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Encyclopedia > Indian summer
An Indian summer day
An Indian summer day

Indian summer is a name given to a period of sunny, warm weather in autumn, not long before winter. This time can be in late October or early November (Northern hemisphere)/late April or early May (Southern hemisphere), usually sometime after the first frost. It can persist for just a few days or weeks. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 232 KB) Summary Image found personal website, author releases it to users and visitors of his website. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 232 KB) Summary Image found personal website, author releases it to users and visitors of his website. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ... Frost on black pipes Frost is a solid deposition of water vapor from saturated air. ...

Contents

Overview

The dates for Indian summer are inexact because of variation in climatic patterns throughout each hemisphere. In the northern U.S. state of Minnesota, for example, warm Indian summer weather generally occurs earlier: in mid-October rather than in early November. Meanwhile, in San Francisco, where winter and summer temperatures vary less and September is the warmest month [1], the term "Indian summer", if used at all, does not have the same meaning as it would in a region with hot summers and very cold winters. In the Pacific Northwest, where sunshine and warmth rarely coincide after November 1, the term Indian summer usually refers to the "final" warm spell of October, which is followed by several months of frequent rain and coolness. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... The Pacific Northwest from space This page is about the region that includes parts of Canada and the United States. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 60 days remaining. ...


Usage

In former times in Europe, the Indian Summer was sometimes called Saint Luke's Summer. Saint Luke's feast day takes place on October 18. In Italy to this day the Indian Summer is expected and celebrated as an ancient rural tradition. It is called Estate di San Martino (St. Martin's Summer) and is a festivity in many localities throughout the peninsula, on St. Martin's day, November 11. In Galicia (northern Spain) it is called Veraniño de San Martiño, and in Portugal it's called "Verão de São Martinho", both meaning St. Martin's Summer. In both cases, it's celebrated in rural areas with Magostos (Magustus in Portuguese, from Magnus Ustus, Big Fire or Magum Ustum in reference to the magical nature of fire), a celebration of celtic origins in which bonfires, roasted chesnuts and wine have an important role. In some regions, such as the southeastern United States, Indian summer is colloquially used to describe the hottest times of the year, typically in late July or August. These are more commonly known as dog days. Luke the Evangelist (Greek Λουκας Loukas) is said by tradition to be the author of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, the third and fifth books of the New Testament. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... St. ... Galicia (Spain) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Dog Days or dog days of summer are typically the hottest and most humid times of the year. ...


The term has been used for well over two centuries. The earliest known use was by French American writer St. John de Crevecoeur in rural New York in 1778. There are several theories as to its etymology: Michel Guillaume Jean de Crèvecoeur (December 31, 1735 – November 12, 1813) was a French-American writer. ... NY redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Entomology, the study of insects. ...

  • It may be so named because this was the traditional period where North American First Nations/Native American peoples would harvest their fall crops.
  • In The Americans, The Colonial Experience, Daniel J. Boorstin speculates that the term originated from raids on European colonies by Indian war parties; these raids usually ended in autumn, hence the extension to summer-like weather was an "Indian" summer. Indeed, two of the three other known uses of the term "Indian summer" in the 18th century are from accounts kept by two Army officers leading retaliation expeditions against Indians for raids on settlers in Ohio and Indiana in 1790, and Pennsylvania in 1794.[1]
  • It could be so named because the phenomenon was more common in what were then North American Indian territories, as opposed to the Eastern seaboard.
  • It may be of Asian Indian, rather than North American Indian, origin. H. E. Ware, an English writer, noted that ships at that time traversing the Indian Ocean loaded up their cargo the most during the "Indian Summer", or fair weather season. Several ships actually had an "I.S." on their hull at the load level thought safe during the Indian Summer.
  • Others link the term to the racial stereotype of indian giving, the practice of giving and then demanding back.

The term is also used metaphorically to refer to anything that blooms late, or unexpectedly, or after it has lost relevance. Compare to renaissance. First Nations is a term of ethnicity used in Canada. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Daniel J. Boorstin. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Categories: US geography stubs ... Indian giver is an American English expression used for any individual who gives something and then either takes it back or wants to take it back[1]. The expression Indian giver is based on the belief that Native Americans would lend items to the settlers, in other words, let them... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ...


Modern ideas on what an Indian Summer constitutes vary, but the most widely accepted value for determining whether one is experiencing an "Indian Summer" is that the weather must be above 21°C (70 F) for 7 days after the autumnal equinox.


See also

The January thaw is an observed but unexplained weather phenomenon found in mid-latitude North America whereby temperatures tend to rise briefly in mid-winter. ... Dog Days or dog days of summer are typically the hottest and most humid times of the year. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...

References

  1. ^ Sweeting, Adam (2003). Beneath the Second Sun: A Cultural History of Indian Summer. University Press of New England, 16. ISBN. 

Further reading

Adam Sweeting, Beneath the Second Sun: A Cultural History of Indian Summer. University Press of New England, 2003. ISBN .


External links

  • Indian Summer Article - National Weather Service
  • USA Today, 'A close look at Indian summer'

  Results from FactBites:
 
Indian summer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (548 words)
Indian summer (also called Old Wives' summer in the United Kingdom) is a name given to a period of sunny, warm weather in autumn, not long before winter.
The dates for Indian summer are very inexact due to the enormous variations in climatic patterns throughout each hemisphere.
Indeed, two of the three other known uses of the term "Indian summer" in the 18th century are from accounts kept by two Army officers leading retaliation expeditions against Indians for raids on settlers in Ohio and Indiana (1790), and Pennsylvania (1794).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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