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Encyclopedia > In God We Trust
"In God We Trust"

In God We Trust is the official national motto of the United States and the U.S. state of Florida. In God We Trust became the official U.S. national motto after the passage of an Act of Congress in 1956.[1] In God We Trust may refer to: In God We Trust, the national motto of the United States of America In God We Trust (album), a 1988 album by Christian rock band Stryper In God We Trust (Brand Nubian album), a 1993 album by rap group Brand Nubian In God... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Enlargement of the 20-dollar bill. ... Enlargement of the 20-dollar bill. ... Here is a list of state mottos for countries and their subdivisions around the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: Acceptance by the President of the United States, Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In God We Trust is also found on the flag of Georgia, flag of Florida, and the Seal of Florida. It was first adopted by the state of Georgia for use on flags in 2001, and subsequently included on the Georgia flag of 2003. In Florida, it became the state motto during the term of Republican governor Jeb Bush, a Roman Catholic, who signed the bill making it so into law. Starting in 2007, the phrase can also be found on the license plates of Indiana, North Carolina, South Carolina and Ohio (it can be selected among offered designs). On May 28, 2008, Florida governor Charlie Crist signed into law Senate Bill 734, which amended the state's specialty license plates law (320.08056) to include an "In God We Trust" automobile license plate as an option for residents. State flag of Georgia The current flag of Georgia was adopted on May 8, 2003. ... The flag of Florida The flag of Florida consists of a red saltire (diagonal cross) on a white background, with the seal of Florida superimposed on the center. ... The Great Seal of the State of Florida The Great Seal of the State of Florida is used to represent the Government of the State of Florida, and for various official purposes, such as to seal official documents and legislation. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... GOP redirects here. ... John Ellis Jeb Bush (born February 11, 1953) is an American politician, and was the 43rd Governor of Florida. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... // Introduction A license plate, number plate or registration plate (often referred to simply as a plate, or colloquially tag) is a small metal or plastic plate attached to a motor vehicle for official identification purposes. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Charles Joseph Charlie Crist, Jr. ...

Contents

History

The motto E Pluribus Unum ("from many, one") was approved for use on the Great Seal of the United States in 1782. It still appears on coins and currency, and was widely considered the national motto de facto. However, by 1956 it had not been established so by legislation as the official "national motto", and therefore[neutrality disputed] "In God We Trust" was selected. Hence[dubious ], the Congressional Record of 1956 reads: "At the present time the United States has no national motto. The committee deems it most appropriate that 'In God we trust' be so designated as U.S. national motto."[1] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... E pluribus unum included in the Great Seal of the United States, being one of the nations mottos at the time of the seals creation E Pluribus Unum was one of the first mottos adopted by the United States government. ... The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States federal government. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. ...


One possible origin of In God We Trust is the final stanza of The Star-Spangled Banner. Written in 1814 by Francis Scott Key (and later adopted as the U.S. national anthem), the song contains an early reference to a variation of the phrase: "...And this be our motto: 'In God is our trust'."[2] The Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ... Maryland Historical Society plaque marking the birthplace of Francis Scott Key Fort McHenry looking towards the position of the British ships (with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the distance on the upper left) Francis Scott Key (August 1, 1779 – January 11, 1843) was an American lawyer, author, and amateur... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ...


History on currency

As excerpted from the United States Treasury Department's public education website:[3] The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ...


The motto In God We Trust was placed on United States coins largely because of the increased religious sentiment existing during the American Civil War. Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase received many appeals from devout Christians throughout the country, urging that the United States recognize God on United States coins. From Treasury Department records, it appears that the first such appeal came in a letter dated November 13, 1861. It was written to Secretary Salmon P. Chase by Reverend M. R. Watkinson, Minister of the Gospel from Ridley Township, Pennsylvania, and read: Top row: Sacagawea Dollar, Lincoln Cent, and Roosevelt Dime. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... Ridley Township is a township located in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. ...

Dear Sir: You are about to submit your annual report to the Congress respecting the affairs of the national finances.
One fact touching our currency has hitherto been seriously overlooked. I mean the recognition of the Almighty God in some form on our coins.
You are probably a Christian. What if our Republic were not shattered beyond reconstruction? Would not the antiquaries of succeeding centuries rightly reason from our past that we were a heathen nation? What I propose is that instead of the goddess of liberty we shall have next inside the 13 stars a ring inscribed with the words PERPETUAL UNION; within the ring the allseeing eye, crowned with a halo; beneath this eye the American flag, bearing in its field stars equal to the number of the States united; in the folds of the bars the words GOD, LIBERTY, LAW.
This would make a beautiful coin, to which no possible citizen could object. This would relieve us from the ignominy of heathenism. This would place us openly under the Divine protection we have personally claimed. From my heart I have felt our national shame in disowning God as not the least of our present national disasters.

To you first I address a subject that must be agitated. Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix, refers to the classical conception of the Goddess Liberty. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A halo (Greek: ; also known as a nimbus, glory, or Gloriole) is a ring of light that surrounds an object. ...

As a result, Secretary Chase instructed James Pollock, Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, to prepare a motto, in a letter dated November 20, 1861: James Pollock (10 September 1811 - 19 April 1890) was the governor of Pennsylvania from 1855 to 1858. ...

Dear Sir: No nation can be strong except in the strength of God, or safe except in His defense. The trust of our people in God should be declared on our national coins.
You will cause a device to be prepared without unnecessary delay with a motto expressing in the fewest and tersest words possible this national recognition.

It was found that the Act of Congress dated January 18, 1837, prescribed the mottoes and devices that should be placed upon the coins of the United States. This meant that the mint could make no changes without the enactment of additional legislation by Congress. In December 1863, the Director of the Mint submitted designs for a new one-cent coin, two-cent coin, and three-cent coin to Secretary Chase for approval. He proposed that upon the designs either OUR COUNTRY, OUR GOD or GOD, OUR TRUST should appear as the motto on the coins. In a letter to the Mint Director on December 9, 1863, Secretary Chase stated: A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...

I approve your mottoes, only suggesting that on that with the Washington obverse the motto should begin with the word OUR, so as to read OUR GOD AND OUR COUNTRY. And on that with the shield, it should be changed so as to read: IN GOD WE TRUST.

1864 two cent coin with motto
1864 two cent coin with motto

Congress passed the Coinage Act (1864) on April 22, 1864. This legislation changed the composition of the one-cent coin and authorized the minting of the two-cent coin. The Mint Director was directed to develop the designs for these coins for final approval of the Secretary. In God We Trust first appeared on the 1864 two-cent coin. Image File history File links Two_cent_obverse. ... Image File history File links Two_cent_obverse. ... The Coinage Act of 1864, a United States federal law, changed the composition of the one-cent coin and authorized the minting of the two-cent coin. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... ¢ c A United States cent, or 1¢ or a penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of various countries basic monetary units. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Another Act of the United States Congress passed on March 3, 1865 which allowed the Mint Director, with the Secretary's approval, to place the motto on all gold and silver coins that "shall admit the inscription thereon." Under the Act, the motto was placed on the gold Double Eagle coin, the gold Eagle coin, and the gold Half Eagle coin. It was also placed on the silver dollar coin, the half dollar coin and the quarter dollar coin, and on the nickel five-cent coin beginning in 1866. Later, Congress passed the Fourth Coinage Act of February 12, 1873. It also said that the Secretary "may cause the motto IN GOD WE TRUST to be inscribed on such coins as shall admit of such motto." Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... The 1933 Double Eagle, Saint Gaudens design A Double Eagle is a gold coin of the United States with a denomination of $20. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The 1914 Half-Eagle The Half Eagle is a United States coin that was produced from 1795 to 1929. ... Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in both gold and silver versions. ... The Half Dollar of the United States has been produced nearly every year since the inception of the United States Mint in 1793. ... The quarter is 1/4th of a United States dollar or 25 cents. ... The United States five-cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit of currency equaling one-twentieth, or five-hundredths, of a United States dollar. ... In 1873, Congress enacted the Fourth Coinage Act (The Crime of 73) which embraced the gold standard and de-monetized silver. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The use of In God We Trust has not been uninterrupted. The motto disappeared from the five-cent coin in 1883, and did not reappear until production of the Jefferson nickel began in 1938. Since 1938, all United States coins bear the inscription. Later, the motto was found missing from the new design of the gold Double Eagle coin and the gold Eagle coin shortly after they appeared in 1907. In response to a general demand, Congress ordered it restored, and the Act of May 18, 1908, made it mandatory on all coins upon which it had previously appeared. Therefore, the motto was not mandatory on the one-cent and five-cent coins, but it could be placed on them by the Secretary of the Treasury or the Mint Director with the Secretary's approval. is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ...


American presidents such as Theodore Roosevelt strongly disapproved of the idea of evoking God within the context of a "cheap" political motto. In a letter to William Boldly on November 11, 1907, President Roosevelt wrote: "My own feeling in the matter is due to my very firm conviction that to put such a motto on coins, or to use it in any kindred manner, not only does no good but does positive harm, and is in effect irreverence, which comes dangerously close to sacrilege... it seems to me eminently unwise to cheapen such a motto by use on coins, just as it would be to cheapen it by use on postage stamps, or in advertisements." For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sacrilege is in general the violation or injurious treatment of a sacred object. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... // Advert redirects here. ...


Despite historical opposition, the motto has been in continuous use on the one-cent coin since 1909 and on the ten-cent dime since 1916. It also has appeared on all gold coins and silver dollar coins, half-dollar coins, and quarter-dollar coins struck since July 1, 1908. ¢ c A United States cent, or 1¢ or a penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of various countries basic monetary units. ... A dime is a coin issued by the United States Mint with a denomination of one-tenth of a United States dollar, or ten cents. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

A 1934-A five-dollar silver certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate).
A 1934-A five-dollar silver certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate).

In God We Trust was first used on paper money in 1957 when it appeared on the one-dollar Silver Certificate. The first paper currency bearing the motto entered circulation on October 1, 1957. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) was converting to the dry intaglio printing process. During this conversion, it gradually included In God We Trust in the back design of all classes and denominations of currency. Download high resolution version (731x642, 151 KB)Picture of a silver certificate. ... Download high resolution version (731x642, 151 KB)Picture of a silver certificate. ... In logic (and usually without being paired with reverse), obverse has a meaning close to contrapositive. ... The term obverse, and its opposite, reverse, describe the two sides of units of currency and many other kinds of two-sided objects, most often in reference to coins, but also to medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art. ... A picture of a Silver Certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... the bomb. ... For other uses, see Intaglio. ...


As a part of a comprehensive modernization program, the BEP successfully developed and installed new high-speed rotary intaglio printing presses in 1957. These allowed BEP to print currency by the dry intaglio process, 32 notes to the sheet. One-dollar silver certificates were the first denomination printed on the new high-speed presses. They included In God We Trust as part of the reverse design as BEP adopted new dies according to the law. The motto also appeared on one-dollar silver certificates of the 1957-A and 1957-B series. For other uses, see Intaglio. ... A picture of a Silver Certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate). ...


One-dollar silver certificates series 1935, 1935-A, 1935-B, 1935-C, 1935-D, 1935-E, 1935-F, 1935-G, and 1935-H were all printed on the older flat-bed presses by the wet intaglio process. P.L. 84-140 recognized that an enormous expense would be associated with immediately replacing the costly printing plates. The law allowed BEP to gradually convert to the inclusion of In God We Trust on the currency. Accordingly, the motto is not found on series 1935-E and 1935-F one-dollar notes. By September 1961, In God We Trust had been added to the back design of the Series 1935-G notes. Some early printings of this series do not bear the motto. In God We Trust appears on all series 1935-H one-dollar silver certificates.


On March 7, 2007, the U.S Mint reported an unknown amount of new George Washington dollar coins mistakenly struck without the edge inscriptions, including "In God We Trust." These coins have been in circulation since February 15, 2007 and it has been estimated by some experts that at least 50,000 of them were put in circulation. The coin rapidly became a collector's item as well as a source for conspiracy theorists.[4][5] is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Seal of the U.S. Mint Denver United States mint building The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... A collectors item is an object or item of any kind that has become valuable -- often unexpectedly. ... For other uses, see Conspiracy theory (disambiguation). ...


Adopted as National Motto

A law was passed by the 84th United States Congress (P.L. 84-140) and approved by the President on July 30, 1956. President Dwight D. Eisenhower approved a joint resolution declaring In God We Trust the national motto of the United States.[1] The same Congress had required, in the previous year, that the words appear on all currency, as a Cold War measure: "In these days when imperialistic and materialistic Communism seeks to attack and destroy freedom, it is proper" to "remind all of us of this self-evident truth" that "as long as this country trusts in God, it will prevail." [6] The Eighty-fourth United States Congress was in session from 1955 to 1957. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


Controversy

Use of the motto on circulating coinage is required by law. While several laws come into play, the act of May 18, 1908 is most often cited as requiring the motto (even though the cent and nickel were excluded from that law, and the nickel did not have the motto added until 1938). Since 1938, all coins have borne the motto. The use of the motto was permitted, but not required, by an 1873 law. The motto was added to paper money over a period from 1957 to 1966.[citation needed] is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

A circulated $1 bill with "In God We Trust" marked out with a custom-made stamp
A circulated $1 bill with "In God We Trust" marked out with a custom-made stamp

Today, the motto is a source of some heated contention. Opponents of the phrase argue that the First Amendment and the "wall of separation between church and state" require that the motto be removed from all governmental use, including on coins and paper money.[7][8] They argue that religious freedom includes the right not to believe in the existence of deities and that the gratuitous use of the motto infringes upon the religious rights of those whose beliefs do not include a god. Some activists have been known to cross out the motto on paper money as a form of protest.[9] Image File history File links Igwtcontro. ... Image File history File links Igwtcontro. ... For the Wikipedia policy regarding controversial issues in articles, see Wikipedia:Guidelines for controversial articles. ... “First Amendment” redirects here. ... The separation of church and state is a legal and political principle derived from the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, which reads, Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof . ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual...


On the other hand, United States President Theodore Roosevelt argued against placing the motto on coinage, not because he objected to its constitutionality, but because he thought it sacrilegious to put the name of God on something so common as money.[10]


Popular culture references

Some shops in the United States have displayed jocular signs reading "In God we trust — All others pay cash." This was also used by humorist Jean Shepherd for the title of his 1966 book In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash. The sentence is parodied in an episode "Deep Space Homer" of the The Simpsons when an Inanimate Carbon Rod saves the day and is featured on the front-page of Time with the slogan "In Rod We Trust." Another religious themed episode (Season 8, Episode 22) is titled "In Marge We Trust." Jean Shepherd posed as Frederick R. Ewing on the back cover of Ballantines I, Libertine (1956). ... In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash (1966, ISBN 0385021747) is the title of a book by Jean Shepherd. ... Deep Space Homer is the fifteenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season and first aired on February 24, 1994. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... TIME redirects here. ... In Marge We Trust is the twenty-second episode of The Simpsons eighth season, which originally aired April 27, 1997. ...


In Chris Rock's Never Scared HBO Special, he made references to the motto to illustrate his point that Americans worship money, declaring, "All my life I've been looking for God, and he's right in my pocket!" Christopher Julius Rock III[5] (born February 7, 1965)[6][7] is an Emmy Award winning American comedian, actor, screenwriter, television producer, film producer and director. ... Chris Rock Chris Rock (born February 7, 1965) is an African-American stand-up comedian and actor born in Georgetown, South Carolina. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ...


In Chuck E. Cheese's restaurants, the 3-Stage, the 2-Stage, and the 1-Stage said "In Pizza We Trust'". It offended some people so they painted over the "In Pizza We Trust" slogan with red, white, and blue. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... This article is about the colour. ...


See also

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in 1970: It is quite obvious that the national motto and the slogan on coinage and currency In God We Trust has nothing whatsoever to do with the establishment of religion. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Holding A noncustodial parent did not have standing in federal court to allege that his childs school violated the Establishment Clause by leading students in the recital of the phrase one nation, under God in the Pledge of Allegiance. ... USD redirects here. ... Gott mit uns (meaning God With Us) was the motto of the royal house of Prussia, and part of the military emblem of Prussia and later Germany. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Congressional Record, 1956, p. 13917
  2. ^ 50th Anniversary of Our National Motto, "In God We Trust," 2006, Proclamation Issued by President Bush, White House.
  3. ^ “History of 'In God We Trust'”, Fact Sheets, U.S. Department of the Treasury, <http://www.treas.gov/education/fact-sheets/currency/in-god-we-trust.shtml>. Retrieved on 2008-01-14 
  4. ^ A Statement from the United States Mint, U.S. Department of the Treasury, March 7, 2007, <http://www.usmint.gov/pressroom/index.cfm?action=press_release&ID=755>. Retrieved on 2008-01-14 
  5. ^ Coins circulating without ‘In God We Trust’: U.S. Mint admits to the goof with the new George Washington dollar, msnbc, March 8, 2007, <http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17501178/>. Retrieved on 2008-01-14 
  6. ^ Steven B. Epstein, "Rethinking the Constitutionality of Ceremonial Deism" Columbia Law Review, Vol. 96, No. 8. (Dec., 1996), pp. 2083-2174, quoting the peroration (abridged here) of the speech by Charles Edward Bennett, sponsor in the House, the only speech in either House of Congress on the subject. President Eisenhower and W. Randolph Burgess, Under Secretary of the Treasury for Monetary Affairs, had approved of the legislation. 101 Congressional Record pp. 4384 (quoted), 7796. (1955)
  7. ^ Atheist protests `In God We Trust' posting
  8. ^ Judge turns down atheist's suit challenging 'In God We Trust'
  9. ^ "In God We Trust"--Stamping Out Religion On National Currency. Flashline. American Atheists (1999-03-15). Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
  10. ^ Religious Tolerance - The US national mottos

For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Edward Bennett (December 2, 1910 - September 6, 2003) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Florida from 1949 to 1993. ... Warren Randolph Burgess (7 May 1889 - September 16, 1978) was an American banker and diplomat who served as ambassador to NATO from 1957 to 1961. ... The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. ... The American Atheists logo, based on the atomic model. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... A work of the United States government, as defined by United States copyright law, is a work prepared by an officer or employee of the U.S. government as part of that persons official duties. ...

External links

  • When and why was "In God We Trust" placed on U.S. currency
  • Final answer? Not quite as star gets second chance to play for a million - article in The Guardian about a disputed quiz question about the motto of the United States.
For other uses, see Guardian. ... The Fed redirects here. ... FRN redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... Seal of the U.S. Mint Denver United States mint building The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... Top row: Sacagawea Dollar, Lincoln Cent, and Roosevelt Dime. ... The United States one-cent coin is a unit of currency equaling one-hundredth of a United States dollar. ... The United States five-cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit of currency equaling one-twentieth, or five hundredths, of a United States dollar. ... For other uses, see Dime. ... A quarter is a coin worth one-quarter of a United States dollar, or 25 cents. ... The Half Dollar of the United States has been produced nearly every year since the inception of the United States Mint in 1794. ... Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver, and base metal versions. ... FRN redirects here. ... For the US one-dollar coin, see United States dollar coin. ... Face of the Series 1995 $2 bill Back of the Series 1995 $2 bill The United States two-dollar bill ($2) is a current denomination of U.S. currency. ... Obverse of the $5 bill Reverse of the $5 bill The United States five-dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Obverse of the current $10 bill, which entered circulation March 2, 2006 Reverse of the current $10 bill The United States ten-dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of United States currency. ... The United States twenty-dollar bill ($20) is a denomination of United States currency. ... 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Obverse 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Reverse The United States fifty-dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Obverse of the Series 2003A $100 bill Reverse of the Series 2003A $100 bill The United States one hundred-dollar bill ($100) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Today, the currency of the United States, the U.S. dollar, is printed in bills in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. ... Quarter bicentennial reverse Half dollar bicentennial reverse Dollar bicentennial reverse All quarter, half dollar and dollar coins produced by the United States Mint during the years 1975 and 1976 bore special designs on their reverse, commemorating the 200th anniversary (bicentennial) of the independence of the United States. ... Commemorative coinage of the United States consists of coins that have been minted to commemorate a particular event, person or organization. ... Six Confederate notes The Confederate States of America dollar was first issued into circulation in April, 1861, when the Confederacy was only two months old, and on the eve of the outbreak of the Civil War. ... Fake denominations of United States currency have been created by individuals as practical jokes, by money artists such as J. S. G. Boggs, or as genuine attempts at counterfeiting. ... Production values for each year are the sum of all facility outputs of business strike coins. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
GOD - All About GOD - a community of seekers, skeptics and believers (559 words)
God, the Father, sent His only Son to satisfy that judgment for those who believe in Him.
Jesus, the creator and eternal Son of God, who lived a sinless life, loves us so much that He died for our sins, taking the punishment that we deserve, was buried, and rose from the dead according to the Bible.
If you truly believe and trust this in your heart, receiving Jesus alone as your Savior, declaring, "Jesus is Lord," you will be saved from judgment and spend eternity with God in heaven.
In God We Trust - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1853 words)
In God We Trust is also the official state motto of the state of Florida, and is found on the Seal of Florida.
The motto In God We Trust was placed on United States coins largely because of the increased religious sentiment existing during the American Civil War.
The other side of the argument states that the separation of church and state means that Congress shall not impose a state religion on the populace, and that the separation of church and state is a legislative invention not intended by the founding fathers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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