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Encyclopedia > Incubation period

Incubation period, also called the latent period or latency period, is the time elapsed between exposure to a pathogenic organism, or chemical or radiation, and when symptoms and signs are first apparent. The period may be as short as minutes, to as long as thirty years in the case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A pathogen (literally birth of pain from the Greek παθογένεια) is a biological agent that can cause disease to its host. ... Life on Earth redirects here. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... Radiation hazard symbol. ... The term symptom (from the Greek syn = con/plus and pipto = fall, together meaning co-exist) has two similar meanings in the context of physical and mental health: A symptom can be a physical condition which shows that one has a particular illness or disorder (see e. ... Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a very rare and incurable degenerative neurological disorder (brain disease) that is ultimately fatal. ...


While Latent or Latency period may be synonymous, a distinction is sometimes made between Incubation period - the period between infection and clinical onset of the disease- and Latent period -the time from infection to infectiousness. Which is shorter depends on the disease.


A person may be a carrier of a disease, such as Streptococcus in the throat without exhibiting any symptoms. Depending on the disease, the person may or may not be able to give the disease to others during the incubation period. This article is about the medical term. ... Streptococcus is a genus of spherical shaped Gram-positive bacteria, belonging to the phylum Firmicutes[1] and the lactic acid bacteria group. ... For other uses, see Throat (disambiguation). ...


Examples of incubation periods

Incubation periods can vary greatly, and are generally expressed as a range. When possible, it is best to express the mean and the 10th and 90th percentiles, though this information is not always available. The values below are arranged roughly in ascending order by number of days, although in some cases the mean had to be inferred.


For many conditions, incubation periods are longer in adults than they are in children or infants.

Disease Incubation period Reference
Cellulitis caused by Pasteurella multocida less than 1 day [1]
Cholera 1-3 days [2]
Influenza 1-4 days [3]
Scarlet fever 1-4 days [4]
Common cold 2-5 days [5]
Ebola 2-21 days
Rocky Mountain spotted fever 2-14 days [6]
SARS up to 10 days [7]
Roseola 5-15 days [8]
Polio 7-14 days [9]
Pertussis 7-14 days [10]
Measles 9-12 days [11]
Smallpox 7-17 days [12]
Generalized tetanus 7-21 days [13]
Chicken pox 14-16 days [14]
Erythema infectiosum (Fifth Disease) 13-18 days [15]
Mumps 14-18 days [16]
Rubella (German measles) 14-21 days [17]
Infectious mononucleosis 28-42 days [18]
Kuru mean between 10.3 and 13.2 years [19]

Pasteurella multocida is a small, Gram-negative, non-motile coccobacillus that is penicillin-sensitive. ... Cholera (or Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera) is an extreme diarrheal disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ... Influenza, commonly known as flu, is an infectious disease of birds and mammals caused by RNA viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae (the influenza viruses). ... // Acute viral nasopharyngitis, or acute coryza, usually known as the common cold, is a highly contagious, viral infectious disease of the upper respiratory system, primarily caused by picornaviruses or coronaviruses. ... For other uses, see Ebola (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Wolbach, 1919 Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most severe and most frequently reported rickettsial illness in the United States, and has been diagnosed throughout the Americas. ... Sars may refer to any of the following: Severe acute respiratory syndrome, commonly abbreviated as SARS Michael Sars, a Norwegian biologist, father of Georg Sars Georg Sars, a Norwegian biologist, son of Michael Sars Special Administrative Regions, commonly abbreviated as SARs Sars, Perm Krai, an urban settlement in Perm Krai... species Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) Human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) Exanthem subitum (meaning sudden rash), also referred to as roseola infantum (or rose rash of infants), sixth disease and (confusingly) baby measles, or three day fever, is a benign disease of children, generally under two years old, whose manifestations... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a highly contagious disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis; a similar, milder disease is caused by B. parapertussis. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a contagious disease unique to humans. ... Tetanus is a medical condition that is characterized by a prolonged contraction of skeletal muscle fibers. ... Chicken pox, also spelled chickenpox, is a common childhood disease caused by the varicella_zoster virus (VZV), also known as human herpes virus 3 (HHV_3), one of the eight herpesviruses known to affect humans. ... Fifth disease is also referred to as erythema infectiosum (meaning infectious redness) and as slapped cheek syndrome. ... Fifth disease is also referred to as erythema infectiosum (meaning infectious redness) and as slapped cheek syndrome, slap face or slapped face. ... Rubella, commonly known as German measles, is a disease caused by the rubella virus. ... Rubella (also known as epidemic roseola, German measles or three-day measles) is a disease caused by the Rubella virus. ... Kuru (also known as laughing sickness due to the outbursts of laughter that mark its second phase) was first noted in New Guinea in the early 1900s. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Monkeypox virus (413 words)
Incubation period is between 10-14 days, usually 12 days.
It also has a healing period that progresses more rapidly.
The pathogenesis of human monkeypox is very similar to that of smallpox, with the exception that viral entry from a wildlife source probably occurs via small lesions on the skin or oral mucous membranes.
incubation period - definition of incubation period in Encyclopedia (105 words)
Incubation period is the time elapsed between exposure to a pathogenic organism and when symptoms and signs are first apparent.
The period may be as short as minutes, to as long as thirty years in the case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.
A person may be a carrier of a disease, such as Streptococcus in the throat without exhibiting any symptoms.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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