FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Indian Massacres

In the history of the European colonization of North America, the term "Indian massacre" was often used to describe either mass killings of Europeans by indigenous people of the North American continent ("Indians") or mass killings of indigenous peoples by Europeans. In theory, massacre applied to the killing of civilian noncombatants or to the summary execution of prisoners-of-war. In practice, the label was often haphazardly applied, rarely without bias, and was sometimes used to describe an overwhelming (though lawful) military defeat. Similarly, massacres were sometimes mislabeled "battles" in an attempt to give legitimacy to what would today be considered a war crime. British colonization of the Americas began under the Kingdom of England in the late 16th century, before reaching its peak after the Acts of Union 1707, which established the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... A European American, or a Euro-American, is a person who resides in the United States and is either the descendant of European immigrants or from Europe him or herself. ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... In times of armed conflict a civilian is any person who is not a combatant. ... Non-combatant is a military and legal term describing civilians not engaged in combat. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The two parts of the laws of war (or Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC)): Law concerning acceptable practices while engaged in war, like the Geneva Conventions, is called jus in bello; while law concerning allowable justifications for armed force is called jus ad bellum. ... Generally, a battle is an instance of combat in warfare between two or more parties wherein each group will seek to defeat the others. ... In the context of war, a war crime is a punishable offense under International Law, for violations of the laws of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ...


Determining how many people died in these massacres overall is difficult. In the book The Wild Frontier: Atrocities during the American-Indian War from Jamestown Colony to Wounded Knee, amateur historian William M. Osborn sought to tally every recorded atrocity in the area that would eventually become the continental United States, from first contact (1511) to the closing of the frontier (1890), and determined that 9,156 people died from atrocities perpetrated by Native Americans, and 7,193 people died from atrocities perpetrated by whites. Osborn defines an atrocity as the murder, torture, or mutilation of civilians, the wounded and prisoners. Different definitions would obviously produce different totals. For example, Osborn does not count estimated 4,000 Indian deaths on the Trail of Tears (because these were allegedly unintentional), but he does count several episodes of post-mortem mutilation, even of combatants killed in open battle. Osborn's exact total of 16,349 killed on both sides can therefore be disputed. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This monument at the New Echota Historic Site honors Cherokees who died on the Trail of Tears. ... The term post mortem means after death. It is also short for postmortem examination, or autopsy. ...

Contents

List of massacres

This is a listing of some of the events reported then or referred to now as "Indian massacres":


From 1600 up to 1830

Year Date Name Description
1622 March 22 Jamestown Massacre Powhatans kill 347 English settlers throughout the Virginia colony.
1637 May 26 Mystic Massacre English colonists, with Mohegan and Narragansett allies, attack a large Pequot village on the Mystic River in what is now Connecticut, killing around 500 villagers.
1690 February 8 Schenectady Massacre French and Algonquins destroy Schenectady, New York, killing 60 settlers, including ten women and at least twelve children.
1704 February 29 Deerfield Massacre A force comprised of Abenaki, Kanienkehaka, Wyandot and Pocumtuck Indians, led by a small contingent of French-Canadian militia, sack the town of Deerfield, Massachusetts, killing 56 civilians and taking dozens more as captives.
1757 August Fort William Henry Massacre Following the fall of Fort William Henry, between 70 and 180 British and colonial prisoners are killed by Indian allies of the French.
1763 September 14 Devil's Hole Massacre Seneca double ambush of a British Supply train and of British soldiers sent to fight Seneca.
1778 July 3 Wyoming Valley Massacre Following a battle with rebel defenders of Forty Fort, Iroquois allies of the Loyalist forces hunt and kill those who flee, then torture to death those who surrendered.
August 31 Stockbridge Massacre A battle of the American Revolutionary War that rebel propaganda portrayed as a massacre.
November 11 Cherry Valley Massacre More than 30 settlers killed.
1782 March 8 Gnadenhütten massacre Nearly 100 non-combatant Christian Delaware (Lenape) Indians, mostly women and children, are killed one at a time by a hammer blow to the head by Pennsylvania militiamen.
1812 August 15 Fort Dearborn Massacre Settlers and soldiers killed in ambush near Fort Dearborn (site of present-day Chicago, Illinois)
1813 January 22 River Raisin Massacre Between 30 and 60 Kentucky militia were killed after surrendering.
August 30 Fort Mims Massacre Following defeat at the Battle of Burnt Corn, a band of Red Sticks sack Fort Mims, Alabama, killing 400 civilians and taking 250 scalps. This action precipitates the Creek War.
1817 Spring Battle of Claremore Mound Cherokee Indians wipe out Osage Indians led by Chief Clermont at Claremore Mound, Indian Territory.
1818 April 22 Chehaw Affair U.S. troops attack a non-hostile village during the First Seminole War, killing an estimated 10 to 50 men, women and children.

March 22 is the 81st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (82nd in leap years). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Indian massacre of 1622. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... The Mystic Massacre took place on May 26, 1637, when English settlers under Captain John Mason, and Narragansett and Mohegan allies set fire to a Pequot fort near the Mystic River, shooting whatever victims attempted to escape the wooden palisade fortress, killing the entire village of mostly women and children... The Mohegan tribe is an Algonquian-speaking tribe living in eastern (upper Thames valley) Connecticut [1] who were jointly ruled by the Pequot tribe until 1637. ... Tribal flag // The Narragansett tribe, or more accurately Nahahiganseck Sovereign Nation, are a Native American tribe who controlled the area surrounding Narragansett Bay in present-day Rhode Island, and also portions of Connecticut, and eastern Massachusetts. ... The Pequot are a tribal nation of Native Americans who, in the 17th century, inhabited much of what is now Connecticut. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Early in 1690, a party of over 200 French and Sault and Algonquin Indian raiders set out from Montreal to attack English outposts to the south. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... Schenectady is a city located in Schenectady County, New York, of which it is the county seat. ... NY redirects here. ... February 29th, or bissextile day, is the 60th day of a leap year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 306 days remaining. ... The Deerfield massacre occurred during Queen Annes War on February 29, 1704, when joint French and Native American forces under the command of Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville attacked the English (predominantly puritan) settlement at Deerfield, Massachusetts at dawn, razing the town and killing fifty-six colonists. ... The Abenaki (also Wabanuok or Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans/First Nations belonging to the Algonquian peoples of northeastern North America. ... The Kanienkehaka, or Mohawk tribe of Native American people live around Lake Ontario and the St. ... Huron redirects here. ... The Pocomtuc were a Native American tribe inhabiting the Connecticut River valley from the northern tip of Connecticut, Western Massachusetts, and the tri-state area of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. ... Deerfield is a town located in Franklin County, Massachusetts. ... The British Fort William Henry on the shores of Lake George, New York, was built during the French and Indian War (1754-1763) by Sir William Johnson as a staging ground for attacks against the French Fort Carillon (later renamed Fort Ticonderoga). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... Combatants Seneca Great Britain Commanders Cornplanter Honayewus John Stedman Strength 300-500 134 Casualties Unknown 80 (although reports are as high as 103) The Battle of Devils Hole Road, also known as the Devils Hole Massacre, was fought on September 14, 1763 between a detachment of the British... Seneca may refer to: Roman figures (any links to Seneca in Roman pages should be relinked to one of these two) Marcus (or Lucius) Annaeus Seneca also called rhetor, Roman orator and father of Seneca the philosopher and dramatist. ... Seneca may refer to: Roman figures (any links to Seneca in Roman pages should be relinked to one of these two) Marcus (or Lucius) Annaeus Seneca also called rhetor, Roman orator and father of Seneca the philosopher and dramatist. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... Combatants Britain United States Commanders Colonel John Butler Colonel Zebulon Butler Strength 900 regulars and Native American warriors 360 milita Casualties three killed, eight wounded over 300 killed and captured (164+6 known dead) The Wyoming massacre was an encounter during the American Revolutionary War between American Patriots and Loyalists... Forty Fort is a borough located in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. ... The Iroquois Confederacy (Haudenosaunee, also known as the League of Peace and Power, Five Nations, or Six Nations) is a group of First Nations/Native Americans. ... Britannia gives a heros welcome to returning American Loyalists. ... August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries French Monarchy Dutch Republic Spanish Empire Oneida and Tuscarora tribes Polish volunteers Prussian volunteers Kingdom of Great Britain Hessian mercenaries Iroquois Confederacy Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert du Motier Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz KoÅ›ciuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben Sir William... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Incident in Cherry Valley - fate of Jane Wells from the original picture by Alonzo Chappel by Thomas Phillibrown, engraver. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in leap years). ... This 37 foot (11 m) monument to the Gnadenhutten massacre, located next to a reconstructed Moravian cabin in what was the center of the original village, was dedicated on June 5, 1872. ... The Lenape or Lenni-Lenape (later named Delaware Indians by Europeans) were, in the 1600s, loosely organized bands of Native American peoples. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... Combatants Potawatomi United Kingdom United States Commanders Chief Blackbird Nathan Heald Strength 500+ 69 military + civilians Casualties 15 39 military + 27 civilians The Fort Dearborn massacre occurred on August 15, 1812 near Fort Dearborn in the United States during the War of 1812. ... Fort Dearborn was a United States fort built on the Chicago River in 1803 under John Whistler on the site of present-day Chicago. ... January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Battle of Frenchtown also known as the River Raisin Massacre was a severe defeat for the Americans during the War of 1812, in an attempt to retake Detroit early in 1813. ... August 30 is the 242nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (243rd in leap years), with 123 days remaining. ... Fort Mims Massacre External Links A Drawing of Fort Mims Description of Massacre at Rootsweb Categories: Battles of the Creek War | 1813 ... The Battle of Burnt Corn was an encounter between United States forces and Creek Indians that took place July 27, 1813. ... Red Sticks is the English term for a faction of Creek Indians (known as mvskoke in the language). ... Combatants Creek Indians (Red Sticks) American Settlers Commanders Peter McQueen William Weatherford Daniel Beasley Captain Bailey Strength 800 Red Stick Creek 175 militia 375 non combatants Casualties 200 killed 400 to 500 killed The Fort Mims massacre occurred on 30 August 1813, when a force of Creeks, belonging to the... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Native American Big Mouth Spring with decorated scalp lock on right shoulder. ... The Creek War of 1813-1814 began as a civil war within the Creek Nation. ... The Battle of Claremore Mound, or the Battle of the Strawberry Moon, was one of the chief battles of the war between the Osage and Cherokee Indians. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... The Osage are American Indian People of the central Midwest. ... Claremore Mound, a hill in present-day Rogers County, Oklahoma, is the site of the Battle of Strawberry Moon where in 1817 a band Cherokees under Chief Spring Frog (Too-an-tuh) wiped out Chief Clermonts band of Osage Indians. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... Osceola, Seminole leader, detail from an 1838 lithograph The Seminole Wars, also known as the Florida Wars, were three wars or conflicts in Florida between the Seminole Native American tribe and the United States. ...

From 1830 through 1890

Year Date Name Description
1832 May 20 Indian Creek Massacre Indians, mainly Potawatomi, kidnap two girls and kill fifteen men, women and children.
August 1 Battle of Bad Axe Around 300 Indian men, women and children are slaughtered in Wisconsin by white soldiers.
1833 Spring Cutthroat Gap Massacre Osage Indians wipe out a Kiowa Indian village in Indian Territory.
1836 May 19 Fort Parker Massacre Six men killed by a mixed Indian group in Limestone County, Texas.
1838 October 5 Killough Massacre Indians massacre eighteen members and relatives of the Killough family in Texas.
1847 November 29 Whitman massacre The murder of missionaries Dr Marcus Whitman, Mrs Narcissa Whitman and twelve others at Walla Walla, Washington by Cayuse and Umatilla Indians, triggering the Cayuse War.
1854 August 17 Kaibai Creek Massacre Forty-two Winnemem Wintu men, women and children are killed by white settlers at Kaibai Creek, California.
August 20 Ward Massacre Eighteen of the 20 members of the Alexander Ward party were killed by Shoshoni Indians while traveling on the Oregon Trail in western Idaho. This event led to the eventual abadonment of Fort Boise and Fort Hall, in favor of the use of military escorts. [1][2]
1855 August 17 Grattan Massacre Twenty-nine U.S. soldiers killed by Brulé Lakota Sioux Indians in Nebraska Territory.
1860 February 26 Indian Island Massacre At least 100 Wiyot Indians, mostly women and children, are slaughtered by white settlers in Humboldt County, California, during one of three simultaneous assaults on the Wiyot [3]
1862 August-September Great Sioux Uprising 300-800 white settlers killed throughout Minnesota as part of the U.S.-Dakota War
October 24 Tonkawa Massacre Accompanied by Caddo allies, a detachment of irregular Union Indians, mainly Kickapoo, Delaware and Shawnee, attempt to destroy the Tonkawa tribe in Indian Territory. One hundred and fifty of 390 Tonkawa survive.
1863 January 29 Bear River Massacre Col. Patrick Connor leads a regiment killing at least 200 Indian men, women and children near Preston, Idaho.
April 19 Keyesville Massacre White settlers kill 35 Tehachapi men in Kern County, California [4].
1864 November 29 Sand Creek Massacre Militiamen slaughter at least 160 Cheyenne Indians at Sand Creek, Colorado.
1867 July 2 Kidder Massacre Cheyenne and Sioux Indians ambush and kill a 2nd US Cavalry detachment of eleven men and Indian guide near Beaver Creek in Sherman County, Kansas [5].
1870 January 23 Marias Massacre White Americans slaughter 173 Piegans, mainly women, children and the elderly.
1879 January 8 Ft Robinson Massacre Northern Cheyenne under Dull Knife attempt to escape from confinement in Fort Robinson, Nebraska; about fifty survive.
1890 December 29 Wounded Knee Massacre Around 300 Sioux men, women and children are massacred by US soldiers at Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... // Introduction On May 20, 1832, a group of settlers living six miles north of Ottawa, Illinois, along the Indian Creek, were attacked by a band of Native Americans. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... The Battle of Bad Axe, one of the last major battles during the Black Hawk War, was fought between the combined forces of the Sauk (Sac) and Fox tribes and United States troops under Gen. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... The Massacre of Cutthroat Gap occurred in the spring of 1833 in the Wichita Mountains. ... The Osage are American Indian People of the central Midwest. ... The Kiowa are a nation of Native Americans who lived mostly in the plains of west Texas, Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico at the time of the arrival of Europeans. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (140th in leap years). ... The Fort Parker massacre was an event in 1836 in which members of the pioneer Parker family were killed in a raid by Native Americans. ... Limestone County is a county located in the state of Texas. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (279th in leap years). ... The Killough Massacre is believed to have been both the largest and last Native American depredation of white immigrants in East Texas. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marcus Whitman The Whitman massacre (also known as the Walla Walla massacre and the Whitman Incident) was the murder in the Oregon Country on November 29, 1847 of U.S. missionaries Dr. Marcus Whitman and his wife Narcissa Whitman, along with twelve others, by Cayuse and Umatilla Indians. ... Marcus Whitman Narcissa Whitman Marcus Whitman (September 4, 1802–November 29, 1847) was an American physician and missionary in the Oregon Country. ... Walla Walla is both the county seat of Walla Walla County, Washington, USA, and the countys largest city. ... For other uses, see Cayuse (disambiguation). ... Categories: Native American tribes | Stub ... The Cayuse War was an armed conflict that took place in the northwestern United States between 1848 and 1855 between the Cayuse people of the region and the United States Government and local white settlers. ... August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Winnemem Wintu (middle river people or middle water people) are a band of the Native American Wintu tribe originally located along the lower McCloud River, above Shasta Dam near Redding, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Shoshone is a Native American language. ... The Ox Team or the Old Oregon Trail 1852-1906 by Ezra Meeker. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Fort Boise was a fur trading post of the Hudsons Bay Company in Idaho. ... Fort Hall Fort Hall in the United States was a 19th century outpost in the eastern Oregon Country. ... August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Grattan massacre of August 17, 1854 occurred east of Fort Laramie, Nebraska Territory, USA (in present-day Goshen County, Wyoming). ... Part of indian genealogy tree (more informations at http://www. ... Eddie Plenty Holes, a Sioux Indian photographed about 1899. ... Wahktageli (Gallant Warrior), a Yankton Sioux chief (Karl Bodmer) Funeral scaffold of a Sioux chief (Karl Bodmer) Horse racing of the Sioux Indians (Karl Bodmer) The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American people. ... Nebraska Territory was a historic, organized territory of the United States from May 30, 1854 until March 1, 1867 when Nebraska became the 37th U.S. state. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Wiyot (also Wishosk) is an extinct Algic language. ... Humboldt County is a county located on the northwest coast of the U.S. state of California, on the Pacific Ocean. ... Chief Taoyateduta, known as Chief Little Crow The Sioux Uprising, also known as the Dakota Conflict or the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, was an armed conflict between the United States and several eastern bands of the Dakota people (often referred to as the Santee Sioux) that began on... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... The Caddo are a nation, or group of tribes, of Southeastern Native Americans who, in the 16th century, inhabited much of what is now East Texas, Western Louisiana and portions of southern Arkansas and Oklahoma. ... Look up guerrilla in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... For the Tenacious D song, see Kickapoo. ... The Lenape or Lenni-Lenape (later named Delaware Indians by Europeans) were, in the 1600s, loosely organized bands of Native American peoples. ... The Shawnee, or Shawano, are a people native to North America. ... Seal of the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma Tonkawa The Tonkawa are a people native to central Texas, speaking the Tonkawa language. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United States Army Shoshone Indians Commanders Col. ... Patrick Edward Connor (March 17, 1820 – December 17, 1891) was a Union general during the American Civil War, most famous for his campaigns against Indians in the American Old West. ... Preston is a city in Franklin County, Idaho, United States. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Tehachapi may refer to: Tehachapi, California Tehachapi Mountains Tehachapi Loop Tehachapi Pass A film starring Christina Applegate Category: ... Kern County is a county located in the southern Central Valley of the U.S. state of California. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America Cheyenne, Arapaho Commanders John M. Chivington Black Kettle Strength 800 soldiers 500, mostly elderly, women and children Casualties 10 dead, 36 wounded 200 dead The Sand Creek Massacre (also known as the Chivington Massacre or the Battle of Sand Creek) was an incident in the... Lexington Minuteman representing militia minuteman John Parker Militia is the activity of one or more citizens organized to provide defense or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Cheyenne lodges with buffalo meat drying, 1870 For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... The Kidder Massacre of 29 June 1867 refers to the killing of a Lyman Kidder along with an Indian scout and ten enlisted men. ... Cheyenne lodges with buffalo meat drying, 1870 For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ... Wahktageli (Gallant Warrior), a Yankton Sioux chief (Karl Bodmer) Funeral scaffold of a Sioux chief (Karl Bodmer) Horse racing of the Sioux Indians (Karl Bodmer) The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American people. ... Coat of Arms of the United States Army 2d Cavalry Regiment Shoulder Sleeve Insignia of the United States Army 2d Cavalry Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia of the United States Army 2d Cavalry Regiment The 2d Armored Cavalry Regiment (2d ACR) —established by President Andrew Jackson on May 23, 1836 as... Beaver Creek may refer numerous places, both stream and towns, etc. ... Sherman County (standard abbreviation: SH) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Official language(s) none Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Marias Massacre is a now little-known massacre that took place in Montana during the late-19th century Indian Wars between the United States government and the American Indians. ... This article is about the Piegan Blackfoot, the band of the tribe located on the Blackfoot Nation in Montana. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cheyenne lodges with buffalo meat drying, 1870 The Cheyenne are a Native American nation of the Great Plains, closely allied with the Arapaho and loosely allied with the Lakota (Sioux). ... Chief Dull Knife was a great chief to the Cheyenne people during the 19th century. ... Fort Robinson is a former U. S. Army post and a present-day state park in the Pine Ridge region of northwest Nebraska. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... Combatants Sioux United States Commanders Big Foot† James W. Forsyth Strength 120 men 230 women and children 500 men Casualties 153 killed 50 wounded 150 missing 25 killed 39 wounded The Wounded Knee Massacre was the last major armed conflict between the Dakota Sioux and the United States, subsequently described... Wounded Knee is a census-designated place (CDP) in Shannon County, South Dakota, United States. ...

Footnotes

    See also


      Results from FactBites:
     
    Indian Wars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2954 words)
    Indian Wars is the name used by historians in the United States to describe a series of conflicts between the United States and Native American peoples ("Indians") of North America.
    Wayne's army defeated the Indian confederacy at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794.
    The Indians had hoped for British assistance; when that was not forthcoming, the Indians were compelled to sign the Treaty of Greenville in 1795, which ceded modern-day Ohio and part of Indiana to the United States.
    Historical Gazette: Oregon Trail 1856 (728 words)
    Men are roaming all over the Indian country, abusing and killing the unprotected natives, until terror and natural instinct compel them to unite for mutual aid and protection.
    It was not until the Whites had become numerous, and grossly abusive, that the Indians, from necessity, resisted further aggressions.
    Next, the Rogue River or Southern Oregon war came as caused by constant depredations of Indian tribes who had made treaties and stipulated in them that in consideration of certain payments and annuities to them, they were to remain quiet and peaceable, and surrender the country to the general government.
      More results at FactBites »

     
     

    COMMENTARY     


    Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
    Your name
    Your comments

    Want to know more?
    Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

     


    Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
    The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
    Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
    All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
    Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m