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Encyclopedia > Independent music

In popular music, independent music, often abbreviated as indie, is a term used to describe independence from major commercial record labels and an autonomous, do-it-yourself approach to recording and publishing. For the music genre, see Pop music. ...

Contents

Overview

Cultural and philosophical attributes of indie

Main article: Indie (culture)

There are a number of cultural and philosophical traits which could be more useful in pinpointing what indie music is about than specific musical styles or commercial ownership. Indie artists are concerned more with self-expression than commercial considerations (though, again, this is a stance that is affected by many artists, including hugely commercially successful ones). A do-it-yourself sensibility, which originated with punk in the 1970s, is often associated with indie, with people in the scene being involved in bands, labels, nights and zines. Indie often has an internationalist outlook, which stems from a sense of solidarity with other fans, bands and labels in other countries who share one's particular sensibilities; small indie labels will often distribute records for similar labels from abroad, and indie bands will often go on self-funded tours of other cities and countries, where those in the local indie scenes will invariably help organize gigs and often provide accommodation and other support. In addition, there is also a strong sense of camaraderie that emerges from a selflessness among indie bands and often results in collaborations and joint tours. Indie, an abbreviation of independent, is a term regarding a trend seen in music, film, business and subculture originating in the late 20th century. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... A zine—an abbreviation of the word fanzine, and originating from the word magazine[1][2]—is most commonly a small circulation, non-commercial publication of original or appropriated texts and images. ...


Indie artists of any particular time often go against the prevailing trends (for example, the twee pop movement that started in the 1980s was a reaction against the testosterone-fueled swagger of rock). A 'lo-fi' aesthetic (i.e., an often deliberate lack of polish and a more "authentic" roughness and imperfection) has often been associated with indie, particularly when slick, polished recordings were the preserve of the commercial music industry; this line has since become blurred, in a world where high-quality recordings can be made increasingly easily with inexpensive computer-based recording systems and where commercial production teams often deliberately utilize a "lo-fi" sound. This article is about the genre of music. ...


Indie and technology

Internet technology allows artists to introduce their music to a potentially enormous audience at low cost without necessarily affiliating with a major recording label.[1] The design of digital music software encourages the discovery of new music. Sites with larger libraries of songs are the most successful. This, in turn, creates many opportunities for independent bands. Royalties from digital services could prove to be an important source of income. If an artist has already paid to record, manufacture, and promote their album, there is little to no additional cost for independent artists to distribute their music online.[2] Digital services offer the opportunity of exposure to new fans and the possibility of increased sales through online retailers. Artists can also release music more frequently and quickly if it is made available online. Additionally, artists have the option of releasing limited edition, out-of-print, or live material that would be too costly to produce through traditional means. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The term special edition implies a kind of an extraordinary, rare quality. ...


With the arrival of newer and relatively inexpensive recording devices and instruments, more individuals are able to participate in the creation of music than ever before. Studio time is extremely expensive and difficult to obtain. The result of new technology is that anyone can produce studio-quality music from their own home. Additionally, the development of new technology allows for greater experimentation with sound.[3] An artist is able to experiment without necessarily spending the money to do it in an expensive studio. ==Individual Studio== A recording studio is a facility for sound recording. ... This article is about audible acoustic waves. ...


Most artists maintain their own Web sites as well as having a presence on sites such as Myspace.com. Technological advances such as message boards, music blogs, and social networks are also being used by independent music companies to make big advances in the business.[4] Some sites rely on audience participation to rate a band, allowing listeners to have a significant impact on the success of a band. This eliminates new talent search and development, one of the most costly areas of the music business. Other sites, allow artists to upload their music and sell it at a price of their choosing. Visitors to the site can browse by genre, listen to free samples, view artist information, and purchase the tracks they want to buy.[5] Acts such as Wilco have chosen to make their new albums available for streaming before they are released.[6] MySpace. ... An Internet forum, also known as a message board or discussion board, is a web application that provides for online discussions, and is the modern descendant of the bulletin board systems and existing Usenet news systems that were widespread in the 1980s and 1990s. ... A social network is a map of the relationships between individuals, indicating the ways in which they are connected through various social familiarities ranging from casual acquaintance to close familial bonds. ... This article is about the music group. ...


However, the sale of digital music makes up only 5-10% of the total income generated from music sales. At this point, most people do not have broadband connections to the internet,[citation needed] making it relatively difficult for the general public to access music online. Many digital music services tend to focus overwhelmingly on major label acts. They don’t necessarily have the time or resources to give attention to independent artists.[7] Broadband in telecommunications is a term that refers to a signaling method that includes or handles a relatively wide range of frequencies, which may be divided into channels or frequency bins. ...


Many bands have chosen to forego a record label and instead market and distribute their music through entirely web-based means. Digital marketing firms offer opportunities such as Podcast creation and promotion and video hosting to their clients. In the case of digital distribution, an artist lends a company the right to distribute their music. The contract is non-exclusive, and the rights to the music continue to belong with the artist. For a small fee, the distributor is in charge of getting an artist’s album to a retailer. Online retailers include iTunes, CD Baby, Rhapsody, and Yahoo. A podcast is a series of digital-media files which are distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and computers. ... This article is about the iTunes application. ... CD Baby is an online music store specializing in the sale of physical compact discs from independent musicians directly to consumers. ... Look up rhapsody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Yahoo! - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


A more recent trend is seen in artists who give their music away for free, such as Radiohead, with their new album In Rainbows [11], or indie artists and bands such as Happy Rhodes whose music is available for free on the indie music site Redfizz [12]. Radiohead are an English alternative rock band from Oxfordshire. ... In Rainbows is the seventh album by the English alternative rock band Radiohead. ... Happy Rhodes (born August 9, 1965) is an American singer, songwriter, instrumentalist, and electronic musician. ...


Subcategories of indie

There are several subcategories which music from the overall indie scene are often grouped broadly into. Music ranging from alternative rock to punk rock to experimental music has long existed in indie scenes, often independent from one another. Indie rock and indie pop are the most common groupings that conform to an "indie" sound. The difference between these is difficult to pick up from the instrumentation or sound, as both genres include distorted guitar-based music based on pop-song conventions. If anything, the key distinction comes not from instrumentation or structure but from how strictly they follow cultural constructions of rockist "authenticity". There is also indie dance, which comes from a fusion of indie pop and electronic/dance music. Crossover between electronica (mostly glitch) resulted in so-called indietronic, electronic indie or indie electronic, for example some artists on the German Morr Music label, The Firebird Band, The Postal Service, or Fever Marlene. For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Rockism is an ideology of popular music criticism, originating in the British music press in the late 1970s or early 1980s. ... Indie dance is a term used for the genre of music combining elements of dance-pop (or other forms of electronic dance music such as house or techno) and indie pop. ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ... Glitch (also known as Clicks and Cuts from a representative compilation series by the German record label Mille Plateaux) is a genre of electronic music that became popular in the late 1990s with the increasing use of digital signal processing, particularly on computers. ... Indietronic, also known as electronic indie and lap-pop, is a music genre that combines indie rock and electronic music (mostly elements of IDM and glitch). ... Morr Music logo. ... The Firebird Band is an indie rock band hailing from Chicago, Illinois. ... This article is about the band. ... Fever Marlene is a rock band from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. After being featured in Spin Magazine in 2006, Fever Marlene released their much buzzed about album titled, Civil War on Rev Pop Records. ...


Another type is post-rock, a music genre characterized by nontraditional use of instruments and high musical density. Although firmly rooted in the indie scene, post-rock's elusive and complex style bears little resemblance musically to indie rock or other styles more commonly associated with the scene. However, as post-rock music is often recorded on independent labels, it therefore often shares the same level of obscurity as much of the indie scene. Some post-rock artists include Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Explosions in the Sky, Animal Collective, Sigur Rós and Tortoise. The term was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music "using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and power chords." The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In popular music, indie music (from independent) is any of a number of genres, scenes, subcultures and stylistic and cultural attributes, characterised by perceived independence from commercial pop music and mainstream culture and an autonomous, do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... A record label is a brand created by companies that specialize in manufacturing, distributing and promoting audio and video recordings, on various formats including compact discs, LPs, DVD-Audio, SACDs, and cassettes. ... Godspeed You! Black Emperor (formerly punctuated Godspeed You Black Emperor!) is an avant-garde Canadian post-rock band based in Montreal, Quebec. ... Explosions in the Sky is an American instrumental post-rock band from Texas. ... Animal Collective is a New York City-based group of experimental musicians from Baltimore, Maryland. ... Sigur Rós ( ) is an Icelandic post-rock band with melodic, classical, experimental, and minimalist elements. ... Tortoise, an instrumental rock band, formed in Chicago, Illinois in 1990. ... Simon Reynolds (born 1963 in London), is an influential British music critic who is well-known for his writings on electronic dance music and for coining the term post-rock. ... The Wire is a British avant garde music magazine. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... Riff is also an alternate spelling of Rif, a region of Morocco. ... In music, a power chord is a bare fifth usually played on electric guitar. ...


Going major versus staying indie

Some bands choose to never go to a major label even if they are given the opportunity to do so. Similarly, others may choose to be an independent artist after having already experienced recording on a major label, such as pianist Bradley Joseph. As an independent, business is a prime concern and can take over if not controlled, Joseph said.[8] "A lot of musicians don’t learn the business. You just have to be well-rounded in both areas. You have to understand publishing. You have to understand how you make money, what’s in demand, what helps you make the most out of your talent."[9] But some artists just want to be involved in the music and don't like the added problems or have the personality to work with both. Joseph suggests newer artists read and study both courses and pick one that best suits their needs and wants.[8] The following is a partial list of record labels, both past and present. ... Bradley Joseph (born in 1965) is an American composer, pianist, keyboardist, arranger, and recording artist, performing on the international stage for many years with artists such as Yanni and Grammy-winner Sheena Easton, as well as having vast experience with artists from RCA, Epic Records, Warner Bros. ...


If a band moves to a major label, it does not necessarily guarantee the band's success. Only about 1 in 10 CDs released by major labels make any profit for the label.[10] It is possible for an artist to make more money producing and promoting their own CDs than signing with a major label. However, an independent label that is creatively productive is not necessarily financially lucrative. Independent labels are often one-or two-person operations with almost no outside assistance and run out of tiny offices.[11] This lack of resources can make it extremely difficult for a band to make revenue from sales. An independent record label is variously described as a record label operating without the funding (or outside the organizations) of the major record labels, and/or a label that subscribes to indie philosophies such as DIY and anti-corporate art. ...


One thing an artist can consider doing if they want to be noticed by a major label is starting their own independent label. A successful independent label with a strong musical reputation can be very appealing to a major label. Major labels rely on independent labels to stay current within the ever-changing music scene.[12] Independent labels are often very good at discovering local talent and promoting specialized genres.


The difference among various independent labels lies with distribution, probably the most important aspect of running a label. A major-label distributed independent label allows the independent label to find, sign, and record their own artists. The independent label has a contract with a major label for promotion and distribution. In some cases, the major label also manufactures and releases the album. Independent labels that are owned by a major label distribute their records through independent distributors but are not purely independent. A purely independent label is not affiliated with a major label in any way. Their records are distributed through independent distributors.[13]


It can be very difficult for indie bands to sign on a record label that may not be familiar with their specific style. It can take years of dedicated effort, self-promotion, and rejections before landing a contract with either an independent or major record label. Bands that are ready to go this route need to be sure they are prepared both in terms of the music they offer as well as their realistic expectations for success[14]


The three main ways for an artist to make money are record deals, touring, and publishing rights. Touring was an Italian automobile design and coachbuilding firm in the 1950s. ... For other uses, see Publishing (disambiguation). ...


Major label contracts

Most major label artists earn a 10-15% royalty rate. However, before a band is able to receive any of their royalties, they must clear their label for all of their debts, known as recoupable expenses. These expenses arise from the cost of such things as album packaging and artwork, tour support, and video production. An additional part of the recoupable expenses are the artist’s advance. An advance is like a loan. It allows the artist to have money to live and record with until their record is released. However, before they can gain any royalties, the advance must be paid back in full to the record label. Since only the most successful artists recoup production and marketing costs, an unsuccessful artist’s debt carries over to their next album, meaning that they see little to no royalties. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... An advance payment, or simply an advance, is the part of a contractually due sum that is paid in advance, while the balance will only follow after receipt on the counterpart in goods or services. ... For other uses, see Loan (disambiguation). ...


Major label advances are generally much larger than independent labels can offer. If an independent label is able to offer an advance, it will most like be somewhere in the range of $5,000-$125,000. On the other hand, major labels are able to offer artists advances in the range of $150,000-$300,000. Instead of offering an advance, some independent labels agree to pay for a certain amount of the artist’s recording costs. This money is recoupable. There are advantages and disadvantages of an advance. If an artist gets no advance, that means they owe their record company less money, thus allowing them to earn royalties more quickly. However, since the label recoups so many costs, an artist’s advance might be the only money they are able to make for quite some time.[15]


In a contract, options are agreed upon. Options allow the label to renew their contract with the artist and release more of their albums. Options lie with the label, and the label has the choice whether or not to record more with the artist. Some artists consider this unfair because the label has the right to not distribute an artist’s project and extend their contract by one more album if they deem the music as commercially or artistically unacceptable. Record labels effectively own the artist’s product for the duration of their contract.[16] A real option is the right, but not the obligation, to undertake some business decision, typically the option to make a capital investment. ...


Independent label contracts

Many times, a deal from an independent label is quite similar to that of a major label. In cases where an independent label is distributed by a major label, the independent label itself will have to have a major-label deal. In this case, the independent label would want to be sure that their contract with their artists covers the same issues as the independent’s own contract with the major label. In other cases, independent labels offer similar contracts to major labels because they want to look more professional. An independent label that thinks it will eventually be dealing frequently with major labels will have a similar contract in order to avoid having to redraft contracts in the future. There are also plenty of cases in which independent labels have contracts that do not resemble major label contracts in any way. In general, independent labels that are not affiliated with a major label are more willing to take chances and are able to be more flexible in their deals. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... An independent record label is variously described as a record label operating without the funding (or outside the organizations) of the major record labels, and/or a label that subscribes to indie philosophies such as DIY and anti-corporate art. ... A contract is a legally binding exchange of promises or agreement between parties that the law will enforce. ...


Though some independent labels offer a royalty rate of 10-15% like the major labels, it is becoming increasingly more common for independent labels to offer a profit-sharing deal in which as much as 40-75% of the net profits go to the artist. In this type of contract, the net gain after all expenses have been taken out are split between the label and artist by a negotiated percentage. However, deals in this form can take longer for an artist to gain any profits since all expenses – such as manufacturing, publicity, and marketing – are also taken into account. As an independent artist becomes more popular, deals of this type are more advantageous. Profit sharing, when used as a special term, refers to various incentive plans introduced by businesses that provide direct or indirect payments to employees that depend on companys profitability in addition to employees regular salary and bonuses. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up publicity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Independent labels often rely heavily on free goods, or the records that are given away in promotion of an album. Artists do not receive royalties on merchandise that is given away for free. Additionally, since compilations made by independent labels are often given away, the artist receives no royalties. Major label compilations are more often sold than given away, and the artist does receive royalties. A compilation album is an album (music or spoken-word) featuring tracks from one or multiple recording artists, often culled from a variety of sources (such as studio albums, live albums, singles, demos and outtakes. ...


Touring

When a band goes on tour, it may or may not have the financial backing of its label. An artist receives a fixed fee or a percentage of the tickets sold by the venue owner or promoter. Touring is an expensive process. A moderate estimate of touring costs with a bus and small crew can easily reach $15,000 a week. If an artist tours with the support of their label, the expenses are all recoupable, thus potentially increasing a band’s debt. Many successful bands tour without the support of their label so that they can keep all of their touring revenue. An independent band would have more difficulty than a highly successful one in being self-sufficient on tour. A music venue is any location of a musical performance. ...


Publishing

If a band or artist writes their own material, publishing can be one of the best ways to earn a profit. It is one of the few guaranteed ways to earn revenue for artists. Even touring is not a sure way to make money because it is possible that no one will attend the shows. Basic copyright law protects songwriters by giving them exclusive rights to grant or deny the reproduction, distribution, or performance of their work. The majority of a band’s publishing income comes from its mechanical and performance rights. Mechanical rights cover the reproduction of a song on a record. In the standard contract between a band and a label, the label is required by law to pay the composer a fixed rate per song simply for the right to use the composition on commercially sold recordings. The mechanical licensing rate in 2006 for the U.S. and Canada is 9.1 cents per song.[17] With the performance rights, a song’s copyright covers every time it appears on radio and television. The copyright symbol is used to give notice that a work is covered by copyright. ...


If an artist prefers to receive up-front money for their songs instead of waiting for the money to come in over time, it can choose to assign its copyright to a music publisher. The music publisher pays a cash advance for what they decide is the value of the copyright. It is common for a band to sign a copublishing deal. This means that the publisher offers the artist an advance in exchange for half the publishing income. When the advance is paid back, the music publisher retains 25% of the income. Since an artist has no guarantees whether or not their song will be popular, some may prefer to have a cash advance that guarantees them money regardless of how well the song does. This article deals with contemporary popular music publishing. ...


Genres associated with indie

Alternative music redirects here. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Glitch (also known as Clicks and Cuts from a representative compilation series by the German record label Mille Plateaux) is a genre of electronic music that became popular in the late 1990s with the increasing use of digital signal processing, particularly on computers. ... Industrial music is a loose term for a number of different styles of experimental music, especially but not necessarily electronic music. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... New Age music is a style of music originally associated with some New Age beliefs. ... Neo soul (also known as nu soul) is a music genre and an umbrella term for current soul music. ... Underground hip hop, underground rap, or undie (to draw comparison to indie or independent rock) is an umbrella term for hip-hop and rap music outside the general commercial cannon. ...

See also

Indie, an abbreviation of independent, is a term regarding a trend seen in music, film, business and subculture originating in the late 20th century. ... These are The Official UK Charts Company UK Official Indie Chart number one hits of 2007. ... Underground music is music which has developed a cult following, independent of commercial success. ... Indie music scenes are localized, independent, music-oriented communities that exist in many countries, especially in North America, the United Kingdom, and Australia. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Leyshon, Andrew, et al. “On the Reproduction of the Music Industry After the Internet.” Media, Culture, and Society, Vol. 27. 177-209.
  2. ^ “An Independent’s Guide to Digital Music.” [1].
  3. ^ Hesmondhalgh, David. “Indie: The Institutional Politics and Aesthetics of a Popular Music Genre.” Cultural Studies, Vol. 13, Issue 1, 1999. 34-61. ISSN [0950-2386].
  4. ^ Leeds, Jeff. “Independent music on move with internet.” January 10, 2006. International Herald Tribune. [2].
  5. ^ Pfahl, Michael. “Giving Away Music to Make Money: Independent Musicians on the Internet.” <www.firstmonday.org>.
  6. ^ Mansfield, Brian. “When Free is Profitable.” USA Today. May 20, 2004. [3].
  7. ^ “An Independent’s Guide to Digital Music.”
  8. ^ a b Wheeler, Fred (2002). Interview with Bradley Joseph. Indie Journal (archived page of indiejournal.com). Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  9. ^ Polta, Anne. "Continuing Journey: Bradley Joseph sustains music career with songwriting, recording", West Central Tribune (wctrib.com) (Minnesota, U.S.), 2007-02-08. Retrieved on 2007-02-18. 
  10. ^ Sherrard, Stephen. “Record Deals Versus Independent Releases.” [4].
  11. ^ Haverty, Neil. “Arts Funding for Whom? Indie Labels Starve While Government Support Rewards Success.” [5].
  12. ^ Knab, Christopher and Bart Day. “Deals that Await Successful Independent Music Labels.” [6].
  13. ^ Friends, Stacey. “Independent Labels: What’s the Deal?” [7].
  14. ^ Indie Music Band Tips: Finding a Record Label at LoveToKnow Music [8].
  15. ^ Friends, Stacey. “Independent Label vs. Major Label Contracts.” [9].
  16. ^ Ian, Janis. “The Internet Debacle: An Alternative View.” Performing Songwriter Magazine, May 2002. [www.janisian.com/article-internet_debacle.html].
  17. ^ “New Songwriter/Publishing Mechanical Royalties for 2006.” [10].

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Imhorst, Christian: The ‘Lost Generation’ of the Music Industry, published under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License 2004
  • Toomey, Jenny (November 15, 1999). Future Prospects for Music and Technology: Musictech’s Ben Morgan on the Paradigm Shift in Music Consumption.
  • Leyshon, Andrew, et al. (2005). "On the reproduction of the music industry after the internet" 27: 177-209. Media, Culture, and Society. 
  • An Independent’s Guide to Digital Music.
  • Hesmondhalgh, David (1999). "Indie: the institutional politics and aesthetics of a popular music genre" 13 (1): 34-61. Cultural Studies. 
  • Leeds, Jeff. "Independent music on move with internet", International Herald Tribune, January 10, 2006. 
  • Pfahl, Michael (August 6, 2001). "Giving away music to make money: independent musicians on the internet" 6 (8). First Monday. 
  • Mansfield, Brian. "When Free is Profitable", USA Today, May 20, 2004. 
  • Ramsay, J.T.. "Live from the Witch Trials", www.pitchforkmedia.com, April 4, 2006. 
  • Sherrard, Stephen (Retrieved April 26, 2006). Record Deals Versus Independent Releases.
  • Haverty, Neil (November 1, 2002). Arts Funding for Whom? Indie Labels Starve While Government Support Rewards Success.
  • Knab, Christopher (April 2006). Deals that Await Successful Independent Music Labels.
  • Friends, Stacey. "Independent Labels: What's the Deal?", Performer, October 2003. 
  • Friends, Stacey. "Independent Label vs. Major Label Contracts", Performer, November 2005. 
  • Ian, Janis. "The Internet Debacle: An Alternative View", Performing Songwriter, May 2002. 
GFDL redirects here. ... Indie, an abbreviation of independent, is a term regarding a trend seen in music, film, business and subculture originating in the late 20th century. ... For the publisher Alternative Comics, see Alternative Comics (publisher). ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ... An Amateur Press Association or APA is a group of people who produce individual pages or magazines that are sent to a Central Mailer for collation and distribution to all members of the group. ... The Dun Emer Press in 1903 with Elizabeth Yeats working the hand press Small press is a term often used to describe publishers who typically specialize in genre fiction, or limited edition books or magazines. ... A minicomic is a small, creator-published comic book, often photocopied and stapled or with a handmade binding. ... Minicomics Co-Ops: The United Fanzine Organization, or UFO, is a co-op of minicomic creators that has existed since about 1968. ... An independent record label is variously described as a record label operating without the funding (or outside the organizations) of the major record labels, and/or a label that subscribes to indie philosophies such as DIY and anti-corporate art. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... An independent film, or indie film, is a film that is produced outside of the studio system. ... Home Movies is a dialogue-driven animated series about 8-year-old Brendon Small (voiced by the creator, head writer, and lead musician of Home Movies Brendon Small), who makes films with his friends, Melissa and Jason, in his spare time. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... An independent station is a television station that is not affiliated with any network. ... Grindhouse redirects here. ... The double feature, also known as a double bill, was a motion picture industry phenomenon in which theatre managers would exhibit two films for the price of one, supplanting an earlier format in which one feature film and various short subject reels would be shown. ... The King of the Bs, Roger Corman, produced and directed The Raven (1963) for American International Pictures. ... This is a history of the early decades of the B movie, from its roots in the silent era through Hollywoods Golden Age of the 1930s and 1940s. ... This is a history of B movies in the 1950s. ... This is a history of B movies in the 1960s and 1970s. ... This is a history of B movies from the 1980s to the present. ... Z-movie (or Grade-Z movie) is a term applied to films with an extremely low budget and a miserable quality. ... A classic midnight movie in every sense of the term, Tod Brownings Freaks (1932) is the sort of (then) obscure horror film shown on late-night TV beginning in the 1950s; in the 1970s and early 1980s it was a staple of midnight screenings at theaters around the U... Software cracking is the modification of software to remove protection methods: copy prevention, trial/demo version, serial number, hardware key, CD check or software annoyances like nag screens and adware. ... The scene (often capitalised) is a term used by people belonging to various communities (social groups) dealing with software to describe the more extensive community that they collectively belong to. ... Homebrew is a term frequently applied only to video games that are produced by consumers on proprietary game platforms; in other words, game platforms that are not typically user-programmable, or use proprietary hardware for storage. ... An amateur adventure game is a freeware computer game belonging to the adventure genre. ... An indie role-playing game is a role-playing game published outside of traditional, mainstream means. ... -1... Independent soda is soft drink generally made by smaller privately run businesses or smaller corporations who use alternative marketing strategies to promote their product. ... For other meanings, see Homebrew. ... The indie design movement is made up of independent designers, artists and craftspeople who design and make a wide array of products without being part of large, industrialized businesses. ...

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We believe the best music available is ignored by the major record labels, so we fully support those independent musicians who believe in themselves and their music.
Whether on small, independent labels or on their own labels, you'll find we have some of the the best independent music being made today in all genres by independent bands and musicians.
Yet it's these roads of independence that produce music that is original, distinct, and fearless.
Indie (music) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3464 words)
In popular music, indie music (from independent) is any of a number of genres, scenes, subcultures and stylistic and cultural attributes, characterised by perceived independence from commercial pop music and mainstream culture and an autonomous, do-it-yourself (DIY) approach.
Many independent artists choose to release their music on independant labels, as they're generally able to retain more creative freedom and control than is usually allowed by major labels to the artists they sign.
In this case, the independent label would want to be sure that their contract with their artists covers the same issues as the independent’s own contract with the major label.
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