel J. Talarico, Jr (R) John Shoaff (D...


Northeastern Indiana is home to a number of lakes, many of which are the remains of the glaciers that covered Indiana thousands of years ago. Some of these lakes include Lake James in Pokagon State Park, Lake Maxinkuckee, Lake Wawasee and Lake Tippecanoe. Lake Wawasee is the largest natural lake in Indiana, while Lake Tippecanoe is the deepest lake, reaching depths of over 120 feet. Both lakes are located in Kosciusko County. Chain O' Lakes State Park, located in Noble County, contains 11 lakes, 8 of which are connected by natural channels. Pokagon State Park is located in ?????????? Indiana close to the village of Fremont and 5 miles (8 km) north of Angola. ... Lake Maxinkuckee, covering 1,864 acres (754 ha), is the second largest natural lake in the U.S. state of Indiana . ... Lake Wawasee satellite photo Lake Wawasee, formerly Turkey Lake is a large lake south of Syracuse in Kosciusko County, Indiana. ... Large Lake in North Central Indiana, created through glaciantion, is the deepest natural lake in the State of Indiana. ... Kosciusko County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... For the similarly-named state park in Illinois, see Chain OLakes State Park Chain O Lakes is a state park in Indiana. ... Noble County is the name of several counties in the United States: Noble County, Indiana Noble County, Oklahoma Noble County, Ohio This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Central Indiana

The state capital, Indianapolis, is situated in the central portion of the state. It is intersected by numerous Interstates and U.S. highways, giving the state its motto as "The Crossroads of America".[14] Other cities and towns located within the area include Anderson, Avon, Beech Grove, Bloomington, Brownsburg, Carmel, Castleton, Clermont, Columbus, Crawfordsville, Cumberland, Danville, Fishers, Franklin, Greenwood, Greenfield, Homecroft, Kokomo, Lafayette, Lawrence, Lebanon, Mooresville, Muncie, Plainfield, Richmond, Southport, Speedway, Terre Haute, West Lafayette, and Zionsville. Indianapolis redirects here. ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... Current U.S. Route shield Current U.S. Route shield in California The system of United States Numbered Highways (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated system of roads and highways in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... Anderson is a city in Madison County, Indiana, United States. ... Avon is a town in Hendricks County, Indiana, United States. ... Beech Grove Marion County, Indiana, United States. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Monroe Mayor Mark Kruzan Area    - City 51. ... Brownsburg is a town in Hendricks County, Indiana, United States. ... Carmel (IPA: ) is a city in Hamilton County, Indiana, United States. ... Castleton is a heavily commercialized area located on the north side of Indianapolis and is the southern terminus of Interstate 69. ... Clermont is a town located in Indiana. ... Columbus (pronounced ) is the county seat of Bartholomew County, Indiana. ... Crawfordsville is a city in Montgomery County, Indiana, United States. ... Cumberland is a town located in Hancock County, Indiana. ... Danville is a town in Hendricks County, Indiana, USA. The population was 6,418 at the 2000 census. ... Fishers, located in Hamilton County, Indiana, is a town of population 52,390, according to a special census conducted in 2004. ... Franklin is a city in Johnson County, Indiana, United States. ... Greenwood (IPA: ) is a city in Johnson County, Indiana, United States. ... Greenfield is a city in Hancock County, Indiana, United States. ... Homecroft is a town located in Indiana. ... For the band, see Kokomo (band). ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Tippecanoe Townships Fairfield, Wea Platted 1825 Incorporated 1853 Government  - Mayor Tony Roswarski Area  - City 20. ... Lawrence is a city located in Marion County, Indiana. ... Mooresville is a town in Morgan County, Indiana, in the United States. ... Muncie (IPA: ) is a city in Delaware County in east central Indiana, best known as the home of Ball State University and the birthplace of the Ball Corporation. ... Plainfield is a town in Hendricks County, Indiana, United States. ... Richmond (IPA: ) is a city in east central Indiana, which borders Ohio. ... Southport is a city located in Marion County, Indiana. ... Nickname: Home of the 500 Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Marion Government  - Town Council Area  - City  4. ... Terre Haute (IPA: ) is a city in Vigo County, Indiana near the states western border with Illinois. ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... Zionsville is a town located in the extreme southeast area of Boone County, Indiana. ...


Rural areas in the central portion of the state are typically composed of a patchwork of fields and forested areas. The geography of Central Indiana consists of gently rolling hills and sandstone ravines carved out by the retreating glaciers. Many of these ravines can be found in west-central Indiana, specifically along Sugar Creek in Turkey Run State Park and Shades State Park. A green field or paddock In agriculture, a field refers generally to an area of land enclosed or otherwise and used for agricultural purposes such as: Cultivating crops Usage as a paddock or generally an enclosure of livestock Land left to lie fallow or as arable land See also Pasture... This article is about a community of trees. ... Red sandstone interior of Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona, worn smooth due to erosion by flash flooding over millions of years Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-size mineral or rock grains. ... Turkey Run State Park is located in Parke County, Indiana, in the west-central part of the state on State Road 47 two miles east of State Road 41. ... Shades State Park is a state park in Indiana. ...


Southern Indiana

Main article: Southern Indiana

Evansville, the third largest city in Indiana, is located in the southwestern corner of the state. It is located in a tri-state area that includes Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky. The south-central cities of Clarksville, Jeffersonville, and New Albany are part of the Louisville metropolitan area. Vincennes, the oldest city in the state, is located on the Wabash River. Southern Indiana, in the United States, is notable because it is culturally and geographically more similar to the South than it is to the rest of the state of Indiana. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Indiana Country State County Vanderburgh Government  - Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel (D) Area  - City 40. ... NY-MA-CT Tripoint Marker CT-RI-MA Tripoint Marker The 38th point is actually a quadripoint, where 4 states meet (Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico) at the Four Corners Monument. ... Clarksville is a town in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Jeffersonville is a city located in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... New Albany is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Ky. ... Louisville redirects here. ... This article is about the United States city, Vincennes. ... The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ...


Southern Indiana is a mixture of farmland, forest and very hilly areas, especially near Louisville and in the south central lime hills areas. The Hoosier National Forest is a 200,000 acre (80,900 ha) nature preserve in south central Indiana. Southern Indiana's topography is more varied than that in the north and generally contains more hills and geographic variation than the northern portion, such as the "Knobs," a series of 1,000 ft (300 m). hills that run parallel to the Ohio River in south-central Indiana. The bottomlands of Indiana, where the Wabash and Ohio converge, hosts numerous plant and animal species normally found in the Lower Mississippi and Gulf Coast region of the United States.[15] Brown County is well-known for its hills covered with colorful autumn foliage, T.C. Steele's former home, and Nashville, the county seat and shopping destination. Harrison and Crawford Counties boast three of the state's most popular commercial caves at Wyandotte, Marengo, and Squire Boone Caverns. The Hoosier National Forest, in the hills of south central Indiana, provides a wide mix of opportunities and resources for people to enjoy. ... Brown County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... Nashville is a town in Brown County, Indiana, United States. ...

Indiana State House; Indianapolis, IN; Built with Southern Indiana Limestone

The limestone geology of Southern Indiana has created numerous caves and one of the largest limestone quarry regions in the USA. Many of Indiana's official buildings, such as the State capitol building, the downtown monuments, the Indiana University School of Law in Indianapolis, many buildings at Indiana University in Bloomington, and the Indiana Government Center are all examples of Indiana architecture made with Indiana limestone. Indiana limestone has also been used in many other famous structures in the US, such as the University of Illinois' Memorial Stadium, the Empire State Building, the Pentagon, and the Washington National Cathedral. In addition, 35 of the 50 state capitol buildings are also made of Indiana Limestone.[16] The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... Washington National Cathedral has been the site of three presidential state funerals: for Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ronald W. Reagan, Gerald R. Ford and a presidential burial for Woodrow Wilson and a memorial service for Harry Truman. ...


For sixty years, from 1890 to 1950, the United States Census found the center of population to lie in southern Indiana. The mean center of U.S. population is determined by the United States Census Bureau after tabulating the results of each census. ...


Climate

Most of Indiana has a humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfa), with hot, humid summers and cool to cold winters. The extreme southern portions of the state border on a humid subtropical climate (Koppen Cfa) with somewhat milder winters. Summertime maximum temperatures average around 85 °F (29 °C) with cooler nights around 60 °F (16 °C). Winters are a little more variable, but generally cool to cold temperatures with all but the northern part of the state averaging above freezing for the maximum January temperature, and the minimum temperature below 20 °F (-8 °C) for most of the state.[17]The state receives a good amount of precipitation, 40 inches (1,000 mm) annually statewide, in all four seasons, with March through August being slightly wetter. The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ...


The state does have its share of severe weather, both winter storms and thunderstorms. While generally not receiving as much snow as some states farther north, the state does have occasional blizzards, some due to lake effect snow. Two major paralyzing snowstorms bear merit. The January, 1978 Blizzard, which affected almost the entire state, and the December, 2004 Blizzard, which primarily affected the Ohio Valley and later caused the severe flooding of the White, Wabash, and the Ohio Rivers in January, 2005. The state averages around 40-50 days of thunderstorms per year, with March and April being the period of most severe storms. While not considered part of Tornado Alley, Indiana is the Great Lakes state which is most vulnerable to tornadic activity. In fact, three of the most severe tornado outbreaks in U.S. history affected Indiana, the Tri-State Tornado of 1925, the Palm Sunday tornado outbreak of 1965 and the Super Outbreak of 1974. The Evansville Tornado of November 2005 killed 25 people, 20 people in Vanderburgh County and 5 in Warrick County. A rolling thundercloud over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... This article is about snowstorms. ... Lake-effect precipitation coming off the Great Lakes, as seen from NEXRAD. Lake effect snow, which can be a type of snowsquall, is produced in the winter when cold, artic dry winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, picking up water vapor which freezes and is deposited on... An outline of Significant Tornado Alley in the United States, where the highest percentage of violent tornadoes occur Tornado Alley is a colloquial term most often used in reference to the area of the United States in which tornadoes are most frequent. ... A tornado in central Oklahoma. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Great Tri-State Tornado of Wednesday, March 18, 1925, crossed from southeastern Missouri, through southern Illinois, then into southwestern Indiana, and was the deadliest tornado in U.S. history. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The first Palm Sunday tornado outbreak occurred on April 11, 1965 and involved 78 tornadoes (38 significant, 19 violent, 21 killers) hitting the Midwest. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Super Outbreak is the largest tornado outbreak on record. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Evansville Tornado of November 2005 was a powerful tornado that formed early in the morning of November 6, 2005, outside of Evansville, Indiana, a city in southwestern Indiana on the Ohio River. ... Warrick County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures for Largest Indiana Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Evansville 40/23 45/26 56/35 67/44 77/54 86/64 89/68 86/64 81/57 70/45 56/36 44/27
Fort Wayne 31/16 35/19 47/29 60/38 72/49 81/59 84/62 82/60 75/53 63/42 48/33 36/22
Indianapolis 34/18 40/22 51/32 63/41 74/52 82/61 86/65 84/63 77/55 66/44 52/34 39/24
South Bend 31/16 36/19 47/28 59/38 71/48 80/58 83/63 81/61 74/53 62/42 48/33 36/22
Source: US Travel Weather[18]

History

Main article: History of Indiana

The area of Indiana has been settled since before the development of the Hopewell culture (ca. 100–400 CE).[19] It was part of the Mississippian culture from roughly the year 1000 up to 1400.[20] The specific Native American tribes that inhabited this territory at that time were primarily the Miami and the Shawnee.[21] The area was claimed for New France in the 17th century, handed over to the Kingdom of Great Britain as part of the settlement at the end of the French and Indian War, given to the United States after the American Revolution, soon after which it became part of the Northwest Territory, then the Indiana Territory, and joined the Union in 1816 as the 19th state. Indiana fought on the Union side during the American Civil War and prohibited slavery. See also Northwest Indian War.[21] This article should appear in one or more categories. ... Hopewell mounds from the Mound City Group in Ohio Hopewell culture is the term used to describe common aspects of the Native American culture that flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States from 200 BC to 400 A.D. At its greatest extent, Hopewell culture stretched from... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The Miami are a Native American tribe originally found in Indiana and Ohio, and now living also in Oklahoma. ... The Shawnee are a people native to North America, and are therefore considered to be Native Americans. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... Map of the Indiana Territory Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States Western Lakes Confederacy Commanders Josiah Harmar Arthur St. ...


Pioneer Era

On June 29, 1816, Indiana adopted a constitution, and on December 11, 1816, became the 19th State to join the Union.[22] is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ...


Indiana filled up from the Ohio River north. Migration, mostly from Kentucky and Ohio, was so rapid that by 1820 the population was 147,176, and by 1830 the sales of public lands for the previous decade reached 3,588,000 acres (5,600 sq mi; 14,500 km²) and the population was 343,031. It had more than doubled since 1820. The first state capital was in the southern Indiana city of Corydon.[23] Corydon is a town in Harrison County, Indiana, United States. ...


Transportation

Down the Mississippi and its tributaries (the Ohio and Wabash) was to be found the sole outlet for the increasing produce of the Middle West, whose waters drained into the great valley. Districts which were not upon streams navigable by even the lightest draught steamboat were economically handicapped. The small, flat boat was their main reliance. Roads suitable for heavy carriage were few up to the middle of the century. The expense and time attending shipment of merchandise from the east at that time were almost prohibitive. To meet this condition, the building of canals (espoused by the constitution of 1816) was long advocated, in emulation of Ohio which took example after New York State. In 1826, Congress granted a strip two and a half miles wide on each side of the proposed canal. A very extensive and ambitious scale of main and lateral canals and turnpikes was advocated in consequence. This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Work began on the Wabash and Erie Canal in 1832, on the Whitewater Canal in 1836, on the Central in 1837. Bad financing and "bad times" nearly wrecked the whole scheme; yet, the Wabash and Erie Canal was completed from Toledo to Evansville. It was a great factor in the development of the state, although it brought heavy loss upon the bondholders with the advent of the railroad. Upon completion, the canal actually increased prices of farm products three or fourfold and reduced prices of household needs 60%, a tremendous stimulus to agricultural development. By 1840, the population of the upper Wabash Valley had increased from 12,000 to 270,000. The canal boat that hauled loads of grain east came back loaded with immigrants. In 1846, it is estimated that over thirty families settled every day in the state. The Wabash and Erie Canal was a shipping canal in Indiana that linked the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River via a man-made waterway. ... The Whitewater Canal, which was built between 1836 and 1847, spanned a distance of seventy-six miles and stretched from Lawrenceburg, Indiana on the Ohio River to Hagerstown, Indiana. ...


Manufacturing also developed rapidly. In the ten years between 1840 and 1850, the counties bordering the canal increased in population 397%; those more fertile, but more remote, 190%. The tide of trade, which had been heretofore to New Orleans, was reversed and went east. The canal also facilitated and brought emigration from Ohio, New York, and New England, in the newly established counties in the northern two-thirds of the state. Foreign immigration was mostly from Ireland and Germany. Later, this great canal fell into disuse, and finally was abandoned, as railway mileage increased.


In the next ten years, by 1840, of the public domain 9,122,688 acres (14,250 mi²; 36,918 km²) had been sold. But the state was still heavily in debt, although growing rapidly. In 1851 a new constitution (now in force) was adopted. The first constitution was adopted at a convention assembled at Corydon, which had been the seat of government since December, 1813. The original statehouse, built of blue limestone, still stands; but in 1821, the site of the present capital, Indianapolis, was selected by the legislature. It was in the wilds, sixty miles from civilization. By 1910, it was a city of 225,000 inhabitants, and was the largest inland steam and electric railroad center in the United States that was not located on a navigable waterway. No railroad reached it before 1847.


Demographics

Indiana Population Density Map
Indiana Population Density Map
Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1800 2,632
1810 24,520 831.6%
1820 147,178 500.2%
1830 343,031 133.1%
1840 685,866 99.9%
1850 988,416 44.1%
1860 1,350,428 36.6%
1870 1,680,637 24.5%
1880 1,978,301 17.7%
1890 2,192,404 10.8%
1900 2,516,462 14.8%
1910 2,700,876 7.3%
1920 2,930,390 8.5%
1930 3,238,503 10.5%
1940 3,427,796 5.8%
1950 3,934,224 14.8%
1960 4,662,498 18.5%
1970 5,193,669 11.4%
1980 5,490,224 5.7%
1990 5,544,159 1.0%
2000 6,080,485 9.7%
Est. 2006 6,313,520 3.8%

As of 2006, Indiana had an estimated population of 6,313,520, which is an increase of 47,501, or 0.8%, from the prior year and an increase of 233,003, or 3.8%, since the year 2000.[24] This includes a natural increase since the last census of 196,728 people (that is 541,506 births minus 344,778 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 51,117 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 68,935 people, and migration within the country produced a net loss of 17,818 people. Image File history File links Indiana_population_map. ... Image File history File links Indiana_population_map. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ...


The center of population of Indiana is located in Hamilton County, in the town of Sheridan.[25] Population growth since 1990 has been concentrated in the counties surrounding Indianapolis, with four of the top five fastest-growing counties in that area: Hamilton, Hendricks, Johnson, and Hancock. The other county is Dearborn County, which is near Cincinnati. Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... County seat building in downtown Noblesville. ... Sheridan is a town in Hamilton County, Indiana, United States. ... County seat building in downtown Noblesville. ... Hendricks County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Johnson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Hancock County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Dearborn County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ...


The Evansville Area has experienced a shift in their population. Evansville continues to lose population as of 2005 while Vanderburgh has continued to grow by at least 3% a year. The other counties of the Evansville Area of Southwestern Indiana have started to grow at an increasingly faster rate, especially Gibson and Warrick Counties who are becoming Evansville's suburban counties. Gibson County has seen at least two towns Haubstadt and Fort Branch starting to become "Bedroom Communities" like Newburgh and Chandler in Warrick County. In addition, the two counties have seen their minority (in particular, Asian, African-American, and Hispanic) populations just about double in the last 15 years. Evansville is a city located in Vanderburgh County, Indiana. ... Evansville is a city located in Vanderburgh County, Indiana. ... Vanderburgh County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Evansville is a city located in Vanderburgh County, Indiana. ... Indiana Regions with Southwestern Indiana Highlighted. ... Gibson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Warrick County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... Evansville is a city located in Vanderburgh County, Indiana. ... Gibson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Haubstadt is a town located in Gibson County, Indiana. ... Fort Branch is a town in Gibson County, Indiana, United States. ... Newburgh is a town in Warrick County, Indiana, United States, along the Ohio River. ... Chandler is a town located in Warrick County, Indiana. ... Warrick County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ...

Demographics of Indiana (csv)
By race White Black AIAN Asian NHPI
AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native — NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
2000 (total population) 90.13% 8.91% 0.65% 1.21% 0.08%
2000 (Hispanic only) 3.31% 0.15% 0.07% 0.03% 0.02%
2005 (total population) 89.57% 9.42% 0.63% 1.44% 0.08%
2005 (Hispanic only) 4.29% 0.19% 0.08% 0.04% 0.02%
Growth 2000–2005 (total population) 2.51% 8.99% -0.26% 23.11% 11.31%
Growth 2000–2005 (non-Hispanic only) 1.33% 8.68% -2.87% 22.97% 9.77%
Growth 2000–2005 (Hispanic only) 33.38% 26.82% 21.02% 28.42% 16.70%

As of 2005, the total population included 242,281 foreign-born (3.9%).[26] Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ...


German is the largest ancestry reported in Indiana, with 22.7% of the population reporting that ancestry in the Census. Persons citing "American" (12.0%) and English ancestry (8.9%) are also numerous, as are Irish (10.8%) and Polish (3.0%).[27] German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ... By county. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ...


Religion

Although the largest single religious denomination in the state is Roman Catholic, most of the population are members of various Protestant denominations. A study by the Graduate Center found that 20% are Roman Catholic, 14% are Baptist, 10% are other Christians, 9% are Methodist, and 6% are Lutheran. The study also found that 16% are secular.[28] The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ...


The state is home to the University of Notre Dame and also has a strong parochial school system in the larger metropolitan areas. Southern Indiana is the home to a number of Catholic monasteries and one of the two archabbeys in the United States, St. Meinrad Archabbey. Two conservative denominations, the Free Methodist Church and the Wesleyan Church, have their headquarters in Indianapolis as does the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). The Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches maintains offices and publishing work in Winona Lake. Huntington serves as the home to the Church of the United Brethren in Christ. Anderson is home to the headquarters of Church of God Ministries and Warner Press Publishing House. Fort Wayne is the headquarters of the Missionary Church. Fort Wayne is also home to one of The Lutheran Church Missouri Synod's seminaries - Concordia Theological Seminary. The Friends United Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, the largest branch of American Quakerism, is based in Richmond. Richmond also houses the oldest Quaker seminary in the US, the Earlham School of Religion. The Islamic Society of North America is headquartered just off Interstate 70 in Plainfield, west of Indianapolis. For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... Saint Meinrad Archabbey Saint Meinrad Archabbey in Spencer County, Indiana was founded by monks from Einsiedeln Abbey (Switzerland) on March 21, 1854 and currently is home to approximately 110 monks. ... The Free Methodist Church is a denomination of Methodism, which is a branch of Protestantism. ... Logo of The Wesleyan Church For the former Wesleyan Methodist Church of Great Britain, see Methodist Church of Great Britain The Wesleyan Church is a religious denomination associated with the holiness movement that has roots in Methodism and the teachings of John Wesley. ... The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), often abbreviated as the Disciples of Christ or Christian Church, is a denomination of Christian Restorationism that grew out of the Restoration Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia (then Virginia) and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky. ... The Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches is a theologically conservative fellowship of Brethren churches descended from the Schwarzenau Brethren movement of Alexander Mack of Germany. ... Winona Lake is a town located in Kosciusko County, Indiana. ... Huntington is a city in Huntington County, Indiana, United States. ... The Church of the United Brethren in Christ is an evangelical Christian denomination based in Huntington, Indiana. ... Anderson is a city in Madison County, Indiana, United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Ke Ki On Ga Location in the state of Indiana, USA Coordinates: , Country State County Allen Founded October 22, 1794 Incorporated February 22, 1840 Government  - Mayor Graham Richard (D)  - City Clerk Sandra Kennedy (D)  - City Council John N. Crawford (R) Samuel J. Talarico, Jr (R) John Shoaff (D... The Missionary Church, Inc. ... Fort Wayne was the name of at least two historic forts in the United States of America; one of these gave its name to Fort Wayne, Indiana. ... The Concordia Theological Seminary is an institution of theological higher education of The Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod, located in Fort Wayne, Indiana, dedicated primarily to the preparation of pastors for the congregations and missions of the LCMS (and, when appropriate, of its partner churches). ... Friends United Meeting is an association of yearly meetings of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) encompasing twenty-six yearly meetings in North America, Africa, and the Caribbean. ... Quaker redirects here. ... Richmond (IPA: ) is a city in east central Indiana, which borders Ohio. ... Earlham School of Religion (ESR), a graduate division of Earlham College, located in Richmond, Indiana is the oldest graduate seminary associated with the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). ... The Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), based in Plainfield, Indiana, USA, is an umbrella group that describes itself as the largest Muslim organization in North America. ... Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Plainfield is a town in Hendricks County, Indiana, United States. ...


In 1906, the Census reported there were 938,405 members of different religious denominations; of this total, 233,443 were Methodists (210,593 of the Northern Church); 174,849 were Roman Catholics, 108,188 were Disciples of Christ (and 10,219 members of the Churches of Christ); 92,705 were Baptists (60,203 of the Northern Convention, 13,526 of the National (African American) Convention; 8,132 Primitive Baptists, and 6,671 General Baptists); 58,633 were Presbyterians (49,041 of the Northern Church, and 6,376 of the Cumberland Church—since united with the Northern); 55,768 were Lutherans (34,028 of the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference, 8,310 of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Ohio and other states), 52,700 were United Brethren (48,059 of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ; the others of the " Old Constitution ") and 21,624 of the German Evangelical Synod.[29]


Cities and towns

See also: List of cities in Indiana and List of towns in Indiana
30 Largest Cities [30] 2005 Population
Indianapolis 784,118
Fort Wayne 223,341
Evansville 115,918
South Bend 105,262
Gary 98,715
Hammond 79,217
Bloomington 69,017
Muncie 66,164
Lafayette 60,459
Carmel 59,243
Anderson 57,500
Fishers 57,220
Terre Haute 56,893
Elkhart 52,270
Mishawaka 48,497
Kokomo 46,178
Greenwood 42,236
Lawrence 40,959
Columbus 39,380
Noblesville 38,825
Richmond 37,560
Portage 36,789
New Albany 36,772
Michigan City 32,205
Merrillville 31,525
Goshen 31,269
East Chicago 30,946
Marion 30,644
Valparaiso 29,102
Jeffersonville 28,621

Indianapolis is the capital of Indiana, near the geographic center of the state. Other Indiana cities functioning as centers of United States metropolitan areas include Anderson, Bloomington (home of Indiana University's main campus), Columbus, Elkhart, Evansville (home of University of Evansville and University of Southern Indiana), Fort Wayne (home of Concordia Theological Seminary), Gary (home of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore), Kokomo, Lafayette (adjoining West Lafayette, home of Purdue University), Michigan City, Muncie (home of Ball State University), South Bend (home of University of Notre Dame), and Terre Haute (home of Indiana State University and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology). The following is the list of incorporated cities in Indiana as of July 7, 2007, with population estimates from 2000 through 2005. ... The following is the list of incorporated towns in Indiana as of January 1, 2004: A Advance, Indiana Akron, Indiana Alamo, Indiana Albany, Indiana Albion, Indiana Altona, Indiana Ambia, Indiana Amo, Indiana Andrews, Indiana Arcadia, Indiana Argos, Indiana Ashley, Indiana Atlanta, Indiana Austin, Indiana Avilla, Indiana Avon, Indiana B Bainbridge... Indianapolis redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Ke Ki On Ga Location in the state of Indiana, USA Coordinates: , Country State County Allen Founded October 22, 1794 Incorporated February 22, 1840 Government  - Mayor Graham Richard (D)  - City Clerk Sandra Kennedy (D)  - City Council John N. Crawford (R) Samuel J. Talarico, Jr (R) John Shoaff (D... Nickname: Location in the state of Indiana Country State County Vanderburgh Government  - Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel (D) Area  - City 40. ... South Bend, see South Bend (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Lake Incorporated 1884 Government  - Mayor Thomas McDermott, Jr. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Monroe Mayor Mark Kruzan Area    - City 51. ... Muncie (IPA: ) is a city in Delaware County in east central Indiana, best known as the home of Ball State University and the birthplace of the Ball Corporation. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Tippecanoe Townships Fairfield, Wea Platted 1825 Incorporated 1853 Government  - Mayor Tony Roswarski Area  - City 20. ... Carmel (IPA: ) is a city in Hamilton County, Indiana, United States. ... Anderson is a city in Madison County, Indiana, United States. ... Fishers, located in Hamilton County, Indiana, is a town of population 52,390, according to a special census conducted in 2004. ... Terre Haute (IPA: ) is a city in Vigo County, Indiana near the states western border with Illinois. ... Elkhart (IPA: ) is a city located about 100 miles due east of Chicago in Elkhart County, Indiana, United States. ... Mishawaka (IPA: ) is a city on the St. ... For the band, see Kokomo (band). ... Greenwood (IPA: ) is a city in Johnson County, Indiana, United States. ... Lawrence is a city located in Marion County, Indiana. ... Columbus (pronounced ) is the county seat of Bartholomew County, Indiana. ... Noblesville (IPA: ) is a city in Hamilton County, Indiana, United States. ... Richmond (IPA: ) is a city in east central Indiana, which borders Ohio. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: , County Porter Area  - City 71. ... New Albany is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Ky. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Lake Area  - Total 33. ... Goshen (IPA: ) is a city of about 30,000 people located about 100 miles east of Chicago and 30 miles east of South Bend in the northern Indiana region known as Michiana in the United States. ... East Chicago is a city in Lake County, Indiana, opposite Chicago, Illinois. ... Marion (IPA: ) is a city in Grant County, Indiana, United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Vale of Paradise Location in Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Porter Government  - Mayor Jon Costas (R) Area  - City  11. ... Jeffersonville is a city located in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... The following is the list of incorporated cities in Indiana as of July 7, 2007, with population estimates from 2000 through 2005. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... Anderson is a city in Madison County, Indiana, United States. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Monroe Mayor Mark Kruzan Area    - City 51. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Columbus (pronounced ) is the county seat of Bartholomew County, Indiana. ... Elkhart (IPA: ) is a city located about 100 miles due east of Chicago in Elkhart County, Indiana, United States. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Indiana Country State County Vanderburgh Government  - Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel (D) Area  - City 40. ... The University of Evansville (UE) is a small (approximately 2400 students), private university located in Evansville, Indiana. ... University of Southern Indiana Campus map. ... Nickname: Motto: Ke Ki On Ga Location in the state of Indiana, USA Coordinates: , Country State County Allen Founded October 22, 1794 Incorporated February 22, 1840 Government  - Mayor Graham Richard (D)  - City Clerk Sandra Kennedy (D)  - City Council John N. Crawford (R) Samuel J. Talarico, Jr (R) John Shoaff (D... The Concordia Theological Seminary is an institution of theological higher education of The Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod, located in Fort Wayne, Indiana, dedicated primarily to the preparation of pastors for the congregations and missions of the LCMS (and, when appropriate, of its partner churches). ... This article is about the city. ... Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, a U.S. national lakeshore authorized by Congress in 1966, is located in Northwest Indiana. ... For the band, see Kokomo (band). ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Tippecanoe Townships Fairfield, Wea Platted 1825 Incorporated 1853 Government  - Mayor Tony Roswarski Area  - City 20. ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... Purdue redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Muncie (IPA: ) is a city in Delaware County in east central Indiana, best known as the home of Ball State University and the birthplace of the Ball Corporation. ... Ball State University is a state-run research university located in Muncie, Indiana, USA. Located on the northwest side of the city, Ball States campus spans more than 1,000 acres (4 km²). The student body consists of more than 20,000 students, of which over 18,000 are... South Bend, see South Bend (disambiguation). ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... Terre Haute (IPA: ) is a city in Vigo County, Indiana near the states western border with Illinois. ... Indiana State University (ISU) is a public university that is located in Terre Haute, Indiana. ... Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (abbreviated RHIT), formerly Rose Polytechnic Institute, is a small, private, non-sectarian college specializing in teaching engineering, mathematics, and science. ...

Map of Indiana
Map of Indiana

Indiana cities that function as centers of United States micropolitan areas include Download high resolution version (804x624, 102 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Indiana Categories: National Atlas images | Indiana maps ... Download high resolution version (804x624, 102 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Indiana Categories: National Atlas images | Indiana maps ... United States micropolitan areas, as defined by the Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget, are urban areas in the United States based around a core city or town with a population of 10,000 to 49,999. ...

Other communities with populations of 10,000 or more include Beech Grove, Brownsburg, Carmel, Chesterton, Clarksville, Connersville, Crawfordsville, Crown Point, Dyer, East Chicago, Fishers, Franklin, Goshen, Greencastle, Greenfield, Greenwood, Griffith, Hammond, Highland, Hobart, Jasper, Jeffersonville, Lake Station, La Porte, Lawrence, Lebanon, Martinsville, Merrillville, Mooresville, Munster, New Albany, New Haven, Noblesville, Plainfield, Portage, Princeton, Schererville, Shelbyville, Speedway, Valparaiso (home of Valparaiso University), Washington, West Lafayette (home of Purdue University), Westfield, and Zionsville. Auburn is a city located in DeKalb County, Indiana. ... Bedford is a city in Lawrence County, Indiana, United States. ... Connersville is a city in Fayette County, Indiana, United States. ... Crawfordsville is a city in Montgomery County, Indiana, United States. ... Decatur is a city in Adams County, Indiana, United States. ... Frankfort is a city in Clinton County, Indiana, United States. ... Greensburg is a city in Decatur County, Indiana, United States. ... Huntington is a city in Huntington County, Indiana, United States. ... Jasper is a city in Dubois County, Indiana, United States. ... Kendallville is a city in Wayne Township, Noble County, Indiana, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Madison is a city in Jefferson County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Marion (IPA: ) is a city in Grant County, Indiana, United States. ... New Castle is a city in Henry County, Indiana, 44 miles (71 km) east-northeast of Indianapolis, on the Big Blue River. ... North Vernon is a city located in Jennings County, Indiana. ... Plymouth is a city in Marshall County, Indiana, United States. ... Richmond (IPA: ) is a city in east central Indiana, which borders Ohio. ... Scottsburg is a city in Scott County, Indiana, about 30 miles (47 km) north of Louisville, Kentucky. ... Seymour is a city in Jackson County, Indiana, United States. ... This article is about the United States city, Vincennes. ... Wabash is a city in Wabash County, Indiana, United States. ... Warsaw is a city in, and the county seat of, Kosciusko County, Indiana, United StatesGR6. ... Washington is a city in Daviess County, Indiana, United States. ... Beech Grove Marion County, Indiana, United States. ... Brownsburg is a town in Hendricks County, Indiana, United States. ... Carmel (IPA: ) is a city in Hamilton County, Indiana, United States. ... Chesterton is a town in Porter County, Indiana, United States. ... Clarksville is a town in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Connersville is a city in Fayette County, Indiana, United States. ... Crawfordsville is a city in Montgomery County, Indiana, United States. ... Crown Point is a city in Lake County, Indiana, United States. ... Dyer is a town located in Lake County, Indiana. ... East Chicago is a city in Lake County, Indiana, opposite Chicago, Illinois. ... Fishers, located in Hamilton County, Indiana, is a town of population 52,390, according to a special census conducted in 2004. ... Franklin is a city in Johnson County, Indiana, United States. ... Goshen (IPA: ) is a city of about 30,000 people located about 100 miles east of Chicago and 30 miles east of South Bend in the northern Indiana region known as Michiana in the United States. ... Greencastle is a city in Putnam County, Indiana, United States. ... Greenfield is a city in Hancock County, Indiana, United States. ... Greenwood (IPA: ) is a city in Johnson County, Indiana, United States. ... Griffith is a town located in Lake County, Indiana and Calumet Township of Lake County, USA. It is a suburb of Chicago, Illinois, and is located in The Region of Northwest Indiana. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Lake Incorporated 1884 Government  - Mayor Thomas McDermott, Jr. ... Highland is the name of some places in the U.S. state of Indiana: Highland, Lake County, Indiana Highland, Vanderburgh County, Indiana This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Hobart is a city in Lake County, Indiana, United States. ... Jasper is a city in Dubois County, Indiana, United States. ... Jeffersonville is a city located in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Lake Station is a city in Lake County, Indiana, United States. ... La Porte (French for The Door) is a city in La Porte County, Indiana, of which it is the county seat. ... Lawrence is a city located in Marion County, Indiana. ... Martinsville is a city in Morgan County, Indiana, United States. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Lake Area  - Total 33. ... Mooresville is a town in Morgan County, Indiana, in the United States. ... Munster is a town in Lake County, Indiana, United States. ... New Albany is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Ky. ... New Haven is a city in Allen County, Indiana, United States. ... Noblesville (IPA: ) is a city in Hamilton County, Indiana, United States. ... Plainfield is a town in Hendricks County, Indiana, United States. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: , County Porter Area  - City 71. ... Princeton is a city in Gibson County, in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Schererville is a town in Lake County, Indiana, United States. ... Shelbyville is a city in Addison Township, Shelby County, Indiana, United States. ... Nickname: Home of the 500 Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Marion Government  - Town Council Area  - City  4. ... Nickname: Motto: Vale of Paradise Location in Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Porter Government  - Mayor Jon Costas (R) Area  - City  11. ... Valparaiso University, known colloquially as Valpo, is a private university located in the city of Valparaiso in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Washington is a city in Daviess County, Indiana, United States. ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... Purdue redirects here. ... Westfield is a town located in Hamilton County, Indiana. ... Zionsville is a town located in the extreme southeast area of Boone County, Indiana. ...


Politics

See also: Indiana Supreme Court, United States congressional delegations from Indiana, and Indiana's congressional districts

Indiana has three branches: executive (government), legislative (parliament) and judicial. The governor of Indiana, elected for a four-year term, heads the government. The Indiana General Assembly, the legislative branch, consists of the upper house, Senate, and the lower house, House of Representatives. Indiana's fifty State Senators are elected for four-year terms and one hundred State Representatives for two-year terms. In odd-numbered years, the General Assembly meets in a sixty-one day session. In even-numbered years, the Assembly meets for thirty session days. The judicial branch consists of the Indiana Supreme Court, Court of Appeals, the Indiana Tax Court, and local circuit courts. The Supreme Court of Indiana is the highest court in the state of Indiana. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Indiana to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ... Image:Indianapolis Capitol. ... For the demesne in The Keys to the Kingdom series, see The House An upper house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the lower house. ... A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house. ... Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ...


The current governor of Indiana is Mitch Daniels, whose campaign slogan was "My Man Mitch," an appellation given by President George W. Bush for whom Mitch Daniels was the director of the Office of Management and Budget. He was elected to office on November 2, 2004. List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ... Mitchell Elias Mitch Daniels, Jr. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Indiana has long been considered to be a Republican stronghold. It has only supported a Democrat for president four times since 1900 - in 1912, 1932, 1936 and 1964. Nonetheless, half of Indiana's governors in the 20th century were Democrats. GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


Historically, Republicans have been strongest in the eastern and central portions of the state, as well as the suburbs of the state's major cities. Democrats have been strongest in the northwestern and southern parts of the state along with the major cities. However, outside of Indianapolis, the Chicago suburbs, and Bloomington, the state's Democrats tend to be somewhat more conservative than their counterparts in the rest of the country, especially on social issues. Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Monroe Mayor Mark Kruzan Area    - City 51. ...


Indiana's delegation to the United States House of Representatives is not overly Republican either. Instead, it has generally served as a bellwether for the political movement of the nation. For instance, Democrats held the majority of seats until the 1994 Republican Revolution, when Republicans took a majority. This continued until 2006, when three Republican congressmen were defeated in Indiana; (Chris Chocola, John Hostettler and Mike Sodrel), giving the Democrats a majority of the delegation again.[31] Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Joseph Christopher Chris Chocola (born February 24, 1962) has, since 2003, been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Indianas 2nd congressional district (map). ... John Nathan Hostettler (born June 19, 1961), American politician, is a former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives. ... Rep. ...


Former governor and current U.S. Senator Evan Bayh announced in 2006 his plans for a presidential exploratory committee.[32] His father was a three-term senator who was turned out of office in the 1980 Reagan Revolution by conservative Republican (and future Vice-President) Dan Quayle, a native of the small town of Huntington in the northeastern part of the state. However, Bayh announced that he would not be seeking the Presidency on December 16, 2006. Birch Evans Bayh III (commonly known as Evan Bayh) (pronounced like bye; IPA pronunciation: ) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... President Reagan, with his Cabinet and staff, in the Oval Office (February 4, 1981) Headed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan from 1981 to 1989, the Reagan Administration was conservative, steadfastly anti-Communist and in favor of tax cuts and smaller government. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... Huntington is a city in Huntington County, Indiana, United States. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The state's U.S. Senators are Senior Sen. Richard G. Lugar (Republican) and Junior Sen. Evan Bayh (Democrat). Both Senators, although of opposite parties, have proved immensely popular in the state. In 2004, Sen. Bayh won reelection to a second term with 62% of the vote. And in 2006, Sen. Lugar won reelection to a sixth term with 87% of the vote against no major-party opposition. Richard Green Dick Lugar (born April 4, 1932) is the senior United States Republican Senator from Indiana. ... GOP redirects here. ... Birch Evans Bayh III (commonly known as Evan Bayh) (pronounced like bye; IPA pronunciation: ) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...

District Representative Party Residence First Took Office
Indiana 1 Peter Visclosky Democrat Merrillville January 1985
Indiana 2 Joe Donnelly Democrat Granger January 2007
Indiana 3 Mark Souder Republican Grabill January 1995
Indiana 4 Steve Buyer Republican Plainfield January 1993
Indiana 5 Dan Burton Republican Indianapolis January 1983
Indiana 6 Mike Pence Republican Columbus January 2001
Indiana 7 André Carson Democrat Indianapolis TBD
Indiana 8 Brad Ellsworth Democrat Evansville January 2007
Indiana 9 Baron Hill Democrat Seymour January 1999

Map The First Congressional District of Indiana, USA, was drawn in its current configuration after the 2000 census. ... Peter J. Visclosky (born August 13, 1949), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1985, representing the 1st District of Indiana. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: , Country State County Lake Area  - Total 33. ... This district will now be represented by Rep. ... Joe Donnelly is an American politician from Indiana, running as a Democrat for Congress in the Second Congressional District. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Granger is a census-designated place located in St. ... Indianas 3rd congressional district takes in Indianas Northeast corner, with its largest population center in Fort Wayne. ... Mark Edward Souder (born July 18, 1950) is an American politician who is serving his sixth term in the United States House of Representatives for Indianas 3rd congressional district (map). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Grabill is a town located in Allen County, Indiana. ... Map The Fourth Congressional District of Indiana was created after the 2000 census. ... Stephen Earle Buyer nicknamed Poopstain McGee by House colleagues (born November 26, 1958) has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1993 for Indianas 4th congressional district. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Plainfield is a town in Hendricks County, Indiana, United States. ... Indianas 5th congressional district takes in the eastern suburbs of Indianapolis, including Hamilton and Hancock Counties, the town of Marion and part of Kokomo. ... Danny Dan Lee Burton (born June 21, 1938), American politician, is a member of the United States House of Representatives for Indianas 5th congressional district. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... Indianas 6th congressional district takes in a large portion of eastern Indiana, including Muncie, Anderson , and Richmond, as well as suburbs of Fort Wayne and Cincinatti. ... Michael Richard Mike Pence (born June 7, 1959) is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives for Indianas 6th congressional district (see map). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Columbus (pronounced ) is the county seat of Bartholomew County, Indiana. ... Indianas 7th congressional district is currently represented by Julia Carson. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... United States House of Representatives, Indiana District 8 is a district of the United States Congress in south-western Indiana. ... Brad Ellsworth is the Democratic congressman from the 8th District of Indiana (map). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Indiana Country State County Vanderburgh Government  - Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel (D) Area  - City 40. ... United States House of Representatives, Indiana District 9 is a district of the United States Congress in south-central and south-eastern Indiana. ... Baron Paul Hill (born June 23, 1953) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives for Indianas 9th congressional district. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Seymour is a city in Jackson County, Indiana, United States. ...

Administrative divisions

Town Council

According to the Indiana laws, Town Council members serve as both the executive and legislative branches for small communities incorporated as towns within the state. They consist of three or five members, depending upon the town's population.


Unlike some states, Indiana councilmembers must declare a political party affiliation, if any, when they file to run for office. Upon election in November, they are sworn in before January 1 of the following year, where they serve a four year term. There are no state term limits affecting how many times a candidate may run for reelection to office.


The first meeting after an election, members of the town council hold an organizing meeting, where they elect a leader to set future agendas and act as an official spokesman for the town or as liaison between the town and state and county government.


Indiana town councils work in conjunction with an elected town clerk, who manages the day-to-day business of the municipal government. As an elected official, the town clerk is solely executive in function and operates independently of the town council. But the council has final say on budgets which clerks depend upon to operate.


In addition to a clerk, the council can authorize the hiring of other staff to run the operations of government, including law enforcement officers, utility workers, park and recreation employees and town managers. These employees serve at the pleasure of the council.


Economy

The total gross state product in 2005 was US$214 billion in 2000 chained dollars.[33] Indiana's per capita income, as of 2005, was US$31,150.[34] A high percentage of Indiana's income is from manufacturing.[35] The Calumet region of northwest Indiana is the largest steel producing area in the U.S. Steelmaking itself requires generating very large amounts of electric power. Indiana's other manufactures include pharmaceuticals and medical devices, automobiles, electrical equipment, transportation equipment, chemical products, rubber, petroleum and coal products, and factory machinery. Download high resolution version (942x936, 109 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Northwest Indiana, also known as The Calumet Region, or just The Region, is comprised of Lake, Porter, LaPorte, Newton, and Jasper counties in Indiana. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Petro redirects here. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal (pronounced ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ...


Despite its reliance on manufacturing, Indiana has been much less affected by declines in traditional Rust Belt manufactures than many of its neighbors. The explanation appears to be certain factors in the labor market. First, much of the heavy manufacturing, such as industrial machinery and steel, requires highly skilled labor, and firms are often willing to locate where hard-to-train skills already exist. Second, Indiana's labor force is located primarily in medium-sized and smaller cities rather than in very large and expensive metropolises. This makes it possible for firms to offer somewhat lower wages for these skills than would normally be paid. In other words, firms often see in Indiana a chance to obtain higher than average skills at lower than average wages.[36] Manufacturing Belt, highlighted in red The Rust Belt, a term coined from Manufacturing Belt, is an area in parts of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States of America. ...


Indiana is home to the international headquarters of pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly in Indianapolis as well as the headquarters of Mead Johnson Nutritionals, a division of Bristol-Myers Squibb, in Evansville. Elkhart, in the north, has also had a strong economic base of pharmaceuticals, though this has changed over the past decade with the closure of Whitehall Laboratories in the 1990s and the planned drawdown of the large Bayer complex, announced in late 2005.[37] Overall, Indiana ranks fifth among all U.S. states in total sales and shipments of pharmaceutical products and second highest in the number of biopharmaceutical related jobs.[38] Medical device manufacturers include Zimmer in Warsaw and Cook in Bloomington. Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) is a global pharmaceutical company and one of the worlds largest corporations. ... Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY), colloquially referred to as BMS, is a pharmaceutical corporation, formed by a 1989 merger between pharmaceutical companies Bristol-Myers Company, founded in 1887 by William McLaren Bristol and John Ripley Myers in Clinton, NY (both were graduates of Hamilton College), and Squibb Corporation. ... Elkhart (IPA: ) is a city located about 100 miles due east of Chicago in Elkhart County, Indiana, United States. ... Bayer AG (IPA pronunciation //) (ISIN: DE0005752000, NYSE: BAY, TYO: 4863 ) is a German chemical and pharmaceutical company founded in Barmen, Germany in 1863. ... A Zimmer Frame is the trademarked name for a supportive frame designed to assist the elderly or disabled. ... The Cook Group, founded in 1963 in the spare bedroom of William and Gayle Cook, is a supplier of medical devices and equipment. ...


The state is located within the Corn Belt and the state's agricultural methods and principal farm outputs reflect this: a feedlot-style system raising corn to fatten hogs and cattle. Soybeans are also a major cash crop. Its proximity to large urban centers, such as Chicago, assure that dairying, egg production, and specialty horticulture occur. Specialty crops include melons, tomatoes, grapes, and mint.[39] Most of the original land was not prairie and had to be cleared of deciduous trees. Many parcels of woodland remain and support a furniture-making sector in the southern portion of the state. Categories: US geography stubs | Belt regions of the United States ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


Indiana is becoming a leading state in the production of biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel. Indiana now has 12 ethanol and 4 biodiesel plants located in the state.[40] Reynolds, located north of Lafayette is now known as BioTown, USA. The town is experimenting with using biofuels and organic fuels, such as those made with manure, to power the town.[41] Biofuel is any fuel that derives from biomass _ recently living organisms or their metabolic byproducts, such as manure from cows. ... Grain alcohol redirects here. ... This article is about transesterified plant and animal oils. ... Reynolds is a town located in White County, Indiana. ... Lafayette, LaFayette, or La Fayette may refer to: // Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (Marquis de Lafayette), French general and revolutionary (sometimes referred to as the Marquis de la Fayette) Marie-Madeleine Pioche de la Vergne, comtesse de la Fayette (Madame de Lafayette), French author Elliston-Lafayette, Virginia La...


In mining, Indiana is probably best known for its decorative limestone from the southern, hilly portion of the state, especially from Lawrence County (the home area of Apollo I astronaut Gus Grissom).[42] One of the many public buildings faced with this stone is The Pentagon, and after the September 11, 2001 attacks, a special effort was made by the mining industry of Indiana to replace those damaged walls with as nearly identical type and cut of material as the original facing.[43] There are also large coal mines in the southern portion of the state. Like most Great Lakes states, Indiana has small to medium operating petroleum fields; the principal location of these today is in the extreme southwest, though operational oil derricks can be seen on the outskirts of Terre Haute. For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Lawrence County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... Virgil Ivan Gus Grissom (April 3, 1926 – January 27, 1967) was a United States Air Force pilot who became the second American astronaut and one of the first to die in the U.S. space program. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Petro redirects here. ...


Indiana's economy is considered to be one of the most business-friendly in the U.S. This is due in part to its conservative business climate, low business taxes, relatively low union membership, and labor laws. The doctrine of at-will employment, whereby an employer can terminate an employee for any or no reason, is in force. At-will employment is an employment relationship in which either party can terminate the employment relationship at-will with no liability if there was not an express contract for a definite term governing the employment relationship. ...


Indiana has a flat state income tax rate of 3.4%. Many Indiana counties also collect income tax. The state sales tax rate is 7%. Property taxes are imposed on both real and personal property in Indiana and are administered by the Department of Local Government Finance. Property is subject to taxation by a variety of taxing units (schools, counties, townships, cities and towns, libraries), making the total tax rate the sum of the tax rates imposed by all taxing units in which a property is located. However, a law enacted on March 19, 2008 limits property taxes to one percent of assessed value for homeowners, two percent for rental properties and farmland and three percent for businesses. Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...


Energy

Indiana's power production chiefly consists of the consumption of fossil fuels, mainly coal. Indiana has 24 coal power plants, including the largest coal power plant in the United States, Gibson Generating Station, located near Owensville, Indiana. While Indiana has made commitments to increasing use of renewable resources such as wind, hydroelectric, biomass, or solar power, however, progress has been very slow, mainly because of the continued abundance of coal in Southern Indiana. Most of the new plants in the state have been "coal gasification" plants. Another source is hydroelectric power. The Gibson Generating Station is a coal-burning power plant located in Gibson County, Indiana, United States. ... ...


Indiana has six hydroelectric dams. The Norway and Oakdale Dams near Monticello provide electrical power, recreation, and other benefits to local citizens. The Norway Dam created Lake Shafer and the Oakdale Dam created Lake Freeman. The Markland Dam, on the Ohio River, near Vevay, Indiana also produces electricity. The city of Wabash was the first electrically lighted city in the country. Solar power and wind power are being investigated, and Geothermal Power is being used commercially.


Sources of energy (2001)

Fuel Capacity Percent of Total Consumed Percent of Total Production Number of Plants/Units
Coal 19,500MW 63.0000% 88.5000% 24 Plants
Natural Gas 2,100MW 29.0000% 10.5000% 12 Units / 2 plants
Petroleum 575MW 7.5000% 1.5000% 10 Units
Hydroelectric 64MW 0.0450% 0.0100% 1 Plant
Biomass 20MW 0.0150% 0.0020% 2 units
Wood & Waste 18MW 0.0013% 0.0015% 3 Units
Geothermal, Wind and/or Solar 0MW 0.0% 0.0 No Facilities at this time

Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal (pronounced ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Petro redirects here. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... For the use of the term in ecology, see Biomass (ecology). ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... Waste inside a wheelie bin Waste in a bin bag Waste, rubbish, trash, garbage, or junk is unwanted or undesired material. ... Geothermal may refer to: Geothermal (geology), heat that comes from within the Earth Geothermal desalination, the production of fresh water using heat energy extracted from underground rocks Geothermal heating, a method of heating and cooling a building using underground heat Geothermal power, electricity generated from naturally occurring geological heat sources... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ... Look up solar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ... A solar cell, a form of photovoltaic cell, is a device that uses the photoelectric effect to generate electricity from light, thus generating solar power (energy). ... Look up solar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Transportation

2008- Indiana License plate
2008- Indiana License plate
2003-2008 Indiana License plate, large letter version

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 412 pixelsFull resolution (1755 × 904 pixel, file size: 204 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) License plate of the U.S. state of Indiana TIM SILCOX HAVE MY ON TH ILCENSE PLATE I J TO LIVE IN INDIANA IN 1954 I... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 412 pixelsFull resolution (1755 × 904 pixel, file size: 204 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) License plate of the U.S. state of Indiana TIM SILCOX HAVE MY ON TH ILCENSE PLATE I J TO LIVE IN INDIANA IN 1954 I...

Airports

Indianapolis International Airport serves the greater Indianapolis area and is currently in the process of a major expansion project. When fully completed, the airport will offer a new midfield passenger terminal, concourses, air traffic control tower, parking garage, and airfield and apron improvements.[47] Midfield Terminal Project Midfield Terminal Rendering Indianapolis International Airport (IATA: IND, ICAO: KIND, FAA LID: IND) is a public airport located seven miles (11 km) southwest of the central business district of Indianapolis, a city in Marion County, Indiana, United States. ...


Other major airports include Evansville Regional Airport, Fort Wayne International Airport (which houses the 122nd Fighter Wing of the Air National Guard), and South Bend Regional Airport. Although Fort Wayne is designated as an international airport, there are no international flights operating out of the facility. A long-standing proposal to turn the under-utilized Gary Chicago International Airport into Chicago's third major airport received a boost in early 2006 with the approval of $48 million in federal funding over the next ten years.[48] The Evansville terminal Evansville Regional Airport (IATA: EVV, ICAO: KEVV) is a public airport located on the north side of Evansville, in Vanderburgh County, Indiana, USA. Established in 1928 on 260 acres of land along U.S. Highway 41 and funded by a city bond issue, the original airport construction... Fort Wayne International Airport (IATA: FWA, ICAO: KFWA) is a public airport located 7 miles (11 km) southwest of Fort Wayne, in Allen County, Indiana, USA. The airport was originally constructed as a military base during World War II. It opened in 1941 as Baer Field at a cost of... The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... Runway layout at SBN South Bend Regional Airport (IATA: SBN, ICAO: KSBN) is located in northwest South Bend, Indiana. ... FAA diagram of GYY Gary/Chicago International Airport (IATA: GYY, ICAO: KGYY) is an airport located in Gary, Indiana that serves the Chicagoland area, located 25 miles (40 km) southeast of the Chicago Loop. ...


The Terre Haute International Airport has no airlines operating out of the facility but is used for private flying. Since 1954, the 181st Fighter Wing of the Indiana Air National Guard has been stationed at the airport. However, the BRAC Proposal of 2005 stated that the 181st would lose its fighter mission and F-16 aircraft, leaving the Terre Haute facility as a general-aviation only facility. Terre Haute International Airport - Hulman Field (IATA: HUF, ICAO: KHUF) is a public airport located east of Terre Haute, Indiana. ... The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a modern multi-role jet fighter aircraft built in the United States and used by dozens of countries all over the world. ...


The southern part of the state is also served by the Louisville International Airport across the Ohio River in Louisville, Kentucky. Louisville International Airport (IATA: SDF, ICAO: KSDF) is a public airport centrally located in the city of Louisville in Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA. The airport covers 1,200 acres and has three runways. ...


Highways

The major U.S. Interstate highways in Indiana are I-69, I-65, I-94, I-70, I-74, I-64, I-80, and I-90. The various highways intersecting in and around Indianapolis earned it the nickname "The Crossroads of America". Interstate 69 is an interstate highway in the midwestern United States. ... Interstate 65 is an interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 94 is a long interstate highway connecting the Great Lakes and Intermountain region of the United States. ... I-70 looking westbound near Mile 326, Wabaunsee County, Kansas Interstate 70 is a long interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 74 is an interstate highway in the midwestern United States. ... Interstate 64 is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 80 as seen from an overpass in Davis, California Interstate 80 is the second-longest interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 90 is the longest interstate highway in the United States. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ...


There are also many state highways maintained by the Indiana Department of Transportation. These are numbered according to the same convention as U.S. Highways. State Roads in the US state of Indiana are numbered rationally: in general, odd one-digit and two-digit highways are north-south highways, numbers increasing toward the west; even one-digit and two-digit highways are east-west highways, numbers increasing toward the south. ... The Indiana Department of Transportation is the agency of the state of Indiana charged with maintaining and regulating transportation and transportation related infrastructure such as state owned airports, state highways and state owned canals or railroads, as well as state routes, US highways and Interstates that lie within the state. ... Current U.S. Highway shield The United States Highway System is an integrated system of roads in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ...


County roads

Most Indiana counties use a grid-based system to identify county roads; this system replaced the older arbitrary system of road numbers and names, and (among other things) makes it much easier to identify the sources of calls placed to the 9-1-1 system. For this reason, the system is often called "9-1-1 addressing". Such systems are easier to implement in the glacially flattened northern portion of the state. Rural counties in the southern third of the state are less likely to have grids and more likely to rely on unsystematic road names (e.g., Franklin County); there are also counties in the northern portions of the state that have never implemented a grid, or have only partially implemented one. This article is about the emergency telephone number. ...


Many counties set up this grid as follows: the county is given an east-west division line, dividing the county into northern and southern parts, and a north-south meridian line, dividing it into eastern and western parts. Roads are numbered by taking the distance, in miles, from the appropriate baseline and multiplying it by 100. Thus, a north-south road that is 1 mile east of the meridian line is county road 100 E; and an east-west road that is 4.75 miles north of the division line is county road 475 N.


Rail

Indiana has over 4,255 railroad route miles, of which 91 percent are operated by Class I railroads, principally CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern. Other Class I railroads in Indiana include Canadian National and the Soo Line, a Canadian Pacific Railway subsidiary, as well as Amtrak. The remaining miles are operated by 37 regional, local, and switching & terminal railroads. The South Shore Line is one of the country's most notable commuter rail systems extending from Chicago to South Bend. Indiana is currently implementing an extensive rail plan that was prepared in 2002 by the Parsons Corporation.[49] This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... CSX redirects here. ... Norfolk Southern Corporation (AAR reporting mark NS) NYSE: NSC is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... A Class I railroad in the United States, or a Class I railway (also Class I rail carrier) in Canada, is one of the largest freight railroads, as classified based on operating revenue. ... CN redirects here, as its the most common usage of the abbreviation in Canada; for more uses, see CN (disambiguation). ... Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Illinois railroads | Michigan railroads | Minnesota railroads | North Dakota railroads | South Dakota railroads | Wisconsin railroads ... An eastbound CPR freight at Stoney Creek Bridge in Rogers Pass. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... The Chicago South Shore & South Bend Railroad (CSS&SB, reporting mark CSS) (more commonly known as the South Shore Line) was an electric-powered interurban passenger railroad which operated between downtown Chicago, Illinois and suburban areas along the south shore of Lake Michigan in Illinois and northern Indiana. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... South Bend is the name of the following places in the United States of America: South Bend, Indiana South Bend Township, Kansas South Bend Township, Minnesota South Bend, Nebraska South Bend Township, Pennsylvania South Bend, Washington This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... Founded in 1944, Parsons is a 100% employee-owned engineering and construction company in the United States. ...


Ports

Indiana annually ships over 70 million tons of cargo by water each year, which ranks 14th among all U.S. states. More than half of Indiana's border is water, which includes 400 miles (640 km) of direct access to two major freight transportation arteries: the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway (via Lake Michigan) and the Inland Waterway System (via the Ohio River). The Ports of Indiana manages three major ports which include Burns Harbor, Jeffersonville, and Mount Vernon.[50] The Port of Indiana, officially the Burns Waterway Harbor, is an industrial area, founded in 1965 and located on the Lake Michigan shore of Indiana at the intersection of U.S. Highway 12 and Indiana 249. ... Burns Harbor is a town in Porter County, Indiana, United States on the shores of Lake Michigan in Northwest Indiana and is part of the Chicago metropolitan area. ... Jeffersonville is a city located in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Mount Vernon is a small city in southern Indiana along the Ohio River and the county seat of Posey County. ...


Education

Indiana is known as the "Brain Bank of the Midwest" as Indiana's colleges and universities attract the fourth largest number of out-of-state students in the nation and the largest out-of-state student population in the midwest. In addition, Indiana is the third best state in the country at keeping high school seniors in-state as Indiana colleges and universities attract 88% of Indiana's college attendees.[51] Indiana universities also lead the nation in the attraction of international students with Purdue University and Indiana University ranked #3 and #17 respectively in the total international student enrollment of all universities in the United States.[52] This exceptional popularity is attributed to the high quality of the research and educational universities located in the state. The state's leading higher education institutions include Indiana University, Purdue University, University of Notre Dame, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Indiana-Purdue at Indianapolis, Butler University, Ball State University, Valparaiso University, Indiana State University, University of Southern Indiana, Vincennes University, Wabash College, DePauw University, Manchester College, Earlham College, Indiana Wesleyan University and St. Mary of the Woods College among the many public and private institutions located in the state. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Indiana University, founded in 1820, is a nine-campus university system in the state of Indiana. ... Purdue redirects here. ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (abbreviated RHIT), formerly Rose Polytechnic Institute, is a small, private, non-sectarian college specializing in teaching engineering, mathematics, and science. ... → Indiana University School of Medicine → Purdue University Indianapolis Extension Center → Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis → Indiana University School of Dentistry Type of institution Public Endowment $389. ... Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Ball State University is a state-run research university located in Muncie, Indiana, USA. Located on the northwest side of the city, Ball States campus spans more than 1,000 acres (4 km²). The student body consists of more than 20,000 students, of which over 18,000 are... Valparaiso University, known colloquially as Valpo, is a private university located in the city of Valparaiso in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Indiana State University (ISU) is a public university that is located in Terre Haute, Indiana. ... University of Southern Indiana Campus map. ... Vincennes University (VU) is a public university in Vincennes, Indiana in the United States. ... , Wabash College is a small private liberal arts college for men, located in Crawfordsville, Indiana. ... This school is not to be confused with DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois, which has a similar pronunciation. ... Manchester College is a liberal arts college located in North Manchester, Indiana. ... Earlham College is a national, selective Quaker liberal arts college in Richmond, Indiana. ... Indiana Wesleyan University (IWU) is a private Christian liberal arts college located in Marion, Indiana that is affiliated with the evangelical Wesleyan Church. ...


The state has had difficulty retaining its college graduates, bringing the issue of brain drain to the attention of Governor Mitch Daniels. [53] This article is about the emigration term. ... Mitchell Elias Mitch Daniels, Jr. ...

See also: List of colleges and universities in Indiana
See also: List of school districts in Indiana
See also: List of high schools in Indiana

See Indiana state entry. ... List of school districts in Indiana by county. ... This is a list of high schools and schools that include grades 9 through 12 in Indiana by county. ...

Sports

Auto racing

Indiana has a long history with auto racing. Indianapolis hosts the Indianapolis 500 mile race over Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway every May. The name of the race is usually shortened to "Indy 500" and also goes by the nickname, "The Greatest Spectacle in Racing". The race attracts over 250,000 people every year. The track also hosts the Allstate 400 at the Brickyard (NASCAR) and the United States Grand Prix (Formula One). A Peugeot 206 World Rally Car Motor racing and Motorsports redirect here. ... “Indy 500” redirects here. ... Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ... Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana (a separate town completely surrounded by Indianapolis) in the United States, is the second-oldest surviving automobile racing track in the world (after the Milwaukee Mile), having existed since 1909, and the original Speedway, the first racing facility historically to incorporate the word. ... The Allstate 400 at The Brickyard is an annual 400-mile (644 km) NASCAR Nextel Cup points race held each August at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... The United States Grand Prix is a motor racing event which has taken place at various times since 1959 in several locations, at first as a part of the American Grand Prize series and later as a race in the Formula One World Championship. ... F1 redirects here. ...


Basketball

Indiana has a rich basketball heritage that reaches back to the formative years of the sport itself. Although James Naismith invented basketball in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1891, Indiana is where high school basketball was born. In 1925, Naismith visited an Indiana basketball state finals game along with 15,000 screaming fans and later wrote "Basketball really had its origin in Indiana, which remains the center of the sport." The 1986 film Hoosiers is based on the story of the 1954 Indiana state champions Milan High School. This article is about the sport. ... James Naismith James A. Naismith (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... This page is about the movie Hoosiers. Hoosiers is also the nickname of Indiana University athletic teams; see Indiana Hoosiers. ... Milan High School is a small high school located at 609 N Warpath Drive Milan, Indiana. ...

Club Sport League
Anderson Packers (defunct) Basketball National Basketball Association
Dubois County Dragons (defunct) Baseball Minor League Baseball
Elkhart Express Basketball Minor League Basketball
Evansville BlueCats (defunct) Indoor football United Indoor Football
Evansville Crimson Giants (defunct) Football National Football League
Evansville Otters Baseball Minor League Baseball
Evansville Triplets (defunct) Baseball Minor League Baseball
Fort Wayne Fever Soccer USL Premier Development League
Fort Wayne Fusion Arena football af2
Fort Wayne Komets Ice hockey International Hockey League (2007-)
Fort Wayne Mad Ants Basketball National Basketball Association Development League
Fort Wayne Wizards Baseball Minor League Baseball
Gary Steelheads Basketball Continental Basketball Association
FC Indiana Soccer Women's Premier Soccer League
Gary SouthShore RailCats Baseball Minor League Baseball
Indiana Fever Basketball Women's National Basketball Association
Indiana Ice Ice hockey United States Hockey League
Indiana Invaders Soccer USL Premier Development League
Indiana Speed Football Women's Professional Football League
Indianapolis Colts Football National Football League
Indiana Pacers Basketball National Basketball Association
Indianapolis Indians Baseball Minor League Baseball
Hammond Pros (defunct) Football National Football League
Indianapolis Olympians (defunct) Basketball National Basketball Association
Indianapolis Jets (defunct) Basketball National Basketball Association
Indianapolis Racers (defunct) Ice Hockey World Hockey Association
Muncie Flyers (defunct) Football National Football League (American Professional Football Association)
South Bend Silver Hawks Baseball Minor League Baseball
Whiting All-American Caesars (defunct) Basketball National Basketball League

The Anderson Packers were a National Basketball Association team based in Anderson, Indiana from 1949 until 1950. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Dubois County Dragons are a minor league baseball team which plays in Huntingburg, Indiana, USA. The team is a member of the Independent Frontier League, and is associated with no Major League Baseball team. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... One of the Express official logos. ... The Evansville BlueCats are a professional indoor football team. ... Indoor football is a variation of American football with rules modified to make it suitable for play within ice hockey arenas. ... United Indoor Football is an indoor American football league that was started in 2005. ... The Evansville Crimson Giants from Evansville, Indiana played from 1921-1922 in the National Football League. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Evansville Otters are a minor league baseball team which plays in Evansville, Indiana. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The Evansville Triplets were a American Association team from 1970-1984. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The Fort Wayne Fever are a soccer team that currently play in the USL Premier Development League that are stationed in the city of Fort Wayne, Indiana. ... The USL Premier Development League (PDL) is the amateur league of the United Soccer Leagues in the United States and Canada, forming part of the American Soccer Pyramid. ... The Fort Wayne Fusion are a 2007 af2 (Arena Football Leagues minor league) expansion team in the Midwest Division of the American Conference. ... Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... The Fort Wayne Komets are a minor league hockey franchise currently playing in the United Hockey Leagues Western Conference. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The International Hockey League (IHL) is a professional ice hockey league with teams in the United States. ... The Fort Wayne Mad Ants are a team of the NBA Development League scheduled to begin play in 2007. ... League Midwest League Division Eastern Division Year founded 1993 Major League affiliation San Diego Padres Home ballpark Memorial Stadium Previous home ballparks City Fort Wayne, Indiana Current uniform colors Previous uniform colors Logo design Division titles League titles Manager Doug Dascenzo Owner The Fort Wayne Wizards are a Class A... The Gary Steelheads are a basketball team that played in the International Basketball League and the Continental Basketball Association. ... The Continental Basketball Association (CBA) is a professional mens basketball league in the United States. ... This article is about the womens WPSL franchise. ... Soccer redirects here. ... WPSL re-directs here; an alternate meaning is WPSL (AM) The Womens Premier Soccer League (WPSL) is a national amateur womens soccer league. ... The Gary SouthShore Railcats are a Minor league baseball team in the Northern League based in Gary, Indiana. ... The Indiana Fever is a professional womens basketball team that plays in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... The Indiana Ice is a Tier I ice hockey team formed in 2004 when it was purchased from the former Danville, Illinois, USA team. ... United States Hockey League (abbreviated USHL) is the top junior ice hockey league in United States. ... The Indiana Invaders F.C. are USL Premier Development League, W-League and a Super Y-League teams all based in South Bend, Indiana, where they all play at a soccer-specific stadium, known as the Invaders Soccer Complex. ... The Womens Professional Football League (WPFL) is the original and longest operating womens professional American football league in the United States. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Indiana Pacers are a professional basketball team that plays in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... NBA redirects here. ... League International League Division West Division Year founded 1902 Major League affiliation Pittsburgh Pirates Home ballpark Victory Field Previous home ballparks Perry Stadium City Indianapolis, Indiana Current uniform colors red, black Previous uniform colors Logo design A Native American design in red with white and black details with a black... The Hammond Pros from Hammond, Indiana played in the National Football League from 1920 to 1926. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Indianapolis Olympians were a National Basketball Association team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Indianapolis Jets were a National Basketball Association team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Indianapolis Racers were a franchise in the former World Hockey Association. ... WHA redirects here. ... The Muncie Flyers from Muncie, Indiana played in the National Football League from 1920-1921. ... NFL redirects here. ... For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... League Midwest League Division Eastern Division Year founded 1988 Major League affiliation Arizona Diamondbacks Home ballpark Stanley Coveleski Regional Stadium Previous home ballparks City South Bend, Indiana Current uniform colors Previous uniform colors Logo design Division titles League titles 2005 Manager Mark Haley Owner Joe Kernan The South Bend Silver... The National Basketball League was a professional basketball league in the United States from 1937 to 1949. ...

College sports

Indiana has had great sports success at the collegiate level. Notably, Indiana University has won five NCAA basketball championships, six swimming and diving NCAA championships, and seven NCAA soccer championships and Notre Dame has won 11 football championships. Schools fielding NCAA Division I athletic programs include: Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...

Ball State University is a state-run research university located in Muncie, Indiana, USA. Located on the northwest side of the city, Ball States campus spans more than 1,000 acres (4 km²). The student body consists of more than 20,000 students, of which over 18,000 are... Butler University is a private liberal arts university in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne (IPFW) is a regional university campus located in Fort Wayne, Indiana. ... → Indiana University School of Medicine → Purdue University Indianapolis Extension Center → Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis → Indiana University School of Dentistry Type of institution Public Endowment $389. ... Indiana State University (ISU) is a public university that is located in Terre Haute, Indiana. ... Purdue redirects here. ... The University of Evansville (UE) is a small (approximately 2400 students), private university located in Evansville, Indiana. ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... Valparaiso University, known colloquially as Valpo, is a private university located in the city of Valparaiso in the U.S. state of Indiana. ...

Miscellaneous

Military installations

Indiana used to be home to two major military installations, Grissom Air Force Base near Peru (reduced to reservist operations in 1994) and Fort Benjamin Harrison near Indianapolis, now closed, though the Department of Defense continues to operate a large finance center there. It has been suggested that Grissom Air Reserve Base be merged into this article or section. ... Fort Benjamin Harrison was a U.S. Army post located on the northeast side of Indianapolis, Indiana, named for the 23rd United States President Benjamin Harrison. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ...


Current active installations include Air National Guard fighter units at Fort Wayne, and Terre Haute airports (to be consolidated at Fort Wayne under the 2005 BRAC proposal, with the Terre Haute facility remaining open as a non-flying installation). The Army National Guard conducts operations at Camp Atterbury in Edinburgh, Indiana and helicopter operations out of Shelbyville Airport. The Crane Naval Weapons Center is in the southwest of the state and the Army's Newport Chemical Depot, which is currently heavily involved in neutralizing dangerous chemical weapons stored there, is in the western part of the state. Also, Naval Operational Support Center Indianapolis is home to several Navy Reserve units, a Marine Reserve unit, and a small contingent of active and full-time-support reserve personnel. The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... Nickname: Motto: Ke Ki On Ga Location in the state of Indiana, USA Coordinates: , Country State County Allen Founded October 22, 1794 Incorporated February 22, 1840 Government  - Mayor Graham Richard (D)  - City Clerk Sandra Kennedy (D)  - City Council John N. Crawford (R) Samuel J. Talarico, Jr (R) John Shoaff (D... Terre Haute is a city located in Vigo County, Indiana. ... The preliminary 2005 Base Realignment and Closure list was released by the United States Department of Defense on May 13, 2005. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ... Camp Atterbury, near Edinburgh, Indiana was considered just months before World War II was declared. ... Alternative meanings at Dunedin (disambiguation) Edinburgh is a town located in Johnson County, Indiana. ... Shelbyville is the name of several places in the United States of America: Shelbyville, Arkansas Shelbyville, Illinois Shelbyville, Indiana Shelbyville, Kentucky Shelbyville, Michigan Shelbyville, Missouri Shelbyville, Tennessee Shelbyville, Texas Shelbyville is also a town in the television series The Simpsons. ... Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division is a United States Navy installation located approximately 70 miles (113 km) southwest of Indianapolis, Indiana and predominantly located in Martin County. ... The Newport Chemical Depot is a bulk chemical storage and destruction facility in west central Indiana, thirty miles north of Terre Haute. ... Heslar Naval Armory located at 30th street and White River in Indianapolis, Indiana Heslar Naval Armory was constructed in 1936 in Indianapolis, Indiana on the shore of White River as a New Deal construction project. ... The United States Navy Reserve is the reserve component of the United States Navy. ... The Marine Forces Reserve (MARFORRES) (also known as the United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR)), a part of the United States Marine Corps, is the largest command in the Marine Corps. ...


Time zones

Main article: Time in Indiana
Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed

Prior to 2006, most of Indiana historically exempted itself from the observation of daylight saving time (DST). Some counties within this area, particularly Floyd, Clark, and Harrison counties near Louisville, Kentucky, and Ohio and Dearborn counties near Cincinnati, Ohio, observed daylight saving time unofficially and illegally by local custom. Due to the confusion of anyone not from Indiana, the state passed a bill in 2005 whereby the entire state began observing daylight saving time starting in April 2006. Residents and officials of Indiana continue to debate whether the state should be in the Central or Eastern Time Zone. Map of U.S. time zones, with most of Indiana shaded out, as it was until April 2, 2006. ... Image File history File links National-atlas-timezones-2006. ... Image File history File links National-atlas-timezones-2006. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Floyd County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Clark County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Harrison County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Louisville redirects here. ... Ohio County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... Dearborn County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ...

State symbols

Main article: List of Indiana state symbols

This is a list of state symbols of Indiana. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Cardinalis cardinalis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a member of the cardinal family of birds in North America. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: External link Juelies State Flower Garden of Gifs See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: Lists of flowers | U.S. state insignia ... Species See text A white peony in Warren County, Indiana. ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... See also Lists of U.S. state insignia ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... On the Banks of the Wabash, Far Away is the state of Indianas official state song. ... The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ... List of U.S. state minerals, rocks, stones, and gemstones. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: U.S. state insignia | Lists of plants | Trees ... Species Liriodendron chinense (Hemsl. ...

Famous Hoosiers

See also: List of people from Indiana

Indiana is the home state of many astronauts, including Gus Grissom, Frank Borman, and David Wolf. The state was the birthplace of numerous entertainers and athletes including Larry Bird, John Mellencamp, Michael Jackson, Don Larsen, David Letterman, David Lee Roth, and Scott Rolen. Other notable people who were in Indiana during a major part of their career include: This is a list of some famous people who were born or lived in Indiana. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... Gus Grissom in his Mercury spacesuit Virgil Ivan Gus Grissom (April 3, 1926–January 27, 1967) was a U.S. Air Force pilot who became one of the first American astronauts. ... Frank Borman (right) poses with Jim Lovell (left) and Bill Anders (center) for an Apollo 8 publicity photo Frank Borman (born March 14, 1928) was a NASA astronaut, best remembered as one of the three crewmembers of Apollo 8, the first mission to fly around the Moon. ... David Wolf David A. Wolf (born 23 August 1956) is an American astronaut and a veteran of three space shuttle missions and an extended stay aboard the Mir space station. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... John Mellencamp, also known as John Cougar and John Cougar Mellencamp, (born October 7, 1951) is best known for being an American rock singer-songwriter. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Donald James Larsen (born August 7, 1929 in Michigan City, Indiana) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for 14 seasons. ... David Michael Letterman (born April 12, 1947, in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.) is an award-winning American comedian, late night talk show host, television producer, philanthropist, and IRL IndyCar Series car owner. ... David Lee Roth (sometimes referred to as Diamond Dave) (born 10 October 1954, Bloomington, Indiana) is an American rock vocalist, songwriter, actor, author, and former radio personality, best known for his work with the band Van Halen. ... Scott Bruce Rolen (born April 4, 1975 in Jasper, Indiana) is an American baseball player who currently plays at third base for the St. ...

George Ade (February 9, 1866 - May 16, 1944) was an American writer, newspaper columnist, and playwright. ... John Andretti talks with a U.S. Navy journalist, courtesy of the U.S. Navy John Andretti is a NASCAR Busch Series driver from Indianapolis, Indiana. ... David Anspaugh (born on 24 September 1946 in Decatur, Indiana, USA) is an American director. ... Albert Jeremiah Beveridge ( October 6, 1862 – April 27, 1927 ) was a historian and United States Senator from Indiana. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Damon Bailey (born October 21, 1971 in Heltonville, Indiana) is a former basketball player, who has been regarded as a basketball idol in the state of Indiana since then-Indiana University head coach Bob Knight called him a hot prospect when Bailey was in eighth grade. ... Arija Bareikis in Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo (1999). ... Birch Evans Bayh II (born January 22, 1928) was a U.S. Senator from Indiana between 1963 and 1981. ... Birch Evans Bayh III (commonly known as Evan Bayh) (pronounced like bye; IPA pronunciation: ) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Claude Bowers was an American Civil War historian of the 19th and 20th centuries. ... Drew Christopher Brees (born January 15, 1979 in Austin, Texas) is an American football quarterback for the New Orleans Saints of the NFL. The San Diego Chargers originally selected him as the first pick of the 2001 NFL Drafts second round. ... Brooks as Sisko Avery Franklin Brooks (born October 2, 1948 in Evansville, Indiana) is an American actor. ... Hoagland Howard Hoagy Carmichael (November 22, 1899 – December 27, 1981) was an American composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader. ... Jared Carter is a contemporary American poet born on January 10, 1939, in Elwood, Indiana. ... James Robert Jim Davis (born July 28, 1945), is an American cartoonist who created the popular comic strip Garfield. ... For the film, see James Dean (film). ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ... Mark Dismore (born October 12, 1956 in Greenfield, Indiana) is a former driver in the Indy Racing League and the 1990 Toyota Pacific champion. ... Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser (August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945) was an American author of the naturalist school, known for dealing with the gritty reality of life. ... Paul Dresser (born April 22, 1859; died January 31, 1906) was an important American songwriter in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... Carl Daniel Erskine (born December 13, 1926 in Anderson, Indiana) is a former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Brooklyn & Los Angeles Dodgers from 1948 through 1959. ... Jessie Flower (born August 18, 1994 in Indiana) is an American actress. ... Vivica Anjanetta Fox (born July 30, 1964 in South Bend, IN) is a film and television actress. ... Jared S. Fogle (born December 1, 1977 in Indianapolis, Indiana), also known as The Subway Guy, is a spokesman employed by Subway Restaurants in its television advertising campaign. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Lillian Moller Gilbreth (May 24, 1878 - January 2, 1972) was one of the first working female engineers and PhD. She and her husband Frank Bunker Gilbreth were pioneers in the field of industrial engineering. ... Jeffery Michael Gordon (born August 4, 1971) is a professional American race car driver. ... -1... Robert Allen Griese (born February 3, 1945 in Evansville, Indiana) is a former American football quarterback who earned All-American honors with the Purdue Boilermakers before being drafted in 1967 by the American Football Leagues Miami Dolphins. ... Virgil Ivan Gus Grissom (April 3, 1926 – January 27, 1967) was a United States Air Force pilot who became the second American astronaut and one of the first to die in the U.S. space program. ... Rex Grossman (born August 23, 1980) is a quarterback for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. ... Charles A. Halleck (August 22, 1900 – March 3, 1986) was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from the second district of Indiana. ... Lee Herbert Hamilton is the vice chair of the 9-11 Commission and currently serves on the Presidents Homeland Security Advisory Council. ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Richard Gordon Hatcher became the first African-American mayor of Gary, Indiana on January 1, 1968. ... Florence Agnes Henderson (b. ... For other uses, see Hoffa (disambiguation). ... Paul Hoffman has been publisher of Encyclopædia Britannica since June 1997. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Gene Keady (born May 21, 1936, in Larned, Kansas, United States) is an assistant coach of the Toronto Raptors of the NBA. He is most notable for being the head basketball coach at Purdue University for 25 years, from 1980-2005. ... Shawn Travis Kemp (born November 26, 1969, in Elkhart, Indiana) is an American former professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association. ... Alfred Charles Kinsey (June 23, 1894 – August 25, 1956), was an American biologist and professor of entomology and zoology who in 1947 founded the Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University, now called the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction. ... Bob Knight Robert Montgomery (Bobby or Bob) Knight (born October 25, 1940 in Massillon, Ohio, USA), known as The General, is the head mens basketball coach at Texas Tech University. ... Donald James Larsen (born August 7, 1929 in Michigan City, Indiana) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for 14 seasons. ... David Michael Letterman (born April 12, 1947, in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.) is an award-winning American comedian, late night talk show host, television producer, philanthropist, and IRL IndyCar Series car owner. ... One of the worlds largest corporations, Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) is a global pharmaceutical company with headquarters in Indianapolis,Indiana, USA. A Fortune 500 corporation, the company had revenues of $12. ... Carole Lombard (October 6, 1908 – January 16, 1942) was an American actress. ... Shelley Lee Long (born August 23, 1949) is an Golden Globe Award and Emmy Award-winning American film, stage and television dramatic and comedic actress. ... Richard Green Dick Lugar (born April 4, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Indiana. ... Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Emmy Award-winning, Oscar-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, known for his expansive manner. ... Donald Arthur Mattingly (nicknamed Donnie Baseball and The Hit Man) (born April 20, 1961) is a retired first baseman who played for the New York Yankees of the American League from 1982-1995. ... John Mellencamp, also known as John Cougar and John Cougar Mellencamp, (born October 7, 1951) is best known for being an American rock singer-songwriter. ... Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an Academy Award-nominated American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool.[1] He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... Ryan Joseph Newman (born December 8, 1977 in South Bend, Indiana) is a driver in the NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series. ... Margaret Jane Pauley (born October 31, 1950, in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American television news anchor and journalist. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... Ernie Pyle on board the U.S.S. Cabot. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... An image of Orville Redenbacher on a popcorn container Image:Bci oriville 1. ... Honorary statue of James Whitcomb Riley on courthouse lawn in Greenfield, Indiana James Whitcomb Riley (Greenfield, Indiana October 7, 1849 – July 22, 1916), American writer and poet called the Hoosier poet and Americas Childrens Poet made a start writing newspaper verse in Hoosier dialect for the Indianapolis Journal... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... 1927 Time cover featuring Rockne Knute (pronounced kah-noot) (noot is the anglicized nickname) Kenneth Rockne (March 4, 1888 – March 31, 1931) was an American football player and is regarded by many as the greatest coach in college football history. ... Ned Rorem (born October 23, 1923) is a noted American composer and diarist. ... W. Axl Rose[1][2] (born William Bruce Rose, Jr. ... This stylized likeness of the Colonel serves as its logo and mascot of his restaurant chain. ... Wilbur Warren Shaw (1902 - 1954), U.S. automobile racer; won Indianapolis 500 race 1937, 1939, 1940; died in airplane crash. ... Jean Shepherd posed as Frederick R. Ewing on the back cover of Ballantines I, Libertine (1956). ... Richard Bernard Red Skelton (July 18, 1913 – September 17, 1997) was an American comedian whose greatest impact — in a career which began as a teen circus clown and graduated to vaudeville, Broadway, MGM films, and radio — began when he reached television stardom with The Red Skelton Show (NBC, 1951–1952... Theodore Clement Steele (1847-1926) was an American Impressionist painter known for his Indiana landscapes. ... For other persons named Tony Stewart, see Tony Stewart (disambiguation). ... Izzy Stradlin (born Jeffrey Dean Isbell on April 8, 1962 in Lafayette, Indiana) is an American musician, best known as the rhythm guitarist of the hard rock band Guns N Roses from 1985 to 1991. ... Gene Stratton-Porter (August 17, 1863 - December 6, 1924) was an American author, screenwriter and naturalist who wrote fanciful, romantic, well-plotted stories set in the American Midwest. ... Clement Studebaker (1831-1901) was one of the brothers who founded what eventually became the Studebaker Corporation, an early manufacturer of automobiles. ... Time magazine, December 21, 1925 Newton Booth Tarkington (July 29, 1869 _ May 19, 1946) was an American novelist and dramatist. ... For other uses, see Tecumseh (disambiguation). ... Steve Tesich is a Serbian-American Oscar-winning screenwriter and playwright who was born Stojan Tesić in Užice, Yugoslavia (now Serbia and Montenegro) on September 29, 1942. ... Maurice Thompson (born September 9, 1844; died February 15, 1901) was an American novelist. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Sarah Breedlove Madam C.J. Walker or Madame Charles Joseph Walker (December 23, 1867–May 25, 1919) was an African American philanthropist and tycoon who made her fortune developing i like cheese a lot a hugely successful line of beauty and hair products for black women. ... Lewis Lew Wallace (April 10, 1827 – February 15, 1905) was a lawyer, governor, Union general in the American Civil War, American statesman, and author, best remembered for his historical novel Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ. ... Ryan Wayne White (December 6, 1971 – April 8, 1990[1]) was a young man with AIDS from Kokomo, Indiana who became a national spokesman for AIDS, after being expelled from school because of his infection. ... Matt Williams is a television writer, creator and producer. ... Wendell L. Willkie Wendell Lewis Willkie (February 18, 1892 – October 8, 1944) was a lawyer in the United States and the Republican nominee for the 1940 presidential election. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... Frank Urban Fuzzy Zoeller, Jr. ...

See also

Indiana Portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Indiana. ... Map of the 92 counties of the State of Indiana The United States Census Bureau has defined 8 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 16 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 25 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of Indiana. ... Listed are the 92 counties of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... The Indiana State Museum is a museum located within White River State Park in Indianapolis, IN. The museum houses many exhibits on the history of Indiana from prehistoric times upto today. ... The Indiana State Police is the state police agency for Indiana, which has jurisdiction anywhere in the state. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on 2006-11-06.
  2. ^ States ranked by population density
  3. ^ Stewart, George R. [1945] (1967). Names on the Land: A Historical Account of Place-Naming in the United States, Sentry edition (3rd), Houghton Mifflin, p. 191. 
  4. ^ Angel Mounds State Historic Site. Evansville Convention & Visitors Bureau. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  5. ^ Meinig, D.W. (1993). The Shaping of America: A Geographical Perspective on 500 Years of History, Volume 2: Continental America, 1800-1867. New Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-05658-3; pg. 436
  6. ^ Ozick, Cynthia. "MIRACLE ON GRUB STREET; Stockholm.", The New York Times, November 9, 1986. Retrieved on 2006-10-19. (English) 
  7. ^ Fantel, Hans. "SOUND; CD'S MAKE THEIR MARK ON THE WABASH VALLEY", The New York Times, October 14, 1984. Retrieved on 2006-10-19. (English) 
  8. ^ Find A Park. National Park Service. Retrieved on 2006-10-19.
  9. ^ Northwest Indiana Population Data. Retrieved on 2007-03-20.
  10. ^ Our History. Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District. Retrieved on 2006-10-19.
  11. ^ Jackson, 211
  12. ^ Hudson, John C.. "Chicago: Patterns of the metropolis", Indiana Business Magazine, May 1, 2001. Retrieved on 2006-10-19. (English) 
  13. ^ Jackson, 190
  14. ^ Verespej, Michael A.. "The atlas of U.S. manufacturing", April 3, 2000. Retrieved on 2006-10-19. (English) 
  15. ^ Jackson, 177
  16. ^ Lawrence County Limestone History. Lawrence County, Indiana. Retrieved on 2007-09-11.
  17. ^ Indiana State Climate Office. agry.perdue.edu. Last accessed November 11, 2006.
  18. ^ Evansville Weather. US Travel Weather. Retrieved on 2007-03-17.
  19. ^ (January 12, 2003) Hopewell culture (in English). Britannica Elementary Encyclopedia. 
  20. ^ Kavasch, E. Barrie. "Ancient mound builders", Cobblestone Publishing Company, Cobblestone, January 10, 2003, p. 6. Retrieved on 2006-10-19. (English) 
  21. ^ a b (January 1, 2005) Indiana (in English). World Almanac Books. 
  22. ^ Our History. The Indiana Historian. Retrieved on 2006-10-19.
  23. ^ (January 12, 2005) Indiana (in English). Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc.. 
  24. ^ Table 4: Cumulative Estimates of the Components of Population Change for the United States, Regions and States: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006
  25. ^ Population and Population Centers by State. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2006-11-21.
  26. ^ Census: Indiana, United States
  27. ^ Census: DP-2. Profile of Selected Social Characteristics: 2000
  28. ^ American Religious Identification Survey. The Graduate Center. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  29. ^ Indiana - Online Information Article. Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2006-12-24.
  30. ^ Census Population Estimates for 2005
  31. ^ Democrats Take House by a Wide Margin. NPR. Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  32. ^ Officials: Bayh to take first step in 2008 bid next week. CNN.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  33. ^ Bureau of Economic Analysis: Gross State Product
  34. ^ Bureau of Economic Analysis: Annual State Personal Income
  35. ^ Indiana Economy at a Glance. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  36. ^ (July 19, 1998). "Manufacturers in Indiana". Purdue University Center for Rural Development.
  37. ^ WNDU-TV: News Story: Bayer is leaving Elkhart - November 16, 2005
  38. ^ Economy & Demographics. Terre Haute Economic Development Co.. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  39. ^ USDA Crop Profiles. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved on 2006-11-20.
  40. ^ Biofuels Indiana
  41. ^ About BioTown
  42. ^ NASA-Astronaut Bio: Virgil I. Grissom
  43. ^ Pentagon Renovation Program
  44. ^ Indiana Energy Statistics. US Department of Energy - Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
  45. ^ Indiana Quick Facts. US Department of Energy - State Energy Profiles
  46. ^ Indiana Office of Energy
  47. ^ New Indianapolis Airport. Indianapolis Airport Authority. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  48. ^ Gary Airpport Gets Millions in Federal Funding. CBS Channel 2. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  49. ^ Indiana Rail Plan. Indiana Department of Transportation. Retrieved on 2007-01-10.
  50. ^ Ports of Indiana Website. Retrieved on 2007-01-07.
  51. ^ National Center for Education Statistics
  52. ^ Institute of International Education
  53. ^ http://www.mymanmitch.com/news_article.asp?pressid=209

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Bibliography

  • Indiana Writer's Project. Indiana: A Guide To The Hoosier State: American Guide Series (1937), famous WPA Guide to every location; strong on history, architecture and culture; reprinted 1973
  • Carmony, Donald Francis. Indiana, 1816 to 1850: The Pioneer Era (1998)
  • Jackson, Marion T., editor. The Natural Heritage of Indiana. © 1997, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana. ISBN 0-2533-3074-2.* James H. Madison. The Indiana Way: A State History (1990)
  • Skertic, Mark and Watkins, John J. A Native's Guide to Northwest Indiana (2003)
  • Taylor, Robert M., ed. The State of Indiana History 2000: Papers Presented at the Indiana Historical Society's Grand Opening (2001)
  • Taylor, Robert M., ed. Indiana: A New Historical Guide (1990), highly detailed guide to citiies and recent history

External links

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Government Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

  • IN.Gov - The Official website of the State of Indiana
  • IndyGov.Org - Official Indianapolis city government website

Culture and recreation

Geography

Professional media

Business

International community and business resources

  • Indiana District Export Council
  • Indiana Foreign Trade Offices
  • Nationalities Council of Indiana
  • Ports of Indiana
  • U.S. Export Assistance Center
  • World Trade Club of Indiana

Coordinates: 40°N 86°W / 40, -86 Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Indiana Guide to Local Hotels, Lodging, Restaurants, Real Estate, Car Rentals and Area Information (399 words)
Indiana has always been a land of diversity, even before becoming the 19th state in the union on December 11, 1816.
The word Indiana, which was coined by congress in the 1800s, was chosen in honor of the diverse native population that lived in the area at the time of its discovery.
Indiana was also the first state to hold a 500 mile motor vehicle race, now know as the Indy500.
Indiana - MSN Encarta (1508 words)
Indiana ranks 38th among the states in size, with a total area of 94,322 sq km (36,418 sq mi), including 818 sq km (316 sq mi) of inland water and 609 sq km (235 sq mi) of Lake Michigan over which it has jurisdiction.
Indiana is roughly rectangular in shape, and the state has a maximum dimension north to south of 459 km (285 mi) and a maximum east to west dimension of 285 km (177 mi).
In Indiana the principal tributaries of the Wabash are the Tippecanoe River in the north, and the East Fork and the West Fork of the White River, which drain large areas of the southern and south central portions of Indiana.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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