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Encyclopedia > Index Librorum Prohibitorum
Title page of Index Librorum Prohibitorum (Venice 1564).
Title page of Index Librorum Prohibitorum (Venice 1564).

The Index Librorum Prohibitorum ("List of Prohibited Books") was a list of publications prohibited by the Roman Catholic Church. The avowed aim of the list was to protect the faith and morals of the faithful by preventing the reading of immoral books or works containing theological errors. The various editions also contain the rules of the Church relating to the reading, selling and censorship of books. Books that passed inspection were printed with nihil obstat ("nothing forbids") or Imprimatur ("let it be printed") on the title page. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (389x625, 111 KB) Краткое описание The Index Librorum Prohibitorum (List of Prohibited Books) is a list of publications which the Catholic Church censored for being a danger to itself and its members. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (389x625, 111 KB) Краткое описание The Index Librorum Prohibitorum (List of Prohibited Books) is a list of publications which the Catholic Church censored for being a danger to itself and its members. ... For other uses, see Censor. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Morality (from the Latin manner, character, proper behavior) has three principal meanings. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... In printmaking, an edition is a set of prints off one plate, composing a limited run of prints. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... Nihil obstat is an LOOK AT ME!!!! official approval by a delegated censor of the Roman Catholic Church to publish a work dealing with faith or morals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The list was not simply a reactive work. Roman Catholic authors had the opportunity to defend their writings and could prepare a new edition with the necessary corrections or elisions, either to avoid or to limit a ban. Pre-publication censorship was encouraged; self-censorship, however, was incalculable. For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... A ban is, generally, any decree that prohibits something. ... Self-censorship is the act of censoring and/or classifying ones own book(s), film(s), or other kind of art to avoid offending others without an authority pressuring them to do so. ...

Contents

History

The first list of the kind was not published in Rome, but in Roman Catholic Netherlands (1529). Venice (1543) and Paris (1551, under the terms of the Edict of Châteaubriant) followed this example. The first Roman Index was the work of Pope Paul IV (1557, 1559). The work of the censors was considered too severe and, after the Council of Trent had revised the church legislation on the prohibition of books, Pope Pius IV promulgated in 1564 the so called Tridentine Index, the basis of all later lists until Pope Leo XIII, in 1897, published his Index Leonianus. The very first lists were the work of the Sacred Congregation of the Inquisition of the Roman Catholic Church (later the Holy Office, now the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith). For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Events April 22 - Treaty of Saragossa divides the eastern hemisphere between Spain and Portugal, stipulating that the dividing line should lie 297. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Catholic Valois propaganda: a haloed Henri II, attended by France and crowned by Fame, effortlessly tramples Heresy under foot in this engraving by Jean Duvet, 1548 The Edict of Châteaubriant,[1] issued from the the seat of Anne, duc de Montmorency in Brittany, was promulgated by Henri II of... Pope Paul IV (June 28, 1476 – August 18, 1559), né Giovanni Pietro Carafa, was Pope from May 23, 1555 until his death. ... Events Spain is effectively bankrupt. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... The Council of Trent is the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... Pius IV, né Giovanni Angelo Medici (March 31, 1499 – December 9, 1565), pope from 1559 to 1565, was born of humble parentage in Milan, unrelated with the Medicis of Florence. ... Events March 27 — Naples bans kissing in public under the penalty of death June 22 — Fort Caroline, the first French attempt at colonizing the New World September 10 — The Battle of Kawanakajima Ottoman Turks invade Malta Modern pencil becomes common in England Conquistadors crossed the Pacific Spanish founded a colony... Pope Leo XIII (March 2, 1810—July 20, 1903), born Count Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci, was the 256th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, reigning from 1878 to 1903, succeeding Pope Pius IX. Reigning until the age of 93, he was the oldest pope, and had the third longest... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Inquisition was an office of the Roman Catholic Church charged with suppressing heresy. ... Holy Office can refer to: the Sacred Congregation of the Holy Office, now called the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith - the historical Inquisition another word for the Mass (liturgy) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) (Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. ...


In 1571 a special congregation was created, the Sacred Congregation of the Index, which had the specific task to investigate those writings that were denounced in Rome as being not exempt of errors, to update the list of Pope Pius IV regularly and also to make lists of corrections in case a writing was not in itself damnable but only in need of correction and put on the list with a mitigating clause (e.g., donec corrigatur (forbidden if not corrected) or donec expurgetur (forbidden if not purged)). This sometimes resulted in very long lists of corrections, published in the Index Expurgatorius. Prohibitions made by other congregations (mostly the Holy Office) were simply passed on to the Congregation of the Index, where the final decrees were drafted and made public, after approval of the Pope (who always had the possibility to condemn an author personally—only a few examples, such as Lamennais and Hermes). The Congregation of the Index was abolished in 1917, when the rules on the reading of books were again reelaborated in the new Codex Iuris Canonici. From that date on the Holy Office (again) took care of the index. Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ... A congregation is a type of dicastery of the Roman Curia, the central administrative organism of the Catholic Church. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... “Dammit” redirects here. ... Decree is an order that has the force of law. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Hughes Felicité Robert de Lamennais (June 19, 1782 - February 27, 1854), was a French priest, and philosophical and political writer. ... Georg Hermes (April 22, 1775 - May 26, 1831), German Roman Catholic theologian, was born at Dreyerwalde, in Westphalia, and was educated at the gymnasium and university of Münster, in both of which institutions he afterwards taught. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ...


The Index was regularly updated until the 1948 edition. This 32nd edition contained 4,000 titles censored for various reasons: heresy, moral deficiency, sexual explicitness, and so on. Among the notable writers on the list were Desiderius Erasmus, Edward Gibbon, Giordano Bruno, Laurence Sterne, Voltaire, Daniel Defoe, Nicolaus Copernicus, Honoré de Balzac, Jean-Paul Sartre, Nikos Kazantzakis, as well as the Dutch sexologist Theodoor Hendrik van de Velde, author of the sex manual The Perfect Marriage. A complete list of the authors and writings present in the subsequent editions of the index are listed in J. Martinez de Bujanda, Index librorum prohibitorum, 1600-1966, Geneva, 2002. Almost every modern Western philosopher was included on the list — even those that believed in God, such as Descartes, Kant, Berkeley, Malebranche, Lamennais and Gioberti. That some atheists, such as Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, were not included was due to the general (Tridentine) rule that heretical works (i.e., works that contradict Catholic dogma) are ipso facto forbidden. Some important works are absent simply because nobody bothered to denounce them. Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Heresy (disambiguation). ... Human sexuality is the expression of sexual feelings. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Erasmus redirects here. ... Edward Gibbon (1737–1794). ... Giordano Bruno Giordano Bruno (1548, Nola – February 17, 1600, Rome) was an Italian philosopher, priest, cosmologist, and occultist. ... Laurence Sterne Laurence Sterne (November 24, 1713 – March 18, 1768) was an Irish-born English novelist and an Anglican clergyman. ... For other uses, see Voltaire (disambiguation). ... Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] â€“ April 24 [?], 1731)[1] was a British writer, journalist, and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... Copernicus redirects here. ... Balzac redirects here. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... Nikos Kazantzakis (Greek: Νίκος Καζαντζάκης) (February 18, 1883, Heraklion, Crete, Greece - October 26, 1957, Freiburg, Germany), author of poems, novels, essays, plays, and travel books, was arguably the most important and most translated Greek writer and philosopher of the 20th century. ... Sexology is the systematic study of human sexuality. ... The Dutch physician and gynæcologist Theodoor Hendrik van de Velde (1873 - 1937) served as Director at the Gynæcological Institute in Haarlem, the Netherlands. ... Sex manuals are books which explain how to perform sexual intercourse and other sexual practices. ... For other uses, see Geneva (disambiguation). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... René Descartes René Descartes (IPA: , March 31, 1596 – February 11, 1650), also known as Cartesius, worked as a philosopher and mathematician. ... Kant redirects here. ... For the second husband of Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk, see George Berkeley (MP). ... Malebranche redirects here. ... Hughes Felicité Robert de Lamennais Hughes Felicité Robert de Lamennais (June 19, 1782 - February 27, 1854), was a French priest, and philosophical and political writer. ... Vincenzo Gioberti (April 5, 1801 - October 26, 1852), Italian philosopher, publicist and politician, was born in Turin. ... Atheist redirects here. ... Arthur Schopenhauer Arthur Schopenhauer (February 22, 1788 – September 21, 1860) was a German philosopher born in Gdańsk (Danzig), Poland. ... Friedrich Nietzsche, 1882 Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... The Council of Trent is the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... For other uses, see Heresy (disambiguation). ... Look up Ipso facto in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Denunciation refers to the announcement of a treatys termination. ...


Many actions of the congregations were of a definite political content. In 1926, the Action Française magazine, espousing far-right French causes, was put on the Index. Alfred Rosenberg’s Der Mythus des 20. Jahrhunderts (The Myth of the Twentieth Century) and his An die Dunkelmänner unserer Zeit: eine Antwort auf die Angriffe gegen den "Mythus des 20. Jahrhundert" (Regarding The Dark Men of Our Time: an Answer to the Problems against the "Myth of the Twentieth Century"), were condemned by decrees of February 7, 1934 and of July 17, 1935 respectively. Ernst Bergmann's Die deutsche Nationalkirche (The German National Church) and his Die natürliche Geistlehre (Natural Spirit Teachings), by decrees of February 7, 1934 and November 17, 1937. Hitler's Mein Kampf was not placed on the Index, however, as censors continually postponed and eventually terminated its examination. Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Right wing” redirects here. ... Alfred Rosenberg around 1935   (January 12, 1893 Reval (today Tallinn) – October 16, 1946) was an early and intellectually influential member of the Nazi party, who later held several important posts in the Nazi government. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Ernst Bergmann (born Colditz, 1881–died Leipzig, 1945) was a German philosopher and proponent of Nazism. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Mein Kampf (English translation: My Struggle) is a book by the German-Austrian politician Adolf Hitler, which combines elements of autobiography with an exposition of Hitlers National Socialist political ideology. ...


The Index's effects were felt throughout much of the Catholic world. From Quebec to Poland it was, for many years, very difficult to find copies of banned works, especially outside of major cities. The Index as an official list having force of law was abolished in 1966 under Pope Paul VI, following the end of the Second Vatican Council and largely due to practical considerations. However, the moral obligation of not circulating or reading those writings which endanger faith and morals, was reaffirmed in 1966, in the same document - Notification by Congregation for Doctrine of Faith: "This Congregation for Doctrine of Faith (...) says that its index keeps its moral value (...) in the sense that it is asking to the conscience of the faithful (...) to be on guard against the written materials that can put the faith and good conduct in danger" - Signed Alfredo card. Ottaviani, June 14, 1966).[1] It should be noted that Cardinal Ottaviani, despite the fact that he signed this decree of legal abolition of the index, under Pope Paul VI approval, was one of the most conservative members of the Vatican at the time. This article is about the Canadian province. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was the twenty-first Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... An obligation can be legal or moral. ... For other uses, see Faith (disambiguation). ... His Eminence Alfredo Cardinal Ottaviani (29 October 1890 - 3 August 1979) was Secretary of the Holy Office of the Roman Curia from 1959 to 1966 when that dicastery was reorganized as the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, in which he served as Pro-Prefect, until 1968. ... His Eminence Alfredo Cardinal Ottaviani (29 October 1890 - 3 August 1979) was Secretary of the Holy Office of the Roman Curia from 1959 to 1966 when that dicastery was reorganized as the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, in which he served as Pro-Prefect, until 1968. ...


Not on the Index were Aristophanes, Juvenal, François Rabelais, John Cleland, James Joyce, and D. H. Lawrence. According to The Book of Lists by Irving Wallace, Amy Wallace and David Wallechinsky, this was because the primary criterion for banning the work was anticlericalism, blasphemy, heresy. This article is about the 5-4th century BC dramatist. ... Woodcut of Juvenal from the Nuremberg Chronicle Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis, Anglicized as Juvenal, was a Roman satiric poet of the late 1st century and early 2nd century. ... François Rabelais François Rabelais (c. ... John Cleland (baptised September 24, 1709 – January 23, 1789) was an English novelist most famous and infamous as the author of Fanny Hill: or, the Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure. ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 – 2 March 1930) was an English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism, and personal letters. ... The Book of Lists actually refers to any one of a series of books compiled by bestselling author Irving Wallace, his son David Wallechinsky, and daughter Amy Wallace. ... Irving Wallace (March 19, 1916 - June 29, 1990) was an American bestselling author and screenwriter. ... David Wallechinsky (born 5 February 1948) is an Olympic historian, who worked as commentator for NBC Olympic coverage and is the author of many Olympic reference books and other reference books. ... Anti-clericalism is a movement that opposes religious interference into public and political life and more generally the encroachment of religion in the citizens lives. ... For the black metal band, see Blasphemy (band). ... For other uses, see Heresy (disambiguation). ...


In a few cases, according to Wallace, all works of a particular writer were on the Index: Thomas Hobbes, Émile Zola, Jean-Paul Sartre. As for Benedict Spinoza, the Church put all of his posthumous works on the Index. With other writers, only certain books were banned: Samuel Richardson (Pamela), Emanuel Swedenborg (The Principia), or Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason), for example. Hobbes redirects here. ... Émile Zola (2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902) was an influential French writer, the most important example of the literary school of naturalism, and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... Baruch Spinoza Benedictus de Spinoza (November 24, 1632 _ February 21, 1677), named Baruch Spinoza by his synagogue elders and known as Bento de Spinoza or Bento dEspiñoza in the community in which he grew up. ... Posthumous means after death. ... Samuel Richardson (August 19, 1689 – July 4, 1761) was a major 18th century writer best known for his three epistolary novels: Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded (1740), Clarissa: Or the History of a Young Lady (1748) and Sir Charles Grandison (1753). ... Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded is an epistolary novel by Samuel Richardson, first published in 1740. ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... Kant redirects here. ... Title page of the 1781 edition. ...


Reversals and exclusions

There have been cases of reversal with respect to some people whose works were on the Index. For instance, Mary Faustina Kowalska's work and her diary of her reported Divine Mercy visions of Jesus and Mary were initially on the Index. She died in obscurity, and only after her death did the sisters of her convent send her writings to the Vatican for its approval. The version of Faustina's writings that reached Rome was incorrectly translated; the questionable material was unable to be corrected with the original Polish version due to the difficulties in communication through the World War II period followed by the Communist Iron Curtain. Only much later, in the 1970s -- four decades after she had died -- had then-Karol Wojtyla, who was Archbishop over the area where Faustina had spent her last years, initiate a re-working of the translation. This version was accepted by Rome in 1976; two years later, Archbishop Wojtyla was elected Pope, become John Paul II. As Pope, John Paul II had the pleasure of beatifying Faustina, then later Canonizing her on Easter 2000, the first saint proclaimed for the third millenium. Upon canonizing her, the Feast Day "Divine Mercy Sunday" proposed by Faustina was made obligatory for the entire Church. Though her writings were once banned, today Faustina's Vatican biography quotes samples of her reported conversations with Jesus Christ from her diary and Divine Mercy Sunday (based on her writings) is now celebrated on the Sunday after Easter.[2] The Divine Mercy image painted by Adolf Hyla. ... The Divine Mercy is a Christian devotion focused on the mercy of God and its power, particularly as a form of thanksgiving and entrusting of oneself to Gods mercy. ... Since the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ in Calvary until today, a number of people have claimed to have had visions (and indeed personal conversations) with Him and with Saint Mary in person. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Warsaw Pact countries to the east of the Iron Curtain are shaded red; NATO members to the west of it — blue. ... Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Feast of the Divine Mercy or Divine Mercy Sunday is the second Sunday of Easter (formerly designated Low Sunday), and dedicated to the devotion to the Divine Mercy promoted by St. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ...


Surprisingly, some authors whose views are generally unacceptable to the Church (e.g. Charles Darwin, Karl Marx or Hitler) were never put on the Index.[3][4] For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Hitler redirects here. ...


Some notable writers with works on the Index Librorum Prohibitorum

Joseph Addison, the Kit-cat portrait, circa 1703–1712, by Godfrey Kneller. ... Dante redirects here. ... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... Balzac redirects here. ... La Beauvoir redirects here; also see: Beauvoir (disambiguation). ... Cesare, Marquis of Beccaria (or the Marchese de Beccaria-Bonesana) (March 11, 1738 - November 28, 1794) was an Italian philosopher and politician. ... Jeremy Bentham (IPA: ) (26 February [O.S. 15 February 15] 1748) – June 6, 1832) was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. ... Henri-Louis Bergson (October 18, 1859–January 4, 1941) was a major French philosopher, influential in the first half of the 20th century. ... For the second husband of Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk, see George Berkeley (MP). ... Sir Thomas Browne (October 19, 1605 – October 19, 1682) was an English author of varied works that disclose his wide learning in diverse fields including medicine, religion, science and the esoteric. ... Giordano Bruno Giordano Bruno (1548, Nola – February 17, 1600, Rome) was an Italian philosopher, priest, cosmologist, and occultist. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... Casanova redirects here. ... Auguste Comte (full name: Isidore Marie Auguste François Xavier Comte; January 17, 1798 - September 5, 1857) was a French thinker who coined the term sociology. ... Copernicus redirects here. ... Jean le Rond dAlembert, pastel by Maurice Quentin de La Tour Jean le Rond dAlembert (November 16, 1717 – October 29, 1783) was a French mathematician, mechanician, physicist and philosopher. ... This article is about Erasmus Darwin who lived 1731–1802; for his descendants with the same name see Erasmus Darwin (disambiguation). ... Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] â€“ April 24 [?], 1731)[1] was a British writer, journalist, and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... Descartes redirects here. ... Portrait of Diderot by Louis-Michel van Loo, 1767 Denis Diderot (October 5, 1713 – July 31, 1784) was a French philosopher and writer. ... Alexandre Dumas redirects here. ... Alexandre Dumas, fils (July 27, 1824 – November 27, 1895) was the son of Alexandre Dumas, père, who followed in his fathers footsteps becoming a celebrated author and playwright. ... Erasmus redirects here. ... J. Scotus Eriugena commemorated on a Irish banknote, issued 1976-1993 Johannes Scotus Eriugena (ca. ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... Anatole France (April 16, 1844 – October 12, 1924) was the pen name of French author Jacques Anatole François Thibault. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Galileo redirects here. ... Edward Gibbon (1737–1794). ... Gide redirects here. ... Vincenzo Gioberti (April 5, 1801 - October 26, 1852) was an Italian philosopher, publicist and politician Gioberti was born in Turin. ... This article is about the writer. ... Christian Johann Heinrich Heine (December 13, 1797 – February 17, 1856) was a journalist, an essayist, and one of the most significant German romantic poets. ... Hobbes redirects here. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... For other persons named David Hume, see David Hume (disambiguation). ... Cornelius Jansen, Engraving by Jean Morin Cornelius Jansen, often known as Jansenius (October 28, 1585–May 6, 1638) was Catholic bishop of Ypres and the father of the religious movement known as Jansenism. ... Kant redirects here. ... The Divine Mercy image painted by Adolf Hyla. ... Nikos Kazantzakis (Greek: Νίκος Καζαντζάκης) (February 18, 1883, Heraklion, Crete, Greece - October 26, 1957, Freiburg, Germany), author of poems, novels, essays, plays, and travel books, was arguably the most important and most translated Greek writer and philosopher of the 20th century. ... Hughes Felicité Robert de Lamennais Hughes Felicité Robert de Lamennais (June 19, 1782 - February 27, 1854), was a French priest, and philosophical and political writer. ... Pierre Athanase Larousse (October 23, 1817-January 3, 1875) was a French grammarian and lexicographer born in Toucy. ... Print from Letis Critique historique, politique, morale, économique, & comique sur les lotteries Gregorio Leti (1630–1701) was a Milanese historian and satirist who sometimes published under the pseudonym Abbe Gualdi, Labbé Gualdi,[1] or Gualdus[2] known for his works about the Roman Catholic Church, especially the papacy. ... For other persons named John Locke, see John Locke (disambiguation). ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Machiavelli redirects here. ... Maurice Polydore Marie Bernard Maeterlinck, Belgian author Count Maurice Polydore Marie Bernard Maeterlinck (August 29, 1862 - May 6, 1949) was a Belgian poet, playwright, and essayist. ... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... Malebranche redirects here. ... Jules Michelet (August 21, 1798 - February 9, 1874) was a French historian. ... John Stuart Mill (20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873), British philosopher, political economist, civil servant and Member of Parliament, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Montesquieu redirects here. ... Blaise Pascal (pronounced ), (June 20 [[1624 // ]] – August 19, 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher. ... François Rabelais François Rabelais (c. ... Ernest Renan (February 28, 1823–October 12, 1892) was a French philosopher and writer. ... Samuel Richardson (August 19, 1689 – July 4, 1761) was a major 18th century writer best known for his three epistolary novels: Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded (1740), Clarissa: Or the History of a Young Lady (1748) and Sir Charles Grandison (1753). ... Rousseau redirects here. ... George Sand sewing, portrait by Eugène Delacroix (1838). ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... Baruch Spinoza Benedictus de Spinoza (November 24, 1632 _ February 21, 1677), named Baruch Spinoza by his synagogue elders and known as Bento de Spinoza or Bento dEspiñoza in the community in which he grew up. ... Laurence Sterne Laurence Sterne (November 24, 1713 – March 18, 1768) was an Irish-born English novelist and an Anglican clergyman. ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... Maria Valtorta at age 5, 1902 At age 15, 1912 Maria with her classmates of Bianconi School of Monza At age 21, in the uniform of a Samaritan Nurse, 1918 At age 25, 1922 Maria Valtorta (14 March 1897 (Caserta, Italy) – 12 October 1961 (Viareggio, Italy)) was an Italian writer... The Dutch physician and gynæcologist Theodoor Hendrik van de Velde (1873 - 1937) served as Director at the Gynæcological Institute in Haarlem, the Netherlands. ... For other uses, see Voltaire (disambiguation). ... Gerard Walschap (Londerzeel-St. ... Émile Zola (2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902) was an influential French writer, the most important example of the literary school of naturalism, and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. ... Huldrych (or Ulrich) Zwingli or Ulricus Zuinglius (January 1, 1484 – October 11, 1531) was the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland, and founder of the Swiss Reformed Churches. ...

See also

Many societies have banned certain books. ... For other uses, see Censor. ... The archive of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in the Vatican (abbreviated to ACDF for Archivio Congregatio pro Doctrina Fidei), commonly referred to as the Archive of the Inquisition (or more fully the Archive of the Inquisition and Index), contains the Catholic Churchs documents dealing with...

References

  1. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis, 1966, p. 445 (my translation)
  2. ^ Vatican Biography of Saint Faustina Kowalska http://www.vatican.va/news_services/liturgy/saints/ns_lit_doc_20000430_faustina_en.html
  3. ^ Vatican opens up secrets of Index of Forbidden Books.
  4. ^ American Magazine http://www.americamagazine.org/content/article.cfm?article_id=3998
  5. ^ On the Origins and Perpetual Use of the Legislative Powers of the Apostolic Kings of Hungary in Matters Ecclesiastical. Vienna, 1764.
  6. ^ Principles of Political Economy placed on Index in 1856; Seldes, G. 1934. The Vatican - Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. London. p. 180.

Missing image Saint Faustina Saint Faustina, of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy in Poland (August 25, 1905 - October 5, 1938), born Maria Helena Kowalska, is perhaps best known for her promotion of the devotion to the Divine Mercy, and her inspired painting of the same name. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

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Pope Paul IV (June 28, 1476 – August 18, 1559), né Giovanni Pietro Carafa, was Pope from May 23, 1555 until his death. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... America is a moderate Catholic weekly published in the United States which contains news and opinion about the Roman Catholic Church and how its positions relate to American politics and cultural life. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Index Librorum Prohibitorum - LoveToKnow 1911 (1047 words)
INDEX LIBRORUM PROHIBITORUM, the title of the official list of those books which on doctrinal or moral grounds the Roman Catholic Church authoritatively forbids the members of her communion to read or to possess, irrespective of works forbidden by the general rules on the subject.
The document is for the most part an enumeration of such apocryphal works as by their titles might be supposed to be part of Holy Scripture (the "Acts" of Philip, Thomas and Peter, and the Gospels of Thaddaeus, Matthias, Peter, James the Less and others).
Already, at the Vatican Council, several bishops had submitted requests for a reform of the Index, but the Council was not able to deal with the question.
Index librorum prohibitorum - definition of Index librorum prohibitorum in Encyclopedia (441 words)
The Index Librorum Prohibitorum (Index of Prohibited Books)—also called Index Expurgatorius—is a list of publications which Roman Catholics were banned from reading, "pernicious books", and also the rules of the Church relating to books.
The index as an official list was relaxed in 1966 under Pope Paul VI following the end of the Second Vatican Council and largely due to practical considerations.
"Index of Prohibited Books", The Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913 (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07721a.htm): "The first Roman Index of Prohibited Books (Index librorum prohibitorum), published in 1559 under Paul IV, was very severe, and was therefore mitigated under that pontiff by decree of the Holy Office of 14 June of the same year.
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